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1486 Ptolemy Holle Rare Antique Map of Great Britain & Ireland - Extremely Rare

1486 Ptolemy Holle Rare Antique Map of Great Britain & Ireland - Extremely Rare

This is a unique opportunity to acquire one of the earliest published maps of Great Britain and Ireland. A very rare map from an atlases published only 47 years after Johannes Gutenberg invention of the moveable type printing press in 1439. 
This Ptolemy trapezoid projection map was printed as part of Lienhart Holle's 1486 edition of the Claude Ptolemy's Atlas Claudii Ptolomei .... Cosmographie ... Opus Donni Nicolai Germani Secvndvm Ptolomevm Finit, Ulm, Germany. 
From a collecting perspective there are only 4 other maps of Great Britain & Ireland published prior to this.
This large map is in fine condition on strong sturdy paper, the printing impression is heavy and clear. The colour is original and beautifully applied. There has been professional restoration to the L&R bottom corners. No loss of original paper and restrengthened on the verso. The centerfold has been re-strengthened, on the verso, with some light creasing and rippling. Please see the images below. A great map and a unique addition to any collection.

We have found 6 sales records for this map since 1983 with the top price of $19,854. The first edition's of Ptolemy’s ‘Geographia’ was published in Italy in 1477, republished in 1478 & 1482. The next atlas to be published was north of the Alps by Lienhart Holle, in Ulm, Germany in 1482. Holle’s maps were printed from woodcuts, and are distinct with their heavy wash colouring for the sea areas, typically a rich blue for the 1482 edition, and an ochre for the 1486 edition. These bright colours, and the greater sense of age that woodcuts convey, make this series of maps one of the most visually attractive (Ref: Shirley 5; Stevenson; Tooley; M&B; MapForum)

General Condition:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, green, red, brown.
General color appearance: - Authentic and fresh
Paper size: - 20 1/2in x 15 1/2in (552mm x 397mm)
Image size: -14 1/2in x 14 1/2in x 20 1/4in (369mm x 369mm (upper margin) 511 mm (lower margin)
Margins: - Min 1/4in (6mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light discolouration & soiling.
Plate area: - Bottom L&R corners restored, no loss. Light creasing and rippling
Verso: - Re-enforced along center-fold and L&R bottom corners

$27,500.00 USD
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1588 Ortelius Antique Rare (State 2:3) World Map

1588 Ortelius Antique Rare (State 2:3) World Map

This is a unique opportunity to purchase the rarest of all Abraham Ortelius world map's - Typus Orbis Terrarum - Ort 2, state 3 or Ort 2:3.
To put the scarcity of this map into context please consider. Ortelius published a total of 6950 world maps over three editions of his atlases. According to the foremost authority on Ortelius works, Marcel Van Den Broecke, only 411 total world maps are known to have survived. Of these 411 only 14 are the Ort 2 edition and of these 14 only 4 are Ort 2:3 state. Making this one of the rarest maps available on the market today. Blank verso.

Description:
Ortelius published 3 World maps over the life of his atlas Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, between 1570 & 1612. These maps are referred to as Ort 1, Ort 2 & Ort 3. Within these three map editions necessary changes, repairs & updates were made to the plates, referred to as states. Ort 1 required 5 changes or states. Ort 2 required 3 changes and Ort 3 changed twice. This map published in 1588 and the last state of Ort 2 is identified by the changes to the western South American coastline, whilst still retaining the decorative cloud surround as in Ort1. Ort 3 was changed by removing the cloud surrounds replacing them with medallions and strap-work This is a beautiful map with original hand colouring, on sturdy clean paper with original margins. Prior to my acquiring the map from Marcel P R van den Broecke - author of "Ortelius Atlas Maps" - the map underwent some small professional restoration. Backed and pressed onto archival Japanese paper, these restorations, a 2cm sq one to the image and an 11cm x 1cm one to the bottom margin, have been carried out professionally and do not detract in anyway from the map. A more comprehensive description is available below as is a Certificate of Authenticity from Marcel van den Broecke, that accompanies the map.

Map history & background.
Below is a list of the different editions and states of Typus Orbis Terrarum.

- 1st edition (Ort 1) – States 1.1 through to 1.5.
A total of 3250 maps from this plate were published between 1570 & 1584. Today it is estimated that there are 236 loose copies in circulation of all 5 states.

- 2nd edition (Ort 2) - States 2.1 through to 2.3.
A total of 500 maps from this plate were published between 1586 & 1588. Today it is estimated that there are 14 loose copies in circulation of all 3 states.

- 3rd edition (Ort 3) – States 3.1 through to 3.2.
A total of 3200 maps from this plate were published between 1589 & 1612. Today it is estimated that there are 161 loose copies in circulation of both states.

Ortelius' world map is a simplified one-sheet reduction of Mercator's large world map which had appeared the year before. Nearly all the legends, textual panels and decorative features of Mercator's map have been omitted; between the oval circumference of the map and the outer frame are now clouds and below, a quotation from Cicero. From surviving correspondence, it is known that Mercator generously encouraged Ortelius to make use of his published research; he also provided him with coordinates of places in America and other newly discovered regions of the world. In the first edition South America retains the unusual bulged south-west coast as drawn by Mercator. There is also a prudent comment adjacent to New Guinea querying whether this large island is part of the southern continent or not.

The original plate, like a number of others in the Atlas, were signed by the engraver Franciscus (Frans) Hogenberg and was used for the first sixteen editions of the Theatrum.
In nearly all places there is text on the reverse of the map in the language indicated but a few copies are known which lack reverse text. Between 1575 and 1579 the plate became cracked along the lower left hand corner. The crack was roughly mended and the whole border of the clouds substantially reworked; editions from 1579 to 1584 contain this revised state 2 of plate 1. Ortelius subsequently produced two further world maps, each slightly improved geographically.
Several of these states co-existed; for instance although plate 3 carries the date 1587, it does not seem to have been issued until 1592. Only one example has been sighted of the first state plate 2 of 1586. State 3 of plate 2 is also uncommon but it re-appears in the British Library's copy of the Dutch 1598 edition of the Theatrum which, as noted by Koeman, was often made up of earlier stock sheets.
Ortelius' map was copied widely, and derivatives were later used to illustrate works by Voisin, Broughton, Maffei, Bell-Forest, Petri, Hakluyt and others.
Cartographical sources were Gerard Mercator 1569 & Gastaldi 1561 world maps and Diego Gutierrez' portolan map of the Atlantic.

Next to the list at the bottom of the text, Ortelius mentions in his Catalogues Auctorum the world maps by Peter ab Aggere from Mechelen, Sebastian Cabotus from Venice, Laurentius Fries from Antwerp, Jacobus Gastaldi, Gemma Frisius from Antwerp, Guicciardinus from Antwerp, Doco ab Hemminga Frisius, and Orontius Finæus from Paris.

Background of Theatrum Orbis Terrarum
For the first time, in 1570, all the elements of the modern Atlas were brought to publication in Abraham Ortelius' Atlas Theatrum Orbis Terrarum. This substantial undertaking assembled fifty-three of the best available maps of the world by the most renowned and up to date geographers.
Unlike earlier compositions, such as the Italian composite or "Lafreri" Atlases, each of Ortelius' maps was engraved specifically for his Atlas according to uniform format. Through its launching, pre-eminence in map publishing was transferred from Italy to the Netherlands, leading to over a hundred years of Dutch supremacy in all facts of cartographical production.
There were a total of 7300 copies of Theatrum published between 1570 - 1612 from 31 editions.

Historical sales data
A total of 114 sales of this map across all editions from 1983 to 2011.
From the 1st edition there are 40 known sales, from the 2nd edition there are 3 known sales leaving 48 sales from the third edition. The following is a further breakdown of sales data per edition.

Edition # 1 – 49 sales from 1983 to 2011 with a top price of $18,172 for an 1570 edition (Ort1:4) in 2005.
Edition # 2 - 4 sales between 1985 & 2007 with a top price of $18,000 for a 1586 Ort 2:3 in 2007
Edition # 3 - 60 sales from 1985 to 2011 with a top price of $17,759 paid for a 1606 Ort 3 in 2000.
(Please note the condition of these maps is largely unknown, condition is a major contributing factor to value). (Ref: Van Den Broecke; Tooley; Shirley; Rosenthal)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, green, blue, pink
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 20in x 14 ½in (510mm x 370mm)
Plate size: - 19 ½in x 13 1/4in (495mm x 340mm)
Margins: - Min ½in (10mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Professional 11cm restoration to bottom margin, 1cm into image. Light soiling
Plate area: - Small 2cm sq professional restoration below the ST of Australis
Verso: - Map backed on fine archival Japanese paper

$17,500.00 USD
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1662 Joan Blaeu Old, Antique Map of America - Americae nova Tabula

1662 Joan Blaeu Old, Antique Map of America - Americae nova Tabula

Description:
This magnificent original antique map of America - the quintessential image of 17th century maps of the New World - was published for the 1662 Latin edition of Joan Blaeus Atlas Major
This map is in beautiful original condition with fresh hand colouring on heavy, stable paper with appropriate age colour and toning. The image has a heavy and deep impression denoting an early pressing. A significant bonus is this map has not been cropped and has the original margins as published.

Background: Originally issued by Joan Blaeus father, Willem,. as early as 1617, this general map of the Americas was one of the longest lived plates in all the Blaeu's atlases, having been used as an atlas map from 1630.
Here is the general seventeenth century European view of the Western Hemisphere: the delineation of the coasts and the nomenclature of the Pacific as well as the Atlantic coasts are basically Spanish in origin and follow the maps of the Fleming Abraham Ortelius and his countryman Cornelis Wytfliet. To these, Willem Blaeu inserted, on the east coast, the English names given by the Roanoke colonists in Virginia, and by Martin Frobisher, John Davis and Henry Hudson in the far north. In Florida and along the St Lawrence, Blaeu added the names given by the French settlers, almost the only memorials to their ill-fated venture in Florida during the latter part of the sixteenth century.
When Blaeu first made his map in the early years of the seventeenth century, Europeans still had no real knowledge of the nature of the Mississippi system. From the expedition journals of Hernando de Soto (1539 - 1543) they had inferred an extensive range of mountains trending eastwards to the north of the Gulf of Mexico in la Florida apparently precluding a great river system. The Great Lakes were as yet unknown although by the time Blaeu issued this map in its atlas form in the Huron region together with the hearsay accounts from Coral Indians were becoming well known through his 1632 map of the region. Evidently, this appears to have been unknown to Blaeu at the time, but surprisingly, he never incorporated the information on later printings of the map. The same applies to Manhattan and Long Island as well, despite the fact that only a short distance from Amsterdam, the Leiden academic Johannes D Late had published the first edition of his monumental work on the Americas which provided source material for any number of maps of the Americas throughout the remainder of the century and beyond. 
In common with the other general continental maps in Blaeus atlas's, he has provided perspective plans or views of settlements in the Americas, including Havana, St Domingo, Cartagena, Mexico, Cusco, Potisi, I.la Moca in Chile, Rio Janeiro and Olianda in Pharnambucco, as well as the vignette illustrations of native figures taken from the accounts of John White (Virginia) or Hans Staden (Brazil) and others. (Ref: Burden; RGS; Koeman; Tooley)     

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original & some later colour
Colors used: - Pink, green, yellow, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic & beautiful
Paper size: - 24in x 23in (610mm x 585mm)
Plate size: - 21 3/4in x 16 1/4in (550mm x 412mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Professional repair to bottom margin, not affecting image. Age toning
Plate area: - Age toning
Verso: - Age toning

$9,000.00 USD
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1638 Joan Blaeu Antique Map of America

1638 Joan Blaeu Antique Map of America

Description:
This magnificent, classic hand coloured original antique map of America 2nd State - the quintessential image of 17th America - was published in the 1638 French edition of Joan Blaeus Atlas Novus. This map is in wonderful condition with a few minor repairs as mentioned below.    

General Condition:  
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable  
Paper color: - White  
Age of map color: - Original color  
Colors used: - Pink, green, yellow, blue, red  
General color appearance: - Authentic & beautiful  
Paper size: - 23in x 18 1/2in (585mm x 450mm)  
Plate size: - 22in x 16 1/2in (555mm x 415mm)  
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)    

Imperfections:  
Margins: - Professional repair to centerfold, no loss.  
Plate area: - Small professional repair to below Atlantic monster. Center-fold creases & re-joined at bottom, slight separation  
Verso: - Creasing and restoration to center-fold, top & left margin, no loss

Background:  
Originally issued by Joan Blaeus father, Willem, as early as 1617, this general map of the Americas was one of the longest lived plates in the atlas, having been used as an atlas map since 1630.  

Here is the general seventeenth century European view of the Western Hemisphere: the delineation of the coasts and the nomenclature of the Pacific as well as the Atlantic coasts are basically Spanish in origin and follow the maps of the Fleming Abraham Ortelius and his countryman  Cornelis Wytfliet. To these, Willem Blaeu inserted, on the east coast, the English names given by the Roanoke colonists in Virginia, and by Martin Frobisher, John Davis and Henry Hudson in the far north. In Florida and along the St Lawrence, Blaeu added the names given by the French settlers, almost the only memorials to their ill-fated venture in Florida during the latter part of the sixteenth century.  

When Blaeu first made his map in the early years of the seventeenth century, Europeans still had no real knowledge of the nature of the Mississippi system. From the expedition journals of Hernando de Soto (1539 - 1543) they had inferred an extensive range of mountains trending eastwards to the north of the Gulf of Mexico in la Florida apparently precluding a great river system. The Great Lakes were as yet unknown although by the time Blaeu issued this map in its atlas form in the Huron region together with the hearsay accounts from Coral Indians were becoming well known through his 1632 map of the region. Evidently, this appears to have been unknown to Blaeu at the time, but surprisingly, he never incorporated the information on later printings of the map. The same applies to Manhattan and Long Island as well, despite the fact that only a short distance from Amsterdam, the Leiden academic Johannes D Late had published the first edition of his monumental work on the Americas which provided source material for any number of maps of the Americas throughout the remainder of the century and beyond.   

In common with the other general continental maps in Blaeus atlas's, he has provided perspective plans or views of settlements in the Americas, including Havana, St Domingo, Cartagena, Mexico, Cusco, Potisi, I.la Moca in Chile, Rio Janeiro and Olianda in Pharnambucco, as well as the vignette illustrations of native figures taken from the accounts of John White (Virginia) or Hans Staden (Brazil) and others. (Ref: Burden; RGS; Koeman; Tooley)     

 

$6,750.00 USD
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1633 Mercator Hondius Large Antique Map of America

1633 Mercator Hondius Large Antique Map of America

  • Title : America sive India Nova. ad magna Gerardi Mercatoris aui Universalis imitationem in compendium redacta. Per Michaelem Mercatorem Duysburgensem
  • Ref #:  61017
  • Size: 21 1/2in x 17 3/4in (545mm x 450mm)
  • Date : 1633
  • Condition: (A) Very Good Condition

Description:
This fine beautifully hand coloured original antique early map of America the only map attributed to Gerard Mercator's Grandson Michael was published in the 1633 French edition of Mercators Atlas.

This map is magnificent with beautiful original hand colouring, wide margins and stable paper. Backed with transparent archival Japanese paper. Original colouring such as this is scarce and hard to find.

Background: Largely based on Rumold Mercator's world map of 1587, this map aptly reflects 16th-century knowledge, theories and suppositions regarding the New World. Naturally, most of this new knowledge was coastal, and configurations of any large areas were greatly hampered by the lack of a sound means of determining longitude. Nevertheless, the collective accomplishment of explorers and mapmakers represented in this map is astounding, showing in a generally correct way the vast extent of the New World. "A few of the most famous theories are still present: a large inland lake in Canada, two of the four islands of the North Pole, a bulge to the west coast of South America and the large southern continent" (Burden).
The map appeared in 1595 and 1606 editions of the Atlantis Pars Altera , after which the plate was sold to Jodocus Hondius, who reissued the maps in varying editions through 1639. The present example includes French text on verso, confirming it to be a Hondius issue.

Several of the more fascinating theories are present, including the multiple islands of the North Polar Sea, bulging South America and vast unknown southern continent. The St. Lawrence crosses half the continent. No sign of the English in Virginia. The search for a water course across North America is interupted only by some mid-continental mountains. Evidence of the Spanish explorations in the Southwest is present and the Colorado and Gila Rivers already reflect a good knowledge of this area, as does the peninsular Baja California, based upon Uloa's work.
The depiction of the NW Passage and Western North America are also of great interest. Annotations reference the voyages of Columbus and Magellan.(Ref: Burden; Koeman; Tooley; M&B)

Condition Report:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, red, green, orange, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 21 1/2in x 17 3/4in (545mm x 450mm)
Plate size: - 18 1/2in x 14 3/4in (470mm x 376mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Uniform age toning
Plate area: - Uniform age toning, light creasing & uplift along center-fold
Verso: - Backed with transparent archival Japanese paper

$6,250.00 USD
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1755 JB D Anville Large Original Antique Map of North America, Great Lakes, Indian Wars

1755 JB D Anville Large Original Antique Map of North America, Great Lakes, Indian Wars

  • Title : Canada Louisiane et Terres Anglois Par Le Sr. D Anville...MDCCLV
  • Ref #:  61140
  • Size: 52in x 38in (1.32m x 960mm)
  • Date : 1755
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This magnificent, scarce, very large (52in x 38in) & highly detail map of North America was engraved in 1755 - dated in the title cartouche - by George De La Haye and was published by Jean Baptiste Bourguignon D Anville in his large elephant folio atlas Atlas Generale.
Geopolitically this map is extremely significant drawn as war between the Global Powers of the day, France, England & Spain, was breaking, known in Europe as the Seven Year War known in North America as the French & Indian war. (Please see below for more detail)

This map rivals John Mitchells "A Map of the British and French Dominions in North America published in 1755" - considered to be one of the most significant maps of North America published in the 18th & 19th centuries (a 1st edition of Mitchells map is currently for sale for $165,000).
I have included an image of the Mitchell map for comparison. The D Anville map is considered by many to be cartographically superior to the Mitchell map, at a fraction of the price. 

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: -  
Colors used: -  
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 52in x 38in (1.32m x 960mm)
Plate size: - 45in x 35in (1.12m x 890mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Light ceasing along folds
Verso: - Very small worm holes

Background: This extraordinary map of the eastern half of North America extends from Newfoundland, Canada to St. Augustine, Florida, stretching westward beyond the Mississippi as far as modern day Texas. The map includes both the original colonial colonies along the Atlantic seaboard from Maine to Georgia and the French claims in Louisiana (the Mississippi Valley) and modern day Canada. Florida is acknowledged as a Spanish enclave. Elevation is rendered in profile with fortifications, towns, and American Indian villages identified. A large inset map centres on the course of the St. Lawrence River from the Isle Aux Coudres to Lake Ontario.
The is a very significant map, drawn from a definitive French perspective, defining the territorial alignments and claims within North America shortly following the outbreak of the French and Indian War, considered to be a New World reflection of the European Seven Years War. It is however notable that it began before the larger hostilities in Europe and most of the major battles involved primarily parties only loosely aligned with the French or English - most specifically American Indians and lawless frontiersman, who had their own political agenda.
The war began with French incursions into western Pennsylvania and other territories claimed simultaneously by the French, English and American Indian forces. Just prior to the war, the French, in the interest of broadening their hold on the lucrative fur trade, established a series of forts, all of which are here noted, along the length of the Mississippi and further east, including Fort Duquesne (here Fort de Quene, Pittsburgh), Fort de la Presquisle, and for Le Beouf (here, Fort de la Riv Jaus Beufs).
The map also recognizes British claims, only inland as far as the Appalachian Mountains, beyond which place names take on a noticeably French character. These last three forts occupied particularly contested territory under the control of the powerful British allied Iroquois League. The most contested of these was Fort Duquesne (modern day Pittsburgh) in direct opposition to another fort then being constructed by the Ohio Company, a trading and land speculation firm established by prominent Virginia colonials, including George Washington. The Virginian colonial governor responded to Duquesne by sending then Lieutenant George Washington and a band of Virginia militiamen to harass the French. The resulting Jumonville Affair, in which Washington oversaw an attack on a French Canadian diplomatic forces led by Joseph Coulon de Villiers de Jumonville, to warn the Ohio Company fort builders away from French claimed territory. The slaying of Jumonville and several other French diplomats prompted a response from French forces at Fort Duquesne, leading to Washingtons retreat and construction of Fort Necessity, really little more than a palisaded shack, marked here just south of Fort Duquesne. These events, all of which occurred in May of 1754, were said to have increased hostilities in Europe and led to the start of the Seven Year War in 1755.
Beyond the political agenda of this map, is the map itself, being one of the finest and most heavily detailed maps of North America published in the mid 18th century. Ranking alongside the large 1755 Mitchell map in detail but judged by many as cartographically superior. Drawing on both French and British cartographical detail, D Anville identifies countless American Indian tribes, many of which, like the Sioux and Missouri, the British had only vague knowledge. Moreover, he also includes detail such as swamps, rapids, fords, abandoned villages, and even the ancient remnants of mound builder culture in the Ohio Valley. D Anville notably does not include Mitchells fictional Lake Superior islands.
This map was originally published to accompany the pamphlet entitledMemoire sur la carte intitulee: Canada, Louisiane, & Terres angloises and was also published in four parts for D Anvilles Atlas General.

These large maps are hard to find in such good condition and make fantastic historical reference tools due to the size and high level of detail as with all D Anvilles work. (Ref: Tooley, M&B)

$4,750.00 USD
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1603-1867 Tokugawa Period Very Large Japanese Map Nagano Prefecture Japan, Yeddo

1603-1867 Tokugawa Period Very Large Japanese Map Nagano Prefecture Japan, Yeddo

  • Title : Shinano no Kuni Zenzu (Complete map of Shinano no Kuni - Shinano Province: Nagano Prefecture
  • Date : 1800
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  91208
  • Size: 78in x 38in (2.0m x 975mm)

Description: This is a wonderful and unique opportunity to acquire an incredibly rare piece of original antique Japanese cartography (a limited printing of less than 100). 

This extremely large (over 2m - 6ft) beautiful wood-block hand coloured map of the old Shinano Province now today's Nagano Prefecture was published in the mid to late Tokugawa Period which existed between 1603-1867.

Although the late 18th or early 19th centuries in cartographical terms is not considered old it is the high level of artistry, detail & size that makes this wood-block cut map unique and I doubt that there is another map like this available on the market today. There is a level of patience, workmanship & detail about this map that epitomises many parts of the Japanese culture.

The map is also accompanied by three separetly type written research pages and a cue card. The first page gives a agenda or legend to the map denoating Roads, villages, paddy fields, towns, shrines and templea amongst others. Also noted on the first page is "On the map stands the name of Yeddo, and not Tokyo, testifying perhaps to the date of the publication to be put in the latter years of the Tokugawa regime (1603-1867)

The second page shows a legend for the Odawara region with Mt. Tanazawa (Akazawa), Lake Ashinoko and To Numazu "One of the strongest military posys protecting Kamakura against Kioto forces" 

The third page is a summary of the Sagami Province "On this map, though(t) little nothing has been skipped as to the location of villages, place of historical interest etc. so that travellers/tourists might it find a suitableguide, guide to be slipped in thier pocket" Takashibe Mitsuo. Also marked is the direction to Hodogaya (Yokohama) old highway between Kioto and Yeddo about 800ad - 1868ad. the town of Fujisawa and Hachiman Shrine (Seat of the Shoguntae betw. 1185-1333)

A truely magnificent and unique piece of Japanese History.

 Nagano Prefecture - formerly known as the province of Shinano, and was divided among many local daimyo during the Sengoku period. In 713, the road which traverses Mino Province and Shinano Province was widened to accommodate increasing numbers of travelers through the Kiso District of modern Nagano Prefecture. In the Sengoku Period, Shinano Province was often split among several fiefs and several other castle towns developed, including Komoro, Ina, and Ueda. Shinano was one of the major centers of Takeda Shingen's power during his wars with Uesugi Kenshin and others. In 1871, during the Meiji Period, with the abolition of the han system and the establishment of prefectures Haihan Chiken after the Meiji Restoration, Shinano Province was administratively separated in 1871 into Nagano and Chikuma prefectures. These two tentative governmental and territorial units were then reconfigured together again in 1876. This became the modern prefecture of Nagano, which remains substantially unchanged since that time.

Japanese maps are well known for their exceptional beauty and high quality of workmanship. Early Japanese cartography has its own very distinctive projection and layout system. Japanese maps made prior to the appearance of Commodore Perry and the opening of Japan in the mid to late 1750s often have no firm directional orientation, incorporate views into the map proper, and tend to be hand coloured woodblock prints. Later Japanese maps, produced in the late Edo and throughout the Meiji period (early to mid 19th century) draw heavily upon western maps as models for their own work. While many of these later maps maintain elements of traditional Japanese cartography such as the use of rice paper, woodblock printing, and delicate hand color, they also incorporate western directional orientation, projection systems, and structural norms. As early as the 7th century AD the Japanese acquired knowledge of surveying and map engraving through their cultural links with Korea and China: their earliest surviving map dates from the 14th century. The first uncertain attempts to show Japan on European maps were not made until the mid 15th century (Fra Mauro, 1459) and even in 1540 Munsters map of the New World still show "zipangu". Jesuit influence in the early days were responsible for any data collected about Japan at this time. From 1640 Japan closed its frontiers (except for the Port of Nagasaki) to the "barbarians" from the West and consequently there was little opportunity for compiling data for accurate mapping. It was not until the 18th century that maps by Valck, de Vaugondy and others started to show a better outline of the country, even incorporating Japanese characters into the images. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original  
Colors used: - Red
General color appearance: - Authentic  
Paper size: - 78in x 38in (2.0m x 975mm)
Margins: - Min 1/4in (5mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$4,250.00 USD
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1715 Homann Antique Map of Virginia, Chesapeake & NE United States of America

1715 Homann Antique Map of Virginia, Chesapeake & NE United States of America

  • Title : Virginia Marylandia et Carolina in America Septentrionali Britannorum industria excultae"...Homann
  • Date : 1718
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  43166
  • Size: 24in x 20 1/2in (610mm x 530mm)  

Description: 
This large finely engraved beautifully hand coloured original antique map of Virginia, Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, the Carolina's, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, New York and parts west of the Apalchians, was published by J.B Homann in 1715.

An exceptionally beautiful example of J. B. Homann's 1715 map of Virginia, Carolina, Maryland, and New Jersey; considered one of the most important and decorative maps of is region to appear in the 18th century. This fine decorative map covers from New York City and Long Island south along the Atlantic Cost as far as modern day Georgia, and as far west as Lake Erie.

Background:
Homann drew this map in response to Virginia Lieutenant-Governor Alexander Spotswood's plan to settled the little known interior of Virginia with German immigrants. Shown here is the first mapping of Germantown Teutsche Statt on the Rappahanock River and Fort Christanna (Christ Anna Fort) on the Makharing River. Fort Christanna was built with the intention of defending the region against incursions from hostile American Indian groups such as the Tuscarora to the west. Christanna also acted as the headquarters of the Virginia Indian Company, a stock venture founded in 1714 with the intention of trading with indigenous groups in the interior.Though Homann's remarkable representation of Spottswood's plan is extraordinarily up-to-date considering that Fort Christana was founded in the same year that this map was initially published, the remainder of the map embraces a number of common misconceptions and cartographic inaccuracies common to the region. Probably the most notable of these is his inclusion of Apalache Lacus. This fictional lake, the source of the May River, appeared on maps of this region since the mid 16th century Le Moyne-De Bry map and was popularized by Mercator and Hondius in 1606.

It would remain on maps well into the mid 18th century before exploration and settlement finally disproved the theory. Further north Lake Erie and been expanded dramatically and shifted somewhat to the south where it takes on the appearance of a vast inland sea occupying the entire northwestern quadrant of the map. This region, west of the English colonies and north as far as Pennsylvana, Homann attaches to the Spanish claims in Florida.

Homann's also offers a wealth of detail along the Atlantic coast, where most of the European colonization efforts were focused. From Long Island, about two-thirds of which is shown, south to Craven County, Carolina, countless towns and cities are identified. New York City is mapped on the southern tip of Manhattan Island, but is not specifically labeled. New Jersey is divided into the colonial provinces of East New Jersey and West New Jersey. Curiously Homann maps a large inland lake "Zuyd Lac" straddling the New Jersey - Pennsylvania border. This is no doubt a early misinterpretation of the natural widening of the Delaware River at the Delaware Water Gap. Heading south along the Delaware River Philadelphia is identified and beautifully rendered as a grid embraced in four quadrants. Both the Delaware Bay and the Chesapeake Bay are rendered in full and even include a number of undersea notations and depth soundings. In Virginia and Carolina the river systems are surprisingly well mapped and a primitive county structure is beginning to emerge.

The early Virginia counties of Rappahannock, Henrico, City, Isle of Wright, Nansemond, Northumberland, Middlesex, Gloster and Corotvk are noted. Similarly in Carolina a number of counties are named, most of which refer to the Lords Proprietors, including Albemarle, Clarenden, and Craven. Cape Fear, Cape Lookout, and Cape Hattaras are noted and a number of anchorages, reefs, and depth sounding are noted along the entire coastline. The lower right quadrant of this map is occupied by a fabulous decorative title cartouche. Centered on an enormous scallop shell bearing the map's title and Homann's Privilege, the cartouche features a number of stylized American Indians trading with European merchants.

The wealth of the region is expressed by an abundance of fish, game, and other trade products. Curling behind the scallop shell is a gigantic stylized alligator looking like nothing so much as a mediaeval dragon. The inclusion of Homann's Provildge in the title cartouche helps us to date this map to about 1715, when Homann was granted the right to add this royal distinction to his maps. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original & later
Colors used: - Yellow, green, blue, pink
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 24in x 20 1/2in (610mm x 530mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 19 1/2in (580mm x 490mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$3,250.00 USD
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1639 Jansson Antique Map of Virginia, Chesapeake & NE United States of America

1639 Jansson Antique Map of Virginia, Chesapeake & NE United States of America

Description:
This beautifully hand coloured, important original antique map of the north east regions of the United States from Virginia, Chesapeake Bay, to New York & New England by Jan Jansson was published in the 1639 French edition of the Jansson, Hondius Atlas.
A beautiful map with sturdy, clean paper original wide margins and beautiful original hand colouring.

Background:
This beautiful 17th map of Virginia, New York and New England was derived from the less well circulated Johannes de Laet map of 1630. This version is enlarged and expanded to the north and slightly east, with de Laets narrative on the verso (De Laets map is one of extreme importance, being the first printed to use the names Manbattes (Manhattan) and N. Amsterdam)

The nomenclature on this map is virtually identical to the De Laet map, with the few minor differences most likely owing to the engravers error. C of Feare is still depicted over 2° too far south. This is not Cape Fear we know of today but actually Cape lookout.

During the fiercely competitive decade of the 1630's the families of Blaeu and Jansson  produced maps drawn directly from one another. Here, however, Jansson produces one that was not followed by Blaeu, relying upon the more restricted map of Nova Belgica to represent the land north of Chesapeake Bay. A sign of the Dutch influence here is that both atlas producers largely declined to include the advanced cartography of Champlain, thereby relegating it altogether.

There are three know states of this map, the first one published in 1636 - entitled Nova Anglia Novvm Belgium et Virginia. The second edition in which the title of the map was changed to Nova Belgium et Anglia Nova (to give more weight to Dutch claims in North America) within a new square cartouche was first published in 1647. State 3 was published in 1694 by Schenk & Valk which included new regional demarcation and a latitude and longitude grid. (Ref: Koeman; M&B; Tooley; Burden; AMPR)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Green, red, orange, yellow, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic 
Paper size: - 22 1/2in x 19 1/2in (570mm x 495mm)
Plate size: - 20in x 15 1/2in (535mm x 395mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light toning on margin edges
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$3,250.00 USD
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1722 Claude Delisle Original Antique Map of North America & The Gulf of Mexico

1722 Claude Delisle Original Antique Map of North America & The Gulf of Mexico

  • Title : Carte Du Mexique et de la Floride des Terres Angloises et des Isles Antilles du Cours...1722
  • Date : 1722
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  70814
  • Size: 25 1/2in x 21 1/2in (650mm x 545mm)  

Description: 
This large beautifully hand coloured original antique map of North America, separated into the British, French & Spanish Colonial Countries & States by Guillaume Delisle was published by Covens & Mortier in 1722, dated in cartouche.
This map is in fantastic condition, heavy stable and fresh paper, deep dark ink denoting an early pressing complimented with beautiful hand colouring. Original margins.

Condition Report
Paper thickness and quality: - Very heavy and stable
Paper colour: - Off white
Age of map colour: - Original & later
Colours used: - Yellow, green, pink, blue
General colour appearance: - Fresh
Paper size: - 25 1/2in x 21 1/2in (650mm x 545mm)  
Plate size: - 24in x 19 1/2in (610mm x 495mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (10mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning in bottom margin
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

Background:
The importance of this landmark map by Guillaume Delisle cannot be overstated. It was the first map to accurately depict the course and mouth of the Mississippi River. Much of the map was drawn from reports brought back to France from the survivor's of the La Salle expedition into the interior of North America and from information derived from the explorations of Bienville and d'Iberville. In the year preceding the publication of the map, Delisle utilised his position with the King of France to gain access to the best available information from the new world.
During this time, he compiled the geographical data from the reports of the French Jesuit Missionaries and explorer's in North America, along with Spanish manuscript maps (often copied by the Missionaries while they were acting in the service of the Spanish as spiritual guides and gaining their confidence). The result of this work were a series of 4 landmark maps of America, including his map of North America (L'Amerique Septentrionale, 1700), Canada and the Great Lakes (Carte du Canada ou de la Nouvelle France 1703) and the Mississippi Valley & Gulf Coast (Carte de la Louisiane et du Cours du Mississipi 1708) and of course this map.
Carl Wheat called this map a "towering  landmark along the path of Western cartographic development." De L'Isle's map also inlcuded greater accuracy in the Great Lakes region and in its depiction of English settlements along the East Coast. Excellent detail of the Indian villages in East Texas, based upon the reports of Iberville and the Spanish missionaries. The best depiction of the Southwest to date, with early trails & Indian tribes. Cumming described the map as "profoundly influential. This is a beautifully engraved and hand coloured map by one of the finest French cartographers of the 18th century. (Ref: Cummings; M&B; Tooley) 

 

$3,250.00 USD
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1730 Seutter Large Antique Map of Japan after Kaempfer - Regni Japoniae

1730 Seutter Large Antique Map of Japan after Kaempfer - Regni Japoniae

  • Title : Regni Japoniae Nova Mappa Geographica, ex indigenarum observationibus delineata ab Engelberto Kaempfero
  • Date : 1730
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  43154
  • Size: 24in x 21in (610mm x 530mm)

Description: 
This large beautifully hand coloured original antique map of Japan engraved by TC Lotter - after Engebert Kaempfer - was published by Georg Mattraus Seutter in 1730.

Background: This beautiful map owes its cartography to a map by Engebert Kaempfer from his important publication History of Japan, based on his travels to Japan in the late 17th century and his own manuscript map, drawn sometime prior to 1716. The map presents a distorted outline for the Island of Japan with numerous political divisions delineated and named. Below the map are numerous Japanese coins and symbols including those of the army of Japan's "Prince". The entire upper left quadrant is filled with a spectacular title cartouche showing a court scene of Kaempfer presenting maps to the Japanese Emperor and other attendants.

Engelbert Kaempfer (September 16, 1651 – November 2, 1716) was a German naturalist and physician known for his tour of Russia, Persia, India, South-East Asia, and Japan between 1683 and 1693. He wrote two books about his travels. Amoenitatum Exoticarum, published in 1712, is important for its medical observations and the first extensive description of Japanese plants (Flora Japonica). His History of Japan, published posthumously in 1727, was the chief source of Western knowledge about the country throughout the 18th century.(Ref: M&B; Tooley)

Condition Report
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original & later
Colors used: - Yellow, pink, green, orange, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 24in x 21in (610mm x 530mm)
Plate size: - 22 1/2in x 19 ½in (570mm x 495mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling
Plate area: - Small repair adjacent to bottom centerfold, no loss
Verso: - None

$2,750.00 USD
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1655 Blaeu Superb Antique Map of Japan, Korea & parts of China

1655 Blaeu Superb Antique Map of Japan, Korea & parts of China

Description: 

This fine beautifully hand coloured original antique map of Japan & Korea  - the seventeenth and last of the maps provided by the Jesuit priest Martino Martini to Joan Blaeu - was published by Joan Blaeu in his 1665 edition of Atlas Simenis.

Martinis map was to provide the most accurate depiction of the general outlines of the principle islands of Japan - Honshu, Kyushu and Shikoku - for more than a century. The map was copied extensively by other mapmakers throughout the remainder of the seventeenth century and was replaced during the eighteenth century by maps that were in nearly all respects considerably inferior, albeit rather more flamboyant in design.  Martinis first hand knowledge of the Chinese mainland enabled him to draw Korea correctly, for the first time on a printed map, as a peninsular even though little interior detail is shown. However what lay to the north of Japan was a mystery, not only Europeans, but also to the Japanese and Chinese as well. Even as early as 1613, William Adams, an Englishman living in Japan for many years, had written back to England recommending Japan as a base for "discouerie to the northward...never hath bin better menes to discouer". As with his general map of China, Martini here provides information on the internal administrative divisions in Japan; each of the feudal fiefdoms is shown, with the chief  town in each, while some evidence of the activity of Jesuit missions, since the arrival of Francis Xavier in 1549, can be gathered from the town symbols surmounted by a small cross. This is one of the finest maps of Japan ever published, the engraving is strong, paper excellent and clean with beautiful original hand colour.  (Ref: Koeman; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Early color
Colors used: - Pink, green, yellow, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic & beautiful
Paper size: - 24in x 21in (610mm x 535mm)
Plate size: - 22 1/2in x 16 3/4in (570mm x 425mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$2,750.00 USD
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1815 Swoboda & Hartl Large Old, Antique Map of Ulimaroa New Holland, New Zealand - Rare

1815 Swoboda & Hartl Large Old, Antique Map of Ulimaroa New Holland, New Zealand - Rare

  • Title : Generalcharte von Australien nach dem entwurfe des H.Joseph Marx Freiherrn   v. Liechtenstern
  • Date : 1815
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  16258
  • Size: 27 1/4in x 22in (695mm x 560mm)

Description: 
This large beautifully hand coloured original & scarce antique map of New Holland also named Ulimaroa, New Zealand and the South Pacific by Franz Swoboda and Martin Hartl was published in Vienna in 1815 - dated.

This map is typical of the affect of Cooks discoveries on European cartography. Australia regularly became a focus on regional maps. The name "Ulimaroa" was often used, mainly by German & Austrian cartographers, at this time. It was term Cook learned from the New Zealand Maoris before discovering the east coast of Australia during his first voyage of discovery. When this map was printed there was a strong belief that the Australian continent was possibly divided by an internal sea strait, separating the east from the west coasts. It was explorers such as Flinders and Baudin who set out to find this elusive passage and if so the possible point at which a ship could enter.
Only a few years before in 1798 Flinders and Bass had proved that there was a strait dividing Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) from the rest of the continent so now the race was on to find the other passage. On Swoboda’s map a line has been drawn from the bottom of Carpentaria to the eastern part of present day Victoria. This line represented two things, the potential shape of the eastern landmass split by the sea and the extent to English territory in the newly settled colonies, only 17 years old. The Southern Coastline is not shown as even though Flinders had by 1803 mapped the entire region he was in 1805 still under house arrest on the islands of Mauritius by the French, he would not publish his discoveries until 1814. Therefore this map shows Australia at a pivotal point in its history when most of the continent was still open for settlement by other nations and the coastlines and mysteries were still to be confirmed. (Ref: Clancy; M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Red, yellow
General color appearance: - Authentic  
Paper size: - 27 1/4in x 22in (695mm x 560mm)
Paper size: - 27in x 20 3/4in (685mm x 525mm)
Margins: - Min 1/4in (7mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Vertical crease right image
Verso: - None

$2,750.00 USD
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1639 Hondius Antique Map East Indies, India to China & 1st Map to show Australia

1639 Hondius Antique Map East Indies, India to China & 1st Map to show Australia

  • Title : India quae Orientalis dicitur et Insulae Adiacentes
  • Date : 1639
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  43140
  • Size: 22 1/2in x 19 1/4in (570mm x 485mm)

Description: 
This fine beautifully hand coloured original antique and very important map of the East Indies, India, SE Asia, China, Japan Philippines and Australia - the first to map the west coast of Cape York Peninsular northern Queensland as well as parts of the SW coast of Western Australia, with place names, was published in the 1639 French edition of Mercators Atlas by Jan Jansson and Henricus Hondius.

An important Dutch map of South East Asia, noteworthy for including the discoveries made in New Guinea and northern Queensland, Australia by the Dutch vessel Duyfken in 1605-06. Under the command of Willem Janzoon, the Duyfken explored the eastern shore of the Gulf of Carpentaria, just below the Cape York Peninsula, a venture which was famously the first recorded European contact with Australia.

Background:
This map of the East Indies extending from India to Japan and south to Australia, shows some of the Dutch discoveries along the West Australian coastline like the Swan River, Nassau River, Coen River and the Batavia River borrows heavily from the exact map by Joan Blaeu. On the eastern part lower right of the map is a small section of Cape York Peninsular. This map is one of the first printed maps to show any part of the Australian coastline. It continued to be an issued unchanged from 1635 up until the 1660's, long after some of the information it contained had been superseded. This was despite the fact that Joan Blaeu as cartographer to the Dutch East India Company from 1638 to 1673 had access to the latest information concerning the extension of the Dutch maritime power in the East Indies, publishing the results of such discoveries (especially of Australia) on large World maps, such as that of 1648. In other words, atlas map's of the East Indies and part of Australia ignores the results of Abel Tasman's discoveries made during the voyage of 1642-44. In 1642, Tasman was appointed commander of an expedition to the South Seas, during which he discovered the Island later named after him as well as part of the coast of New Zealand. His voyage 1644 coasted along the shore of the Gulf of Carpentaria and along the northern coast of Australia as far as the Tropic of Capricorn.

Tasman's discoveries were published very soon afterwards on Blaeu's large World Maps, rendering it all the more curious that the atlas map was never revised. In affect, this map remained an historical map of the archipelago, showing discoveries made. albeit in a rather haphazard and fortuitous manner by the Dutch, between 1606 and 1623.. The design of the map emphasises the importance of the commercial interests in the East Indies, centred as it is on the heart of what was to become The Netherlands East Indies and later Indonesia. (Ref: Koeman; M&B)

Condition Report
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Red, yellow, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 22 1/2in x 19 1/4in (570mm x 485mm)
Plate size: - 19 1/4in x 15 1/2in (485mm x 395mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - Light offsetting, light age toning
Verso: - Light age toning 

$2,750.00 USD
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1658 Visscher Large Antique Map of America

1658 Visscher Large Antique Map of America

  • Title : Novissima et Accuratissima Totius Americae Descriptio per N. Visscher
  • Ref #:  50683
  • Size: 24in x 20 1/4in (610mm x 515mm)
  • Date : 1658
  • Condition: (A) Very Good Condition

Description:
This large rare beautifully hand coloured original antique 1st edition map of America was published by Nicholas Visscher in ca 1658.

This is an important map, derived from Blaeu's earlier wall map, that would prove influential to many future maps of the western hemisphere, with similar maps issued by De Wit, Danckerts, Allard, and Ottens to the end of the 17th century.

Background:
Various dates have been attributed to this map from 1658 to 1680. The earliest date derives from its presence in the third volume of Jan Jansson's Novus Atlas dated 1658. However, it is not present in all examples and other maps have borne dates as late as 1680. The heirs of Jan Jansson who died in 1664, appear to have issued the volumes with old title pages on a continuous basis.
Although the map did not provide much in the way of cartographic advances after Blaeu, it had a large influence on future cartographers drawing upon either its geography or the distinctive cartouches. One of the most recognisable features is the large open lake in the place of the western Great Lakes. The single lake to its east most probably represents that of Ontario, but is named Lac Contenant. This like much of the map is derived from Joan Blaeu's wall map of the world, 1648. The use of Real de Nueva Mogulcorrectly placed on the east bank of the Rio del Norte is taken directly from Blaeu. One are where Visscher breaks from this is his depiction of the west coast. He uses an older model, that of Briggs, 1625 although with a broader north coast to California as an Island, a feature that was not found in any of Viscchers earlier works. He continues the mainland coastline north-north -east towards the Strait of Anian, which separates it from ANIAN.
The title is decorated with a scene showing the panning of gold or silver, with a native standing by under an umbrella. The cartouche top left bears a dedication to Cornelis Witsen, mayor of Amsterdam who financed many trips to the New World and depicts three angels helping a native Indian to heaven while the devil is fading away. (Burden; M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Red, yellow, green, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 24in x 20 1/4in (610mm x 515mm)
Plate size: - 21 1/2in x 17 1/4in (545mm x 440mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Uniform age toning
Plate area: - Uniform age toning, center-fold re-joined, no loss
Verso: - Uniform age toning, light spotting

$2,750.00 USD
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1671 Jacob Van Meurs Rare Original Antique Map of America - Island of California

1671 Jacob Van Meurs Rare Original Antique Map of America - Island of California

  • Title : Novissima et Accuratissima Totius Americae Descriptio per Jacobum Meursium
  • Date : 1671
  • Size: 22in x 19in (560mm x 485mm)
  • Ref #:  61157
  • Condition: (A) Very Good Condition

Description: This uncommon and rare original antique map of America and the Pacific, including parts of New Zealand, was published in Amsterdam by Jacob Van Meurs in 1671 for the German edition of Arnold Montanus' ground breaking publication "America". (Ref: Burden, Tooley, Koeman)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Green, red, orange, yellow, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic 
Paper size: - 22in x 19in (560mm x 485mm)
Plate size: - 21 3/4in x 17 1/2in (550mm x 445mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling
Plate area: - Folds as issued, light separation along folds, no loss
Verso: - Professionally backed onto Japanese archival rice paper

Background: Unlike the Dutch edition of this map (by Van Schaegen) and English edition (by John Ogilby), which copied the De Wit / Visscher America map, Van Meurs creates a highly decorative new plate for the German edition of Montanus' America. The plate was later acquired by Pierre Vander Aa and re-issued bearing Vander Aa's name circa 1714.
 The map shows California as an Island on the first Sanson Projection, showing a single large Great Lake (open at the west), a curious north-easterly coastline north of the Island of California and a geographically misaligned South America, with tribal vignettes in Brazil and wild life in North America. The map predates La Salle's information on the interior of North America, but includes excellent detail on Canada and the East Coast of North America, noting the Dutch Possessions, the Iroquois regions, N. Anglia, New Amsterdam, the Cheaspeak, Plymouth, and many Indian Place names.
 Meurs's map is based upon Nicholas Visscher's map of 1658, in that it includes the coastline New Zealand and the early Sanson model for California, and only shows one of the Great Lakes, updated from Visscher's edition. Visscher in turn drew his information from Joan Blaeu's wall map of the World, published in 1648.
 The map is most notable for its elaborate allegorical cartouches. One of the most outstanding features of this map are the beautifully engraved decorative cartouches that include numerous vignettes of wildlife, American Indians, sailing ships and battles. The title is surrounded by Native Americans trading with Europeans and in the North Pacific is a lavish scene of Neptune and his consort in a chariot surrounded by his entourage and putti. The map was to be included in Montanus book of America and so has folds as issued. (Ref: Burden, Tooley, Koeman)

$2,750.00 USD
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1827 Herisson Large Rare Original Antique Twin Hemisphere World Map, Capt J Cook

1827 Herisson Large Rare Original Antique Twin Hemisphere World Map, Capt J Cook

  • Title : La mappe-monde ou le globe terrestre, représenté en deux hemisphères, l\'un oriental l\'autre occidental, où sont marquées les découvertes les plus récentes, faites par Mackenzie, Vancouver, La Pérouse, Bruce, Renell, Mungo Park, Joub [sic] Barrow, Franklin et Parry. Dressée par Hérisson, élève de Mr. Bonne / Indication des trois voyages de Cook et de celui de La Pérouse … … À Paris : chez Basset, 1827
  • Date : 1827
  • Size: 31in x 22in (790mm x 560mm)
  • Ref #:  70815
  • Condition: (A) Very Good Condition

Description:
This impressive scarce & large scale double hemisphere original antique map, by the French cartographer Eustache Herisson, was published in 1827, dated in text.
The main feature of the map is the illustration of the tracks taken by most recent explorers of the time. From Captain James Cook, to George Vancouver in Canada, Jean-Francois la Perouse in the Pacific, Alexander Humboldt in America, John Franklin and William Parry in Canada.

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, green, blue, pink
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 31in x 22in (790mm x 560mm) 
Plate size: - 31in x 22in (790mm x 560mm) 
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Several small repairs to margin not affecting the image, age toning
Plate area: - Age toning
Verso: - Age toning, repairs as noted

Background: 
With the exception of the Arctic region of North America, which shows a land bridge connecting Greenland with Alaska and an inland polar sea, the landmasses are drawn with contemporary accuracy. Politically the world was a very different place. North America was still divided by the Old World major powers, Britain, France & Spain. As already noted northern Canada was still to be fully mapped, the interior of Africa was still largely unexplored by Europeans. The European settlement of Australia & New Zealand was still in its infancy Australia and the Antarctic region was still only known by the voyage of Cook some 40 years earlier. The explorers noted below were some of the 18th century adventurers responsible for filling in the cartographically unknown 

Captain James Cook FRS 1728 – 1779 was a British explorer, navigator, cartographer, and captain in the Royal Navy. Cook made detailed maps of Newfoundland prior to making three voyages to the Pacific Ocean, during which he achieved the first recorded European contact with the eastern coastline of Australia and the Hawaiian Islands, and the first recorded circumnavigation of New Zealand.
Cook joined the British merchant navy as a teenager and joined the Royal Navy in 1755. He saw action in the Seven Years\' War, and subsequently surveyed and mapped much of the entrance to the Saint Lawrence River during the siege of Quebec. This helped bring Cook to the attention of the Admiralty and Royal Society. This notice came at a crucial moment in both Cook\'s career and the direction of British overseas exploration, and led to his commission in 1766 as commander of HM Bark Endeavour for the first of three Pacific voyages.
In three voyages Cook sailed thousands of miles across largely uncharted areas of the globe. He mapped lands from New Zealand to Hawaii in the Pacific Ocean in greater detail and on a scale not previously achieved. As he progressed on his voyages of discovery he surveyed and named features, and recorded islands and coastlines on European maps for the first time. He displayed a combination of seamanship, superior surveying and cartographic skills, physical courage and an ability to lead men in adverse conditions.
Cook was attacked and killed while attempting to kidnap Kalaniʻōpuʻu, a Hawaiian chief, during his third exploratory voyage in the Pacific in 1779. He left a legacy of scientific and geographical knowledge which was to influence his successors well into the 20th century, and numerous memorials worldwide have been dedicated to him.

Captain George Vancouver 1757 – 1798 was a British officer of the Royal Navy, best known for his 1791–95 expedition, which explored and charted North America\'s north-western Pacific Coast regions, including the coasts of contemporary Alaska, British Columbia, Washington, and Oregon. He also explored the Hawaiian Islands and the southwest coast of Australia.
In Canada, Vancouver Island and the city of Vancouver are named after him, as are Vancouver, Washington, in the United States, Mount Vancouver on the Yukon/Alaska border, and New Zealand\'s sixth highest mountain

Jean François de Galaup, comte de La Perouse 1741 – 1788 was a French Naval officer and explorer whose expedition vanished in Oceania after the French government decided to complete the work of Captain james Cook.

Alexander Humboldt 1769 – 1859 was a Prussian geographer, naturalist, explorer, and influential proponent of Romantic philosophy and science. He was the younger brother of the Prussian minister, philosopher, and linguist Wilhelm von Humboldt (1767–1835). Humboldt\'s quantitative work on botanical geography laid the foundation for the field of biogeography. Humboldt\'s advocacy of long-term systematic geophysical measurement laid the foundation for modern geomagnetic and meteorological monitoring. 
Between 1799 and 1804, Humboldt travelled extensively in Latin America, exploring and describing it for the first time from a modern scientific point of view. His description of the journey was written up and published in an enormous set of volumes over 21 years. Humboldt was one of the first people to propose that the lands bordering the Atlantic Ocean were once joined (South America and Africa in particular). Humboldt resurrected the use of the word cosmos from the ancient Greek and assigned it to his multi-volume treatise, Kosmos, in which he sought to unify diverse branches of scientific knowledge and culture. This important work also motivated a holistic perception of the universe as one interacting entity. He was the first person to describe the phenomenon and cause of human-induced climate change, in 1800 and again in 1831, based on observations generated during his travels. 

Rear-Admiral Sir John Franklin 1786 –1847 was an English Royal Navy officer and explorer of the Arctic. Franklin also served as Lieutenant-Governor of Van Diemen\'s Land (now Tasmania) from 1837 to 1843. He disappeared on his last expedition, attempting to chart and navigate a section of the Northwest Passage in the Canadian Arctic. The icebound ships were abandoned and the entire crew perished from starvation, hypothermia, tuberculosis, lead poisoning and scurvy.

Rear Admiral Sir William Edward Parry, RN, FRS 1790 - 1855 was an English rear-admiral and Arctic explorer. His 1819 voyage through the Parry Channel was probably the most successful in the long quest for the Northwest Passage. In 1827 he attempted one of the earliest expeditions to the North Pole. He reached 82°45′ North latitude, setting the record for human exploration farthest North that stood for nearly five decades before being surpassed at 83°20′26″ by Albert Hastings Markham in 1875–1876.

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1736 Seutter Large Old Antique Map Spanish North America, Colonial United States

1736 Seutter Large Old Antique Map Spanish North America, Colonial United States

  • Title : Mappa Geographica Regionem Mexicanam et Floridam. Terrasque adjacentes
  • Date : 1736
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  16495
  • Size: 22 1/2in x 19 1/4in (570mm x 485mm)

Description: 
This large beautifully hand coloured original antique map of Spanish North America, the Colonial United States, Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico was engraved by Tobia Lotter nd was published by Georg Mattraus Seutter in 1736.

This map is in exceptional condition with beautiful original colour, with heavy engraving (denoting an early pressing) on clean heavy sturdy paper.

Background: This is Mathias Seutter's decorative and beautifully engraved version of Delisle's important map of 1703 (Carte du Mexique et de la Floride). It provides a view of North America from the Great Lakes through the West Indies. The British colonies are confined east of the Appalachian Mountains, France controls the Mississippi valley and Florida, and Spain possesses Mexico; political divisions as dictated by the Treaty of Utrecht in 1713. New Mexico is finely described with many native tribes and pueblos noted, including Acoma, Santa Clara, Isleta and more. While geographically nearly identical to Delisle's chart, this map is very ornate with the lower left corner filled with a huge sea battle and the Atlantic filled with four inset plans of Panama, Havana, Cartagena and Vera Cruz. (Ref: M&B; Tooley) 

Condition Report
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, pink, green, orange, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 24in x 20 1/2in (610mm x 520mm)
Plate size: - 22 1/2in x 19 ½in (570mm x 495mm)
Margins: - Min 3/4in (19mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - Light offsetting, light age toning
Verso: - Light age toning 

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1646 Jansson Antique Map of America - Virginia, New Jersey, New York New England

1646 Jansson Antique Map of America - Virginia, New Jersey, New York New England

Description: 
This very important early original antique map of the north east region of The United States from Virginia to Chesapeake Bay and New England was published in the 1646 Latin  edition of Jansson's Atlas Nouvs. 
In excellent condition with a small professional repairs to bottom left margin corner, not affecting the image and backed with light transparent Japanese tissue. Please see below for a more detaile ddecsription.

Background: A great example of a very early American map derived from the less well circulated Johannes de Laet map of 1630. This version is enlarged and expanded to the north and slightly east. This version also carries de Laets narrative on the verso. (De Laets map is one of extreme importance, being the first printed to use the names Manbattes (Manhattan) and N. Amsterdam) The nomenclature on this map is virtually identical to the De Laet map, with the few minor differences most likely owing to the engravers error. C of Feare is still depicted over 2° too far south. This is not Cape Fear we know of today but actually Cape lookout.
During the fiercely competitive decade of the 1630's the families of Blaeu and Jansson  produced maps drawn directly from one another. Here, however, Jansson produces one that was not followed by Blaeu, relying upon the more restricted map of Nova Belgica to represent the land north of Chesapeake Bay. A sign of the Dutch influence here is that both atlas producers largely declined to include the advanced cartography of Champlain, thereby relegating it altogether. 
There are three know states of this map, the first one published in 1636 - entitled Nova Anglia Novvm Belgium et Virginia. 
The second edition in which the title of the map was changed to Nova Belgium et Anglia Nova (to give more weight to Dutch claims in North America) within a new square cartouche was first published in 1647.
State 3 was published in 1694 by Schenk & Valk which included new regional demarcation and a latitude and longitude grid. (Ref: Koeman; M&B; Tooley; Burden; AMPR)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Green, red, orange, yellow, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic  
Paper size: - 22 1/2in x 19in (570mm x 490mm)
Plate size: - 20in x 15 1/2in (535mm x 395mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Small professional repair bottom left margin corner, light spotting in top margin, no affecting image
Plate area: - Light show-through, light creasing along margin
Verso: - Backed with light transparent Japanese tissue

$2,499.00 USD
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1710 G & L Valck Large Old, Antique Map of America - California as an Island

1710 G & L Valck Large Old, Antique Map of America - California as an Island

  • Title : America Aurea Pars Altera Mundi Auctoribus Gerardo et Leonardo Valk....
  • Ref #:  16379
  • Size: 24 1/2in x 20 1/2in (625mm x 520mm)
  • Date : 1710
  • Condition: (A) Very Good Condition

Description: 
This large rare beautifully hand coloured original antique map of America by Gerald & Leonard Valk was published in 1710.
Gorgeous old color example of this striking map of America, A strong dark impression of this scarce map. 

Background: Valck's map of America illustrates many of the myths of cartographic America in the 17th Century. California is shown as an island based on the second Sanson Model.  A massive land bridge extends from just west of Capo Blanco on the northern California coastline to Niphon, a curious adaptation of the legend of Compagnie Land (shown here as a place name -- Terre de la Compagne) and the continuous land bridge from America to Asia, although adding the Detroit de Tzungaar (Strait of Tzungaar), a very rarely mentioned mythical Strait between two islands of Japan.
The Great Lakes are oddly configured, with Lake Superior and Lake Michigan open ended to the West. The Mississippi River is very ill conceived, pre-dating the radical improvements which would come with Guilluame De L'Isle's map of North America of 1700 and Carte du Mexique of 1703. 

Many of the facts of America depicted in this map Valk derives directly from Alexis-Hubert Jaillot in the late 17th century. Interestingly in transferringFLORIDE FRANÇOISE from Jaillot the engraver managed to come up withFloroi de Fran. It appears the remainder of Françoise was erased whilst arranging the border. No attempt is made to update the cartography, none of the more recent English colonies is present, not even Pennsylvania, arguably the one with the most exposure throughout the continent of Europe. A second title is engraved across the top of the map detailing further the various territories. The imprint and a total of eight different scales are decorated by a trading scene with natives who appear more Asian than American Indian. It is more accurately rendered in the similar scene lower right. (Ref: Burden; Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original 
Colors used: - Yellow, green, pink, blue.
General color appearance: - Authentic
Papaer size: - 24 1/2in x 20 1/2in (625mm x 520mm)
Plate size: - 23 1/2in x 19 1/2in (595mm x 495mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (10mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Small repair to left margin 2in into image, no loss.
Plate area: - Light soiling 
Verso: - Light soiling

$2,499.00 USD
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1639 Jansson & Hondius Large Antique Map of Japan, Korea & China

1639 Jansson & Hondius Large Antique Map of Japan, Korea & China

Description:
This fine, beautifully hand coloured original  antique, early scarce map of Japan & Korea (as an Island) with parts of eastern China was published in the 1639 French edition of Gerardi Mercators Atlantis Novi Atlas by Jan Jansson and Henricus Hondius.

Background: This map published by Jansson is taken directly from the Jodocus Hondius map - first published in 1606 - of Japan which faithfully followed the Ortelius/Teixeira style. Jansson has added an explanation for Korea, saying he  was not yet certain whether it was an island or part of the mainland. The rest of Jansson's changes were ornamental, replacing the bottom Chinese Junk with a European ship & monster as well as changing the title and scale cartouches.
Luis Teixeira'a map, which was published by Ortelius in 1595, began a process  that would last for three centuries, in which Western printed maps of Japan increasingly approached geographical reality. (Ref: Koeman; M&B)

Condition Report:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Later
Colors used: - Yellow, pink, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 22 1/2in x 18 3/4in (570mm x 475mm)
Plate size: - 17 1/2in x 13 3/4in (445mm x 350mm)
Margins: - Min 2in (50mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Age toning, light spotting
Plate area: - None
Verso: - Age toning, bottom centerfold re-joined, no loss

$2,499.00 USD
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1633 John Smith & Hondius Original Antique Map of Virginia, Chesapeake Bay - Pocahontas

1633 John Smith & Hondius Original Antique Map of Virginia, Chesapeake Bay - Pocahontas

Description:
This superb original antique hand coloured map of Chesapeake Bay, Virginia was published in the 1633 edition of Mercators Atlas. 
Although this map bears the name of Henricus Hondius, the plate originated from his brother Joducus II in 1618, after Captain John Smith\'s famous map of 1612, and was published in many editions of Mercators Atlas after 1630. Willem Blaeu also purchased this copper-plate from the Hondius plate stock in 1629 and was published in many future Blaeu atlases.

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, green, blue, pink
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 23in x 18 3/4in (585mm x 475mm)
Plate size: - 19 3/4in x 15 1/2in (500mm x 395mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - 4 very small worm holes
Verso: - None

Background: 
This is one of the most important seventeenth century maps of the Chesapeake Bay region. The early settlement of Jamestown Iamestowne is noted along with a number of other place names, both in English and Native American. The map was derived from Capt. John Smith's map of 1612 and was the first to depict the bay and its tributaries with any accuracy.
Capt John Smith's fine survey work, as well as reports from indigenous American Indian tribes, and fanciful wishful thinking, combine to make this one of the most interesting maps of America to emerge in the 17th century. Philip D. Burden, the author of The Mapping of America, considers this map, Nova Virginiae Tabula, to be 'one of the most important maps of America ever produced and certainly one of the greatest influence.' Oriented to the west, this map covers from Cape Henry to the Susquehanna River and inland as far as the Appellation Mountains. The Chesapeake Bay is shown in full as are many of its river estuaries, though topographically this map places a number of mountain ranges where there are in fact none.
To fully understand this map one must first realize that most Europeans believed the Pacific, or at least some great bay that led to the Pacific, lay just a few days travel inland. In the minds of most Europeans of the period, the trade potential for the Virginia colony was entirely dependent upon it being a practical access point to the riches of Asia. Thus the significance of large and mysterious body of water appearing in the land of the Massawomecks, in the upper right quadrant, becomes apparent. Of course, much of this land was entirely unexplored by the European settlers in Jamestown, shown here on the Powhatan River (James River), who relied heavily upon American Indian reports for much of their cartographic knowledge of the Virginia hinterlands. The Massawomecks themselves were a rival of the Powhatan and made their home near the headwaters of the Potomac. These, like many other indigenous groups of the region made only a brief and frequently violent appearance during the 17th century before entirely disappearing, mostly from disease and war, in the early 18th century.
In the upper left quadrant there is an image of the American Indian chief of the Powhatan sitting enthroned before a great fire in his long house. One of the more popular legends regarding John Smith was his capture and trial before the chief of the Powahatan. Smith was convinced that his liberation had something to do with the youthful daughter of Chief Powahatan, Pocahontas, taking a liking to him. Although this grew into a fictitious legend of its own, the truth is more likely that Powhatan saw Smith and his Englishmen as potential allies against the rival American Indian groups, such as the Massawomecks, that were pressing hard against his borders.
There are a number of different editions of this map and its publication by various map houses in various states made it the first widely distributed map of the Virginia colony and of John Smith's important map. There was, however, a scandal relating to its publication. The map was originally drawn and engraved in 1618 by Jodocus Hondius based upon the first edition of John Smith's 1612 map. When Jodocus died in 1629, he and his brother, Henricus Hondius, while collaborating on the Hondius Atlas Major, had established and maintained separate business for some 10 years. Jodocus' death enabled the competing cartographer, Willem Blaeu to acquire a large number of Jodocus' map plates, which he promptly published in 1630 as the Atlantis Appendix. Henricus, in the meantime, had been counting on Jodocus' new plates to enhance his own, by then outdated, Hondius Atlas Major. A surviving contract dated March 2, 1630 reveals that Henricus Hondius and his partner Joannes Janssonius hired engravers to produce a number of new map plates copying the work of Jodocus – now in the hands of the Blaeu firm. This map was among the most important of that group and accounts for variants of this map being issued by competing Blaeu and Hondius firms.

The History of Virginia begins with documentation by the first Spanish explorers to reach the area in the 1500s, when it was occupied chiefly by Algonquian, Iroquoian, and Siouan peoples. After a failed English attempt to settle Virginia in the 1580s by Walter Raleigh permanent English settlement began in Virginia with Jamestown, Virginia, in 1607. The Virginia Company colony was looking for gold but failed and the colonists could barely feed themselves. The famine during the harsh winter of 1609 forced the colonists to eat leather from their clothes and boots and resort to cannibalism.[1] The colony nearly failed until tobacco emerged as a profitable export. It was grown on plantations, using primarily indentured servants for the intensive hand labor involved. After 1662, the colony turned black slavery into a hereditary racial caste. By 1750, the primary cultivators of the cash crop were West African slaves. While the plantations thrived because of the high demand for tobacco, most white settlers raised their families on subsistence farms. Warfare with the Virginia Indian nations had been a factor in the 17th century; after 1700 there was continued conflict with natives east of the Alleghenies, especially in the French and Indian War (1754-1763), when the tribes were allied with the French. The westernmost counties including Wise and Washington only became safe with the death of Bob Benge in 1794.
The Virginia Colony became the wealthiest and most populated British colony in North America, with an elected General Assembly. The colony was dominated by rich planters who were also in control of the established Anglican Church. Baptistand Methodist preachers brought the Great Awakening, welcoming black members and leading to many evangelical and racially integrated churches. Virginia planters had a major role in gaining independence and in the development of democratic-republican ideals of the United States. They were important in the Declaration of Independence, writing the Constitutional Convention (and preserving protection for the slave trade), and establishing the Bill of Rights. The state of Kentuckyseparated from Virginia in 1792. Four of the first five presidents were Virginians: George Washington, the "Father of his country"; and after 1800, "The Virginia Dynasty" of presidents for 24 years: Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and James Monroe.

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1639 Hondius Antique Map of Bermuda

1639 Hondius Antique Map of Bermuda

  • Title : Mappa Aestivarum Insularum, alias Barmudas Dictarum ... Accurate Descripta
  • Date : 1639
  • Condition: (A) Very Good Condition
  • Ref:  43135
  • Size: 22 1/2in x 19 1/4in (570mm x 485mm)  

Description: 
This fine beautifully hand coloured original antique map of the Island of Bermuda was published in the 1639 French edition of Mercators Atlas by Henricus Hondius. A much sought after map of Bermuda, with decorative cartouche, compass rose with the Island divided into lots and tribes, listed at the base of the map.

Background:
Like all 17th century maps of Bermuda this map is based ultimately on the survey made by John Norwood of the Bermuda Company in 1618 in the form as published by the English map-maker John Speed in 1627. Although discovered in 1515 by Spaniard Juan de Bermudez, after whom the island is supposedly named, it was the shipwreck of a party of Virginia colonists in 1610 led by Sir George Somers that gave Bermuda its first known inhabitants. The Latin title reflects this fact, for Aestivarum Insularum  means summers (or Somers) Islands. The experience of Somers and his men inspired William Shakespeare, who dispatched Ariel to "fetch dew from the still-vext Bermoothes" and populated the islands with the cast of The Tempest.

The place names and the list of Proprietors given below the map itself all recall the original members of the Bermuda Company, the latter being listed as eight tribes (or parishes). In 1610, the Virginia Company, in a True Declaration of the Estate of the Colonie of Virginia, said of Bermuda: These Islands of Bermudos, have evere beene accounted as an inchaunted pile of rocks, and a desert inhabitation for Divels; but all the Faities of the rockes were but flocks of Birds, and all the Divels that haunted the woods, were but heards of Swine. In the upper left-hand and right-hand corners of the map appear the adjacent coasts of the North American colonies of Virginia and New England with, just below the cartouche a tiny outline of Bermuda itself, intended to show its correct proportion and position against the mainland.(Ref Tooley M&B)

Condition Report
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Red, yellow, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 22 1/2in x 19 1/4in (570mm x 485mm)
Plate size: - 20 1/2in x 15 3/4in (520mm x 400mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - Light age toning
Verso: - Light age toning

$2,250.00 USD
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1851 Tallis Antique Maps of Australia and 5 x States

1851 Tallis Antique Maps of Australia and 5 x States

  • Title : Australia; New South Wales; Victoria or Port Phillip; Van Diemens Land or Tasmania; Part of South Australia; Western Australia Swan River
  • Date : 1851
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  35511:1554:35503:35519:22126:35523
  • Size: 14in x 10 ½in (355mm x 265mm) each

Description: 
These six is finely engraved beautifully hand coloured original antique maps of Australia and the 5 Australian States at the time of publishing - NSW, Victoria, Tasmania, South Australia and Western Australia - all with several vignettes of city views, Aboriginals and various wildlife - was engraved by John Rapkin and published by John Tallis in 1851.

The firm of Tallis & Company flourished from 1835 to 1860 with varying imprints. Their illustrated Atlas of 1850-51 was one of the last decorative atlases, all the maps being engraved on steel and all adorned with small vignettes. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original & later
Colors used: - Yellow, green, red, brown.
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 14in x 10 ½in (355mm x 265mm)Each
Plate size: - 14in x 10 ½in (355mm x 265mm) Each
Margins: - Min 1/2in (10mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$2,250.00 USD
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1802 Freycinet Very Large Antique Map of Van Diemens Land, Tasmania

1802 Freycinet Very Large Antique Map of Van Diemens Land, Tasmania

  • TitleCarte Generale de la Cote Orientale de la Terre de Diemen...1802
  • Date : 1802
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  92634
  • Size: 38in x 26in (965mm x 600mm)

Description: 
This large beautifully engraved early important original antique map of Tasmania as surveyed by the Baudin expedition in 1802 - from Cape Portland to Maingon Bay - was engraved by Charles Bouclet in 1802 - the date is engraved in the title cartouche - and was published in the 1812 Ist edition of Voyage de descouvertes aux Terres Australes by Louis Freycinet. This was the largest and most detailed map of Tasmania published up to this time.

The map contains 3 inset maps two of which shows early cartographic details of Van Diemens land by Abel Tasman in 1642 & the English explorer Tobias Furneaux in 1773. The third inset is a map of part of the North River surveyed by Freycinet in 1802.

After returning from the first expedition on Le Naturaliste and Le Geographe Louis Freycinet returned to Australia on La Casuarina and aided by Boullanger explored Northern Tasmania and the southern coast of Australia. This and earlier voyages resulted in the publication of Voyage de descouvertes aux Terres Australes in 1812. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 38in x 26in (965mm x 600mm)
Plate size: - 31 1/2in x 21 1/2in (800mm x 545mm)
Margins: - Min 2in (50mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning, repair to top margin
Plate area: - Light age toning
Verso: - Light age toning

$2,250.00 USD
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1639 Jansson Large Old, Antique Map of East Indies, Australia - Voyage of Dufken

1639 Jansson Large Old, Antique Map of East Indies, Australia - Voyage of Dufken

Description: 
This beautiful, very significant original antique map of SE Asia, the East Indies PNG and significantly a small portion of the west coast of Australia's Cape York Peninsular was published in the 1639 French edition of Mercator's Atlas published by Henricus Hondius and Jan Jansson.

Background: This landmark map is the first published record of the discoveries made by the Dutch ship Dufken on route to Cape York in Australia. New Guinea ("Landt vande Papuos") is marked  the (Is)land next to it is called ÔNieu ZeelandtÕ and the island Duyfkens is named after the ship Duyfken.

With the first publication of this map 27 years had passed since the voyage of the Dufken and its discoveries of PNG and NW Australia had been completed. The Dutch East India Company had suppressed the discoveries until it was sure how profitable or not Australia would be.
Jansson & Hondius were the first to published this map in 1630 and it is believed the information was leaked from the Blaeu firm - the official cartographers to the Dutch East India Company. Surprisingly Blaeu did not publish a similar map for another two years. It must have been incredibly galling for Blaeu to have known of the discoveries for nearly thirty years and then to have been beaten to publication by his fiercest rival Jansson & Hondius.
Given this information this is an incredibly significant map of this imporatant region being the first map published with concrete first hand knowledge of the area which prior had been mapped based mainly on speculation or second hand knowledge.

The text running for two pages on the back of the map generally describes the region or country name, history (as it was), temperature, seasons, soil and agricultural productivity. Also described is the topography, wildlife, local inhabitants their culture and religion, as well as a description of major European and local towns and cities. This text makes extremely enjoyable reading and a very good insight not only into the area described but the general European attitudes towards alien countries and cultures. (Ref: Suraz; Koeman; M&B; Tooley)

Condition Report:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Later
Colors used: - Yellow, pink, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 22 1/2in x 19in (570mm x 485mm)
Plate size: - 20in x 15 1/2in (510mm x 395mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Uniform age toning, bottom centerfold restored
Plate area: - Uniform age toning, centerfold re-joined
Verso: - Uniform age toning

$2,250.00 USD
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1650 Original Antique Hand Drawn Manuscript Map of Ptolemaic Germany - Unique

1650 Original Antique Hand Drawn Manuscript Map of Ptolemaic Germany - Unique

Description: 
This is a unique and rare opportunity to acquire a hand drawn hand coloured manuscript Ptolemaic map of Germany.

The map was drawn from Ptolemy's map of Germany and is drawn on heavy cable laid paper with a Bunch of Grapes watermark, which denotes paper made in France in 1616. This does not necessarily mean the map was drawn in 1616 as paper was held for years sometimes before being used. But I would surmise from the colours, faded ink and age of the paper that the drawing was done sometime by the mid 17th century.
The map was once part of an atlas containing a range of 17th & 18th century maps with the margins being extended top and bottom to fit into the atlas.

Background of Ptolemy's Geographia: The first published edition of Ptolemy's ‘Geographia’ with maps, engraved by Taddeo Crivelli, was issued in Bologna in 1477.  Unusually, this edition contained 26 maps, with one of the Asia maps divided up among three neighbouring sheets. With the exception of Palestine, these are the first regional maps of any of these various countries.
Unfortunately for the undertakers, this atlas seems not to have been a commercial success, and today only twenty-six examples of the atlas are recorded, with all but one in institutional libraries.
One explanation of the failure is that the publishers do not seem to have been fully mastered the intricacies and problems of engraving, and printing from, copper-plates, an art, which, after all, was very new and experimental. These problems were more successfully addressed by a German printer, Conrad Sweynheym, who was working on an edition of Ptolemy in Rome in the same period. Unfortunately, he did not live to see the volume appear, but his successor, Arnold Buckinck, saw the atlas through the press, in 1478.
The Rome Ptolemy contained 27 maps, with the same geographical coverage as the 1477 Ptolemy. Of the engraved editions of Ptolemy’s ‘Cosmographia’ the maps in the Rome edition are the finest fifteenth century examples, and second only to Mercator’s maps, from his 1578 edition.  One explanation for this was the use of individual punches to stamp letters onto the printing plates, rather than engraving them.  This allowed much greater uniformity than lettering-engravers were able to achieve, and gives a very pleasing overall effect. The atlas proved popular, and three successive editions (to 1508) followed, although only about forty examples of the first edition are recorded today.

Claudius Ptolemy(90 A.D.-168 A.D.) was a celebrated astronomer, mathematician, and geographer who lived in Alexandria in the 2nd century AD. Although his thinking influenced contemporary Arab geographers, little was known of his work in the West until manuscripts from Constantinople reached Italy in about 1400.  These manuscripts were written in Greek and contained the names of every city, island,  mountain and  river known to the many travellers interviewed by Ptolemy. In addition, the latitude and longitude of each of the resulting eight thousand locations were also recorded. They were translated into Latin by 1401 and appeared in print by 1475.  The earliest Byzantine manuscript maps, drawn by analysing the Ptolemy figures, date from the twelfth century. A number of hand-drawn copies were made in Italy throughout the early fifteenth century to accompany Ptolemy's text.
Ptolemy stressed the importance of accurate observations in order to calculate latitude and longitude, and  laid down the principals of systematic cartography that remain to this day. Obviously there are many errors in Ptolemy's maps, due to the limited extent of basic geographic information at that time and the lack of a method of determining accurate longitudes. Judged by modern standards, the basic shortcoming of the Ptolemy world map is the small area it portrays. The Mediterranean is fairly well depicted, but is greatly exaggerated in length (Longitudinally). The effect of this, combined with Ptolemy's disregard for Eratosthenes' extremely accurate estimate of the earth's circumference (c. 200 B.C.) and the use of a Posidonius' much smaller flawed estimate (c.50 B.C.) implied a much shorter distance across that part of the unknown earth's surface not drawn on the map. Columbus and his contemporaries based their exploratory ventures on Ptolemy's calculations and, like him, had no idea of the vast New World to the west, interposed between Europe and Asia.
Work on the first “printed” atlas from the text of Ptolemy was started in 1473 and finally published in 1478. A crude copy of this atlas was produced and published by some dissident workers in 1477 in order to be ‘first’.However, the plates for the 1478 were done prior to the pirated issue and thus the 1478 atlas holds the title of the first Atlas of the world. There are very few surviving examples of this atlas and individual maps. (Ref: Stevenson; Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, green, red.
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 19in x 12in (485mm x 305mm)
Map size: - 13in x 11 1/2in (330mm x 295mm)
Margins: - Min 1/4in (6mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Top and bottom margin extended outside of image
Plate area: - None
Verso: - Light soiling

$2,250.00 USD
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1753 Bellin Antique Map of Australia & New Zealand - Carte Reduite.....Australes

1753 Bellin Antique Map of Australia & New Zealand - Carte Reduite.....Australes

  • Title : Carte Reduite des Terres Australes pour Servir a l'Histoire des Voyages...1753
  • Ref #:  61042
  • Size: 12 1/2in x 9 1/4in (320mm x 230mm)
  • Date : 1753
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This beautifully hand coloured original antique map* of Australia - one of the earliest near complete maps dedicated to the Island Continent - was engraved in 1753 by Jacques Nicolas Bellin  - date engraved in the title -and was published in the 1753 edition of Prevosts Histoire Generale Des Voyages.

Background: This is one of the few 18th century maps to focus on the Australian continent prior to Cook's famous first voyage from 1768-1771. Mainland Australia is connected to both Tasmania (Terre de Van Diemen) and Papua New Guinea (Nouv. Guinee). Along the imaginary eastern coastline is a note that reads: "I suppose that the land of Diemen can join with the land of the Holy Ghost, but this is without proof." A partial coastline of New Zealand is shown peeking out of the corner of the map, with a note that it was discovered by Abel Tasman in 1642 and speculation that it might be part of a great southern continent. This is an important map of Australia depicting the interesting theories made prior to exploration of the region later in the 18th century. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Yellow, green, red, brown.
General color appearance: - Authentic and fresh
Paper size: - 12 1/2in x 9 1/4in (320mm x 230mm)
Plate size: - 11 3/4n x 8 1/2in (295mm x 215mm)
Margins: - Min ½in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Folds as issued
Verso: - None

$2,250.00 USD
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1573 Abraham Ortelius Original Antique 1st Edition Map of The Island of Cyprus

1573 Abraham Ortelius Original Antique 1st Edition Map of The Island of Cyprus

Description:
This extremely handsome and much sort after original antique map of the Island of Cyprus was published by Abraham Ortelius in 1573. There were a total of 6275 of these maps published between 1573 and 1641, with approx. 10% surviving to this day.
This actual map is a true first edition or state (1573IG39A), of 3 states, with German text & page number 39A on the verso.

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, green, blue, pink
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 20 3/4in x 15in (525mm x 382mm)
Plate size: - 19 3/4in x 14in (500mm x 355mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

Background: 
A milestone in the history of the cartography of Cyprus, based on a 1570 map by Giacomo Franco. The map is embellished by sailing ships and a sea monster, bearing a map of the Greek Island of Lemnos in an inset mp at bottom right, based on the written account by Pierre Belon in 1555. Signed in the plate by the Dutch engraver Joannes van Doetecum

Cyprus is an island country in the Eastern Mediterranean and the third largest and third most populous island in the Mediterranean. It is located south of Turkey, west of Syria and Lebanon, northwest of Israel, north of Egypt, and southeast of Greece.
The earliest known human activity on the island dates to around the 10th millennium BC. Archaeological remains from this period include the well-preserved Neolithic village of Khirokitia, and Cyprus is home to some of the oldest water wells in the world. Cyprus was settled by Mycenaean Greeksin two waves in the 2nd millennium BC. As a strategic location in the Middle East, it was subsequently occupied by several major powers, including the empires of the Assyrians, Egyptians and Persians, from whom the island was seized in 333 BC by Alexander the Great. Subsequent rule by Ptolemaic Egypt, the Classical and Eastern Roman Empire, Arabcaliphates for a short period, the French Lusignan dynasty and the Venetians, was followed by over three centuries of Ottoman rule between 1571 and 1878.

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1730 Georg M Seutter Original Antique Map of America, Island of California

1730 Georg M Seutter Original Antique Map of America, Island of California

  • Title : Novus Orbis sive America Meridionalis et Septentrionalis
  • Date : 1730
  • Size: 23 3/4in x 21in (605mm x 535mm)
  • Ref #:  70793
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This large handsome and beautifully hand coloured original antique map of America - showing California as an Island - was published by Georg Mattraus Seutter in 1730. 
One of the best examples of this map I have seen to date with exceptional hand colouring.

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: - Original & later
Colors used: - Yellow, green, blue, pink
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 23 3/4in x 21in (605mm x 535mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 20in (585mm x 510mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Light spotting bottom right of map
Verso: - None

Background: 
This is a highly decorative and informative map based on the contemporary European knowledge of America at the beginning of the 18th century. California is shown as an island based on the Sanson-Homann model but with additions including several more rivers on the west coast and two mountains to the north - M. Neges and M.S. Martin and C de Fortuna, C&R de Pins and many others. 
The great lakes still show a large degree of ignorance to both shape and location and the NW is left blank. Brazil and the east coast of South America is still largely exaggerated. 
The tracks of the early navigators are shown in the Pacific including Fr. Quir, Magellan, Drake and others.
The map also supports two large and highly decorative uncoloured - as published - cartouches which in themselves tell a story of European conquest and ignorance of the local populations.
Religion was a compelling motivation for European imperialism, and the opportunity to convert \"heathen\" Indians provided both a justification and means to conquer the indigenous peoples of the New World. Two Indians kneel reverently before a female figure representing Christianity in the top cartouche, flanked on the right by an altar prepared for Holy Communion and on the left by Europeans at a dining table. 
The lower cartouche portrays tranquil Indians surrounded by standard symbols representing the Americas. The seated figure wears a feathered headdress, armband, and skirt. A servant shades him from the sun with a baldachin (parasol), while others in the background and to the left harvest what appears to be sugarcane and tobacco. In the center background someone rests in a hammock suspended between two palm trees while another rows quietly out to sea. A pelican, a cockatiel, and whimsical flying fish, some sporting saw-like beaks, hover above the title. The latter creatures appear to be the artist\'s misconception of a sawfish. 
The placement of the two scenes illustrating this work is significant. By depicting numerous symbols associated with Roman Catholicism above a scene of Indians, a subtle message is conveyed: European contact with Indians would yield vast spiritual riches in the form of Christian converts and benefit the indigenous people, who, because they did not practice a Christian faith, were \"beneath\" those who did. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

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1628 Henricus Hondius Original Antique Map of South America w/ inset Cusco, Peru

1628 Henricus Hondius Original Antique Map of South America w/ inset Cusco, Peru

Description: 
This superb, original antique hand coloured folio map of South America, was engraved by Jodocus Hondius & published by his son Henricus for the continuation of Gerard Mercators 1628 French edition of Atlas.
This map is in superb condition with beautiful hand colouring, a deep heavy imprint denoting an early pressing on clean, heavy paper. Original margins, one of the best I have seen for sometime.

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Yellow, green, blue, pink
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 23in x 18 3/4in (585mm x 475mm)
Plate size: - 19 1/2in x 14 1/4in (495mm x 363mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - 4 very small worm holes
Verso: - None

Background: 
The interior of the map is dominated by the large mythical lake Parime Lacus straddling the equator below Venezuela along with an interesting & mythical continental river system. The huge Rio de la Plata river flows south from the conjectural Eupana Lacus in Brazil, while the R. Grande flows north from the same lake, ostensibly making Brazil an island.
The Strait of Magellan is represented, but Tierra del Fuego (Fogo) is named as part of the mythical Great Southern Land instead of an island.
The map is beautifully engraved with a stippled wave pattern Pacific & Atlantic Oceans, filled with Spanish & English ships, sea monsters and native canoe. The continent is flanked by two elaborate Baroque cartouches; title to the right and a large inset plan of the Capital of the Ancient Incan Empire, Cuzco. A sole representation of the conquered Native Americans is engraved as a lone Indian with a bow and arrow in the interior of Patgonia.

Between 1452 and 1493, a series of papal bulls (Dum Diversas, Romanus Pontifex, and Inter caetera) paved the way for the European colonization and Catholic missions in the New World. These authorized the European Christian nations to \"take possession\" of non-Christian lands and encouraged subduing and converting the non-Christian people of Africa and the Americas.
In 1494, Portugal and Spain, the two great maritime powers of that time, signed the Treaty of Tordesillas in the expectation of new lands being discovered in the west. Through the treaty they agreed that all the land outside Europe should be an exclusive duopoly between the two countries. The treaty established an imaginary line along a north-south meridian 370 leagues west of Cape Verde Islands, roughly 46° 37\' W. In terms of the treaty, all land to the west of the line (which is now known to include most of the South American soil), would belong to Spain, and all land to the east, to Portugal. Because accurate measurements of longitude were not possible at that time, the line was not strictly enforced, resulting in a Portuguese expansion of Brazil across the meridian.
In 1498, during his third voyage to the Americas, Christopher Columbus sailed near the Orinoco Delta and then landed in the Gulf of Paria (Actual Venezuela). Amazed by the great offshore current of freshwater which deflected his course eastward, Columbus expressed in his moving letter to Isabella I and Ferdinand II that he must have reached heaven on Earth (terrestrial paradise):
Great signs are these of the Terrestrial Paradise, for the site conforms to the opinion of the holy and wise theologians whom I have mentioned. And likewise, the [other] signs conform very well, for I have never read or heard of such a large quantity of fresh water being inside and in such close proximity to salt water; the very mild temperateness also corroborates this; and if the water of which I speak does not proceed from Paradise then it is an even greater marvel, because I do not believe such a large and deep river has ever been known to exist in this world.
Beginning in 1499, the people and natural resources of South America were repeatedly exploited by foreign conquistadors, first from Spain and later from Portugal. These competing colonial nations claimed the land and resources as their own and divided it into colonies.
European diseases (smallpox, influenza, measles and typhus) to which the native populations had no resistance were the overwhelming cause of the depopulation of the Native American population. Cruel systems of forced labor (such as encomiendas and mining industry\'s mita) under Spanish control also contributed to depopulation. Lower bound estimates speak of a decline in the population of around 20–50 per cent, whereas high estimates arrive at 90 per cent.[42] Following this, African slaves, who had developed immunity to these diseases, were quickly brought in to replace them.
The Spaniards were committed to converting their American subjects to Christianity and were quick to purge any native cultural practices that hindered this end. However, most initial attempts at this were only partially successful; American groups simply blended Catholicism with their traditional beliefs. The Spaniards did not impose their language to the degree they did their religion. In fact, the missionary work of the Roman Catholic Church in Quechua, Nahuatl, and Guarani actually contributed to the expansion of these American languages, equipping them with writing systems.
Eventually the natives and the Spaniards interbred, forming a Mestizo class. Mestizos and the Native Americans were often forced to pay unfair taxes to the Spanish government (although all subjects paid taxes) and were punished harshly for disobeying their laws. Many native artworks were considered pagan idols and destroyed by Spanish explorers. This included a great number of gold and silver sculptures, which were melted down before transport to Europe.
In 1616, the Dutch, attracted by the legend of El Dorado, founded a fort in Guayana and established three colonies: Demerara, Berbice, and Essequibo.
In 1624 France attempted to settle in the area of modern-day French Guiana, but was forced to abandon it in the face of hostility from the Portuguese, who viewed it as a violation of the Treaty of Tordesillas. However French settlers returned in 1630 and in 1643 managed to establish a settlement at Cayenne along with some small-scale plantations.
Since the sixteenth century there were some movements of discontent to Spanish and Portuguese colonial system. Among these movements, the most famous being that of the Maroons, slaves who escaped their masters and in the shelter of the forest communities organized free communities. Attempts to subject them by the royal army was unsuccessful, because the Maroons had learned to master the South American jungles. In a royal decree of 1713, the king gave legality to the first free population of the continent: Palenque de San Basilio in Colombia today, led by Benkos Bioho. Brazil saw the formation of a genuine African kingdom on their soil, with the Quilombo of Palmares.
Between 1721 and 1735, the Revolt of the Comuneros of Paraguay arose, because of clashes between the Paraguayan settlers and the Jesuits, who ran the large and prosperous Jesuit Reductions and controlled a large number of Christianized Indians.
Between 1742 and 1756, was the insurrection of Juan Santos Atahualpa in the central jungle of Peru. In 1780, the Viceroyalty of Peru was met with the insurrection of curaca Condorcanqui or Tupac Amaru II, which would be continued by Tupac Catari in Upper Peru.
In 1763, the African Cuffy led a revolt in Guyana which was bloodily suppressed by the Dutch. In 1781, the Revolt of the Comuneros (New Granada), an insurrection of the villagers in the Viceroyalty of New Granada, was a popular revolution that united indigenous people and mestizos. The villagers tried to be the colonial power and despite the capitulation were signed, the Viceroy Manuel Antonio Flores did not comply, and instead ran to the main leaders José Antonio Galán. In 1796, Essequibo (colony) of the Dutch was taken by the British, who had previously begun a massive introduction of slaves.
During the eighteenth century, the figure of the priest, mathematician and botanist José Celestino Mutis (1732–1808), was delegated by the Viceroy Antonio Caballero y Gongora to conduct an inventory of the nature of the Nueva Granada, which became known as the Botanical Expedition, which classified plants, wildlife and founded the first astronomical observatory in the city of Santa Fé de Bogotá.
On August 15, 1801, the Prussian scientist Alexander von Humboldt reached Fontibón where Mutis, and began his expedition to New Granada, Quito. The meeting between the two scholars are considered the brightest spot of the botanical expedition. Humboldt also visited Venezuela, Mexico, United States, Chile, and Peru. Through his observations of temperature differences between the Pacific Ocean between Chile and Peru in different periods of the year, he discovered cold currents moving from south to north up the coast of Peru, which was named the Humboldt Current in his honour.
Between 1806 and 1807, British military forces tried to invade the area of the Rio de la Plata, at the command of Home Riggs Popham and William Carr Beresford, and John Whitelocke. The invasions were repelled, but powerfully affected the Spanish authority

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1730 Seutter Large Rare Map of Australia, East Indies, SE Asia, China

1730 Seutter Large Rare Map of Australia, East Indies, SE Asia, China

    • Title: India Orientalis cum Adjacentibus Insulis Nova Delineatione ob oculos posita ..Matth. Suettro.
    • Date: 1730
    • Condition: (A+) Condition
    • Ref: 43155
    • Size: 25 ½in x 21 ½in (650mm x 545mm)

Description: This large, scarce & beautifully hand coloured original map of Australia & SE Asia was published by Georg Mattraus Seutter in 1730. This is one of the best examples of this map I have seen, especially with the colouring. In excellent condition, a must in any Australian or SE Asian collection.

Background: The map extends from China, Japan and Persia in the North and in the south stretching from The Maldives east to Northern Australia. Of note, Australia continues to be attached to Nova Guinea, albeit with some hesitation, as the image extends outside the inner neat-line to convey this information - even though 20+ names are confidently engraved around Northern Australia Coastline. The detail throughout Southeast Asia is informative and up-to-date and the print style typically strong. The cartouche is one of Seutter's most ornate, with elaborate scenes from sea, land, jungle and mythology. This map rarely appears on the market, as it was only included in select copies of Seutters atlas. (Ref: Norwich; M&B; Tooley)

Condition Report
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original & later
Colors used: - Yellow, pink, green, orange, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 25 ½in x 21 ½in (650mm x 545mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 19 1/4in (580mm x 490mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$1,750.00 USD
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1691 Jaillot Antique Map of South America

1691 Jaillot Antique Map of South America

  • Title : Amerique Meridionale Divisee en ses Principales Parties
  • Date : 1691
  • Condition: (A) Very Good Condition
  • Ref:  43160
  • Size: 35 1/2in x 23 1/2in (900mm x 595mm)

Description: 

This very large, beautifully hand coloured (with gold highlights) original antique map of South America was engraved in 1691 - dated in Cartouche - and was published by Hubert Jaillot in his monumental Atlas Nouveau. This map is beautifully hand coloured with gold highlights along country borders and the cartouches indicating it was once part of an Imperial Atlas. The Imperial atlases were hand coloured using gold highlights and other rare colours which at the time was extremely expensive and available at the time only to royalty and the very rich.

Background: The map include lines of latitude and longitude, some topographical details, location of settlements, rivers, and lakes (including the lakes Parime, thought to be where the fabulous El Dorado was located) as well as the boundaries of the possessions of the European claimants to South America. Extremely decorative cartouche with dedication to Le Dauphin, and his coat of arms in top After Nicolas Sanson, Hubert Jaillot and Pierre Duval were the most important French cartographers of the seventeenth & eighteenth centuries. Jaillot, originally a sculptor, became interested in geography after his marriage to the daughter of Nicolas Berey (1606-65), a famous map colourist, and went into partnership in Paris with Sanson's sons. There, from about 1669, he undertook the re-engraving, enlarging and re-publishing of the Sanson maps in sheet form and in atlases, sparing no effort to fill the gap in the map trade left by the destruction of Blaeu's printing establishment in Amsterdam in 1672. Many of his maps were printed in Amsterdam (by Pierre Mortier) as well as in Paris. One of his most important works was a magnificent sea atlas, Le Neptune François, published in 1693 and compiled in co-operation with J D Cassini. This was re-published shortly afterwards by Pierre Mortier in Amsterdam with French, Dutch and English texts, the charts having been re-engraved. Eventually, after half a century, most of the plates were used again as the basis for a revised issue published by J N Bellin in 1753.(Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, green, red, brown.
General color appearance: - Authentic and fresh
Paper size: - 35 1/2in x 23 1/2in (900mm x 595mm)
Plate size: - 35 1/2in x 23 1/2in (900mm x 595mm)
Margins: - Min 1/4in (5mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Several small repairs to margins, no loss
Plate area: - Age toning, re-join to left of image, no loss
Verso: - Age toning, repairs as noted

$1,750.00 USD
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1674 A H Jaillot Large Old Antique 1st edition Map of Africa

1674 A H Jaillot Large Old Antique 1st edition Map of Africa

  • Title : L 'Afrique Divisee Suivant l'Estendue de ses Principales Parties...Alexis Hubert Jaillot...1674
  • Ref #:  50667
  • Size: 36in x 24 1/2in (915mm x 620mm)
  • Date : 1674
  • Condition: (A) Very Good Condition

Description:
This large, exquisitely hand coloured, original antique 1st edition map of Africa by Alexis Hubert Jaillot - after Nicolas Sanson - was engraved in 1674 - the date is engraved in the scale cartouche.
This is a beautifully presented map, fantastic colour on sturdy & heavy paper with a deep clear impression, signifying a very early pressing.
This 1st edition map is not to be confused with the later smaller more common version of the map published by A.H. Jaillot. There are 5 editions of this map published in 1674, 1685, 1690, 1692 & 1695.

Background: Being part of the Mediterranean world, the northern coasts of the African continent as far as the Straits of Gibraltar and even round to the area of the Fortunate Isles (the Canaries) were reasonably well known and quite accurately mapped from ancient times. In particular, Egypt and the Nile Valley were well defined and the Nile itself was, of course, one of the rivers separating the continents in medieval T-O maps. Through Arab traders the shape of the east coast, down the Red Sea as far as the equator, was also known but detail shown in the interior faded into deserts with occasional mountain ranges and mythical rivers. The southern part of the continent, in the Ptolemaic tradition, was assumed to curve to the east to form a land-locked Indian Ocean. The voyages of the Portuguese, organized by Henry the Navigator in the fifteenth century, completely changed the picture and by the end of the century Vasco da Gama had rounded the Cape enabling cartographers to draw a quite presentable coastal outline of the whole continent, even if the interior was to remain largely unknown for the next two or three centuries.

After Nicolas Sanson, Hubert Jaillot and Pierre Duval were the most important French cartographers of the seventeenth centuries. Jaillot, originally a sculptor, became interested in geography after his marriage to the daughter of Nicolas Berey (1606-65), a famous map colourist, and went into partnership in Paris with Sanson's sons. There, from about 1669, he undertook the re-engraving, enlarging and re-publishing of the Sanson maps in sheet form and in atlases, sparing no effort to fill the gap in the map trade left by the destruction of Blaeu's printing establishment in Amsterdam in 1672. Many of his maps were printed in Amsterdam (by Pierre Mortier) as well as in Paris. One of his most important works was a magnificent sea atlas, Le Neptune François, published in 1693 and compiled in co-operation with J D Cassini. This was re-published shortly afterwards by Pierre Mortier in Amsterdam with French, Dutch and English texts, the charts having been re-engraved. Eventually, after half a century, most of the plates were used again as the basis for a revised issue published by J N Bellin in 1753.(Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, green, red, orange.
General color appearance: - Authentic and fresh
Paper size: - 36in x 24 1/2in (915mm x 620mm)
Plate size: - 35in x 23in (890mm x 585mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning in margins, bottom margin corners cropped
Plate area: - Light age toning & creasing along centerfold
Verso: - Light age toning & creasing along centerfold

$1,750.00 USD
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1776 Capt. Cook & Whitchurch Old, Antique 1st Ed. Southern Hemisphere Map - Australia - Nathaniel Dance

1776 Capt. Cook & Whitchurch Old, Antique 1st Ed. Southern Hemisphere Map - Australia - Nathaniel Dance

  • Title : A Chart of the Southern Hemisphere shewing the Tracks of some of the most distinguished Navigators by Captain James Cook of His Majesty's Navy 
  • Ref #:  61111
  • Size: 23 1/2in x 22 1/2in (605mm x 575mm)
  • Date : 1776
  • Condition: (A) Very Good Condition

Description: 
This large, scarce, original antique 1st edition map, a sea-chart of the Southern Hemisphere by Captain James Cook, was engraved by William Whitchurch in 1776 (dated at the foot of the map) and was published by William Strahan, in The Strand, London in 1777.
This 1st English edition is scarce & hard to find, as opposed to the more common French edition of this Hemisphere map by Robert Benard, published in 1784.
This map is unique in another way, being used by Nathaniel Dance in his 1776 portrait of Captain James Cook. Please also see below for more information & to the left for a the portrait. 

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: -  
Colors used: -  
General color appearance: -   
Paper size: - 23 1/2in x 22 1/2in (605mm x 575mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 21 1/2in (585mm x 545mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Repair as noted
Plate area: -  9in repair to the left of the image from NZ to margin, no loss
Verso: - Repair as noted

Background: This map by James Cook was published as the premier map of his second voyage to the Southern Hemisphere, dispelling forever the myth of the Great Southern Land, showing the true cartographic nature of the southern hemisphere dominated by Australia & New Zealand. The map on a South Polar Projection also shows South America, the South Atlantic Ocean, South Africa, Madagascar, Australia - with Tasmania still joined to the mainland - New Zealand and the southern Pacific Ocean with islands. 
Cook has also included the tracks of previous navigators & explorer's, including Mendana in 1595, Quiros in 1606, Le Maire and Schouten in 1616, Tasman in 1642 and Bougainville in 1768, Furneaux, Wallis & of course Capt James Cook himself. Engraved within the explorer's tracks are the dates of their voyages and ships tracks are particularly noted around the Antarctic Circle with notations of ice fields seen during the voyages.

Nathaniel Dance Portrait of Cook, 1776
A three-quarter-length portrait of Captain Cook, seated to the left, facing the right. He is wearing captain's full-dress uniform, 1774-87, consisting of a navy blue jacket, white waistcoat with gold braid and gold buttons and white breeches. He wears a grey wig or his own hair powdered. He holds his own chart of the Southern Ocean on the table and his right hand points to the east coast of Australia on it. His left thumb and finger lightly hold the other edge of the chart over his knee. His hat sits on the table behind him to the left on top of a substantial book, perhaps his journal, itself resting on the chart. In 1772, Cook sailed for the second time to the fringes of the Antarctic and the Pacific, returning in 1775. He sat for this portrait, commissioned by Sir Joseph Banks, 'for a few hours before dinner' on 25 May 1776 but it is not known whether he did so again before he left London on 24 June for his third voyage, never to return. None the less, David Samwell, surgeon's mate in 'Resolution' on the second voyage and surgeon of 'Discovery' on the third, thought it 'a most excellent likeness ... and ... the only one I have seen that bears any resemblance to him'. This view was based on John Sherwin's later engraving of the portrait, which probably argues even more favourably for the original despite an element of idealization, not least omission of a large burn scar (from 1764) on the right hand. Banks had sailed with Cook on his first voyage in the 'Endeavour' and took an influential interest in his subsequent ones. This portrait hung over the fireplace in the library of his London house. After his death, it was presented to the Naval Gallery at Greenwich Hospital by his executor, Sir Edward Knatchbull, following a request by E.H. Locker, the Hospital Secretary. In 1781-83 Charles Grignion, then in Rome, painted a 'Death of Captain Cook' which was sold in 1821 after the British Museum declined it as a bequest from his brother Thomas, a well-known watchmaker. That picture subsequently disappeared but Thomas's will says the likeness of Cook was based on the present portrait. Dance worked with Pompeo Batoni in Rome and on his return to London in 1765 achieved success as a portrait and history painter. In 1768, he joined a group of artists who successfully petitioned George III to establish the Royal Academy in that year.

Cook's First Voyage (1768-1771)
The first voyage under Captain James Cook's command was primarily of a scientific nature. The expedition on the Endeavour initially sailed to Tahiti to observe the transit of the planet Venus in order to calculate the earth's distance from the sun. Cook landed on the South Pacific island in April of 1769 and in June of that year the astronomical observations were successfully completed. In addition to these labors, very good relations with the Tahitians were maintained and the naturalists Joseph Banks and Daniel C. Solander conducted extensive ethnological and botanical research. 
Another purpose of the voyage was to explore the South Seas to determine if an inhabitable continent existed in the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Upon leaving Tahiti, Cook named and charted the Society Islands and then continued southwest to New Zealand. His circumnavigation and exploration of that country also resulted in a detailed survey. Cook proceeded to Australia, where he charted the eastern coast for 2,000 miles, naming the area New South Wales. As a result of these surveys, both Australia and New Zealand were annexed by Great Britain. In addition to these explorations, the Endeavour returned to England without a single death from scurvy among its men, an historic feat at the time. The combination of these accomplishments brought Cook prominence, promotion, and the opportunity to lead further expeditions.

Cook's Second Voyage (1772-1775)
Based on the success of his first voyage, Cook was appointed by the Admiralty to lead a second expedition. Two ships were employed with Cook commanding the Resolution and Captain Tobias Furneaux in charge of the Adventure. The purpose was to circumnavigate the globe as far south as possible to confirm the location of a southern continent. Cook proved that there was no "Terra Australis," which supposedly was located between New Zealand and South America. Cook was convinced, however, that there was land beyond the southern ice fields. In his pursuit of this idea, this expedition was the first European voyage to cross the Antarctic Circle. In addition, in two great sweeps through the Southern latitudes, Cook made an incredible number of landfalls including New Zealand, Easter Island, the Marquesas, Tahiti and the Society Islands, the Tonga Islands, the New Hebrides, New Caledonia, and a number of smaller islands. 
In addition to these navigational accomplishments and the accompanying expansion of geographical knowledge, the expedition also recorded a vast amount of information regarding the Pacific islands and peoples, proved the value of the chronometer as an instrument for calculating longitude, and improved techniques for preventing scurvy.

Cook's Third Voyage (1776-1779)
In the course of his first two voyages, Cook circumnavigated the globe twice, sailed extensively into the Antarctic, and charted coastlines from Newfoundland to New Zealand. Following these achievements, Cook's third voyage was organized to seek an efficient route from England to southern and eastern Asia that would not entail rounding the Cape of Good Hope. The search for such a Northwest (or Northeast) Passage had been on the agenda of northern European mariners and merchants since the beginning of European expansion in the late fifteenth century. England's growing economic and colonial interests in India in the later eighteenth century provided the stimulus for the latest exploration for this route. 
Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

$1,750.00 USD
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1720 Bowen & Owen British Road Maps Collection Consisting of 83 Pages = 166 Maps

1720 Bowen & Owen British Road Maps Collection Consisting of 83 Pages = 166 Maps

Description: 
These wonderful, beautifully detailed original antique copper-plate engraved double sided Road Maps of the counties and regions of England and Wales were compiled by John Owen and Engraved by Emmanual Bowen in the 1720 edition of Britannia Depicta or Ogilby Improved.
We have a total of 83 double sided pages remaining of the original 137 pages. 5 are hand coloured the rest are B&W. All are in VG to fine condition with light age toning to some.

Background: These delightful and fascinating small road maps with their embellishments of coats of arms and historical notes come from an 18th century road atlas - Britannia Depicta. The strip road maps of England and Wales first appeared in 1675 with the publishing of John Ogilby's magnificent atlas Britannia, containing 100 folio sized road maps. By the first part of the 18th century there was public demand for a small road atlas that could be easily carried by travellers on horseback or for those who could afford to take a coach. There were a number of abortive attempts to produce such a handy sized atlas but others succeeded like John Senex who published his small road atlas in 1719. A year later Britannia Depicta was published by Thomas Bowles. The interesting notes that appear on the front and back of each map were compiled by the antiquarian and lawyer John Owen whilst the engraving was undertaken by Emanuel Bowen This was Bowen's first major work as a cartographical engraver for which he received a part share in the atlas in payment for his labours. The format of the atlas and maps met with the public's approval and the atlas was republished many times over the next forty years until the last edition in 1764. The double sided Road Maps each measure about 5 x 7 inches.
The maps are highly entertaining describing the route taken with sights of churches to gallows and many other misc. items of interest for travelers of the 17th and 18th centuries, fascinating maps.

The following list show all the double sided pages numbering no. 1 to 273. Each map follows the road direction indicating city & town names, rivers, mountains and places of interest along the roads shown (the pages missing are struck through)

1/2 CARDIGANSHIRE. / London, Uxbridge, Beaconsfield
3/4 High Wycombe, Tetsworth, Oxford, Islip. Islip, Enston, Morton Broadway.
5/6 Broadway, Pershore, Worcester, Bramyard. / Bramyard Leominster, Presteign.
7/8 Rhayader, Aberystwyth. SUSSEX
9/10 London, Ewell, Leatherhead, Dorking / Billingshurst, Amberley.
11/12 NOTTINGHAMSHIRE. London, Ware, Puckridge.
13/14 Royston, Huntingdon Stilton/Stilton, Stamford.
15/16 Grantham, Newark, Tuxford? Tuxford, Bawtry, Doncaster.
17/18 Wentbridge, Ferrybridge, Tadcaster, York/ York Boroughbridge, North Allerton.
19/20 Darlington, Durham, Chester le Street/Newcastle Morpeth.
21/22 Alnwick, Berwick. MIDDLESEX.
23/24 London, Hounslow, Maidenhead, Reading/Newbury, Hungerford, Marlborough.
25/26 Marlborough, Chippenham, Marshfield/Bristol Axbridge,Huntspil
27/28 NORTHAMPTONSHIRE. London, Uxbridge, Amersham, Missenden.
29/30 Wendover, Aylesbury, Buckingham, Banbury/Banbury Stratford, Caughton
31/32 Bromsgrove, Kidderminster, Bridgnorth. Banbury, Campden. GLAMORGANSHIRE
33/34 London, Brentford, Hounslow Slough/ Maidenhead, Henley, Dorchester,, Abingdon
35/36 Abingdon, Faringdon, Lechlade / Gloucester Monmouth
37/38 Monmouth, Newport, Cardiff/Llandaff, Cowbridge, Burton
39/40 Burton, Swansea,Llanelly, Kidwelly Haverfordwest,St Davids
41/42 London, Deptford,Dartford, Rochester, Rainham. Description of London on verso
43/44 Sittingbourne, Canterbury, Dover. Part of an Description of London  on verso
45/46 London, Romford, Chelmsford, Kelvedon, Colchester, Harwich.
47/48 London, Eltham, Farningham, Wrotham. Part of a description on verso
49/50 Maidstone, Ashford, Hythe. ANGLESEY.
51/52 London, High Barnet, St. Albans, Dunstable, Stony Stratford,Towcester

53/54 Towcester, Daventry, Dunchurch, Coventry, Coleshill, Lichfield
55/56 Lichfield, Rugeley, Stone, Darleston, Nantwich, Tarporley, Chester
57/58 Chester, Hawarden, Northop, Denbigh, Conway Beaumaris, Holyhead
59/60 London, Brentford, Hounslow, Staines, Bagshot. Description  of London on verso.
61/62 Basingstoke, Andover, Salisbury.
63/64 Shaftesbury, Sherborne, Crewkerne, Axminster, Exeter, Chidley
65/66 Ashburton, Plymouth, Looe, Foy, Tregony
67/68 Golsenna, Penzance, Lands End. Part of a description of London on verso
69/70 Southwark, Stretham, Croydon, East Grinstead, Newhaven, Brighton, New Shoreham.
71/72 London, Wandsworth, Kingston, Guildford. Godalming Description of London on verso.
73/74 Lippock, Petersfield, Portsmouth, London, Bromley, Sevenoaks, Tunbridge
75/76 Lamberhurst, Newenden, Rye. Part of a description of London on verso.
77/78 Andover, Amesbury, Warminster. Part of a description on London on verso.
79/80 Bruton, East Lidford, Bridgwater, Dulverton
81/82 South Moulton, Barnstaple, Torrington, Hatherleigh, Launceston, Camelford
83/84 Padstow, Columb, Truro, Part of a description of London on verso.
85/86 Chippenham, Bath Wells, Marlborough, Devises, Trowbridge, Wells
87/88 Stilton, Peterborough, Crowland, Spalding Part of a description of London on verso.
89/90 Boston, Sleaford, Lincoln. STAFFORDSHIRE.
91/92 Darleston Bridge, Newcastle under Lyme, Warrington, Wigan, Whittle, Preston Garstang
93/94 Garstang, Lancaster, Bolton, Kendal, Penrith, Carlisle
95/96 SURREY. Guildford, Godalming, Midhurst, Chichester.
97/98 Midhurst, Petersfield, Winchester. 
DERBYSHIRE.
99/100 Stony Stratford, Northampton, Market Harborough, Leicester, Loughborough, Derby
101/102 Tamesford, Eaton, Stilton, Peterborough. Part of a description of London on verso.
103/104 Market Deeping, Sleaford, Lincoln, Glamfordbridges, Barton.
105/106 Hull, Beverley, Bridlington, Flamborough Head. CAMBRIDGESHIRE.
107/108 Puckeridge, Cambridge, Ely, Downham, Kings Lynn
109/110 MERIONETHSHIRE. Campden, Evesholme, Worcester.
111/112 Tenbury, Ludlow, Bishops Castle, Montgomery. Description of the Fens on verso.
113/114 High Barnet, Hatfield, Baldock, Biggleswade, St. Neots, Oakham
115/116 RUTLANDSHIRE. Puckeridge, Newmarket.
117/118 Thetford, Attleborough, Norwich. 
BEDFORDSHIRE
119/120 St. Albans, Bedford, Wellingborough, Kettering, Rockingham, Oakham.
121/122 Oakham, Melton Mowbray, Nottingham, Mansfield, Rotherham, Barnsley
123/124 Barnsley, Halifax, Skipton, Richmond.
125/126 SHROPSHIRE. Meriden, Birmingham, Dudley, Bridgnorth, Wenlock.
127/128 Shrewsbury, Welshpool. 
ISLANDS IN THE BRITISH OCEAN
129/130 Bagshot, Farnham, Alresford, Southampton, Salisbury
131/132 HERTFORDSHIRE. Newmarket, Swaffham.
133/134 Fakenham, Walsingham, Wells. Newmarket, Bury St. Edmunds.
135/136 Basingstoke, Stockbridge, Cranford, Blandford, Dorchester, Weymouth
137/138 BUCKINGHAMSHIRE. Colchester, Ipswich, Woodbridge.
139/140 Saxmundham, Beccles, Yarmouth. 
OXFORDSHIRE.
141/142 Bristol, Chipping Sodbury, Tetbury, Cirencester, Burford, Banbury.
143/144 HEREFORDSHIRE. Bristol, Chepstow, Monmouth.
145/146 Hereford, Leominster, Ludlow, Church Stretton, Shrewsbury.
147/148 Whitchurch, Chester. DEVONSHIRE.
149/150 Bristol, Wells, Glastonbury, Taunton, Wellington, Exeter.
151/152 WORCESTERSHIRE. Bristol, Dursley.
153/154 Gloucester, Tewksbury, Worcester. 
DORSETSHIRE,
155/156 Bristol, Wells, Glastonbury, Somerton, Crewkerne, Frampton, Weymouth
157/158 Cambridge, St. Neots, Higham Ferrers. Description of Cambridge University on verso.
159/160 Northampton, Rugby, Coventry. EAST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE
161/162 Carlisle, Jedburgh,, Kelso, Berwick.
163/164 BRECONSHIRE. Chester, Wrexham, Sellatyn, Llanfyllin.
165/166 Llanfair, , Tregynon. Newtown, Llanbedr, Builth Wells, Brecon.
167/168
169/170 Dartmouth, Exeter, Silverton, Bumpkin, Minehead.
171/172 PEMBROKESHIRE. St. David's Fishguard, Newport, Cardigan.
173/174 Llanerch, Llanbadern Vawr, Talabont, Machynlleth Dinas Mawddy.
175/176 Bala, Bettws y Coed, Ruthin, , Holywell. Description of Exeter on verso.
177/178 Exeter, Crediton, Barnstaple, Ilfracombe, Bideford, Torrington.
179/180 CORNWALL. Exeter, Tavistock
181/182 St. Ives, Liskeard, Lostwithiel, Truro. 
DENBIGHSHIRE
183/184 Gloucester, Campden, Stratford, Warwick, Coventry.
185/186 MONTGOMERYSHIRE. Gloucester, Huntley, Ross, Hereford
187/188 Pembridge, Presteign, Montgomery. LEICESTERSHIRE.
189/190 Hereford, Worcester,Droitwich,, Bromsgrove, Solihull, Meriden, Coventry, Leicester
191/192 HUNTINGDONSHIRE. Huntingdon, Erith, Ely, Soham
193/194 Bury St. Edmunds, Needham Market, Ipswich. SUFFOLK
195/196 Ipswich, Norwich, Cromer.
197/198 Kings Lynn, Swaffham, Thetford. Description of the British Ocean Islands on verso.
199/200 Ixworth, Ipswich, Harwich. NORFOLK.
201/202 King's Lynn, Billingford, Norwich, Yarmouth.
203/204 MONMOUTHSHIRE. Monmouth, Abergavenny, Crickhowell.
205/206 Brecon, Llandovery, Llanbedor. LINCOLNSHIRE
207/208 Nottingham, Newark. Lincoln, Market Rasen, Grimsby.
209/210 Oxford, Faringdon, Purton. Description of Oxford University on verso.
211.212 Malmesbury, Bristol, Arms of the Colleges of Oxford University on verso.
213/214 Oxford, Burcester, Buckingham, Bedford, Cambridge.
215/216 Cartouche and 21 College Arms of Cambridge. Map on verso Oxford to beyond Newbury.
217/218 Basingstoke, Alton, Petersfield, Chichester. WARWICKSHIRE
219/220 Oxford, Banbury, Southam, Coventry, Nuneaton, Ashby, Derby.
221/222 BERKSHIRE. Oxford, Abingdon, Great Shelford, Hungerford.
223/224 North Tudworth, Salisbury, Cranborne, Wimborne Minster, Poole. RADNORSHIRE
225/226 Presteign, Builth, Carmarthen.
227/228 GLOUCESTERSHIRE. Salisbury, Burbage, Marlborough.
229/230 Burford, Campden. NORTHUMBERLAND.
231/232 Tynemouth, Newcastle, Hexham, Haltwhistle, Carlisle.
233/234 CAERNARVONSHIRE. Welshpool, Dinas Mawddwy, Dollgelley.
235/236 Harlech, Dolbadern, Caernarvon. LANCASHIRE.
237/238 York, Knaresborough, Ripley, Skipton, Settle, Hornby, Lancaster.
239/240 CHESHIRE. York, Tadcaster, Leeds,
241/242 Rochdale, Manchester, Warrington, Frodsham, Chester, Manchester, Stockport.
243/244 Buxton, Derby. CARMARTHENSHIRE
245/246 Carmarthen, Cardigan, Llanbedr, Aberystwyth.
247/248 ESSEX. Chelmsford, Sudbury.
249/250 Bury St. Edmunds, Chelmsford, Saffron Walden. 
KENT
251/252 Chelmsford to Maldon,Rayleigh and Dover
253/254 Exeter, Lyme Regis, Description of Dorchester and Lyme Regis on verso.
255/256 Bridport, Dorchester. Plymouth, Dartmouth. WEST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE.
257/258 Ferrybridge, Boroughbridge,Richmond, Barnard Castle, Ferrybridge, Pontefract, Wakefield.
259/260 CUMBERLAND. Kendal, Keswick.
261/262 Cockermouth. Egremont, Cockermouth, Carlisle.
263/264 Alresford,Winchester, Rumsey, Ringwood, Poole, Lymington, Southampton, Winchester.
265/266 FLINTSHIRE. Shrewsbury, Wrexham.
267/268 Mold, Holywell. Chester, Flint, Holywell. COUNTY DURHAM
269/270 Whitby, Guisborough, Morton, Durham,Sunderland,Tynemouth, Kingscleer.
271/272 WESTMORLAND. York, New Malton, Pickering.
273 Whitby, New Malton, Scarborough,Plain on verso. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early (5)
Colors used: - Red, yellow, blue (5)
General color appearance: - Authentic (5)
Paper size: - 8in x 6in (200mm x 150mm)ea
Plate size: - 8in x 6in (200mm x 150mm)ea
Margins: - Min 1/4in (5mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - Light age toning
Verso: - Light age toning

$1,659.00 USD
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1650 Jansson Large Old, Antique Map Java Batavia, Indonesia, Dutch East India Co

1650 Jansson Large Old, Antique Map Java Batavia, Indonesia, Dutch East India Co

Description:
This large elegant & very impressive hand coloured original antique map, a sea chart of the Indonesian Island of Java including Sumatra, Borneo and Bali was published by Jan Jansson in the 1650 Edition of his "Water World" atlas Atlantis Majoris.
This is a reasonably scarce map with very few available on the market today. I have 3 records of past sales since 1983 with a top price of $1550 paid in 1996.

Background:
Java & the port of Batavia was at the time of publication of the utmost importance to the Dutch East India Company and its domination of the Spice Trade.
This elegant chart focuses on the islands coast with the lack of detail on the interior correctly reflecting the lack of knowledge (or possible lack of importance) to the Dutch, who's primary concern was the sea and sea charts used in the trade of the ever lucrative Spice Trade.
The Dutch capital in the East Indies is Batavia (Jakarta) located on the NW coast. The beautiful chart is richly embellished with two fine cartouche featuring local Javanese warrior and Chinese merchants flanking the title and Neptune and mermaids surrounding the scale of miles... The Dutch East India Company (VOC) was a chartered company established in 1602, when the States-General of the Netherlands granted it a 21-year monopoly to carry out colonial activities in Asia. It was the second multinational corporation in the world (the British East India Company was founded two years earlier) and the first company to issue stock. It was also arguably the first mega-corporation, possessing quasi-governmental powers, including the ability to wage war, imprison and execute convicts, negotiate treaties, coin money, and establish colonies.
Statistically, the VOC eclipsed all of its rivals in the Asia trade. Between 1602 and 1796 the VOC sent almost a million Europeans to work in the Asian trade on 4,785 ships, and netted for their efforts more than 2.5 million tons of Asian trade goods. By contrast, the rest of Europe combined sent only 882,412 people from 1500 to 1795, and the fleet of the English (later British) East India Company, the VOC’s nearest competitor, was a distant second to its total traffic with 2,690 ships and a mere one-fifth the tonnage of goods carried by the VOC. The VOC enjoyed huge profits from its spice monopoly through most of the 17th century.
Having been set up in 1602, to profit from the Malukan spice trade, in 1619 the VOC established a capital in the port city of Batavia (now Jakarta) on the Indonesian Island of Java. Over the next two centuries the Company acquired additional ports as trading bases and safeguarded their interests by taking over surrounding territory. It remained an important trading concern and paid an 18% annual dividend for almost 200 years.
Weighed down by corruption in the late 18th century, the Company went bankrupt and was formally dissolved in 1800, its possessions and the debt being taken over by the government of the Dutch Batavian Republic. The VOC's territories became the Dutch East Indies and were expanded over the course of the 19th century to include the whole of the Indonesian archipelago, and in the 20th century would form Indonesia. (Ref: Tooley, M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Green, red, orange, yellow, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 23in x 19 1/2in (585mm x 495mm)
Plate size: - 20 1/2in x 16 3/4in (520mm x 425mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Small repair & ink notations
Plate area: - Light creasing
Verso: - None

$1,499.00 USD
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1639 Jansson Large Old, Antique Map of America Gulf of Mexico, Virginia to Texas, Caribbean

1639 Jansson Large Old, Antique Map of America Gulf of Mexico, Virginia to Texas, Caribbean

  • TitleInsulae Americanae in Oceano Septentrionali cum terris adiacentibus
  • Date : 1639
  • Condition: (A) Very Good Condition
  • Ref:  43142
  • Size: 22 1/2in x 18 3/4in (570mm x 475mm)

Description: 
This finely engraved beautifully hand coloured original antique map of Gulf of Mexico, The Caribbean, Virginia to Florida to Texas and Central America, Venezuela was published in the 1639 French edition of Jan Jansson's Atlas Nouvs.
This map has been re-joined along the centerold and has some uplift along the centerfold and has been priced accordingly.
These maps, published in the later editions of Mercators atlas, are derived from the original maps drawn and engraved by Gerald Mercator in the mid to late 16th century, published by his son Rumold as an atlas, after his death, in 1595.
After two editions the plates were purchased by Jodocus Hondius in 1604 andcontinued to be published until the mid 1630's when the plates were re-engraved and updated by Jan Jansson and Henricus Hondius.

Background: Cartographically this map draws on the extremely rare chart by Hessel Gerritsz, c.1631. The area of coverage is exactly the same with the exception of the addition of the west coast of Central America. The nomenclature of the North American part is virtually identical, the only notable addition being the naming of Virginia. It reflects the firsthand knowledge of Gerritsz during his voyage to South America and the West Indies undertaken in 1628. The distance between Chesapeake Bay and Albemarle Sound is accurately portrayed at 1°; even in Gerritsz's acclaimed NOVA ANGLIA ..., for de Laet, 1630, this distance is over 2°. It seems likely that a Spanish chart was used as the nomenclature along the south-east coast lacks any of the French influences often seen at the time.(Ref: Burden; Tooley, Koeman)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Green, red, orange, yellow, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic  
Paper size: - 22 1/2in x 18 3/4in (570mm x 475mm)
Plate size: - 20 1/2in x 15 1/4in (525mm x 390mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light creasing 
Plate area: - Light uniform age toning, centerfold re-joined with light uplift
Verso: - Light age toning

$1,499.00 USD
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1609 Mercator Hondius Antique Map of Siberia, China, Central Asia, North America

1609 Mercator Hondius Antique Map of Siberia, China, Central Asia, North America

Description: 
This fine beautifully hand coloured original antique map of Central Asia, China & Eastern Russia with a very early view of the NW coast of America - one of the first maps to depict this region - by Gerard Mercator was published by Joducus Hondius in the 1609 French edition of Mercators Atlas.

Background: 
A beautifully ornate map in a style highly popular in the 16th and early 17th centuries. To the left of the map is the image of a man of Central Asia and another of an Arctic Hunter, possibly an Eskimo. The rest of the map is full of detail both real and myth, some of which is no doubt borrowed from the writings of Marco Polo considered at the time one of the foremost expert on China and Central Asia. Overlooked by some experts is the inclusion of the NW Coastline of America important as it would be 150 years before this region was thoroughly mapped by Capt. James Cook in the 1770's.

The newly discovered northern coastline of Nova Zembla is shown with a notation concerning the Dutch expedition led by Willem Barents in 1594-96. Interesting notations in Siberia, Ung quae Gog and Sumongul quae Mogog, refer to the mythological lands of Gog and Magog. These lands, noted in the Bible as being situated in the remotest parts of the earth, were originally depicted on maps just north of Israel. Also shown is the Great Wall of China, Korea is depicted as an Island, a very early example of the the Northwest Coast of America, naming Cape de Fortuna and the Straits of Anian. The map extends west to include the Black Sea and Russia, but the primary focus of the map is Tartaria, Central Asia China and Asiatic Russia. Decorative vignettes in include a nomadic tribe, tents and livestock. An early map of the region and certainly one of the most decorative of the genre.

Jodocus Hondius (1563 - 1612), one of the most notable engravers of his time, is known for his work in association with many of the cartographers and publishers prominent at the end of the sixteenth and the beginning of the seventeenth century. 
In 1604 Hondius bought the plates of Mercator's Atlas which, in spite of its excellence, had not competed successfully with the continuing demand of Abraham Ortelius's Theatrum Orbis Terrarum. 
To meet this competition Hondius added about 40 maps to Mercator's original number and from 1606 published enlarged editions in many languages, still under Mercator's name but with his own name as publisher. These atlases have become known as the Mercator/Hondius series. The following year the maps were re-engraved in miniature form and issued as a pocket Atlas Minor.
After the death of Jodocus Hondius the Elder in 1612, work on the two atlases, folio and miniature, was carried on by his widow and sons, Jodocus II and Henricus, and eventually in conjunction with Jan Jansson in Amsterdam. In all, from 1606 onwards, nearly 50 editions with increasing numbers of maps with texts in the main European languages were printed. (Ref: Koeman; M&B; Tooley)

Condition Report:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy, stained & weak in places
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, pink, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 23in x 19in (580mm x 480mm)
Plate size: - 19 1/2in x 13 1/2in (490mm x 340mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Uniform age toning
Plate area: - None
Verso: - Uniform age toning

$1,499.00 USD
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1774 Cpt. James Cook Large Antique Map of Australia, New Zealand 1st Voyage Tracks

1774 Cpt. James Cook Large Antique Map of Australia, New Zealand 1st Voyage Tracks

  • TitleCarte d'une Partie de la Mer du Sud Contenant les Decouvertes de Vaisseaux de sa Majeste le Dauphin, Commodore Byron, la Tamar, Capitne. Mouats, 1765, le Dauphin, Capitne. Wallis, le Swallow, Capitne. Cartaret, 1767, et l'Endeavour, Lieutenant Cook 1769
  • Date : 1774
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  35509
  • Size: 28in x 16 3/4in (710mm x 425mm)

Description: 
A fine example of this very large and  important original antique map, a chart of Australia and New Zealand tracking the voyage of by Lieutenant James Cook duringhis first voyage of discovery between 1768 & 1771. This map was published in the 1st French version of John Hawkesworth's voyages in 1774.

The map was engraved by the eminent French engraver Robert Benard, responsible for many of the prints and maps of the French period of enlightenment during the 18th century.

During his first voyage of 1768-71 on theEndeavour, he charted New Zealand and the eastern coast of Australia. This map follows the voyages of Cook and other explorers of the South Pacific Ocean between 1765 - 1769. The routes of Byron, Mouats, Wallis, Carteret, and Cook are depicted, with indications of the dates of their travels and their discoveries. A notation on the map indicates that the shaded coastlines are the new discoveries of these explorers. The south-eastern tip of Australia is still connected to Tasmania, and the inland area is blank as it was still largely unexplored.

Cook was recognized by his contemporaries as a highly competent navigator and scientific observer. The map clearly details his departure from the more established routes crossing the Pacific at a higher latitude, making it inevitable that he reached New Holland's east coast. Note the more northerly route taken by Cooks predecessors through calmer waters, thus missing the prize of the east coast of Australia.

Cook's First Voyage (1768-1771)
The first voyage under Captain James Cook's command was primarily of a scientific nature. The expedition on the Endeavour initially sailed to Tahiti to observe the transit of the planet Venus in order to calculate the earth's distance from the sun. Cook landed on the South Pacific island in April of 1769 and in June of that year the astronomical observations were successfully completed. In addition to these labors, very good relations with the Tahitians were maintained and the naturalists Joseph Banks and Daniel C. Solander conducted extensive ethnological and botanical research.
Another purpose of the voyage was to explore the South Seas to determine if an inhabitable continent existed in the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Upon leaving Tahiti, Cook named and charted the Society Islands and then continued southwest to New Zealand. His circumnavigation and exploration of that country also resulted in a detailed survey. Cook proceeded to Australia, where he charted the eastern coast for 2,000 miles, naming the area New South Wales. As a result of these surveys, both Australia and New Zealand were annexed by Great Britain. In addition to these explorations, the Endeavour returned to England without a single death from scurvy among its men, an historic feat at the time. The combination of these accomplishments brought Cook prominence, promotion, and the opportunity to lead further expeditions. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: -  
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 28in x 16 3/4in (710mm x 425mm)
Plate size: - 26 3/4in x 14 3/4in (680mm x 375mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Bottom half right margin extended from just outside border
Plate area: - Folds as issued, light creasing
Verso: - None

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1693 Coronelli 2 Globe Gores of Brazil, South America

1693 Coronelli 2 Globe Gores of Brazil, South America

  • Title : Mare Del Bresile; Il Mare Del Paraguay; Agaglianes
  • Date : 1693
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  31920 & 31921
  • Size: 17 1/4in x 10 1/2in (440mm x 265mm) & 11 1/2in x 11 1/2in (290mm x 290mm)

Description: 
This is a rare opportunity to acquire two original antique Globe Gores, one cropped quater and the other a full half, of Brazil,   published by Vincenzo Maria Coronelli (1650 - 1718) in the 1693 Venice edition of Atlante Veneto, Libro dei Globi.
The Gores are printed on heavy clean cabled paper, acquired by us in a large collection some years ago. The bottom full gore also includes the map also includes a Cartouche showing Pope Alexander VI dividing the New World between Spain and Portugal. 

In 1693 Coronelli published all his gores - from the 2in to the 42 in - in an atlas,  Libero dei Globi, part of the great series of atlases,  Atlante Veneto. Libero dei Globi was published by Coronelli to ensure his work was available to a wider audience, as very few could afford travel to Venice, Rome or Paris to view his completed globes.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Yellow, green, pink, blue 
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 17 1/4in x 10 1/2in (440mm x 265mm) & 11 1/2in x 11 1/2in (290mm x 290mm)
Margins: - min. 1/2in (10mm)

Imperfections: Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - Old text on verso of bottom gore

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1579 Abraham Ortelius Antique Map of Holland - Hollandia

1579 Abraham Ortelius Antique Map of Holland - Hollandia

  • Title : Hollandia Antiquorum Catthorum Sedis Nova Descriptio, Avctore Iacobo A Daventria
  • Ref #:  50664
  • Size: 21 1/2in x 17in (550mm x 430mm)
  • Date : 1579
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This beautifully hand coloured original antique map of Holland, 1st edition - based on the cartographic works of Jacob van Deventer - was published by Abraham Ortelius in the 1579 Latin edition of Theatrum Orbis Terrarum.

Ortelius published a total of 7300 of this map between 1570 to 1641 from 3 States:
1570-1584 state 1
1587-1595 State 2
1598-1641 State3.
According to Marcel Van dem Broecke there are estimated to be only 140 loose copies in circulation.

Background: It would be hard to imagine a more inauspicious period for a nation's cultural development than the years between 1520 and 1600 in the Low Countries. Under the harsh domination of the Spanish Emperors, facing fanatical religious persecution and the threat of the Inquisition, the constant presence of foreign troops and even the destruction of some of their cities, the Dutch, nevertheless, in 1581 contrived to break their subservience to Spain and form their own federation. Belgium, being mainly Catholic, remained within the orbit of the Empire though henceforward was recognized as a separate state. In such circumstances there would seem to have been little chance for growth of a national entity in the small Northern Provinces but, on the contrary, under the leadership of Amsterdam, their banking and commercial enterprise soon dominated Europe. The attempt by Philip II to eliminate their control of European coastal trade by the use of Portuguese craft inspired the Dutch, first, to seek a North East passage to India and Asia and then, failing that, to challenge Spanish and Portuguese power directly, not only in European waters but also in the East, and eventually to eclipse it. English attempts to gain a foothold in the Indies were bitterly opposed and the English turned their attention to India where only a handful of Dutch settlements existed.

In spite of the turmoil arising out of these events, first Antwerp and then Amsterdam became centres of the arts and their cartographers, engravers and printers produced magnificent maps and charts of every kind which many claim have never been surpassed. Later in this chapter an account is given of Gerard Mercator, who studied at Louvain under Gemma Frisius, the Dutch astronomer and mathematician, and later moved to Duisburg in the Rhineland where most of his major work was carried Out. There he produced globes, maps of Europe, the British Isles and the famous World Map using his newly invented method of projection, all of which were widely copied by most of the cartographers of the day. The first part of his Atlas - the word chosen by Mercator to describe a collection of maps - was published in 1585, the second in 1589, and the third in 1595, a year after his death.

Other great names of the time were Abraham Ortelius, native of Antwerp, famous for his world atlas, Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, issued in 1570; Waghenaer, noted for his sea atlases of 1584 and 1592, Gerard de Jode and Jodocus and Henricus Hondius, followed in the next century by W. J. Blaeu and his sons and Jan Jansson. The Blaeu and Jansson establishments were noted mainly for land atlases but their sea atlases and pilot books were also published in numerous editions which went some way to meeting the rising demand for aids to navigation in European and Mediterranean waters. Their productions were challenged by other, smaller publishers specializing in such works, Jacob Colom, Anthonie Jacobsz, Pieter Goos, Hendrick Doncker, to mention a few, and, later, the charts issued by the van Keulen family and their descendants covered practically all the seas of the known world. As we reach the second half of the seventeenth century the details of publication of these sea atlases and pilot books become more and more interwoven and complicated. Not infrequently the same charts were issued under the imprint of different publishers; at death the engraved plates were sold or passed to their successors and were re-issued, with minor alterations and often without acknowledgement to the originator, all of which adds to problems of identification. Although, in this period, charts of every kind must have been issued in great quantity, good copies are now hard to find.

By about the year 1700 Dutch sea power and influence was waning and although their pilot books and charts remained much in demand for many years to come, leadership in the production of land atlases passed into the hands of the more scientific French cartographers who, in their turn, dominated the map trade for most of the following century.

Atlas Background: For the first time, in 1570, all the elements of the modern Atlas were brought to publication  in Abraham Ortelius' Theatrum Orbis Terrarum. This substantial undertaking assembled fifty-three of the best available maps of the world by the most renowned and up to date geographers.
Unlike earlier compositions, such as the Italian composite or "Lafreri" Atlases, each of Ortelius' maps was engraved specifically for his Atlas according to uniform format. Through its launching, pre-eminence in map publishing was transferred from Italy to the Netherlands, leading to over a hundred years of Dutch supremacy in all facts of cartographical production.
There were a total of 7300 copies of Theatrum  published between 1570 - 1612 from 31 editions. (Ref: Van Den Broecke; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early color
Colors used: - Yellow, green, blue, pink
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 21 1/2in x 17in (550mm x 430mm)
Plate size: - 19 1/2in x 14in (495mm x 355mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light browning in top and bottom margins
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

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1719 Chatelain Antique Map of North America, GOM, Caribbean, United States

1719 Chatelain Antique Map of North America, GOM, Caribbean, United States

  • Title : Carte Contenant Le Royaume Du Mexique Et La Floride
  • Date : 1719
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  50621
  • Size: 23 1/4in x 17 1/2in (590m x 445m) 

Description: 
This large beautifully hand coloured original antique foundation map of North America and the Caribbean - after Delisle landmark map of 1703 - was published by Henri Abraham Chatelain in 1719, in his famous Atlas Historique.

Background:
A very attractive example of Chatelain's issue of Guillaume De L'Isle's foundation map of present-day United States, Central America and the West Indies, originally published in 1703. Guillaume De L'Isle brought a new scientific approach to mapmaking at the end of the seventeenth century and his rigorously prepared maps of all areas became the standards for much of the following century.

Amongst his most important works were those relating to the New World, especially North America, where the recent reports of French travellers into the interior were utilised. Sources for this map - the first to show the lower reaches of the Mississippi accurately - included d'Iberville, Tonty and Le Sueur, Father Gravier, and Bienville (later to become Governor of the French colony of Louisiana). Evidence of the contemporary superiority of De L'Isle's maps lies in the numerous copies, published in Paris, Amsterdam, London and Germany, and the republishing of the original plate over many years. Geographically his maps were as correct, however, this map is also remarkable for De L'Isle's political boundaries which squeeze the English Colonies, on the east coast into a narrow strip, thus allocating the greater part of North America to France. Chatelain's map has a large panel of text describing Mexico and Florida at lower left.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Pink, green, yellow, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic 
Paper size: - 23 1/4in x 17 1/2in (590m x 445m)
Plate size: - 20 3/4in x 16 1/4in (530m x 415mm)
Margins: - min. 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections: Margins: - None
Plate area: - Folds as issued
Verso: - None

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1690 Nicolas Visscher Large Original Antique Map of Africa

1690 Nicolas Visscher Large Original Antique Map of Africa

  • Title : Africae Accurata Tabula ex officina...Nic Visscher
  • Date : 1690
  • Size: 24 1/2in x 21in (620mm x 535mm)
  • Ref #:  61158
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This large beautifully hand coloured original antique map of Africa was published by Nicholas Visscher in 1690.
This is a fine map with beautiful hand colouring on strong sturdy paper with original margins & a fresh deep impression denoting an early pressing.

 

 

Background: The first separately printed map of Africa (as with the other known continents) appeared in Munster's Geographia from 1540 onwards and the first atlas devoted to Africa only was published in 1588 in Venice by Livio Sanuto, but the finest individual map of the century was that engraved on 8 sheets by Gastaldi, published in Venice in 1564. Apart from maps in sixteenth-century atlases generally there were also magnificent marine maps of 1596 by Jan van Linschoten (engraved by van Langrens) of the southern half of the continent with highly imaginative and decorative detail in the interior. In the next century there were many attractive maps including those of Mercator/Hondius (1606), Speed (1627), Blaeu (1 630), Visscher (1636), de Wit (c. 1670), all embellished with vignettes of harbours and principal towns and bordered with elaborate and colourful figures of their inhabitants, but the interior remained uncharted with the exception of that part of the continent known as Ethiopia, the name which was applied to a wide area including present-day Abyssinia. Here the legends of Prester John lingered on and, as so often happened in other remote parts of the world, the only certain knowledge of the region was provided by Jesuit missionaries. Among these was Father Geronimo Lobo (1595-1678), whose work A Voyage to Abyssinia was used as the basis for a remarkably accurate map published by a German scholar, Hiob Ludolf in 1683. Despite the formidable problems which faced them, the French cartographers G. Delisle (c. 1700-22), J. B. B. d'Anville (1727-49) and N. Bellin (1754) greatly improved the standards of mapping of the continent, improvements which were usually, although not always, maintained by Homann, Seutter, de Ia Rochette, Bowen, Faden and many others in the later years of the century. (M&B; Tooley)

 

 

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Red, yellow, green, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 24 1/2in x 21in (620mm x 535mm)
Plate size: - 21 1/2in x 17 1/4in (540mm x 435mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

 

 

Imperfections:
Margins: - Top margin repair, no loss
Plate area: - None
Verso: - Old tape top & bottom margin not affecting the image

 

 

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1720 John Senex Large Original Antique Map of Africa - Dedicated to Isaac Newton

1720 John Senex Large Original Antique Map of Africa - Dedicated to Isaac Newton

  • Title : Africa Corrected from the Observations of the Royal Society of London and Paris by John Senex
  • Date : 1720
  • Size: 40in x 27in (1.10m x 685mm)
  • Ref #:  24893
  • Condition: (B) Good Condition

Description: This very large, beautifully hand coloured and incredibly scarce original antique map of Africa was published by John Senex in the 1720 edition of his Elephant Folio General Atlas

This large rare two sheet map provides a highly detailed look of the coastal regions along with the interior of Africa, at a time when it was still very much the Dark Continent. Also included are many annotations, including apocryphal notes regarding local peoples, animals, indigenous gems, mines, etc.  
The map has undergone some restoration. These very large maps were subjected to adverse handling conditions over the centuries, making actual survival rare. This map has been backed onto archival Japanese tissue, with the bottom missing 1 1/2in re-enforced. This map sells normally retail up to $3500 (based on condition)

Condition Report:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - Off white
Age of map colour: - Original & early
Colours used: - Yellow, pink, green
General colour appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 40in x 27in (1.10m x 685mm)
Plate size: - 38in x 27in (960mm x 685mm)
Margins: - Min 1/4in (5mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Bottom 1 1/2in of margin & image cropped
Plate area: - Soiling and several repairs to bottom of map adjacent to centerfold
Verso: - Backed with archival Japanese tissue, repairs as noted 

Background:  Good example of the large Senex map of Africa, dedicated to Sir Isaac Newton. " President of the Royal Society and Master of His Majesty's Mint." Newton served as President of the Royal Society from 1703 to 1727 and Master of the Mint from 1700 to 1727.  
According to E.H. Lane-Pool, The Discovery of Africa . . . As Reflected in the Maps in the Collection of the  Rhodes-LIvingstone Museum (1950)......."The dedication suggests that [Newton] was holding his post under Queen Anne, at the time the map was produced..  The topography is based on the later de L'Isle maps . .  . the Portuguese discoveries inserted . . . much curious information is derived from the commentaries appended to the placenames. Of the Hensquas, a people inhabiting the country of Griquas, it is said, "This nations makes use of Lyons in fighting?'  At the source of the Buffalo River is the note "This river is said to have no end."  The Zimbas in  what now is Nyasaland are "Anthropophagi or men-eaters who pay divine worship to their King", and Mount Chiri (near the Shire river) is aptly described as "very fertile and populous. "  John Cassangi becomes established at the headwaters of the Cuneni River about this period.  His town was a famous market for traders in transit from the interior, and was the limit of Portuguese Exploration from the West Coast.  Seventy years later Cassangi was an embarrassment to the Portuguese on account of the embargo he placed upon trade between Mwatayamvu an the West Coast"

Being part of the Mediterranean world, the northern coasts of the African continent as far as the Straits of Gibraltar and even round to the area of the Fortunate Isles (the Canaries) were reasonably well known and quite accurately mapped from ancient times. In particular, Egypt and the Nile Valley were well defined and the Nile itself was, of course, one of the rivers separating the continents in medieval T-O maps. Through Arab traders the shape of the east coast, down the Red Sea as far as the equator, was also known but detail shown in the interior faded into deserts with occasional mountain ranges and mythical rivers. The southern part of the continent, in the Ptolemaic tradition, was assumed to curve to the east to form a land-locked Indian Ocean. The voyages of the Portuguese, organized by Henry the Navigator in the fifteenth century, completely changed the picture and by the end of the century Vasco da Gama had rounded the Cape enabling cartographers to draw a quite presentable coastal outline of the whole continent, even if the interior was to remain largely unknown for the next two or three centuries.
The first separately printed map of Africa (as with the other known continents) appeared in Munster's Geographia from 1540 onwards and the first atlas devoted to Africa only was published in 1588 in Venice by Livio Sanuto, but the finest individual map of the century was that engraved on 8 sheets by Gastaldi, published in Venice in 1564. Apart from maps in sixteenth-century atlases generally there were also magnificent marine maps of 1596 by Jan van Linschoten (engraved by van Langrens) of the southern half of the continent with highly imaginative and decorative detail in the interior. In the next century there were many attractive maps including those of Mercator/Hondius (1606), Speed (1627), Blaeu (1 630), Visscher (1636), de Wit (c. 1670), all embellished with vignettes of harbours and principal towns and bordered with elaborate and colourful figures of their inhabitants, but the interior remained uncharted with the exception of that part of the continent known as Ethiopia, the name which was applied to a wide area including present-day Abyssinia. Here the legends of Prester John lingered on and, as so often happened in other remote parts of the world, the only certain knowledge of the region was provided by Jesuit missionaries. Among these was Father Geronimo Lobo (1595-1678), whose work A Voyage to Abyssinia was used as the basis for a remarkably accurate map published by a German scholar, Hiob Ludolf in 1683. Despite the formidable problems which faced them, the French cartographers G. Delisle (c. 1700-22), J. B. B. d'Anville (1727-49) and N. Bellin (1754) greatly improved the standards of mapping of the continent, improvements which were usually, although not always, maintained by Homann, Seutter, de Ia Rochette, Bowen, Faden and many others in the later years of the century. (Ref: Tooley, Koeman)

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1759 J.B. D' Anville Large Original Antique Map of Africa - Fantastic

1759 J.B. D' Anville Large Original Antique Map of Africa - Fantastic

  • TitleAfrique Publiee sous les Auspices de Monseigneur le Duc D\'Orleans Premier Prince du Sang Par le Sr D Anville MDCCXLIX
  • Date : 1759
  • Condition: (A) Very Good Condition
  • Ref:  92322
  • Size: 40in x 40in (1.02m x 1.02m)

Description:
This large finely engraved and highly detailed original antique map of Africa by Jean Baptiste Bourguignon D'Anville was engraved in 1759 - dated in the tile cartouche - by Guillaume Delahaye and was published D'Anville's large elephant folio Atlas Generale.

This is one of the largest and most influential maps of Africa to appear in the mid-18th century. Anville\'s map covers the entire continent of Africa from the Mediterranean to the Cape of Good Hope and from the Cape Verde Islands to Madagascar. Anville was a careful cartographer known for his scientific approach to mapmaking, and nowhere is this more evident than in this, his greatest and most innovative map of Africa. Following the trajectory set by Guillaume de L\'Isle half a century earlier, D\'Anville takes a number of significant steps forward in addressing the confusions inherent in mapping this vast though mostly, in the mid-17th century, unexplored continent. These include unreliable cartographic suppositions regarding the African interior dating practically to antiquity. Many of these, including such speculative ideas as the \'Mountains of Kong,\' have been diminished if not removed entirely from this map, leaving vast unexplored areas throughout.
What was known of Africa, however, Anville incorporates here in an impressive compilation of the most up to date reports from colonial, missionary, and exploratory entradas into the interior of the continent. Thus well mapped parts of the continent are limited to the Mediterranean Coast, Morocco, the Senegambia, the Congo, South Africa, the Kingdom of Monomatapa, Abyssinia, and egypt. Morocco, egypt, and the southern Mediterranean Coast (Barbary) were well known to europeans since antiquity and Anville\'s accurate mapping of these regions reflects continual contact. Further south the colonial enclaves along the Niger River (Senegal and Gambia), the Congo River, and South Africa reflect considerable detail associated with european penetration by trader and missionaries. The land of Monomopota around the Zambezi River was explored early in the 16th century by the Portuguese in hopes that the legendary gold mines supposedly found there would counterbalance the wealth flowing into Spain from the New Word. Unfortunately these mines, often associated with the Biblical kingdom of Ophir, were mostly tapped out by the 15th century. Abyssinia (modern day ethiopia) was mapped in detail by early Italian missionaries and of considerable interest to europeans first, because it was (and is) predominantly Christian; second, because it was a powerful well-organized and unified kingdom; and third because the sources of the Blue Nile were to be found here.
The remainder of the continent remained largely speculative though Anville rarely lets his imagination get the upper hand. He does however follow the well-established Ptolemaic model laid down in the Geographica regarding the sources of the White Nile – here seen as two lakes at the base of the semi-apocryphal Mountains of the Moon. However, he also presents a curious network of interconnected rivers extending westward from the confused course of the White Nile following the popular 18th century speculation that the Nile may be connected to the Niger. To his credit Anville does not advocate this and offers no true commerce between the two river systems. 
Lake Malawi, here identified as Maravi, appears in a long thin embryonic state that, though it had not yet been \'discovered,\' is remarkably accurate to form. Lake Malawi was not officially discovered until Portuguese trader Candido Jose da Costa Cardoso stumbled upon it in 1849 – one hundred years following Anville\'s presentation of the lake here. Anville\'s inclusion of Lake Malawi is most likely a prescient interpretation of indigenous reports brought to europe by 17th century Portuguese traders. Its form would be followed by subsequent cartographers well into the mid-19th century when the explorations of John Hanning Speke, David Livingstone, Richard Francis Burton and others would at last yield a detailed study of Africa\'s interior.

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: - Original & later
Colors used: - Yellow, green, blue, pink
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 40in x 40in (1.02m x 1.02m)
Plate size: - 39in x 39in (1.0m x 1.0m)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Light spotting bottom of image, folds as issued, light toning along folds
Verso: - Light spotting bottom of image, folds as issued, light toning along folds

Background: 
Being part of the Mediterranean world, the northern coasts of the African continent as far as the Straits of Gibraltar and even round to the area of the Fortunate Isles (the Canaries) were reasonably well known and quite accurately mapped from ancient times. In particular, Egypt and the Nile Valley were well defined and the Nile itself was, of course, one of the rivers separating the continents in medieval T-O maps. Through Arab traders the shape of the east coast, down the Red Sea as far as the equator, was also known but detail shown in the interior faded into deserts with occasional mountain ranges and mythical rivers. The southern part of the continent, in the Ptolemaic tradition, was assumed to curve to the east to form a land-locked Indian Ocean. The voyages of the Portuguese, organized by Henry the Navigator in the fifteenth century, completely changed the picture and by the end of the century Vasco da Gama had rounded the Cape enabling cartographers to draw a quite presentable coastal outline of the whole continent, even if the interior was to remain largely unknown for the next two or three centuries.
The first separately printed map of Africa (as with the other known continents) appeared in Munster\'s Geographia from 1540 onwards and the first atlas devoted to Africa only was published in 1588 in Venice by Livio Sanuto, but the finest individual map of the century was that engraved on 8 sheets by Gastaldi, published in Venice in 1564. Apart from maps in sixteenth-century atlases generally there were also magnificent marine maps of 1596 by Jan van Linschoten (engraved by van Langrens) of the southern half of the continent with highly imaginative and decorative detail in the interior. In the next century there were many attractive maps including those of Mercator/Hondius (1606), Speed (1627), Blaeu (1 630), Visscher (1636), de Wit (c. 1670), all embellished with vignettes of harbours and principal towns and bordered with elaborate and colourful figures of their inhabitants, but the interior remained uncharted with the exception of that part of the continent known as Ethiopia, the name which was applied to a wide area including present-day Abyssinia. Here the legends of Prester John lingered on and, as so often happened in other remote parts of the world, the only certain knowledge of the region was provided by Jesuit missionaries. Among these was Father Geronimo Lobo (1595-1678), whose work A Voyage to Abyssinia was used as the basis for a remarkably accurate map published by a German scholar, Hiob Ludolf in 1683. Despite the formidable problems which faced them, the French cartographers G. Delisle (c. 1700-22), J. B. B. d\'Anville (1727-49) and N. Bellin (1754) greatly improved the standards of mapping of the continent, improvements which were usually, although not always, maintained by Homann, Seutter, de Ia Rochette, Bowen, Faden and many others in the later years of the century. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

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1838 Basire Antique Rare British Postal Map Uniform Penny Post, Sir Rowland Hill

1838 Basire Antique Rare British Postal Map Uniform Penny Post, Sir Rowland Hill

Description:
This large original hand coloured and incredibly rare antique map of England and Wales, illustrating the Post Office Reform proposed by Sir Rowland Hill in 1837 was engraved by James Basire in 1838, dated in the title.
This original map of England and Wales was commissioned by the House of Commons for the reform of the post service in the late 1830s. The map shows the mail delivery routes throughout the country (distinguishing rail, coach, horse and foot deliveries) and indicates all post office towns and Penny Post sub-offices. The circles radiating from the City of Leicester indicate the distances regulating the rates of postage.
In my research of this map, I have only been able to find one other example that currently resides in the British library.

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Blue, red, black
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 35 1/2in x 28 1/2in (900mm x 725mm)
Plate size: - 35 1/2in x 28 1/2in (900mm x 725mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Uplift of the map in left margin, not affecting the image
Plate area: - Soiling top right of image
Verso: - Map was originally folding and has been professionally backed onto archival linen

Background: 
The Uniform Penny Post was a component of the comprehensive reform of the Royal Mail, the UK\'s official postal service, that took place in the 19th century. The reforms were a government initiative to eradicate the abuse and corruption of the existing service. Under the reforms, the postal service became a government monopoly, but it also became more accessible to the British population at large through setting a charge of one penny for carriage and delivery between any two places in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland irrespective of distance.
Richard Cobden and John Ramsey McCulloch, both advocates of free trade, attacked the Conservative government\'s policies of privilege and protection, including their archaic postal system. McCulloch, in 1833, advanced the view that nothing contributes more to facilitate commerce than the safe, speedy and cheap conveyance of letters. 
The campaign for cheap postage was actually initiated by Robert Wallace, who in 1835 argued, before a governmental commission set up to investigate the problems, that greater use of the mailing system would lead to increased revenue for the government.
Sir Rowland Hill expounded his concept for the reformed service at a meeting of the commission on February 13, 1837, and published a famous pamphlet Post Office Reform: its Importance and Practicability late that year. In 1838 Hill made a proposal to parliament in which he suggested that the postage on all letters received in a post-town, and delivered in the same, or any other post-town in the British Isles, shall be at the uniform rate of one penny per half ounce\". However, Hill did not include a specific timetable for the introduction of a \"penny post\" in his proposal, nor did he suggest a plan for its implementation. Nonetheless, Hill\'s 1838 proposal paved the way for the 1840 Act which introduced the Uniform Penny Post.
In his proposal, Hill also called for official pre-printed envelopes and adhesive postage stamps as alternative ways of getting the sender to pay for postage, at a time when prepayment was optional. Previously, postage had depended on distance and the number of sheets of paper; now, one penny would assure delivery of an envelope and the letter it enclosed anywhere in the country provided together they satisfied the weight condition. This was a lower rate than before, when the cost of postage was usually more than 4d (four pence). The reform did not settle the issue of who paid for the postage, as it still remained optional for a number of years in spite of Hill\'s efforts as Secretary to the Post Office to alter the situation.
As of 2013 the value of one penny in 1840 ranges from 32p (GBP) to 4.89 (GBP); the latter based on mean income. It would appear that the cost to an established semi-skilled man of sending a letter in 1840 can be represented by approximately 1.00 (GBP) in 2013 values.
This however was a lower cost than previously and made postal communication more affordable to the increasing numbers of people capable of reading and writing as a consequence of public education. Financially, the penny post scheme was a disaster. More than thirty years elapsed before revenues were back to the pre-1840 level. The real benefits were the encouragement and support that the availability of cheap letterpost communication gave to the development of transport links, education, commerce and social cohesion.

$1,499.00 USD
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1722 (1745) Delisle Map of America

1722 (1745) Delisle Map of America

  • Title : Carte D Amerique...Par Guillaume Delisle...1722
  • Date : 1722 (1745)
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref: 50603
  • Size: 28in x 22in (710mm x 560mm) 

This large, beautifully engraved, hand coloured original antique map of America, was published in 1722 by Claude de L'Isle (Delisle) and re-issued - cartographically unchanged - by Phillip Bauche in 1745 - both dates are engraved in the title cartouche and at the foot of the map. This is a landmark map and one of the most important maps of America published in the 18th century. So detailed was it, for its day, that it was copied many times over the next 100 years.

The map has an immense amount of detail regarding North America. In California and the Southwest the west coast is taken north to Cap Mendocin and Cap Blanc, with the notation, "Entrée decouverte par Martin d'Aguilar." Wagner notes "Briggs names with some of the corrections made by Blaeu. The Mediterranean Sea of California has disappeared. Delisle retained Cabrillo's B. de Pinos and introduced a few, the I. Ste Anne, the B. de St. Martin, and the B. de la Medelaine, from other maps. It seems likely that he had read the account of the Vizcaino expedition Torquemada... On the Sonora coast the names are much the same as those on his 1700 map with a few additions from Kino's map and other sources in Sonora. The course of the Mississippi is pushed considerably west of its true location, but the Missouri River is shown in a remarkably accurate fashion, with headwaters in the Northern Rocky Mountains. The look of the Great Lakes take on a more realistic form, the original Colonial States are represented and as can be expected from a French map of the period France through Louisiana claims most of south middle and north America. The map is rich with Indian and other early American details. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)   

Condition Report
Paper thickness and quality: - Very heavy and stable
Paper color: - Off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, green, pink
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: -  28in x 22in (710mm x 560mm)
Plate size: - 24 ½in x 19 ½in (620mm x 495mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Toning along centrefold, professional restoration to small worm holes adjacent to Caribbean
Verso: - Toning along centrefold 

$1,250.00 USD
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