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1200 - Template Prints

  • Title : Karstia, Carniola, Histria et Windorum Marchia
  • Ref  :  43152
  • Size: 21 1/2in x 18 1/2in (550mm x 470mm)
  • Date : 1639
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This finely engraved, beautifully hand coloured original 1st edition antique map of America by Johann Baptiste Homann was published in 1710. This map is in beautiful condition, with a heavy, dark impression signifying an early pressing, beautiful original hand colouring on clean heavy and stable paper, a wonderful example of this hard to find map.

Background:
A wonderfully constructed map, an uncommon 1st edition, showing California as an Island based on Nicolas Sanson's second model, with additions of the towns, S Isidoro, Gigante and N S de la Guadalupe inserted in the south of the Island. The Straits of Anian are shown forming a Northwest Passage between California and the mythical Terra Esonis, which forms a nearly continuous land bridge from the Northwest to Asia. The Pays de Moozemleck is shown east of the Straits of Anian. This landmark remains virtually unchanged through all of Homann's maps of America, despite the later transition to a peninsular California, resulting in an odd change from a coastal to an apparently landlocked position for this landmark. The Great Lakes have a little more updated information and the Mississippi River shows the results of the early French Jesuit explorations. The rivers source extends to the far North of the limits of the maps produced 20 and 30 years earlier, although Le Moyne's mythical lake in the Southeastern US remains. The title cartouche is based upon De Fer's landmark map of 1699. The top dedication cartouche is based upon De L'Isle's 1703 map of Canada. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - Off white
Age of map color: - Original color:
Colors used: - Green, yellow, pink, orange.
General color appearance: - Authentic & beautiful
Paper size: - 23in x 20in (585mm x 510mm)
Plate size: - 22 1/2in x 19 1/4in (575mm x 490mm)
Margins: - Min 1/4in (7mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$2,250.00 USD
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1741 Large Homann Antique Map of London Surrey - Birds Eye View of London

1741 Large Homann Antique Map of London Surrey - Birds Eye View of London

  • TitleRegionis quae est circa Londinum....Homaniamus Heredibus 1741
  • Date : 1741
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  92275
  • Size: 25 ½in x 21 ½in (650mm x 550mm)

Description: 
This beautifully hand coloured original antique map* of the Environs of London - Middlesex, Essex, Surrey and Kent - with a beautiful and a very real view of the city of London in the mid 18th century and the Thames - was engraved in 1741 - dated at the top of the map - and was published by the Homann firm.
A superb map with a deep heavy impression, stunning colour and sound heavy paper, a fine map.

Background: This map is based upon an earlier map of the region by Thomas Bowles and covers the London area from Berkshire (including Windsor Castle) in the west to Shamel in the east, extending north north as far as Bedford. Specifically focuses on Hertfordshire, Middlesex, Surrey, Essex and Kent. Offers extraordinary detail throughout, showing roadways, villages, London Streets, estates, and in many cases, individual homes. The lower portion of the sheet is dominated by a dramatic bird's-eye view of London and Westminster from Southwark across the Thames. View reveals a densely populated showing numerous boats, barges, and sailing vessels.
The beautifully hand coloured view of the city of London & Westminster was published only 90 odd years after the great fire of 1666.The view of London after Thomas Bowles, was one of a number published by Bowles and the Homann firm in the mid 18th century illustrating the growth and change of the great city.
The view is stunning, stretching from old London bridge & the docklands in the east to the farmlands to the west. What is really fascinating is the level of detail. There are a myriad of different sailing vessels occupying both sides of London bridge. The number of shops and residences that occupied the bridge at that time are uniquely displayed as is the number churches and cathedrals that dominate the skyline. To the right you can see the farm land that will one day become the West End and other upmarket areas of London.(Ref: M&B; Tooley)

 General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original & later color
Colors used: - Yellow, green, pink
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 25 ½in x 21 ½in (650mm x 550mm)
Plate size: - 22 ½in x 20in (570mm x 510mm)
Margins: - Min ½in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling in margins
Plate area: - None
Verso: - Bottom left plate-mark a little worn

$1,250.00 USD
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1784 Cook Webber Antique Print of Cooks Visit to Christmas Bay Kerguelen Isles

1784 Cook Webber Antique Print of Cooks Visit to Christmas Bay Kerguelen Isles

Description:
This large beautifully hand coloured original antique print of Capt. James Cooks ships the Resolution and Discovery anchored in Christmas Bay, Kerguelen Islands on Christmas day 1776, was engraved by Edward Newton drawn by John Webber during Cooks 3rd voyage of Discovery. The print was published in the 1784 1st edition of 'A Voyage to the Pacific', James Newton, London.

The Resolution and Discovery are anchored in the bay with two boats putting off, another by the shore to right and a man in the foreground raising a stick to kill penguins; a great hill is sited on the opposite side with a rocky outcrop above, a portion of land separated from the mainland by a small channel and a natural stone arch separated from that, in the distance to left. 
These large 1st edition prints were copied many times over the next 50 years but none rival the expertise and detail evident in this original print.

John Webber (1752-93) was the official artist on Cook's final voyage through the Pacific; his drawings formed the basis for printed illustrations to the account of the voyage 'A Voyage to the Pacific', published in 1784.

The Kerguelen Islands, 
sometimes called the Desolation Islands, are located in the southern Indian Ocean and were discovered by the French navigator Yves de Kerguelen-Trémarec in 1772. On Christmas Day, 1776 Cook’s ships Resolution and Discovery anchored in Oiseau Bay, which he named Christmas Harbour. Cook's men discovered a bottle containing a message in Latin left by Kerguelen's men. Cook wrote in his log: “I could have very properly called the island Desolation Island to signalise its sterility, but in order not to deprive M. de Kerguelen of the glory of having discovered it, I have called it Kerguelen Land.”
The Kerguelen Islands or the Kerguelen Archipelago are located in the southern Indian Ocean. The main island, Grande Terre, is 6,675 km² and it is surrounded by another 300 smaller islands and islets, forming an archipelago of 7,215 km². The climate is cold and very windy and the seas are usually rough. The islands are part of a submarine large igneous province called the Kerguelen Plateau.

Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

Condition Report:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Green, yellow, blue, red  
General color appearance: - Authentic  
Paper size: - 20in x 14 1/2in (510mm x 370mm)
Plate size: - 16in x 10 1/2in (410mm x 270mm)
Margins: - 2in (50mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light spotting
Plate area: - Vertical crease along top of image
Verso: - Light soiling

$650.00 USD
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1780 Cook Basire Large Antique Print of Capt. James Cooks Men Landing in Vanuatu

1780 Cook Basire Large Antique Print of Capt. James Cooks Men Landing in Vanuatu

  • Title: The Landing at Mallicolo one of the New Hebrides...Published Feb 1st 1777 by Wm. Strahan
  • Date:  1780
  • Ref: 91223
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Size: 19in x 12 ½in (485mm x 320mm)

Description:
This large 1st edition original antique print of  Capt James Cook's men landing in the New Hebrides - Vanuatu - in the South Pacific during his 3rd voyage of Discovery (see below) - was engraved by James Basire in 1777 - the date is engraved at the foot of the print - and was published in the 1st edition of John Hawkesworth's accounts of Cooks Voyage's  "A voyage towards the South Pole, and round the World. Performed in His Majesty's ships the Resolution and Adventure, in the years 1772, 1773, 1774, and 1775". 

Please note this original print is from the Ist edition, not from later copies by Hogg, Bankes etc.  (Ref Tooley M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 19in x 12 ½in (485mm x 320mm)
Plate size: - 19in x 12in (480mm x 305mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (10mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light chipping to margin edges
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$650.00 USD
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1844 Durand-Brager Large Antique Print of Wharf at Jamestown St Helena Island

1844 Durand-Brager Large Antique Print of Wharf at Jamestown St Helena Island

Description: 

This large finely coloured original antique  lithograph print - a view of the unloading dock or wharf at the port of Jamestown on the Island of St Helena - was published by Jean-Baptiste Henri Durand-Brager (1814-1879) in the publication "Sainte-Hélène. Translation du Crecueil du l'Empereur Napoléon a bord de la frégate La Belle-Poule. Histoire et vues pittoresques de tous les sites de l'ile se rattachant au mémorial de Saint-Hélène a l'expédition de S.A.R.Mgr. le Prince de Joinville". Paris, 1844. This Lithograph was executed by the famous Cuban lithographer Eduardo Laplante (1818 - 1860).

"Sainte-Hélène. Translation du Crecueil du l'Empereur Napoléon".... is a rare work which included some of the finest views of St. Helena ever published. Durand-Brager was the official artist sent to record the scenery and scenes surrounding the collection of Napoleon's body from St.Helena by an offical French expedition in 1840. The text includes eye-witness accounts of the whole affair together with transcriptions of many of the relevant official documents.

Sainte-Hélène contained 5 lithographic portraits by and after Lévieill or G.Staal, three tinted, two on India paper mounted. 24 tinted lithographic views after Durand-Brager in     cluding 6 'avant-lettre' proofs with titles and inscriptions in pencil, the others by De Laplante and Durand-Brager, De Laplante, Sabatier or Eugène Cicéri, printed by Lemercier or Formentier et Cie. Only two copies of this work are listed as having sold at auction in the past twenty five years.

Jean-Baptiste Henri Durand-Brager 1814-1879 An adventurous soul, inherited partially from his father explorer Jean-Baptiste-Leonard Durand, Henri Durand-Brager explored the world’s reaches. If not for some fateful moments he would have probably settled into a naval career rather than that of an artist. His youthful travels included the coasts of Africa, Asia and South America, and his repertoire contains scenes of these lands and seas. His father had led similar explorations during his career, including a voyage to Senegal on which he was shipwrecked. To avoid such possible hardships, he encouraged Henri to study art.

He trained at the side of Eugene Isabey, who himself produced a significant number of coastal scenes amongst his old master influenced genre paintings. Isabey instilled an emphasis on humanity’s interaction with nature with Durand-Brager, who saw the primal forces of the environment as a subject suitable for fine art on its own. They both worked extensively with numerous technical drawings before committing their works to oil on canvas.

Bordering the edge of the educational art direction which would soon produce the important impressionist and Plein-Air methodologies of art, Durand-Brager’s works demonstrate some of the basic tenants of emotional strength and interpretive loose brush within his seas and skies, while his subject ships and people hold to realistic looks. He found favour and patrons in the royal houses of Russia and Austria, and the French provincial government

Saint Helena: named after St Helena of Constantinople, is an island of volcanic origin in the South Atlantic Ocean. It is part of the British overseas territory of Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha which also includes Ascension Island and the islands of Tristan da Cunha.

The island has a history of over 500 years since it was first discovered as an uninhabited island by the Portuguese in 1502. Britain's second oldest remaining colony (after Bermuda), Saint Helena is one of the most isolated islands in the world and was for several centuries of vital strategic importance to ships sailing to Europe from Asia and South Africa. For several centuries, the British used the island as a place of exile, most notably for Napoleon Bonaparte.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Very heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: -  Blue, brown,  
General color appearance: - Authentic 
Paper size: - 23 1/2in x 16 1/2in (600mm x 420mm)
Margins: - Min 2in (50mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Small repair to bottom margin, no loss
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$525.00 USD
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1841 D Urville Large Antique Folio Print View of Icebergs on the Adélie Coast, Antarctica

1841 D Urville Large Antique Folio Print View of Icebergs on the Adélie Coast, Antarctica

  • Title: Vue d'une Ile De Glacie Le 18 Janvier 1840
  • Date: 1841
  • Condition : (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref: 40417
  • Size: 21in x 13 1/2in (535mm x 345mm)

Description:
This large finely engraved original and antique folio print of the pack ice and icebergs of the Adélie Coast region in Antarctica in January 1840 was published in the 1841 edition of Dumont d'Urville Voyage au Pole Sud during his second circumnavigation of the globe in 1837-40.
In 1840 D Urville penetrated the ice pack south of New Zealand and discovered the Adélie Coast region in Antarctica, the first known human to visit the region.

Voyage au Pole Sud et dan l'Océanie sur les corvettes - In 1836, the French King Louis-Philippe, enthusiastic for Southern Hemisphere exploration, supported J. Dumont d'Urville's plan for a circumnavigation focusing on the South Seas. D'Urville (1790–1842) had already distinguished himself on two Pacific expeditions and was eager to rival the achievements of James Cook. Between 1837 and 1840, the ships Astrolabe and Zélée explored the waters of the Antarctic area and Oceania in extremely harsh conditions: almost forty crew members died or deserted. However, d'Urville discovered a new portion of the Antarctic coast, shed light on the ethnography of several Pacific islands and brought back multitudes of botanical specimens. His impressive contributions to the fields of geography, natural history and ethnography were gathered in this ten-volume work, published between 1841 and 1846. In Volume 10, published in 1846, which includes extracts from his correspondence, as well as a biography, d'Urville shares his immense relief as he returns to France. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: -
Colors used: -
General color appearance: -
Paper size: - 21in x 13 1/2in (535mm x 345mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$475.00 USD
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1575 Braun & Hogenberg Map of Pozzuoli Bay Naples Italy

1575 Braun & Hogenberg Map of Pozzuoli Bay Naples Italy

Description:
This finely engraved beautifully hand coloured original antique 2 x birds-eye view of the Bay of Pozzuoli -in the Gulf of Naples - with The city of Pozzuoli & the Port Of Baia visible was published by Georg Braun & Frans Hogenberg for the 1575 atlas of town plans Civiates Orbis Terrarum Vol II intended as a companion to Abraham Ortelius's master Atlas Theatrum Orbis Terrarum published in 1570.

The Gulf of Naples is a 10-mile wide gulf located in the south western coast of Italy, (province of Naples, Campania region). It opens to the west into the Mediterranean Sea & is bordered on the north by the cities of Naples and Pozzuoli. To the east is Mount Vesuvius, and on the south by the Sorrentine Peninsula and its main town Sorrento; the Peninsula separates it from the Gulf of Salerno.

Pozzuoli began as the Greek colony of Dicaearchia. The Roman colony was established in 194 BC, and took the Latin name Puteoli 'little wells', referring to the many hot springs in the area, most notably Solfatara. This is because Pozzuoli lies in the center of the Campi Flegrei, a caldera.
Puteoli was the great emporium for the Alexandrian grain ships, and other ships from all over the Roman world. It also was the main hub for goods exported from Campania, including blown glass, mosaics, wrought iron, and marble. The Roman naval base at nearby Misenum housed the largest naval fleet in the ancient world. It was also the site of the Roman Dictator Sulla's country villa and the place where he died in 78 BC.
The local volcanic sand, pozzolana formed the basis for the first effective concrete, as it reacted chemically with water. Instead of just evaporating slowly off, the water would turn this sand/lime mix into a mortar strong enough to bind lumps of aggregate into a load-bearing unit. This made possible the cupola of the Pantheon, the first real dome.

Background of Civitates Orbis Terrarum

The first volume of the Civitates Orbis Terrarum was published in Cologne in 1572. The sixth and the final volume appeared in 1617. 
This great city atlas, edited by Georg Braun and largely engraved by Franz Hogenberg, eventually contained 546 prospects, bird-eye views and map views of cities from all over the world. Braun (1541-1622), a cleric of Cologne, was the principal editor of the work, and was greatly assisted in his project by the close, and continued interest of Abraham Ortelius, whose Theatrum Orbis Terrarum of 1570 was, as a systematic and comprehensive collection of maps of uniform style, the first true atlas.

For a variety of reasons town plans were comparatively latecomers in the long history of cartography. Few cities in Europe in the middle ages had more than 20,00 inhabitants and even London in the late Elizabethan period had only 100-150,000 people which in itself was probably 10 times that of any other English city. The Nuremberg Chronicle in 1493 included one of the first town views of Jerusalem, thereafter, for most of the sixteenth century, German cartographers led the way in producing town plans in a modern sense. In 1544 Sebastian Munster issued in Basle his Cosmographia containing roughly sixty-six plans and views, some in the plan form, but many in the old panorama or birds eye view. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

Condition Report:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Green, blue, red, yellow
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 21in x 16in (535mm x 410mm)
Plate size: - 19in x 12in (485mm x 310mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Professional repair to top centre margin
Plate area: - Small professional repairs & light age toning to centrefold
Verso: - None

$475.00 USD
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1575 Braun & Hogenberg Antique Map City Plan of Tournai or Doornik, Belgium

1575 Braun & Hogenberg Antique Map City Plan of Tournai or Doornik, Belgium

Description:
This fine beautifully hand coloured original antique map a birds-eye view of the town ofTournai or Doornik, a Walloon city located 85 kilometres west-southwest of Brussels, on the river Scheldt, in the province of Hainaut in Belgium was published by Georg Braun & Frans Hogenberg for the 1575 atlas of town plans Civiates Orbis Terrarum Vol II (1572-1612) intended as a companion to Abraham Ortelius's master Atlas Theatrum Orbis Terrarum published in 1570.

Background: 
Bird's-eye view of the city from the south seen fortified with a Renaissance-style moat and wall with projecting bastions. The Old Town wall, dating from 1290, can be seen inside the city. The 12th-century Gothic cathedral of Notre-Dame (5) stands out in the centre , the most important and influential church building in Belgium. 
Tournai is one of Belgium's oldest cities. A formidable stronghold as early as the 4th century AD, it was the main centre of the Salian Franks until the mid-5th century. Tournai became an Episcopal See at the beginning of the 6th century and belonged then to the Count of Flanders from 1188 to France. 
In the 15th century the city flourished economically and culturally as a result of its tapestry industry (Rogier van der Weyden, among others). In the Treaties of Madrid and Cambrai (1526/29), France had to cede Tournai to Charles V and it thus became part of the Spanish Netherlands.  

Verso Text: "Tornacum or Turnacum is a city in Gallia Belgica, situated on the Schelde in the territory of the Nervii, called Tournai by its French inhabitants, but Dorneck by the Germans. Tournai has always been a large and powerful city, with an abundance of goods and commercial activities and wonderfully resourceful craftsmen, who invent new articles every day, and although some of these go out of use they constantly conceive of other new things, both useful and delightful, so that they have at all times something that provides work and a means of livelihood for the poor." 

Civitates Orbis Terrarum

The first volume of the Civitates Orbis Terrarum was published in Cologne in 1572. The sixth and the final volume appeared in 1617. 
This great city atlas, edited by Georg Braun and largely engraved by Franz Hogenberg, eventually contained 546 prospects, bird-eye views and map views of cities from all over the world. Braun (1541-1622), a cleric of Cologne, was the principal editor of the work, and was greatly assisted in his project by the close, and continued interest of Abraham Ortelius, whose Theatrum Orbis Terrarum of 1570 was, as a systematic and comprehensive collection of maps of uniform style, the first true atlas.

For a variety of reasons town plans were comparatively latecomers in the long history of cartography. Few cities in Europe in the middle ages had more than 20,00 inhabitants and even London in the late Elizabethan period had only 100-150,000 people which in itself was probably 10 times that of any other English city. The Nuremberg Chronicle in 1493 included one of the first town views of Jerusalem, thereafter, for most of the sixteenth century, German cartographers led the way in producing town plans in a modern sense. In 1544 Sebastian Munster issued in Basle his Cosmographia containing roughly sixty-six plans and views, some in the plan form, but many in the old panorama or birds eye view. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

Condition Report:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Green, blue, red, yellow
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 21 1/2in x 16in (550mm x 400mm)
Plate size: - 16 3/4in x 14 1/4in (440mm x 365mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light chipping to margin edges
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$475.00 USD
More Info
1574 Munster Large Antique Print View of The City of Wormbs, Germany

1574 Munster Large Antique Print View of The City of Wormbs, Germany

Description:
This large folding original antique print a View of the important German city ofWormbs, south of Hamburg was published in the 1574 release of Sebastian MunstersCosmographia published by Sebastian Petri, Basle.
(This is a reasonably scarce map as the large fold out maps in Cosmographia were easily damaged and lost)

Background: For a variety of reasons town plans were comparatively latecomers in the long history of cartography. Few cities in Europe in the middle ages had more than 20,00 inhabitants and even London in the late Elizabethan period had only 100-150,000 people which in itself was probably 10 times that of any other English city. The Nuremberg Chronicle in 1493 included one of the first town views of Jerusalem, thereafter, for most of the sixteenth century, German cartographers led the way in producing town plans in a modern sense. In 1544 Sebastian Munster issued in Basle his Cosmographia containing roughly sixty-six plans and views, some in the plan form, but many in the old panorama or birds eye view. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Later
Colors used: - Green, blue, yellow, pink
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 27in x 13in (685mm x 330mm)
Plate size: - 25in x 10in (635 x 255m)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling
Plate area: -Folds re-joined small loss, light soiling, light creasing
Verso: - Light soiling, colour show through, half the map backed in archival material

$475.00 USD
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1575 Braun & Hogenberg Large Antique Map of the City of Arras, France

1575 Braun & Hogenberg Large Antique Map of the City of Arras, France

Description:
This fine beautifully hand coloured original antique map a birds-eye view of the French City of Arras - the capital of the Pas de Calais region - was published by Georg Braun & Frans Hogenberg for the 1575 atlas of town plans Civiates Orbis Terrarum Vol II (1572-1612) intended as a companion to Abraham Ortelius's master Atlas Theatrum Orbis Terrarum published in 1570.

Background of Civitates Orbis Terrarum
The first volume of the Civitates Orbis Terrarum was published in Cologne in 1572. The sixth and the final volume appeared in 1617. 
This great city atlas, edited by Georg Braun and largely engraved by Franz Hogenberg, eventually contained 546 prospects, bird-eye views and map views of cities from all over the world. Braun (1541-1622), a cleric of Cologne, was the principal editor of the work, and was greatly assisted in his project by the close, and continued interest of Abraham Ortelius, whose Theatrum Orbis Terrarum of 1570 was, as a systematic and comprehensive collection of maps of uniform style, the first true atlas.

For a variety of reasons town plans were comparatively latecomers in the long history of cartography. Few cities in Europe in the middle ages had more than 20,00 inhabitants and even London in the late Elizabethan period had only 100-150,000 people which in itself was probably 10 times that of any other English city. The Nuremberg Chronicle in 1493 included one of the first town views of Jerusalem, thereafter, for most of the sixteenth century, German cartographers led the way in producing town plans in a modern sense. In 1544 Sebastian Munster issued in Basle his Cosmographia containing roughly sixty-six plans and views, some in the plan form, but many in the old panorama or birds eye view. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

Condition Report:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Green, blue, red, yellow
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 21in x 16in (535mm x 410mm)
Plate size: - 19in x 14in (485mm x 355mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$425.00 USD
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1575 Braun & Hogenberg Antique Print Sneek Dokkum Ylst Frisia Sloten Netherlands

1575 Braun & Hogenberg Antique Print Sneek Dokkum Ylst Frisia Sloten Netherlands

  • TitleSneecha, vulgo Sneeck Frisiae Occidentalis Oppidum. - Doccum - Sloten - Ylsta
  • Ref #:  30261
  • Size: 21in x 16in (535mm x 410mm)
  • Date : 1575
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This fine beautifully hand coloured original antique map a birds-eye view of the towns of Sneek, Dokkum, Ylst and Sloten in Frisia, the Netherlands was published by Georg Braun & Frans Hogenberg for the 1575 atlas of town plans Civiates Orbis Terrarum Vol II (1572-1612) intended as a companion to Abraham Ortelius's master Atlas Theatrum Orbis Terrarum published in 1570.

Background of Civitates Orbis Terrarum
The first volume of the Civitates Orbis Terrarum was published in Cologne in 1572. The sixth and the final volume appeared in 1617. 
This great city atlas, edited by Georg Braun and largely engraved by Franz Hogenberg, eventually contained 546 prospects, bird-eye views and map views of cities from all over the world. Braun (1541-1622), a cleric of Cologne, was the principal editor of the work, and was greatly assisted in his project by the close, and continued interest of Abraham Ortelius, whose Theatrum Orbis Terrarum of 1570 was, as a systematic and comprehensive collection of maps of uniform style, the first true atlas.

For a variety of reasons town plans were comparatively latecomers in the long history of cartography. Few cities in Europe in the middle ages had more than 20,00 inhabitants and even London in the late Elizabethan period had only 100-150,000 people which in itself was probably 10 times that of any other English city. The Nuremberg Chronicle in 1493 included one of the first town views of Jerusalem, thereafter, for most of the sixteenth century, German cartographers led the way in producing town plans in a modern sense. In 1544 Sebastian Munster issued in Basle his Cosmographia containing roughly sixty-six plans and views, some in the plan form, but many in the old panorama or birds eye view. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

Condition Report:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Green, blue, red, yellow
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 21in x 16in (535mm x 410mm)
Plate size: - 16 1/2in x 14in (420mm x 355mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling in margins
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$425.00 USD
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1575 Braun & Hogenberg Large Antique Print a View of Mechelen, Belgium

1575 Braun & Hogenberg Large Antique Print a View of Mechelen, Belgium

  • TitleMechelen - Nitidissimae Civitatis Mechlineensis in meditullio Brabantiae sitae, exactis: delineatio
  • Ref #:  16247
  • Size: 21in x 16in (535mm x 410mm)
  • Date : 1575
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This fine beautifully hand coloured original antique map a birds-eye view of the city of Mechelen in the Antwerp province of Flanders, Belgium was published by Georg Braun & Frans Hogenberg for the 1575 atlas of town plans Civiates Orbis Terrarum Vol II (1572-1612) intended as a companion to Abraham Ortelius's master Atlas Theatrum Orbis Terrarum published in 1570.

Franz Hogenberg's birthplace is illustrated twice. In the view presented in Volume I the cityscape is dominated by the massive tower belonging to the cathedral of Sint-Rombout, which measures almost 100 m in height. Behind the cathedral to the right lies the Onze-Lieve-Vrouwe church built in the Brabantine late Gothic style. In the present plate Mechelen is seen in a bird's-eye view from the northwest. Clearly apparent is the almost circular shape of the inner city, which has already spread beyond the bounds of the canal ringing the old city wall. In the Middle Ages staple rights and the cloth trade brought Mechelen great prosperity. In 1336 the city passed to the Duchy of Brabant, later to Burgundy, and developed into a highly regarded centre of commerce. The collapse of the cloth industry prompted the development of new areas of manufacturing, such as cannon and bell founding. In 1477 Mechelen passed to the Habsburgs and from 1507 to 1530, under the regency of Margaret of Austria, was capital of the Habsburg Netherlands. In 1559 Mechelen became an archbishopric and over the course of the Wars of Religion grew into a centre of the Counter-Reformation. For some time it was also the seat of the highest tribunal of the Habsburg Netherlands. (Taschen)

Background of Civitates Orbis Terrarum
The first volume of the Civitates Orbis Terrarum was published in Cologne in 1572. The sixth and the final volume appeared in 1617. 
This great city atlas, edited by Georg Braun and largely engraved by Franz Hogenberg, eventually contained 546 prospects, bird-eye views and map views of cities from all over the world. Braun (1541-1622), a cleric of Cologne, was the principal editor of the work, and was greatly assisted in his project by the close, and continued interest of Abraham Ortelius, whose Theatrum Orbis Terrarum of 1570 was, as a systematic and comprehensive collection of maps of uniform style, the first true atlas.

For a variety of reasons town plans were comparatively latecomers in the long history of cartography. Few cities in Europe in the middle ages had more than 20,00 inhabitants and even London in the late Elizabethan period had only 100-150,000 people which in itself was probably 10 times that of any other English city. The Nuremberg Chronicle in 1493 included one of the first town views of Jerusalem, thereafter, for most of the sixteenth century, German cartographers led the way in producing town plans in a modern sense. In 1544 Sebastian Munster issued in Basle his Cosmographia containing roughly sixty-six plans and views, some in the plan form, but many in the old panorama or birds eye view. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

Condition Report:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Green, blue, red, yellow
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 21in x 16in (535mm x 410mm)
Plate size: - 18 1/2in x 13 1/2in (470mm x 345mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling in margins
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$425.00 USD
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1820 J W Lewin Antique Print Early View of Sydney Cove

1820 J W Lewin Antique Print Early View of Sydney Cove

Description:
This wonderful hand coloured original antique print an early view Sydney Cove, - attributed to a drawing, now lost, by the artist John William Lewin in ca 1820 - was published in the 1826 of Nouvelles Annales Des Voyages, De La Geographie et de L Histoire, ou Recueil, volume II.

Background: 
This is an early panorama of Sydney Cove only 32 years after the first European settlement of Sydney Cove. In the foreground is an octagonal two-storey, yellow, sandstone house, built by Governor Macquarie in 1812 for his favourite boatman and former water bailiff, Billy Blue. The drawing of this little house – now the site of the Sydney Opera House — is out of all proportion to its actual modest size. Billy or William Blue (1767–1834) was an African-Jamaican who had been given a seven-year sentence in London for stealing raw sugar. To the left of the house is a sandy beach where the Circular Quay ferry wharves now stand. Facing the beach is First Government House where the Museum of Sydney is now situated.

On the western shore is the Rocks district, with two windmills on the ridge. Known as Tallawoladah by the Cadigal people, the Rocks became the convicts' side of the town. They built traditional vernacular houses, first of wattle and daub, with thatched roofs, later of weatherboards or rubble stone, roofed with timber shingles. They took in lodgers – the newly arrived convicts – who slept in kitchens and skillions. Some emancipists also had convict servants. After November 1790, large numbers of Aboriginal people also came into the town to visit and to live. By 1823, about 1,200 people lived in The Rocks, most of them emancipists and convicts and their children.

To the left of The Rocks area is a long, low, military barracks, built between 1792 and 1818 around Barracks Square/the Parade Ground – which is now Wynyard Park. It was from here that, in 1808, the New South Wales Corps marched to arrest Governor Macquarie's predecessor Governor William Bligh (1754–1817), an event later known as the Rum Rebellion. Heading east is St. Philip's Church  – the earliest Christian church (Church of England) in Australia – erected in stone in 1810 on Church Hill – now Lang Park.[34] In 1798, the original wattle and daub church – on what is now the corner of Bligh and Hunter Streets – was burnt down, allegedly by disgruntled convicts in response to a decree by the second NSW Governor (1795–1800), John Hunter, that all colony residents, including officers and convicts, attend Sunday services. The jail had earlier suffered a similar fate.

Further along the ridge to the east is Fort Phillip, flying the Union Jack, on Windmill (later Observatory) Hill where the Sydney Observatory is now located. Fort Phillip was commissioned in 1804 by the third NSW Governor (1800–1806), Philip Gidley King, partly as a response to external threats and partly due to the internal unrest reflected in Australia's only major convict rebellion at Castle Hill in March 1804. This was dubbed the Battle of Vinegar Hill as most of the convict rebels were Irish. Windmill Hill was chosen as a fort location as it was the highest point above the colony, affording commanding views of the Harbour approaches from east and west, theriver and road to Parramatta, surrounding country and of the entire town below.

On the waterfront below Fort Phillip is the yellow, four-storey, Commissariat Stores, constructed by convicts for Governor Macquarie in 1810 and 1812. One of the largest buildings constructed in the colony at the time, it is now the site of the Museum of Contemporary Art. The foreshore buildings on the extreme right are the warehouse and 'Wharf House' residence of merchant, Robert Campbell (1769–1846) who was to become one of the colony's biggest landholders. This is now the site of the Sydney Harbour Bridge pylons and is just to the left of Dawes Point. Three British Sailing ships, flying either the red ensign of the Merchant Navy or (more likely) the white ensign of the Royal Navy, are anchored in the Cove along with four sailboats and five canoes.
The Sydney Cove panorama on the Museum punchbowl can be dated between 1812 and 1818. The vantage point is from beneath Dawes Point, shown with its flagstaff and before the Dawes Point fortifications built 1818 to 1821. Looking directly into Campbell's Cove, the immediate focal points are Robert Campbell's warehouse and the 'Wharf House' roof of his residence. To the right of Campbell's Wharf are extensive stone walls marking boundaries between properties in this part of the Rocks district. 

First Government House can be seen at the head of Sydney Cove in the distance and around the eastern shore a small rendition of Billy Blue's 1812 house. The Governor and civil personnel lived on the more orderly eastern slopes of the Tank Stream, compared to the disorderly western side where convicts lived. The Tank Stream was the fresh water course emptying into Sydney Cove and supplied the fledgling colony until 1826. Further along is Bennelong Point – with no sign of Fort Macquarie [built from December 1817 – and Garden Island – the colony's first food source. The distant vista of the eastern side of the Harbour goes almost as far as the Macquarie Lighthouse – Australia's first lighthouse – built between 1816–18 on South Head. There are seven Sailing ships flying the white ensign of the British Royal Navy in the Harbour, along with three sailboats and two canoes.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - Off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Green, orange, yellow 
General color appearance: -  Authentic
Paper size: - 7 3/4in x 4 1/2in (195mm x 115mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$425.00 USD
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1780 Vue d' Optic Antique Print of Westminster, River Thames, Tower of London

1780 Vue d' Optic Antique Print of Westminster, River Thames, Tower of London

  • Title : Vue Du Pont De Westminster Du Cote Du Nord
  • Date : 1780
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  92718
  • Size: 21in x 14 1/2in (535mm x 370mm) 

Description: 

This large beautifully engraved hand coloured original antique print, a view of Westminster in London -including London Bridge, Tower Hill, Westminster Abbey and the old Parliament buildings - was engraved by Balthazar Frederic Leizelt and was published in 1780 in the unusual publication Vues d’Optique.

Vues d' Optique or Perspective Views: Perspective views, or "vues d'optique," are a special type of popular print published in Europe during the 18th century. These prints provided a form of entertainment when viewed through a device called an "optical machine" or an "optique." The most characteristic feature of the perspective views is their emphasized linear perspective, done to further intensify the enhanced appearance of depth and illusionistic space in the prints when viewed through an optique. When displayed in the optique, the prints might transport the viewer into a far away place---an unknown city, or perhaps into the midst of a dramatic bit of contemporary history. Another attribute of these prints is their bright, often heavy hand coloring, applied boldly so as to show the tints when viewed through the lens.

A number of perspective prints depicted American scenes at the time of the Revolution for a European audience hungry for news of the events in the British colonies. As documents of American history and European printmaking, these are unusual and appealing eighteenth-century prints.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Blue, yellow, green, red
General color appearance: - Authentic & bright
Paper size: - 21in x 14 1/2in (535mm x 370mm)
Plate size: - 15 1/2in x 10in (395mm x 255mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - Light soiling

$325.00 USD
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1780 Vue D Optic Antique Print Royal Household Cavalry Procession in London

1780 Vue D Optic Antique Print Royal Household Cavalry Procession in London

  • Title :Vue de l Hotel Royal des Gardes du corps a pied vis a vis la Salle Blanche a manger a Londres
  • Date : 1780
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  92706
  • Size: 19in x 12 1/2in (485mm x 330mm) 

Description: 
This large beautifully hand coloured original antique print, a view of the Royal Household Cavalry Procession from the Royal Hotel in London was engraved by Balthazar Frederic Leizelt and was published in 1780 publication Vues d’Optique.

Vues d' Optique or Perspective Views: Perspective views, or "vues d'optique," are a special type of popular print published in Europe during the 18th century. These prints provided a form of entertainment when viewed through a device called an "optical machine" or an "optique." The most characteristic feature of the perspective views is their emphasized linear perspective, done to further intensify the enhanced appearance of depth and illusionistic space in the prints when viewed through an optique. When displayed in the optique, the prints might transport the viewer into a far away place---an unknown city, or perhaps into the midst of a dramatic bit of contemporary history. Another attribute of these prints is their bright, often heavy hand coloring, applied boldly so as to show the tints when viewed through the lens.

A number of perspective prints depicted American scenes at the time of the Revolution for a European audience hungry for news of the events in the British colonies. As documents of American history and European printmaking, these are unusual and appealing eighteenth-century prints.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - Off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Blue, yellow, green, red
General color appearance: - Authentic & bright
Paper size: - 19in x 12 1/2in (485mm x 330mm)
Plate size: - 17in x 12in (435mm x 305mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Small repair to right margin
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1780 Vue D Optic Antique Print of Queens College Oxford University, England

1780 Vue D Optic Antique Print of Queens College Oxford University, England

  • Title : Le College de L Universite et celui de la Reine a Oxford (The University College and the Queen's at Oxford) 
  • Date : 1780
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  92705
  • Size: 19 1/2in x 13in (485mm x 330mm)  

Description: 
This large beautifully hand coloured original antique print, a view of the famous Queens College located in Oxford University was engraved by Balthazar Frederic Leizelt and was published in 1780 in the unusual publication Vues d’Optique..

Vues d' Optique or Perspective Views: Perspective views, or "vues d'optique," are a special type of popular print published in Europe during the 18th century. These prints provided a form of entertainment when viewed through a device called an "optical machine" or an "optique." The most characteristic feature of the perspective views is their emphasized linear perspective, done to further intensify the enhanced appearance of depth and illusionistic space in the prints when viewed through an optique. When displayed in the optique, the prints might transport the viewer into a far away place---an unknown city, or perhaps into the midst of a dramatic bit of contemporary history. Another attribute of these prints is their bright, often heavy hand coloring, applied boldly so as to show the tints when viewed through the lens.

A number of perspective prints depicted American scenes at the time of the Revolution for a European audience hungry for news of the events in the British colonies. As documents of American history and European printmaking, these are unusual and appealing eighteenth-century prints.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - Off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Blue, yellow, green, red
General color appearance: - Authentic & bright
Paper size: - 19 1/2in x 13in (485mm x 330mm)
Plate size: - 17in x 12in (435mm x 305mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Small repair to right margin
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1819 Gainsborough & Wells Antique Print of an English Country Farming Scene

1819 Gainsborough & Wells Antique Print of an English Country Farming Scene

  • Title : From the Original in the Collection of the Rt. Hon. ble Baroness Lucas...T Gainsborough del. W.F. Wells sculpt.
  • Date : 1801
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  91222
  • Size: 17 1/4in x 11 1/2in (440mm x 290mm) 

Description: 
This large beautiful executed original antique soft ground etched print with hand tint colour, of a English country scene after Thomas Gainsborough, was engraved by William Frederick Wells and published in A Collection of Prints Illustrative of English Scenery From the Drawings and Sketches of Thos. Gainsborough, R.A. in the various collections of The Baroness Lucas; Viscount Palmerston; George Herbert, Esq.; Dr. Monro by John and Josiah Boydell, London in 1819.

The English painter Thomas Gainsborough (1727-1788) ranks as one of the principal masters and innovators of the English school of landscape painting. Thomas Gainsborough was baptized in Sudbury, Suffolk, on May 14, 1727. His father, a substantial cloth merchant, recognized Thomas's precocious artistic gifts and sent him at an early age, possibly 12, to London. Gainsborough was connected with the artists Francis Hayman and Hubert François Gravelot, possibly as apprentice to the former and assistant to the latter. Gainsborough is reported to have copied and restored Dutch landscapes for dealers. At the age of 19 he married Margaret Burr, reputedly a natural daughter of the Duke of Beaufort, who is said to have brought him an income of £200 a year.

At the age of 21 Gainsborough was so much admired as a landscape painter that he was invited with the leading artists of the day to present a picture to the Foundling Hospital in London. His painting, The Charterhouse, shows a mature observation of reality and handling of light. From Hayman the scene painter and Gravelot the rococo decorator Gainsborough learned to approach pictorial composition on inventive principles, and the alternation between observation and invention henceforth became the basis of his artistic growth. The two approaches may be illustrated by comparing Mr. and Mrs. Robert Andrews (ca. 1749), with a deliciously observed Suffolk landscape dappled by sunlight and shadow of cloud, and Henéage Lloyd and His Sister (ca. 1750), shown against a limpid background of stage scenery.

Gainsborough's art after his early London studies falls into three main divisions: the Suffolk period, 1748-1759; the Bath period, 1759-1774; and the years of fame in London, 1774-1788. In Suffolk he combined the charms of the modern conversation piece with those of realistic landscape, thus making a strong appeal to the country gentry. Here too he painted the Suffolk countryside as faithfully and freshly as if he were a Dutch painter reborn in the 18th century.

William Frederick Wells (1762 - 10 Nov 1836) was an English watercolour landscape painter and etcher. Wells was born in London in 1762. Wells studied art in London under John James Barralet (1747–1815). On 20 November 1804, Wells initiated the founding of the Society of Painters in Watercolours (now the Royal Watercolour Society), at a meeting held at the Stratford Coffee House, Oxford St, London. He served as President of the fledgling association from 1806 to 1807.

He travelled and painted extensively in England and Europe, particularly in Norway and Sweden. Wells' art was annually exhibited at the Royal Academy from 1795 to 1813. He held the post of Professor of Drawing at Addiscombe Military Seminary for officers of the East India Company Army over twenty years from 1813 until his retirement, immediately before his death, in November 1836.[1] Wells was an intimate friend of Joseph Mallord William Turner. Among his works as an etcher are two fine sets in soft ground; Thomas Gainsborough's English Scenery (1819) and Select Views in Cumberland (1810).

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Blue, orange, green, brown
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 17 1/4in x 11 1/2in (440mm x 290mm)
Plate size: - 12 1/2in x 9 1/2in (315mm x 245mm)
Margins: - Min 2in (50mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1809 Wilkinson Large Antique Print of London, Somerset to Whitehall, Westminster

1809 Wilkinson Large Antique Print of London, Somerset to Whitehall, Westminster

  • Title : Somerset House in its Original State With the Various Buildings on the Banks of the River Thames as far as Westminster...October 1809...Rob Wilkinson
  • Date : 1809
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  92599
  • Size: 18in x 12 1/2in (460mm x 320mm)

Description: 

This large finely engraved beautifully hand coloured original antique print of Somerset House - and the Thames as far as Westminster - as it was before the alterations by Indigo Jones was published by Robert Wilkinson 11th of October 1809, the date is engraved at the foot of the print.

Text below the title goes into some detail of the view quote ..."Buildings in the distance are Whitehall and Westminster Abbey opposite to which are Lambeth Church and Palace". (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

Condition Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Blue, green, brown, yellow
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 18in x 12 1/2in (460mm x 320mm)
Plate size: - 17in x 12in (435mm x 305mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Plate-mark re-enforced with archival tape left margin
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1724 Kip Large Antique Folio Print of Rochester Cathedral, Kent, England

1724 Kip Large Antique Folio Print of Rochester Cathedral, Kent, England

  • TitleThe North Prospect of the Cathedral Church of Rochester
  • Date : 1724
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  40405
  • Size: 26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)

Description: 
This finely engraved original large folio antique Cathedral print by Johnnes Kip (1653-1722) and engraved by James Collins was published in the 1724 by Joseph Smith monumental work Nouveau Theatre de la Grande Bretagne. This print also appeared in Britannia Illustrata by D. Mortier (brother of Pierre).
This is a finely engraved print being testimony to the beautiful and detailed work produced by Kip whose eye for detail was one of the most acknowledged of his day.

Background:
Being the second oldest cathedral foundation in England, Rochester Cathedrals history goes back to AD604 when Augustine sent Bishop Justus to establish the house founded by King Ethelbert of Kent. Following several invasions by the Danes, the church was in a state of devastation by the time Bishop Gundulf was consecrated in 1077 but immediately he began a major building operation, and introduced a community of Benedictine monks in 1080.
The church suffered misfortune again in the mid 12th century with two serious fires, resulting in a further rebuilding programme. Since that time there has been continuous remodelling, refurbishments and restorations, mainly due to other historical events when the cathedral sustained damage. As a consequence of its very chequered history, Rochester Cathedral displays the varied building styles of each period, from the functional austerity of Gundulf's original structure, through the Romanesque, Gothic and Early English architectural periods, and continuing with renovation and restoration well into the 20th century following war damage.
The sturdy, squat Norman nave contrasts dramatically with the tall, narrow Gothic arches of the crossing. A superbly carved stone archway of the Decorated period (c1345), now enhanced with a solid oak door, leads to the chapter room and is a magnificent feat of craftsmanship. Quite unusually, the Lady Chapel is sited between the nave and the south transept as monastic outbuildings occupied the traditional location at the eastern end of the church when the chapel was added in the late 15th century. Beneath the quire transept is a beautifully preserved and vaulted crypt, with two bays surviving from the original Norman construction. There are also many fragments of medieval ceiling paintings to be found in this lower level sanctuary.
Though one of the smaller Norman cathedrals, Rochester was an important centre for pilgrimage during the 13th century, and even today attracts many visitors who are keen to learn more about its fascinating history. From a photographic perspective, a wonderful view of Rochester cathedral can be seen from the top of Rochester Castle, immediately opposite. We have visited both the Rochester Cathedral and Castle on many occasions, and still manage to uncover more information, or something interesting that we had previously overlooked. Earlier this year, we ventured for the first time into the cloister garth, discovering a substantial section of the ruined Chapter House. On the south side, the entrance arch to the monk's refectory survives and, looking behind it, the 13th century lavatorium and towel recess is still visible.

Johannes Kip was a draughtsman and engraver, who worked first in his native Amsterdam before moving to London at the end of the seventeenth century. He did portraits, views, and book illustrations. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - 
Colours used: - 
General colour appearance: - 
Paper size: - 
26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 18in (585mm x 460mm)
Margins: - min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: -  None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1724 Kip Large Antique Folio Print of St Marys Church, The Strand, London

1724 Kip Large Antique Folio Print of St Marys Church, The Strand, London

  • TitleThe South West Prospect of St Mary's Church in ye Strand
  • Date : 1724
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  40400
  • Size: 26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)

Description: 
This finely engraved original large folio antique Cathedral print by Johnnes Kip (1653-1722) and engraved by James Collins was published in the 1724 by Joseph Smith monumental work Nouveau Theatre de la Grande Bretagne. This print also appeared in Britannia Illustrata by D. Mortier (brother of Pierre).
This is a finely engraved print being testimony to the beautiful and detailed work produced by Kip whose eye for detail was one of the most acknowledged of his day.

Background:
The parish of St Mary le Strand may lay a good claim to being one of the oldest parishes in London. It stands dominating a roadway which since prehistory has been the main artery to the west from the City of London. In early Saxon times the Strand area was the very heart of London, for it seems that the City was effectively abandoned by the newly-arrived settlers. The Saxons predominantly inhabited "Lundenwic", an area stretching from Fleet Street to Whitehall and from the Thames to Covent Garden from the sixth to the ninth centuries. Christianity came to this settlement with St Mellitus and his followers in 604, and, despite their brief expulsion in the 620s, became firmly established. We do not know if any of the existing churches in the area date back that far but some, such as St Clement Danes, are known to have existed in later Saxon times. 

There is no record of when St Mary le Strand was founded, but the first church, which was dedicated to the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, stood just south of the present church on a site now covered by Somerset House. Throughout the Middle Ages, the Bishops of Worcester were the Patrons of the parish and had their London residence on an adjoining site. For throughout the period from the Norman Conquest to the Reformation, the Strand was mainly the home of bishops and princes. Within the parish were the "inns" - large town houses with chapels, stables and accommodation for a large retinue - of the Bishops of Worcester, Llandaff, Coventry and Lichfield. A large part of the parish was absorbed by the building of a great house, the Palace of the Savoy, by Count Peter of Savoy, the uncle of Henry III, in the 1240s. A century later this became the home of John of Gaunt, Earl of Lancaster, and the palace became a centre of culture; among its residents was Geoffrey Chaucer, who was married in the palace chapel. Gaunt's unpopularity, as the king's chief minister, caused the palace to be burned in the Peasant's Revolt. Despite its long absence, the fame of the palace has lasted in the area and was recreated in the nineteenth century by the Savoy Hotel and Theatre. 
The site where the present church stands was occupied in medieval times by Strand Cross. The origins of this are unclear. It was not a cross erected in memory of Queen Eleanor - as was Charing Cross - but seems to have dated back at least to Norman times. Perhaps it began as a market cross; by the early fourteenth century it had been rebuilt in a lavish manner, almost certainly following the design of the Eleanor Crosses. Strand Cross was a famous site and it is recorded that in the thirteenth century the local magistrates held their assizes in front of it.
Until the sixteenth century, the Strand was no more than a line of Bishops' palaces on the south side of the roadway stretching all the way to Whitehall. On the north side stood a wall which bounded the Convent - later Covent - Garden, while the churches further away, St Martin's and St Giles, stood "in-the-fields". All this was to change with the Reformation. The bishops' inns around the church were seized by Edward Lord Protector who set about building himself a renaissance palace in what was then the most fashionable part of town. Even with the extensive site that he had now obtained, further space was needed and towards the end of 1548 the Lord Protector's workmen fell upon St Mary's church and demolished it to provide stone for the new palace. Further stone was provided by the demolition of a cloister at St Paul's Cathedral known as Pardon Churchyard and the greater part of the Priory of St John at Clerkenwell. Even by the standards of the time, the demolition of so much sacred property was an outrage. Somerset was never to enjoy living in his new palace; just as it was nearing completion he was overthrown by his political enemies and executed at Tower Hill in 1551.
It is said that Somerset had intended to build a new parish church. If so, all thought of it passed away with his fall. Initially, the parishioners scattered but within a short time we find them gathered in the chapel of St John the Baptist in the Savoy. Here they would remain for the next 175 years. Now known at "St Mary le Savoy", the parishioners chose and paid for their own ministers. The most famous of these was Thomas Fuller, the church historian, who was appointed in 1642, fled during the Civil War and was restored to his living in 1660. 
Following the execution of Somerset, his palace had passed to the possession of the Crown. Elizabeth I occasionally lodged there and it was from Somerset House that she set off to give thanks after the defeat of the Armada. Under the Stuarts, extensive improvements were made to the palace, the most impressive being the lavish Roman Catholic chapel built by Charles I's queen, Henrietta Maria.
The roadway in front of Somerset House, where Strand Cross had stood and where the present church was later to stand, was occupied in the early seventeenth century by a windmill used to pump water. In 1634 the first Hackney Carriage stand in England was established here by one Captain Bailey. Here also a maypole was erected which became the most famous maypole in London. Demolished by the Puritans, a new maypole was erected in 1661. Parts of this maypole remained until 1717, when they were removed and presented to Sir Isaac Newton as the base for a telescope.
In 1711, an Act of Parliament was passed for building 50 New Churches in the fast expanding suburbs of London. These were the so-called "Queen Ann Churches"; among them are Hawksmoor's Chris
t Church Spitalfields, St Anne's Limehouse, and St George's-in-the-East, Archer's St Paul's Depftord and James' St George's, Hanover Square. St Mary le Strand was quick to apply for a church to replace their demolished one and, as the site on the Strand was so prominent, the Commissioners for building the New Churches decided to make the Strand church the most lavish of the churches. Initially, it was intended that there should not be a spire but that a column celebrating the building of the New Churches should stand directly in front of the church.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - 
Colours used: - 
General colour appearance: - 
Paper size: - 
26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 18in (585mm x 460mm)
Margins: - min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: -  None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1725 Kip Large Antique Print of the Holy Trinity Cathedral, Chichester, England

1725 Kip Large Antique Print of the Holy Trinity Cathedral, Chichester, England

  • TitleThe Cathedral Church of the Holy Trinity in Chichester
  • Date : 1724
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  40411
  • Size: 26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)

Description: 
This finely engraved original large folio antique Cathedral print by Johnnes Kip (1653-1722) and engraved by James Collins was published in the 1724 by Joseph Smith monumental work Nouveau Theatre de la Grande Bretagne. This print also appeared in Britannia Illustrata by D. Mortier (brother of Pierre).
This is a finely engraved print being testimony to the beautiful and detailed work produced by Kip whose eye for detail was one of the most acknowledged of his day.

Background:
The cathedral of the Holy Trinity at Chichester was founded in 1075, after the seat of the bishop was transferred to the town from nearby Selsey. It was consecrated in 1108, but a subsequent fire created a need for substantial rebuilding, which was not completed until 1184. The cathedral was reconsecrated in 1199. This was not the last stage in its development, by a long way. Richard de la Wyche, (Saint Richard of Chichester in the Anglican Communion), who was bishop from 1245 to 1253, was buried in the cathedral, where his shrine was a place of pilgrimage, until it was ordered destroyed in 1538, during the first stages of the English Reformation. Further damage to the cathedral had been done by fire after the second consecration, and much rebuilding was carried out in the Early English style. The original wooden ceiling had burnt out, and the sublimely simple present vaulting replaced it. The spire, which was originally built in the 14th century, was of poor-quality local stone, and collapsed suddenly in 1861, miraculously without loss of life. It was immediately rebuilt, by Sir Gilbert Scott, a noted scholarly architect.

The cathedral has many other unique features. Under the floor of the nave are the remains of a Roman mosaic pavement, which can be viewed through a glass window. Also in the interior are the grave of the composer Gustav Holst and the Gothic "Arundel tomb" referred to in a famous poem by Philip Larkin.
Despite its age, the cathedral contains several modern works of art, including tapestries by John Piper and Ursula Benker-Schirmer, a window by Marc Chagall, and a sculpture by Graham Sutherland.  

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - 
Colours used: - 
General colour appearance: - 
Paper size: - 
26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 18in (585mm x 460mm)
Margins: - min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: -  None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
More Info
1720 Kip Large Folio Antique Print of Bath Cathedral, Somerset, England

1720 Kip Large Folio Antique Print of Bath Cathedral, Somerset, England

Description: 
This finely engraved original large folio antique Cathedral print by Johnnes Kip (1653-1722) and engraved by James Collins was published in the 1724 by Joseph Smith monumental work Nouveau Theatre de la Grande Bretagne. This print also appeared in Britannia Illustrata by D. Mortier (brother of Pierre).
This is a finely engraved print being testimony to the beautiful and detailed work produced by Kip whose eye for detail was one of the most acknowledged of his day.

Background:
Bath Abbey stands at the heart of the city of Bath; during the past twelve and a half centuries, three different churches have occupied this site:
An Anglo-Saxon Abbey Church dating from 757, pulled down by the Norman conquerors of England soon after 1066.
A massive Norman cathedral begun about 1090. It was larger than the monastery could afford to maintain and by the end of the 15th century was in ruins.
The present Abbey church founded in 1499, ruined after the dissolution of the monasteries in 1539 by order of Henry VIII.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - 
Colours used: - 
General colour appearance: - 
Paper size: - 
26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 18in (585mm x 460mm)
Margins: - min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: -  None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
More Info
1724 Kip Large Antique Print of Chester Cathedral Church, Cheshire, England

1724 Kip Large Antique Print of Chester Cathedral Church, Cheshire, England

Description: 
This finely engraved original large folio antique Cathedral print by Johnnes Kip (1653-1722) and engraved by James Collins was published in the 1724 by Joseph Smith monumental work Nouveau Theatre de la Grande Bretagne. This print also appeared in Britannia Illustrata by D. Mortier (brother of Pierre).
This is a finely engraved print being testimony to the beautiful and detailed work produced by Kip whose eye for detail was one of the most acknowledged of his day.

Background:
Standing on the site of a 10th century Saxon church, the present cathedral at Chester dates from the mid 13th century. Dedicated to St Werburgh, this Christian church was transformed into a Benedictine Abbey in 1092, colonised by a small group of monks from Normandy. Building of the new abbey church began immediately and took the best part of 150 years to complete but little evidence of the first church remains. The traditional sturdy Norman architecture was eventually replaced over the next two centuries by a more elegant Gothic style. Henry VIII dissolved the monastery in 1540 just as the monks of St Werburgh's Abbey were beginning to enjoy their new surroundings. A year later the abbey was given back as a cathedral, the last abbot of St Werburgh's becoming the first Dean of Chester Cathedral. 

Over the next two hundred years the cathedral slipped into a bad state of disrepair but was eventually saved from total collapse by the efforts of Sir George Gilbert Scott. His 19th century restoration of Chester Cathedral, both externally and internally, not only put in place essential repairs but also enhanced the appearance of the great church immensely. Most of the stained glass comes from this period and highlights the abbey's dedication to St Werburgh, as well as the long history of the cathedral. On the northern aisle of the nave, at the side of one of the large windows, sits the 'Chester Imp'. A charming little figure in chains, carved by one of the medieval monks, to protect the church from evil spirits.
Most medieval cathedrals have beautifully carved stalls in the quire but the quality of oak carving at Chester Cathedral is quite exceptional. Each stall is topped with an elaborately carved canopy set above a row of small corbels, and below each seat a magnificently carved misericord. This area of the church is so richly carved with such a diverse array of religious artefacts, animals, birds and grotesque figures that it is quite overwhelming.
Apart from the main church many of the monastic buildings from the ancient Benedictine Abbey have been remarkably preserved. The original cloisters, although largely rebuilt during the first half of the 16th century and subsequently restored at the beginning of the 20th century, are a constant reminder of the important part they played in monastic life. All the bays of the undercroft, containing some wonderful vaulting, have been utilised to provide an exhibition centre, gift shop and workshop. The monks' dining room or refectory is still used regularly, as is the superb Chapter House. .

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - 
Colours used: - 
General colour appearance: - 
Paper size: - 
26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 18in (585mm x 460mm)
Margins: - min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: -  None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
More Info
1724 Kip Large Antique Folio Print of St Marys Church The Strand London England

1724 Kip Large Antique Folio Print of St Marys Church The Strand London England

  • TitleAdmodum Reverendis Amplissimis...Templi St Maria in Vico dicto The Strand
  • Date : 1724
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  40399
  • Size: 26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)

Description: 
This finely engraved original large folio antique Cathedral print by Johnnes Kip (1653-1722) and engraved by James Collins was published in the 1724 by Joseph Smith monumental work Nouveau Theatre de la Grande Bretagne. This print also appeared in Britannia Illustrata by D. Mortier (brother of Pierre).
This is a finely engraved print being testimony to the beautiful and detailed work produced by Kip whose eye for detail was one of the most acknowledged of his day.

Background:
The parish of St Mary le Strand may lay a good claim to being one of the oldest parishes in London. It stands dominating a roadway which since prehistory has been the main artery to the west from the City of London. In early Saxon times the Strand area was the very heart of London, for it seems that the City was effectively abandoned by the newly-arrived settlers. The Saxons predominantly inhabited "Lundenwic", an area stretching from Fleet Street to Whitehall and from the Thames to Covent Garden from the sixth to the ninth centuries. Christianity came to this settlement with St Mellitus and his followers in 604, and, despite their brief expulsion in the 620s, became firmly established. We do not know if any of the existing churches in the area date back that far but some, such as St Clement Danes, are known to have existed in later Saxon times. 

There is no record of when St Mary le Strand was founded, but the first church, which was dedicated to the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, stood just south of the present church on a site now covered by Somerset House. Throughout the Middle Ages, the Bishops of Worcester were the Patrons of the parish and had their London residence on an adjoining site. For throughout the period from the Norman Conquest to the Reformation, the Strand was mainly the home of bishops and princes. Within the parish were the "inns" - large town houses with chapels, stables and accommodation for a large retinue - of the Bishops of Worcester, Llandaff, Coventry and Lichfield. A large part of the parish was absorbed by the building of a great house, the Palace of the Savoy, by Count Peter of Savoy, the uncle of Henry III, in the 1240s. A century later this became the home of John of Gaunt, Earl of Lancaster, and the palace became a centre of culture; among its residents was Geoffrey Chaucer, who was married in the palace chapel. Gaunt's unpopularity, as the king's chief minister, caused the palace to be burned in the Peasant's Revolt. Despite its long absence, the fame of the palace has lasted in the area and was recreated in the nineteenth century by the Savoy Hotel and Theatre. 
The site where the present church stands was occupied in medieval times by Strand Cross. The origins of this are unclear. It was not a cross erected in memory of Queen Eleanor - as was Charing Cross - but seems to have dated back at least to Norman times. Perhaps it began as a market cross; by the early fourteenth century it had been rebuilt in a lavish manner, almost certainly following the design of the Eleanor Crosses. Strand Cross was a famous site and it is recorded that in the thirteenth century the local magistrates held their assizes in front of it.
Until the sixteenth century, the Strand was no more than a line of Bishops' palaces on the south side of the roadway stretching all the way to Whitehall. On the north side stood a wall which bounded the Convent - later Covent - Garden, while the churches further away, St Martin's and St Giles, stood "in-the-fields". All this was to change with the Reformation. The bishops' inns around the church were seized by Edward Lord Protector who set about building himself a renaissance palace in what was then the most fashionable part of town. Even with the extensive site that he had now obtained, further space was needed and towards the end of 1548 the Lord Protector's workmen fell upon St Mary's church and demolished it to provide stone for the new palace. Further stone was provided by the demolition of a cloister at St Paul's Cathedral known as Pardon Churchyard and the greater part of the Priory of St John at Clerkenwell. Even by the standards of the time, the demolition of so much sacred property was an outrage. Somerset was never to enjoy living in his new palace; just as it was nearing completion he was overthrown by his political enemies and executed at Tower Hill in 1551.
It is said that Somerset had intended to build a new parish church. If so, all thought of it passed away with his fall. Initially, the parishioners scattered but within a short time we find them gathered in the chapel of St John the Baptist in the Savoy. Here they would remain for the next 175 years. Now known at "St Mary le Savoy", the parishioners chose and paid for their own ministers. The most famous of these was Thomas Fuller, the church historian, who was appointed in 1642, fled during the Civil War and was restored to his living in 1660. 
Following the execution of Somerset, his palace had passed to the possession of the Crown. Elizabeth I occasionally lodged there and it was from Somerset House that she set off to give thanks after the defeat of the Armada. Under the Stuarts, extensive improvements were made to the palace, the most impressive being the lavish Roman Catholic chapel built by Charles I's queen, Henrietta Maria.
The roadway in front of Somerset House, where Strand Cross had stood and where the present church was later to stand, was occupied in the early seventeenth century by a windmill used to pump water. In 1634 the first Hackney Carriage stand in England was established here by one Captain Bailey. Here also a maypole was erected which became the most famous maypole in London. Demolished by the Puritans, a new maypole was erected in 1661. Parts of this maypole remained until 1717, when they were removed and presented to Sir Isaac Newton as the base for a telescope.
In 1711, an Act of Parliament was passed for building 50 New Churches in the fast expanding suburbs of London. These were the so-called "Queen Ann Churches"; among them are Hawksmoor's Chris
t Church Spitalfields, St Anne's Limehouse, and St George's-in-the-East, Archer's St Paul's Depftord and James' St George's, Hanover Square. St Mary le Strand was quick to apply for a church to replace their demolished one and, as the site on the Strand was so prominent, the Commissioners for building the New Churches decided to make the Strand church the most lavish of the churches. Initially, it was intended that there should not be a spire but that a column celebrating the building of the New Churches should stand directly in front of the church.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - 
Colours used: - 
General colour appearance: - 
Paper size: - 
26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 18in (585mm x 460mm)
Margins: - min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: -  None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
More Info