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1845-63 John Gould Large Antique Print of Tree Kangaroo The Mammals of Australia

1845-63 John Gould Large Antique Print of Tree Kangaroo The Mammals of Australia

  • Title : Dendrolagus Inustus, Mull....H C Richter del et lith....C Hullmandel Imp.
  • Ref #:  93442
  • Size: 22in x 15in (560mm x 385mm)
  • Date : 1845–63
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This large rare original hand coloured lithograph antique print of The Grizzled Tree Kangaroo, by the artist HC Richter was printed by Charles Joseph Hullmandel 1789 – 1850 in the famous Naturalists John Goulds The Mammals of Australiapublished between 1845–63.

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Blue, pink, red, green, yellow
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 22in x 15in (560mm x 385mm)
Plate size: - 22in x 15in (560mm x 385mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

Background:
The Mammals of Australia is a three-volume work written and published by John Gould between 1845–63. It contains 182 illustrations by the author and its artist H. C. Richter. It was intended to be a complete survey of the novel species of mammals, such as the marsupials, discovered in the colonies of Australia.
The author, John Gould, best known for The Birds of Australia and other major works of ornithology, visited Australia in 1838. In his introduction, Gould says:.....It was not until I arrived in the country, and found myself surrounded by objects as strange as if I had been transported to another planet, that I conceived the idea of devoting a portion of my attention to the mammalian class of its extraordinary fauna......During his short stay he made observations on the natural history and employed his skills as a taxidermist to obtain specimens.
The publication of this major work by Gould followed his A Monograph of the Macropodidae or Family of Kangaroos in 1841. This work was the first comprehensive survey of Australian mammals, and gave an account of their classification and description. Gould also included the indigenous names for the species from the lists he made while in Australia. He used these names to make requests of the local peoples for his specimens, and recorded the regions where the names were used. This conserved a number of common names, such as dibbler (Parantechinus apicalis), which were later recommended by authorities.
The large lithographs reproduced the artwork of Richter, after the drawings and watercolours made in Australia by Gould and his wife, Elizabeth. (The contribution by Elizabeth Gould was uncredited). These were hand-coloured by a group of artists, led by Gabriel Bayfield, that required the completion of 26,572 plates. The illustrations produced during their visit to Australia were supplemented by the preserved specimens returned to England and detailed the characteristics of the species. These illustrations have become iconic images of the mammals of Australia. Among the best known of the illustrations from the work are the two of Thylacinus cynocephalus (Tasmanian tiger), copied since its publication and the most frequently reproduced, made more recognizable by Cascade Brewerys appropriation for its label in 1987. The government of Tasmania published a monochromatic reproduction of the same image in 1934, the author Louisa Anne Meredith also copied it for Tasmanian Friends and Foes (1881).
The Mammals of Australia was published by subscription in the format Imperial Folio; 13 parts in three volumes were issued from 1845 until 1863. To these the author added An Introduction to The Mammals of Australia (1863) in a separate work. This provided corrections and updates, a new preface, introduction, and a list of the mammals of the three volumes. The first two volumes were complete surveys of orders Marsupiata (marsupials), and, with Rodentia in the third, it formed the sum of known mammalian species of Australia. With the addition of those contained in the later Introduction the total of species described reached 166. The same work notes the exclusion of marine mammals such as whales from the volumes, but reprints a manuscript by Charles Coxen on the dugong.
Beyond the scientific value of this comprehensive survey, the document is cited in reference to its subjects conservation. Some of the species included in the work, such as Onychogalea lunata (crescent nailtail wallaby), have since succumbed to changes in land use since European colonisation.
The work was received with acclaim, but the high cost of production, especially of the coloured plates, reduced its accessibility. The original listed price was £41 for the complete set of volumes. The public curiosity for the unique fauna of Australia was met by this handsomely illustrated and comprehensive survey, and it spawned imitations in Australia. The curator of the Australian Museum, Gerard Krefft, produced the more affordable The Mammals of Australia (1871); intended for educational purposes and influenced by Goulds illustrations. Gracius Broinowskis abandoned work, Birds and Mammals of Australia (1884), so closely imitated the plates that an injunction was threatened by its publisher.

Gould, John FRS 1804 – 1881
Gould was an English ornithologist and bird artist. He published a number of monographs on birds, illustrated by plates that he produced with the assistance of his wife, Elizabeth Gould, and several other artists including Edward Lear, Henry Constantine Richter, Joseph Wolf and William Matthew Hart. He has been considered the father of bird study in Australia and the Gould League in Australia is named after him. His identification of the birds now nicknamed Darwins finches played a role in the inception of Darwins theory of evolution by natural selection. Goulds work is referenced in Charles Darwins book, On the Origin of Species.
Gould was born in Lyme Regis the first son of a gardener. He and the boy probably had a scanty education. Shortly afterwards his father obtained a position on an estate near Guildford, Surrey, and then in 1818 Gould became foreman in the Royal Gardens of Windsor. He was for some time under the care of J. T. Aiton, of the Royal Gardens of Windsor. The young Gould started training as a gardener, being employed under his father at Windsor from 1818 to 1824, and he was subsequently a gardener at Ripley Castle in Yorkshire. He became an expert in the art of taxidermy. In 1824 he set himself up in business in London as a taxidermist, and his skill helped him to become the first Curator and Preserver at the museum of the Zoological Society of London in 1827.
Goulds position brought him into contact with the countrys leading naturalists. This meant that he was often the first to see new collections of birds given to the Zoological Society of London. In 1830 a collection of birds arrived from the Himalayas, many not previously described. Gould published these birds in A Century of Birds from the Himalaya Mountains (1830–1832). The text was by Nicholas Aylward Vigors and the illustrations were drawn and lithographed by Goulds wife Elizabeth Coxen Gould. Most of Goulds work were rough sketches on paper from which other artists created the lithographic plates.
This work was followed by four more in the next seven years, including Birds of Europe in five volumes. It was completed in 1837; Gould wrote the text, and his clerk, Edwin Prince, did the editing. The plates were drawn and lithographed by Elizabeth Coxen Gould. A few of the illustrations were made by Edward Lear as part of his Illustrations of the Family of Psittacidae in 1832. Lear, however, was in financial difficulty, and he sold the entire set of lithographs to Gould. The books were published in a very large size, imperial folio, with magnificent coloured plates. Eventually 41 of these volumes were published, with about 3000 plates. They appeared in parts at £3 3s. a number, subscribed for in advance, and in spite of the heavy expense of preparing the plates, Gould succeeded in making his ventures pay, realising a fortune. This was a busy period for Gould who also published Icones Avium in two parts containing 18 leaves of bird studies on 54 cm plates as a supplement to his previous works. No further monographs were published as in 1838 he and his wife moved to Australia to work on the Birds of Australia. Shortly after their return to England, his wife died in 1841. Elizabeth Gould completed 84 plates for Birds of Australia before her death.
When Charles Darwin presented his mammal and bird specimens collected during the second voyage of HMS Beagle to the Zoological Society of London on 4 January 1837, the bird specimens were given to Gould for identification. He set aside his paying work and at the next meeting on 10 January reported that birds from the Galápagos Islands which Darwin had thought were blackbirds, gross-bills and finches were in fact a series of ground Finches which are so peculiar as to form an entirely new group, containing 12 species. This story made the newspapers. In March, Darwin met Gould again, learning that his Galápagos wren was another species of finch and the mockingbirds he had labelled by island were separate species rather than just varieties, with relatives on the South American mainland. Subsequently, Gould advised that the smaller southern Rhea specimen that had been rescued from a Christmas dinner was a separate species which he named Rhea darwinii, whose territory overlapped with the northern rheas. Darwin had not bothered to label his finches by island, but others on the expedition had taken more care. He now sought specimens collected by captain Robert FitzRoy and crewmen. From them he was able to establish that the species were unique to islands, an important step on the inception of his theory of evolution by natural selection. Goulds work on the birds was published between 1838 and 1842 in five numbers as Part 3 of Zoology of the Voyage of H.M.S. Beagle, edited by Charles Darwin. Elizabeth Gould illustrated all the plates for Part 3.
In 1838 the Goulds sailed to Australia, intending to study the birds of that country and be the first to produce a major work on the subject. They took with them the collector John Gilbert. They arrived in Tasmania in September, making the acquaintance of the governor Sir John Franklin and his wife. Gould and Gilbert collected on the island. In February 1839 Gould sailed to Sydney, leaving his pregnant wife with the Franklins. He travelled to his brother-in-laws station at Yarrundi, spending his time searching for bowerbirds in the Liverpool Range. In April he returned to Tasmania for the birth of his son. In May he sailed to Adelaide to meet Charles Sturt, who was preparing to lead an expedition to the Murray River. Gould collected in the Mount Lofty range, the Murray Scrubs and Kangaroo Island, returning again to Hobart in July. He then travelled with his wife to Yarrundi. They returned home to England in May 1840.
The result of the trip was The Birds of Australia (1840–48). It included a total of 600 plates in seven volumes; 328 of the species described were new to science and named by Gould. He also published A Monograph of the Macropodidae, or Family of Kangaroos (1841–1842) and the three volume work The Mammals of Australia (1849–1861).
Elizabeth died in 1841 after the birth of their eighth child, Sarah, and Goulds books subsequently used illustrations by a number of artists, including Henry Constantine Richter, William Matthew Hart and Joseph Wolf.
Throughout his professional life Gould had a strong interest in hummingbirds. He accumulated a collection of 320 species, which he exhibited at the Great Exhibition of 1851. Despite his interest, Gould had never seen a live hummingbird. In May 1857 he travelled to the United States with his second son, Charles. He arrived in New York too early in the season to see hummingbirds in that city, but on 21 May 1857, in Bartrams Gardens in Philadelphia, he finally saw his first live one, a ruby-throated hummingbird. He then continued to Washington D.C. where he saw large numbers in the gardens of the Capitol. Gould attempted to return to England with live specimens, but, as he was not aware of the conditions necessary to keep them, they only lived for two months at most.
Gould published: A Monograph of the Trochilidae or Humming Birds with 360 plates (1849–61); The Mammals of Australia (1845–63), Handbook to the Birds of Australia (1865), The Birds of Asia (1850–83), The Birds of Great Britain (1862–73) and The Birds of New Guinea and the adjacent Papuan Islands (1875–88).
The University of Glasgow, which owns a copy of Birds of Great Britain, describes John Gould as the greatest figure in bird illustration after Audubon, and auctioneers Sotherans describe the work as Goulds pride and joy.
Gould had already published some of the illustrations in Birds of Europe, but Birds of Great Britain represents a development of his aesthetic style in which he adds illustrations of nests and young on a large scale.
Sotherans Co. reports that Gould published the book himself, producing 750 copies, which remain sought after both as complete volumes, and as individual plates, currently varying in price from £450 – £850. The University of Glasgow records that the volumes were issued in London in 25 parts, to make the complete set, between 1863 and 1873, and each set contained 367 coloured lithographs.
Gould undertook an ornithological tour of Scandinavia in 1856, in preparation for the work, taking with him the artist Henry Wolf who drew 57 of the plates from Goulds preparatory sketches. According to The University of Glasgow Goulds skill was in rapidly producing rough sketches from nature (a majority of the sketches were drawn from newly killed specimens) capturing the distinctiveness of each species. Gould then oversaw the process whereby his artists worked his sketches up into the finished drawings, which were made into coloured lithographs by engraver William Hart.
There were problems: the stone engraving of the snowy owl in volume I was dropped and broken at an early stage in the printing. Later issues of this plate show evidence of this damage and consequently the early issue – printed before the accident – are considered more desirable.
The lithographs were hand coloured. In the introduction for the work, Gould states every sky with its varied tints and every feather of each bird were coloured by hand; and when it is considered that nearly two hundred and eighty thousand illustrations in the present work have been so treated, it will most likely cause some astonishment to those who give the subject a thought.
The work has gathered critical acclaim: according to Mullens and Swann, Birds of Great Britain is the most sumptuous and costly of British bird books, whilst Wood describes it as a magnificent work. Isabella Tree writes that it was seen – perhaps partly because its subject was British, as the culmination of [his] ... genius

$1,250.00 USD
More Info
1845-63 John Gould Large Antique Print The Mammals of Australia - Tree Kangaroo

1845-63 John Gould Large Antique Print The Mammals of Australia - Tree Kangaroo

  • Title : Dendrolagus Ursinus, Mull....H C Richter del et lith....C Hullmandel Imp.
  • Ref #:  93441
  • Size: 22in x 15in (560mm x 385mm)
  • Date : 1845–63
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This large rare original hand coloured lithograph antique print of The Ursine Tree Kangaroo, by the artist HC Richter was printed by Charles Joseph Hullmandel 1789 – 1850 in the famous Naturalists John Goulds The Mammals of Australiapublished between 1845–63.

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Blue, pink, red, green, yellow
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 22in x 15in (560mm x 385mm)
Plate size: - 22in x 15in (560mm x 385mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

Background:
The Mammals of Australia is a three-volume work written and published by John Gould between 1845–63. It contains 182 illustrations by the author and its artist H. C. Richter. It was intended to be a complete survey of the novel species of mammals, such as the marsupials, discovered in the colonies of Australia.
The author, John Gould, best known for The Birds of Australia and other major works of ornithology, visited Australia in 1838. In his introduction, Gould says:.....It was not until I arrived in the country, and found myself surrounded by objects as strange as if I had been transported to another planet, that I conceived the idea of devoting a portion of my attention to the mammalian class of its extraordinary fauna......During his short stay he made observations on the natural history and employed his skills as a taxidermist to obtain specimens.
The publication of this major work by Gould followed his A Monograph of the Macropodidae or Family of Kangaroos in 1841. This work was the first comprehensive survey of Australian mammals, and gave an account of their classification and description. Gould also included the indigenous names for the species from the lists he made while in Australia. He used these names to make requests of the local peoples for his specimens, and recorded the regions where the names were used. This conserved a number of common names, such as dibbler (Parantechinus apicalis), which were later recommended by authorities.
The large lithographs reproduced the artwork of Richter, after the drawings and watercolours made in Australia by Gould and his wife, Elizabeth. (The contribution by Elizabeth Gould was uncredited). These were hand-coloured by a group of artists, led by Gabriel Bayfield, that required the completion of 26,572 plates. The illustrations produced during their visit to Australia were supplemented by the preserved specimens returned to England and detailed the characteristics of the species. These illustrations have become iconic images of the mammals of Australia. Among the best known of the illustrations from the work are the two of Thylacinus cynocephalus (Tasmanian tiger), copied since its publication and the most frequently reproduced, made more recognizable by Cascade Brewerys appropriation for its label in 1987. The government of Tasmania published a monochromatic reproduction of the same image in 1934, the author Louisa Anne Meredith also copied it for Tasmanian Friends and Foes (1881).
The Mammals of Australia was published by subscription in the format Imperial Folio; 13 parts in three volumes were issued from 1845 until 1863. To these the author added An Introduction to The Mammals of Australia (1863) in a separate work. This provided corrections and updates, a new preface, introduction, and a list of the mammals of the three volumes. The first two volumes were complete surveys of orders Marsupiata (marsupials), and, with Rodentia in the third, it formed the sum of known mammalian species of Australia. With the addition of those contained in the later Introduction the total of species described reached 166. The same work notes the exclusion of marine mammals such as whales from the volumes, but reprints a manuscript by Charles Coxen on the dugong.
Beyond the scientific value of this comprehensive survey, the document is cited in reference to its subjects conservation. Some of the species included in the work, such as Onychogalea lunata (crescent nailtail wallaby), have since succumbed to changes in land use since European colonisation.
The work was received with acclaim, but the high cost of production, especially of the coloured plates, reduced its accessibility. The original listed price was £41 for the complete set of volumes. The public curiosity for the unique fauna of Australia was met by this handsomely illustrated and comprehensive survey, and it spawned imitations in Australia. The curator of the Australian Museum, Gerard Krefft, produced the more affordable The Mammals of Australia (1871); intended for educational purposes and influenced by Goulds illustrations. Gracius Broinowskis abandoned work, Birds and Mammals of Australia (1884), so closely imitated the plates that an injunction was threatened by its publisher.

Gould, John FRS 1804 – 1881
Gould was an English ornithologist and bird artist. He published a number of monographs on birds, illustrated by plates that he produced with the assistance of his wife, Elizabeth Gould, and several other artists including Edward Lear, Henry Constantine Richter, Joseph Wolf and William Matthew Hart. He has been considered the father of bird study in Australia and the Gould League in Australia is named after him. His identification of the birds now nicknamed Darwins finches played a role in the inception of Darwins theory of evolution by natural selection. Goulds work is referenced in Charles Darwins book, On the Origin of Species.
Gould was born in Lyme Regis the first son of a gardener. He and the boy probably had a scanty education. Shortly afterwards his father obtained a position on an estate near Guildford, Surrey, and then in 1818 Gould became foreman in the Royal Gardens of Windsor. He was for some time under the care of J. T. Aiton, of the Royal Gardens of Windsor. The young Gould started training as a gardener, being employed under his father at Windsor from 1818 to 1824, and he was subsequently a gardener at Ripley Castle in Yorkshire. He became an expert in the art of taxidermy. In 1824 he set himself up in business in London as a taxidermist, and his skill helped him to become the first Curator and Preserver at the museum of the Zoological Society of London in 1827.
Goulds position brought him into contact with the countrys leading naturalists. This meant that he was often the first to see new collections of birds given to the Zoological Society of London. In 1830 a collection of birds arrived from the Himalayas, many not previously described. Gould published these birds in A Century of Birds from the Himalaya Mountains (1830–1832). The text was by Nicholas Aylward Vigors and the illustrations were drawn and lithographed by Goulds wife Elizabeth Coxen Gould. Most of Goulds work were rough sketches on paper from which other artists created the lithographic plates.
This work was followed by four more in the next seven years, including Birds of Europe in five volumes. It was completed in 1837; Gould wrote the text, and his clerk, Edwin Prince, did the editing. The plates were drawn and lithographed by Elizabeth Coxen Gould. A few of the illustrations were made by Edward Lear as part of his Illustrations of the Family of Psittacidae in 1832. Lear, however, was in financial difficulty, and he sold the entire set of lithographs to Gould. The books were published in a very large size, imperial folio, with magnificent coloured plates. Eventually 41 of these volumes were published, with about 3000 plates. They appeared in parts at £3 3s. a number, subscribed for in advance, and in spite of the heavy expense of preparing the plates, Gould succeeded in making his ventures pay, realising a fortune. This was a busy period for Gould who also published Icones Avium in two parts containing 18 leaves of bird studies on 54 cm plates as a supplement to his previous works. No further monographs were published as in 1838 he and his wife moved to Australia to work on the Birds of Australia. Shortly after their return to England, his wife died in 1841. Elizabeth Gould completed 84 plates for Birds of Australia before her death.
When Charles Darwin presented his mammal and bird specimens collected during the second voyage of HMS Beagle to the Zoological Society of London on 4 January 1837, the bird specimens were given to Gould for identification. He set aside his paying work and at the next meeting on 10 January reported that birds from the Galápagos Islands which Darwin had thought were blackbirds, gross-bills and finches were in fact a series of ground Finches which are so peculiar as to form an entirely new group, containing 12 species. This story made the newspapers. In March, Darwin met Gould again, learning that his Galápagos wren was another species of finch and the mockingbirds he had labelled by island were separate species rather than just varieties, with relatives on the South American mainland. Subsequently, Gould advised that the smaller southern Rhea specimen that had been rescued from a Christmas dinner was a separate species which he named Rhea darwinii, whose territory overlapped with the northern rheas. Darwin had not bothered to label his finches by island, but others on the expedition had taken more care. He now sought specimens collected by captain Robert FitzRoy and crewmen. From them he was able to establish that the species were unique to islands, an important step on the inception of his theory of evolution by natural selection. Goulds work on the birds was published between 1838 and 1842 in five numbers as Part 3 of Zoology of the Voyage of H.M.S. Beagle, edited by Charles Darwin. Elizabeth Gould illustrated all the plates for Part 3.
In 1838 the Goulds sailed to Australia, intending to study the birds of that country and be the first to produce a major work on the subject. They took with them the collector John Gilbert. They arrived in Tasmania in September, making the acquaintance of the governor Sir John Franklin and his wife. Gould and Gilbert collected on the island. In February 1839 Gould sailed to Sydney, leaving his pregnant wife with the Franklins. He travelled to his brother-in-laws station at Yarrundi, spending his time searching for bowerbirds in the Liverpool Range. In April he returned to Tasmania for the birth of his son. In May he sailed to Adelaide to meet Charles Sturt, who was preparing to lead an expedition to the Murray River. Gould collected in the Mount Lofty range, the Murray Scrubs and Kangaroo Island, returning again to Hobart in July. He then travelled with his wife to Yarrundi. They returned home to England in May 1840.
The result of the trip was The Birds of Australia (1840–48). It included a total of 600 plates in seven volumes; 328 of the species described were new to science and named by Gould. He also published A Monograph of the Macropodidae, or Family of Kangaroos (1841–1842) and the three volume work The Mammals of Australia (1849–1861).
Elizabeth died in 1841 after the birth of their eighth child, Sarah, and Goulds books subsequently used illustrations by a number of artists, including Henry Constantine Richter, William Matthew Hart and Joseph Wolf.
Throughout his professional life Gould had a strong interest in hummingbirds. He accumulated a collection of 320 species, which he exhibited at the Great Exhibition of 1851. Despite his interest, Gould had never seen a live hummingbird. In May 1857 he travelled to the United States with his second son, Charles. He arrived in New York too early in the season to see hummingbirds in that city, but on 21 May 1857, in Bartrams Gardens in Philadelphia, he finally saw his first live one, a ruby-throated hummingbird. He then continued to Washington D.C. where he saw large numbers in the gardens of the Capitol. Gould attempted to return to England with live specimens, but, as he was not aware of the conditions necessary to keep them, they only lived for two months at most.
Gould published: A Monograph of the Trochilidae or Humming Birds with 360 plates (1849–61); The Mammals of Australia (1845–63), Handbook to the Birds of Australia (1865), The Birds of Asia (1850–83), The Birds of Great Britain (1862–73) and The Birds of New Guinea and the adjacent Papuan Islands (1875–88).
The University of Glasgow, which owns a copy of Birds of Great Britain, describes John Gould as the greatest figure in bird illustration after Audubon, and auctioneers Sotherans describe the work as Goulds pride and joy.
Gould had already published some of the illustrations in Birds of Europe, but Birds of Great Britain represents a development of his aesthetic style in which he adds illustrations of nests and young on a large scale.
Sotherans Co. reports that Gould published the book himself, producing 750 copies, which remain sought after both as complete volumes, and as individual plates, currently varying in price from £450 – £850. The University of Glasgow records that the volumes were issued in London in 25 parts, to make the complete set, between 1863 and 1873, and each set contained 367 coloured lithographs.
Gould undertook an ornithological tour of Scandinavia in 1856, in preparation for the work, taking with him the artist Henry Wolf who drew 57 of the plates from Goulds preparatory sketches. According to The University of Glasgow Goulds skill was in rapidly producing rough sketches from nature (a majority of the sketches were drawn from newly killed specimens) capturing the distinctiveness of each species. Gould then oversaw the process whereby his artists worked his sketches up into the finished drawings, which were made into coloured lithographs by engraver William Hart.
There were problems: the stone engraving of the snowy owl in volume I was dropped and broken at an early stage in the printing. Later issues of this plate show evidence of this damage and consequently the early issue – printed before the accident – are considered more desirable.
The lithographs were hand coloured. In the introduction for the work, Gould states every sky with its varied tints and every feather of each bird were coloured by hand; and when it is considered that nearly two hundred and eighty thousand illustrations in the present work have been so treated, it will most likely cause some astonishment to those who give the subject a thought.
The work has gathered critical acclaim: according to Mullens and Swann, Birds of Great Britain is the most sumptuous and costly of British bird books, whilst Wood describes it as a magnificent work. Isabella Tree writes that it was seen – perhaps partly because its subject was British, as the culmination of [his] ... genius

$850.00 USD
More Info
1856 Delafield Antique Architectural Plan SM Kirov Medical Academy St Petersburg

1856 Delafield Antique Architectural Plan SM Kirov Medical Academy St Petersburg

Description:
This very large original lithograph print, an architectural plan of the S.M. Kirov Military Medical Academy in St Petersburg, Russia - during the time of the Crimean War and just prior to the American Civil War - was engraved by John T Bowen & co. of Philadelphia and was published in the 1856 edition of Captain Richard Delafields Report on the Art of War in Europe in 1854, 1855, and 1856.

In early 1855, Captain Richard Delafield was appointed by the Secretary of War, Jefferson Davis, a head of the board of officers, later called The Delafield Commission, and sent to Europe to study the European military. The board included Captain George B. McClellan and Major Alfred Mordecai. They inspected the state of the military in Great Britain, Germany, the Austrian Empire, France, Belgium, and Russia, and served as military observers during the Crimean War. After his return in April 1856, Delafield submitted a report which was later published as a book by Congress, Report on the Art of War in Europe in 1854, 1855, and 1856. The book was suppressed during the American Civil War due to fears that it would be instructive to Confederate engineers as it contained multiple drawings and descriptions of military fortifications.

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: -
Colors used: -
General color appearance: -
Paper size: - 36in x 24in (915mm x 610mm)
Plate size: - 36in x 24in (915mm x 610mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Folds as issued
Verso: - Folds re-enforced with archival tape

Background:
The S. M. Kirov Military Medical Academy (Военно-медицинская академия имени С. М. Кирова) is the oldest school of military medicine in Saint Petersburg and the Russian Federation. Senior medical staff are trained for the Armed Forces and conduct research in military medical services.
The origins of S.M. Kirov Military Medical Academy go back to the years of Peter the Great. In 1715 by the Tsars order the Admiralty Hospital in the Vyborg Side of Saint Petersburg was founded. In 1717 next to in the Land Military Hospital was opened. Since 1773 surgical schools attached to both hospitals were operating. In 1786 those schools were consolidated into the Main Medical College. It became the principal training center for army and fleet physicians.
Unofficially, the year 1714 is considered the foundation year of the academy. The Medical and Surgical Academy was established by the order of Emperor Paul I of 18/29 December 1798 on the initiative of Baron Alexei Vasilyev, General Director of the Medical College. At the same time a Neoclassical building for the Academy was designed by Antonio Porta. It was decorated with a set of panel paintings by Giuseppe Bernasconi.
Ranked as one of the best educational institutions in the Russian Empire, it was known as the Imperial Medical and Surgical Academy from 1808. According to the order of Emperor Alexander I, a member of the Medical and Surgical Academy had the rights, liabilities, and benefits of a member of the Academy of Sciences.
Sir James Wylie, a Scottish baronet, managed the academy between 1808 and 1838. His contributions have been commemorated with a monument which stood in front of the academy until the October Revolution. The monument was designed in 1859 by David Jensen. It was later relocated and replaced with a statue of Hygieia.
In 19th century the Imperial Medical and Surgical Academy played a major role in the development of Russian natural science and medicine. In 1840 — 1856 one of its professors was Nikolay Pirogov, considered the founder of field surgery.
Since 1861 Sergey Botkin, one of Pirogovs disciples, worked at the Academy. He is considered one of the founders of modern Russian medical science and education. Botkin introduced triage, pathological anatomy, and post mortem diagnostics into Russian medical practice.
In 1881 the Academys official name was changed into the Imperial Military Medical Academy. In the late 19th century, its physiology laboratory, founded by Ivan Sechenov, was at the forefront of medical research. Ivan Romanovich Tarkhanov conducted some important experiments there.
In 1890 — 1901 the Academys President was Viktor Pashutin, one of the founders of the pathophysiologic school in Russia and of pathophysiology as an independent scientific discipline.
The Nobel-prize winning physiologist Ivan Pavlov graduated from the Academy in 1879 with Gold Medal award. Since 1895 he headed Department of Physiology at the Academy for three decades.
In 1904 — 1924 Nikolai Kravkov, the founder of Russian national school of pharmacologists, headed the Academys Department of Pharmacology.
In 1903 — 1936 one of the Academys professors was Sergey Fedorov, the founder of the largest national school of surgery and «the father of Russian urology».
The academy was also among the pioneers of medical education for women, launching the courses for nurse-midwives in 1872. Nadezhda Suslova, the first female physician in Russia, attended Sechenovs classes at the academy. A school of gymnastics (now the Military Institute of Physical Culture) was launched in 1909.

Delafield, Richard Major General 1798 - 1873
Delafield was a United States Army officer for 52 years. He served as superintendent of the United States Military Academy for 12 years. At the start of the American Civil War, then Colonel Delafield helped equip and send volunteers from New York to the Union Army. He also was in command of defences around New York harbor from 1861 to April 1864. On April 22, 1864, he was promoted to Brigadier General in the Regular Army of the United States and Chief of Engineers. On March 8, 1866, President Andrew Johnson nominated Delafield for appointment to the grade of brevet major general in the Regular Army, to rank from March 13, 1865, and the United States Senate confirmed the appointment on May 4, 1866, reconfirmed due to a technicality on July 14, 1866. He retired from the US Army on August 8, 1866. He later served on two commissions relating to improvements to Boston Harbor and to lighthouses. He also served as a regent of the Smithsonian Institution.
Delafield served as assistant engineer in the construction of Hampton Roads defences from 1819–1824 and was in charge of fortifications and surveys in the Mississippi River delta area in 1824-1832. While superintendent of repair work on the Cumberland Road east of the Ohio River, he designed and built Dunlaps Creek Bridge in Brownsville, Pennsylvania, the first cast-iron tubular-arch bridge in the United States. Commissioned a major of engineers in July 1838, he was appointed superintendent of the Military Academy after the fire of 1838 and served till 1845. He designed the new buildings and the new cadet uniform that first displayed the castle insignia. He superintended the construction of coast defences for New York Harbor from 1846 to 1855.
In the beginning of 1855, Delafield was appointed by the Secretary of War, Jefferson Davis a head of the board of officers, later called The Delafield Commission, and sent to Europe to study the European military. The board included Captain George B. McClellan and Major Alfred Mordecai. They inspected the state of the military in Great Britain, Germany, the Austrian Empire, France, Belgium, and Russia, and served as military observers during the Crimean War. After his return in April 1856, Delafield submitted a report which was later published as a book by Congress, Report on the Art of War in Europe in 1854, 1855, and 1856. The book was suppressed during the American Civil War due to fears that it would be instructive to Confederate engineers as it contained multiple drawings and descriptions of military fortifications.
Delafield served as superintendent of the Military Academy again in 1856-1861. In January 1861, he was succeeded by Captain Pierre G. T. Beauregard, who was dismissed shortly after Beauregards home state of Louisiana seceded from the Union, and Delafield returned as superintendent serving until March 1, 1861. In the beginning of the Civil War he advised the governor of New York Edwin D. Morgan during the volunteer force creation. Then, in 1861–1864, he was put in charge of New York Harbor defences, including Governors Island and Fort at Sandy Hook. On May 19, 1864, he was commissioned a brigadier-general after replacing Joseph Gilbert Totten, who had died, as the Chief of Engineers, United States Army Corps of Engineers, on April 22, 1864. He stayed in charge of the Bureau of Engineers of the War Department until his retirement on August 8, 1866. On March 8, 1866, President Andrew Johnson nominated Delafield for appointment to the grade of brevet major general in the Regular Army of the United States, to rank from March 13, 1865, and the United States Senate confirmed the appointment on May 4, 1866 and reconfirmed it due to a technicality on July 14, 1866.After retirement Delafield served as a regent of the Smithsonian Institution and a member of the Lighthouse Board. He died in Washington, D.C. on November 5, 1873.

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1683 Daniel King & William Dugdale Antique Print of Old St Pauls Cathedral London - Pre Great Fire

1683 Daniel King & William Dugdale Antique Print of Old St Pauls Cathedral London - Pre Great Fire

  • Title  : Ecclesiae Cathedralis Sti Pauli facies Aquilonaris / The North Prospect of ye Cathedral Church of St Paul in London
  • Date  : 1683
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref # :  16365
  • Size   : 15 1/2in x 13 1/2in (395mm x 340mm) 

Description:
This fine original copper-pate antique print of the old St Pauls Cathedral London, was engraved by Daniel King prior to the Great Fire of London in 1666 and was published by Sir William Dugdale in the 1683 edition of Monasticon Anglicanum: A History of the Abbies and other Monasteries, Hospitals, Frieries, and Cathedral and Collegiate Churches, with their Dependencies, in England and Wales.

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 15 1/2in x 13 1/2in (395mm x 340mm)
Plate size: - 14 1/2in x 9in (370mm x 230mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Folds as issued, small repair to bottom of page not affecting the image 
Verso: - None

Background: Old St Paul's Cathedral was the medieval cathedral of the City of London that, until 1666, stood on the site of the present St Paul's Cathedral. Built in 1087–1314 and dedicated to Saint Paul, the cathedral was the fourth church on the site at Ludgate Hill. Work began during the reign of William the Conqueror after a fire in 1087 that destroyed much of the city. Work took more than 200 years, and construction was delayed by another fire in 1135. The church was consecrated in 1240 and enlarged again in 1256 and the early 14th century. At its completion in the middle of the 14th century, the cathedral was one of the longest churches in the world and had one of the tallest spires and some of the finest stained glass.
The presence of the shrine of Saint Erkenwald made the cathedral a pilgrimage site during the Medieval period. In addition to serving as the seat of the Diocese of London, the building developed a reputation as a hub of the City of London, with the nave aisle, "Paul's walk", known as a centre for business and the London grapevine. After the Reformation, the open-air pulpit in the churchyard, St Paul's Cross, became the stage for radical evangelical preaching and Protestant bookselling.
The cathedral was already severely in decline by the 17th century. Restoration work by Inigo Jones in the 1620s was halted by the English Civil War. Sir Christopher Wren was attempting another restoration in 1666 when the cathedral was destroyed in the Great Fire of London. After demolition of the old structure, the present, domed cathedral was erected on the site, with an English Baroque design by Wren

Sir William Dugdale 1605-1686 was an English antiquary and herald. As a scholar he was influential in the development of medieval history as an academic subject.

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1868 Ernst Gladbach Large Original Antique Print of Houses in Zurich Switzerland

1868 Ernst Gladbach Large Original Antique Print of Houses in Zurich Switzerland

Description:
This large original copper plate engraved antique print, details of houses of the Hongg & Rapperswil districts in the Swiss city of Zurich by Ernst Gladbach, was published in the 1868 edition of Der Schweizer Holzstyl in seinen cantonalen und constructiven Verschiedenheiten vergleichend dargestellt mit Holzbauten Deutschlands . Darmstadt: Carl Koehler\'s Verlag.
(Translation of title: The comparisons in construction & details between wooden houses in Switzerland and Germany)

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, blue, green, brown
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 27in x 19in (685mm x 485mm)
Plate size: - 18 1/2in x 13 1/2in (470mm x 345mm)
Margins: - Min 2in (50mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Small repair to left margin, no loss
Plate area: - Central vertical fold
Verso: - None

Gladbach, Ernst Georg 1812 - 1896 
Born in Darmstadt, Germany the son of a jurist, Gladbach early on became involved in architecture and construction issues in particular through his uncle Georg Moller Moller [1784-1852] was an influential court builder in the Grand Duchy of Hesse. At the age of 14 Gladbach began an apprenticeship in his uncle’s office. He soon worked on major projects such as the theatre of Mainz [1829-1833] and supported his uncle in teaching young architects. Aside from this, he became involved with the book series Denkmaler der deutschen Baukunst (Moller 1815-1851). In the large-format illustrated volumes Moller presented detailed architectural surveys of medieval buildings. In the books and in his work as an architect and teacher he focused on construction issues in particular. Between 1833-1844 he published his own textbook on construction, under the title Beiträge zu der Lehre von den Construktionen, that assembled surveys of exemplary buildings. For Gladbach’s further work, the exposure to construction issues in his uncle’s office was formative. In addition, Gladbach received drawing lessons from his cousin Fritz Hessemer who also worked in Moller’s office. The lessons resulted in the publication of some of Gladbach’s artistic drawings by a publisher in Darmstadt. After studying at the universities in Giessen and Heidelberg, Gladbach further improved his drawing skills on a three-year study trip that took him to different German cities and then to Italy from 1837 to 1839. Back in Germany Gladbach worked as a master builder for the Hesse state civil service, dealing with timber construction mainly in a practical way. In his spare time he did some building surveys that he published together with some of Moller’s surveys as a third volume to the series Denkmäler der deutschen Baukunst. In 1857 Gladbach was appointed professor for structural theory and construction materials at the newly founded Swiss Polytechnic School in Zurich and kept this position until 1890. Being professor at the Polytechnic School, he shifted once more the main focus of his work: Gladbach stopped being professionally active as an architect. Instead, teaching became the centre of his life. In addition to his teaching load at the Polytechnic School he gave private drawing lessons. The long semester breaks allowed him to carry out study trips in the Swiss mountains where he conducted his extensive studies on historical timber constructions. In summary, Gladbach explored construction issues from different views before publishing his well-known books on Swiss timber construction: from the view of a designing architect, of a teacher wanting to make constructions issues comprehensible, of an artist who likes to draw and, last but not least, as an architect doing precise building surveys for his uncle’s publication series. This multi-perspective view decisively influenced Gladbach’s method of analysing and documenting historical Swiss timber structures.

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1740 Wolff & Corvinus Antique Arch Plan Officers Quarters, Royal Arsenal, Berlin

1740 Wolff & Corvinus Antique Arch Plan Officers Quarters, Royal Arsenal, Berlin

  • Title : Das von dem Tit. H. Commendanten der Residentz Berlin, durch den Tit. H. Philipp Gerlach Senior Capitain und Ingenieur gebaute Commendaten Hauß mit der vorderen faciata und allen dreyen Grund-Rissen
  • Ref #:  93449
  • Size: 19 1/2in x 15in (495mm x 390mm)
  • Date : 1740
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This large rare, original copper-plate engraved antique architectural print, view & plan of officers quarters at the Royal Arsenal in Berlin - plate No.17 of 19 - by Johann August Corvinus 1683 - 1738, after Andreas Mayers 1716 - 1782, was published in Eigentliche Abbildung des Prächtigen Königl. Lust Schlosses Charlottenburg, eine Meile von Berlin, sambt dem darhinden im Walde gelegenen schönen Lust Garten
(Set of 16 numbered plates, the first with the title, with plans and views of the buildings and gardens at Charlottenburg, the palace of the King of Prussia on the outskirts of Berlin.)
 by Jeremias Wolff Erben in 1740.

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: -
Colors used: -
General color appearance: -
Paper size: - 19in x 12 1/2in (490mm x 335mm)
Plate size: - 14 1/2in x 10 1/2in (370mm x 260mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

 

Background:
Berlin straddles the banks of the River Spree, which flows into the River Havel (a tributary of the River Elbe) in the western borough of Spandau. Among the citys main topographical features are the many lakes in the western and southeastern boroughs formed by the Spree, Havel, and Dahme rivers (the largest of which is Lake Müggelsee). Due to its location in the European Plain, Berlin is influenced by a temperate seasonal climate. About one-third of the citys area is composed of forests, parks, gardens, rivers, canals and lakes. The city lies in the Central German dialect area, the Berlin dialect being a variant of the Lusatian-New Marchian dialects.
First documented in the 13th century and situated at the crossing of two important historic trade routes, Berlin became the capital of the Margraviate of Brandenburg (1417–1701), the Kingdom of Prussia (1701–1918), the German Empire (1871–1918), the Weimar Republic (1919–1933), and the Third Reich (1933–1945). Berlin in the 1920s was the third-largest municipality in the world. After World War II and its subsequent occupation by the victorious countries, the city was divided; West Berlin became a de facto West German exclave, surrounded by the Berlin Wall (1961–1989) and East German territory. East Berlin was declared capital of East Germany, while Bonn became the West German capital. Following German reunification in 1990, Berlin once again became the capital of all of Germany.
The Thirty Years War between 1618 and 1648 devastated Berlin. One third of its houses were damaged or destroyed, and the city lost half of its population. Frederick William, known as the Great Elector, who had succeeded his father George William as ruler in 1640, initiated a policy of promoting immigration and religious tolerance. With the Edict of Potsdam in 1685, Frederick William offered asylum to the French Huguenots.
By 1700, approximately 30 percent of Berlins residents were French, because of the Huguenot immigration. Many other immigrants came from Bohemia, Poland, and Salzburg.
Since 1618, the Margraviate of Brandenburg had been in personal union with the Duchy of Prussia. In 1701, the dual state formed the Kingdom of Prussia, as Frederick III, Elector of Brandenburg, crowned himself as king Frederick I in Prussia. Berlin became the capital of the new Kingdom, replacing Königsberg. This was a successful attempt to centralise the capital in the very far-flung state, and it was the first time the city began to grow. In 1709, Berlin merged with the four cities of Cölln, Friedrichswerder, Friedrichstadt and Dorotheenstadt under the name Berlin, Haupt- und Residenzstadt Berlin.
In 1740, Frederick II, known as Frederick the Great (1740–1786), came to power. Under the rule of Frederick II, Berlin became a center of the Enlightenment, but also, was briefly occupied during the Seven Years War by the Russian army. Following Frances victory in the War of the Fourth Coalition, Napoleon Bonaparte marched into Berlin in 1806, but granted self-government to the city. In 1815, the city became part of the new Province of Brandenburg.
The Industrial Revolution transformed Berlin during the 19th century; the citys economy and population expanded dramatically, and it became the main railway hub and economic centre of Germany. Additional suburbs soon developed and increased the area and population of Berlin. In 1861, neighbouring suburbs including Wedding, Moabit and several others were incorporated into Berlin. In 1871, Berlin became capital of the newly founded German Empire. In 1881, it became a city district separate from Brandenburg.

Wolff, Jeremais 1663 - 1724
Wolff was an German engraver and publisher. Born in Augsburg, he originally trained as a clock and automat maker, later changing course and opening a small copperplate engraving shop. His success was impressive and became one of the largest European art, print & map publishers in the first half of the 18th century. Wolff employed some of the best engravers of the time and although not an engraver himself, only Wolffs name was recorded on the engravings. Many of his engravers went uncredited for their work. In 1710 Wolff was one of the founder member of the Empire State Academy of Arts in Augsburg.
After his death in 1724, Wolffs publishing business was inherited by his sons and son-in-law, Johann Balthasar Probst (1673–1750) a notable engraver at the time. The firm continued on in Augsburg under the name Jeremias Wolff Erben.
Together with the Nuremberg copperplate engraver Paul Decker , Wolff published a series of engravings showing the war successes of Prince Eugene of Savoy in Italy , southern Germany and the Spanish Netherlands, during the War of the Spanish Succession . The prints are exhibited in the Museum of Military History, in Vienna .

 

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1740 Wolff & Corvinus Antique Arch Print of Charlottenburg Palace Stables Berlin

1740 Wolff & Corvinus Antique Arch Print of Charlottenburg Palace Stables Berlin

  • Title : Ist ein von Hr. Andreas Schlütter Seel. inventirt und aufgebauer Schöner Marstall Datierung
  • Ref #:  93447
  • Size: 19in x 12 1/2in (490mm x 335mm)
  • Date : 1740
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This large rare, original copper-plate engraved antique architectural print, view of the facade of the Charlottenburg Palace stables in Berlin - plate No.15 of 16 - by Johann August Corvinus 1683 - 1738, after Andreas Mayers 1716 - 1782, was published in Eigentliche Abbildung des Prächtigen Königl. Lust Schlosses Charlottenburg, eine Meile von Berlin, sambt dem darhinden im Walde gelegenen schönen Lust Garten
(Set of 16 numbered plates, the first with the title, with plans and views of the buildings and gardens at Charlottenburg, the palace of the King of Prussia on the outskirts of Berlin.)
 by Jeremias Wolff Erben in 1740.

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: -
Colors used: -
General color appearance: -
Paper size: - 19in x 12 1/2in (490mm x 335mm)
Plate size: - 14 1/2in x 10 1/2in (370mm x 260mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

 

Background:
Berlin straddles the banks of the River Spree, which flows into the River Havel (a tributary of the River Elbe) in the western borough of Spandau. Among the citys main topographical features are the many lakes in the western and southeastern boroughs formed by the Spree, Havel, and Dahme rivers (the largest of which is Lake Müggelsee). Due to its location in the European Plain, Berlin is influenced by a temperate seasonal climate. About one-third of the citys area is composed of forests, parks, gardens, rivers, canals and lakes. The city lies in the Central German dialect area, the Berlin dialect being a variant of the Lusatian-New Marchian dialects.
First documented in the 13th century and situated at the crossing of two important historic trade routes, Berlin became the capital of the Margraviate of Brandenburg (1417–1701), the Kingdom of Prussia (1701–1918), the German Empire (1871–1918), the Weimar Republic (1919–1933), and the Third Reich (1933–1945). Berlin in the 1920s was the third-largest municipality in the world. After World War II and its subsequent occupation by the victorious countries, the city was divided; West Berlin became a de facto West German exclave, surrounded by the Berlin Wall (1961–1989) and East German territory. East Berlin was declared capital of East Germany, while Bonn became the West German capital. Following German reunification in 1990, Berlin once again became the capital of all of Germany.
The Thirty Years War between 1618 and 1648 devastated Berlin. One third of its houses were damaged or destroyed, and the city lost half of its population. Frederick William, known as the Great Elector, who had succeeded his father George William as ruler in 1640, initiated a policy of promoting immigration and religious tolerance. With the Edict of Potsdam in 1685, Frederick William offered asylum to the French Huguenots.
By 1700, approximately 30 percent of Berlins residents were French, because of the Huguenot immigration. Many other immigrants came from Bohemia, Poland, and Salzburg.
Since 1618, the Margraviate of Brandenburg had been in personal union with the Duchy of Prussia. In 1701, the dual state formed the Kingdom of Prussia, as Frederick III, Elector of Brandenburg, crowned himself as king Frederick I in Prussia. Berlin became the capital of the new Kingdom, replacing Königsberg. This was a successful attempt to centralise the capital in the very far-flung state, and it was the first time the city began to grow. In 1709, Berlin merged with the four cities of Cölln, Friedrichswerder, Friedrichstadt and Dorotheenstadt under the name Berlin, Haupt- und Residenzstadt Berlin.
In 1740, Frederick II, known as Frederick the Great (1740–1786), came to power. Under the rule of Frederick II, Berlin became a center of the Enlightenment, but also, was briefly occupied during the Seven Years War by the Russian army. Following Frances victory in the War of the Fourth Coalition, Napoleon Bonaparte marched into Berlin in 1806, but granted self-government to the city. In 1815, the city became part of the new Province of Brandenburg.
The Industrial Revolution transformed Berlin during the 19th century; the citys economy and population expanded dramatically, and it became the main railway hub and economic centre of Germany. Additional suburbs soon developed and increased the area and population of Berlin. In 1861, neighbouring suburbs including Wedding, Moabit and several others were incorporated into Berlin. In 1871, Berlin became capital of the newly founded German Empire. In 1881, it became a city district separate from Brandenburg.

Wolff, Jeremais 1663 - 1724
Wolff was an German engraver and publisher. Born in Augsburg, he originally trained as a clock and automat maker, later changing course and opening a small copperplate engraving shop. His success was impressive and became one of the largest European art, print & map publishers in the first half of the 18th century. Wolff employed some of the best engravers of the time and although not an engraver himself, only Wolffs name was recorded on the engravings. Many of his engravers went uncredited for their work. In 1710 Wolff was one of the founder member of the Empire State Academy of Arts in Augsburg.
After his death in 1724, Wolffs publishing business was inherited by his sons and son-in-law, Johann Balthasar Probst (1673–1750) a notable engraver at the time. The firm continued on in Augsburg under the name Jeremias Wolff Erben.
Together with the Nuremberg copperplate engraver Paul Decker , Wolff published a series of engravings showing the war successes of Prince Eugene of Savoy in Italy , southern Germany and the Spanish Netherlands, during the War of the Spanish Succession . The prints are exhibited in the Museum of Military History, in Vienna .

 

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1740 Wolff & Corvinus Antique Arch Print of The Royal Arsenal in Berlin Germany

1740 Wolff & Corvinus Antique Arch Print of The Royal Arsenal in Berlin Germany

  • Title : Das von dem H. Architect und Bau-Meister Nering Seel. angefangne, und von dem unvergleichlichen Architect Ober-Ingenier und Bau-Meistern H. Obrist Both in vollkommenen Perfection Stand gebrachte und von jedermann belobte Herr. Zeug-Haus, dessen vordere faciata
  • Ref #:  93454
  • Size: 19in x 12 1/2in (490mm x 335mm)
  • Date : 1740
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This large rare, original copper-plate engraved antique architectural print, view & plan of The Royal Arsenal in Berlin Houses - plate No.13 of 16 - by Johann August Corvinus 1683 - 1738, after Andreas Mayers 1716 - 1782, was published in Eigentliche Abbildung des Prächtigen Königl. Lust Schlosses Charlottenburg, eine Meile von Berlin, sambt dem darhinden im Walde gelegenen schönen Lust Garten
(Set of 16 numbered plates, the first with the title, with plans and views of the buildings and gardens at Charlottenburg, the palace of the King of Prussia on the outskirts of Berlin.)
 by Jeremias Wolff Erben in 1740.

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: -
Colors used: -
General color appearance: -
Paper size: - 19in x 12 1/2in (490mm x 335mm)
Plate size: - 14 1/2in x 10 1/2in (370mm x 260mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

 

Background:
Berlin straddles the banks of the River Spree, which flows into the River Havel (a tributary of the River Elbe) in the western borough of Spandau. Among the citys main topographical features are the many lakes in the western and southeastern boroughs formed by the Spree, Havel, and Dahme rivers (the largest of which is Lake Müggelsee). Due to its location in the European Plain, Berlin is influenced by a temperate seasonal climate. About one-third of the citys area is composed of forests, parks, gardens, rivers, canals and lakes. The city lies in the Central German dialect area, the Berlin dialect being a variant of the Lusatian-New Marchian dialects.
First documented in the 13th century and situated at the crossing of two important historic trade routes, Berlin became the capital of the Margraviate of Brandenburg (1417–1701), the Kingdom of Prussia (1701–1918), the German Empire (1871–1918), the Weimar Republic (1919–1933), and the Third Reich (1933–1945). Berlin in the 1920s was the third-largest municipality in the world. After World War II and its subsequent occupation by the victorious countries, the city was divided; West Berlin became a de facto West German exclave, surrounded by the Berlin Wall (1961–1989) and East German territory. East Berlin was declared capital of East Germany, while Bonn became the West German capital. Following German reunification in 1990, Berlin once again became the capital of all of Germany.
The Thirty Years War between 1618 and 1648 devastated Berlin. One third of its houses were damaged or destroyed, and the city lost half of its population. Frederick William, known as the Great Elector, who had succeeded his father George William as ruler in 1640, initiated a policy of promoting immigration and religious tolerance. With the Edict of Potsdam in 1685, Frederick William offered asylum to the French Huguenots.
By 1700, approximately 30 percent of Berlins residents were French, because of the Huguenot immigration. Many other immigrants came from Bohemia, Poland, and Salzburg.
Since 1618, the Margraviate of Brandenburg had been in personal union with the Duchy of Prussia. In 1701, the dual state formed the Kingdom of Prussia, as Frederick III, Elector of Brandenburg, crowned himself as king Frederick I in Prussia. Berlin became the capital of the new Kingdom, replacing Königsberg. This was a successful attempt to centralise the capital in the very far-flung state, and it was the first time the city began to grow. In 1709, Berlin merged with the four cities of Cölln, Friedrichswerder, Friedrichstadt and Dorotheenstadt under the name Berlin, Haupt- und Residenzstadt Berlin.
In 1740, Frederick II, known as Frederick the Great (1740–1786), came to power. Under the rule of Frederick II, Berlin became a center of the Enlightenment, but also, was briefly occupied during the Seven Years War by the Russian army. Following Frances victory in the War of the Fourth Coalition, Napoleon Bonaparte marched into Berlin in 1806, but granted self-government to the city. In 1815, the city became part of the new Province of Brandenburg.
The Industrial Revolution transformed Berlin during the 19th century; the citys economy and population expanded dramatically, and it became the main railway hub and economic centre of Germany. Additional suburbs soon developed and increased the area and population of Berlin. In 1861, neighbouring suburbs including Wedding, Moabit and several others were incorporated into Berlin. In 1871, Berlin became capital of the newly founded German Empire. In 1881, it became a city district separate from Brandenburg.

Wolff, Jeremais 1663 - 1724
Wolff was an German engraver and publisher. Born in Augsburg, he originally trained as a clock and automat maker, later changing course and opening a small copperplate engraving shop. His success was impressive and became one of the largest European art, print & map publishers in the first half of the 18th century. Wolff employed some of the best engravers of the time and although not an engraver himself, only Wolffs name was recorded on the engravings. Many of his engravers went uncredited for their work. In 1710 Wolff was one of the founder member of the Empire State Academy of Arts in Augsburg.
After his death in 1724, Wolffs publishing business was inherited by his sons and son-in-law, Johann Balthasar Probst (1673–1750) a notable engraver at the time. The firm continued on in Augsburg under the name Jeremias Wolff Erben.
Together with the Nuremberg copperplate engraver Paul Decker , Wolff published a series of engravings showing the war successes of Prince Eugene of Savoy in Italy , southern Germany and the Spanish Netherlands, during the War of the Spanish Succession . The prints are exhibited in the Museum of Military History, in Vienna .

 

$275.00 USD
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1740 Wolff & Corvinus Antique Arch Print Plans of Residential Houses in Berlin

1740 Wolff & Corvinus Antique Arch Print Plans of Residential Houses in Berlin

  • Title : Zwey von Hr. von Grünenberg inventirte und gebaute Burgerl. Wohnhäusser mit ihren Faciaten u. Grundrissen
  • Ref #:  93450
  • Size: 19in x 12 1/2in (490mm x 335mm)
  • Date : 1740
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This large rare, original copper-plate engraved antique architectural print plans of Berlin Houses - plate No. 12 of 16 - by Johann August Corvinus 1683 - 1738, after Andreas Mayers 1716 - 1782, was published in Eigentliche Abbildung des Prächtigen Königl. Lust Schlosses Charlottenburg, eine Meile von Berlin, sambt dem darhinden im Walde gelegenen schönen Lust Garten
(Set of 16 numbered plates, the first with the title, with plans and views of the buildings and gardens at Charlottenburg, the palace of the King of Prussia on the outskirts of Berlin.)
 by Jeremias Wolff Erben in 1740.

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: -
Colors used: -
General color appearance: -
Paper size: - 19in x 12 1/2in (490mm x 335mm)
Plate size: - 14 1/2in x 10 1/2in (370mm x 260mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

 

Background:
Berlin straddles the banks of the River Spree, which flows into the River Havel (a tributary of the River Elbe) in the western borough of Spandau. Among the citys main topographical features are the many lakes in the western and southeastern boroughs formed by the Spree, Havel, and Dahme rivers (the largest of which is Lake Müggelsee). Due to its location in the European Plain, Berlin is influenced by a temperate seasonal climate. About one-third of the citys area is composed of forests, parks, gardens, rivers, canals and lakes. The city lies in the Central German dialect area, the Berlin dialect being a variant of the Lusatian-New Marchian dialects.
First documented in the 13th century and situated at the crossing of two important historic trade routes, Berlin became the capital of the Margraviate of Brandenburg (1417–1701), the Kingdom of Prussia (1701–1918), the German Empire (1871–1918), the Weimar Republic (1919–1933), and the Third Reich (1933–1945). Berlin in the 1920s was the third-largest municipality in the world. After World War II and its subsequent occupation by the victorious countries, the city was divided; West Berlin became a de facto West German exclave, surrounded by the Berlin Wall (1961–1989) and East German territory. East Berlin was declared capital of East Germany, while Bonn became the West German capital. Following German reunification in 1990, Berlin once again became the capital of all of Germany.
The Thirty Years War between 1618 and 1648 devastated Berlin. One third of its houses were damaged or destroyed, and the city lost half of its population. Frederick William, known as the Great Elector, who had succeeded his father George William as ruler in 1640, initiated a policy of promoting immigration and religious tolerance. With the Edict of Potsdam in 1685, Frederick William offered asylum to the French Huguenots.
By 1700, approximately 30 percent of Berlins residents were French, because of the Huguenot immigration. Many other immigrants came from Bohemia, Poland, and Salzburg.
Since 1618, the Margraviate of Brandenburg had been in personal union with the Duchy of Prussia. In 1701, the dual state formed the Kingdom of Prussia, as Frederick III, Elector of Brandenburg, crowned himself as king Frederick I in Prussia. Berlin became the capital of the new Kingdom, replacing Königsberg. This was a successful attempt to centralise the capital in the very far-flung state, and it was the first time the city began to grow. In 1709, Berlin merged with the four cities of Cölln, Friedrichswerder, Friedrichstadt and Dorotheenstadt under the name Berlin, Haupt- und Residenzstadt Berlin.
In 1740, Frederick II, known as Frederick the Great (1740–1786), came to power. Under the rule of Frederick II, Berlin became a center of the Enlightenment, but also, was briefly occupied during the Seven Years War by the Russian army. Following Frances victory in the War of the Fourth Coalition, Napoleon Bonaparte marched into Berlin in 1806, but granted self-government to the city. In 1815, the city became part of the new Province of Brandenburg.
The Industrial Revolution transformed Berlin during the 19th century; the citys economy and population expanded dramatically, and it became the main railway hub and economic centre of Germany. Additional suburbs soon developed and increased the area and population of Berlin. In 1861, neighbouring suburbs including Wedding, Moabit and several others were incorporated into Berlin. In 1871, Berlin became capital of the newly founded German Empire. In 1881, it became a city district separate from Brandenburg.

Wolff, Jeremais 1663 - 1724
Wolff was an German engraver and publisher. Born in Augsburg, he originally trained as a clock and automat maker, later changing course and opening a small copperplate engraving shop. His success was impressive and became one of the largest European art, print & map publishers in the first half of the 18th century. Wolff employed some of the best engravers of the time and although not an engraver himself, only Wolffs name was recorded on the engravings. Many of his engravers went uncredited for their work. In 1710 Wolff was one of the founder member of the Empire State Academy of Arts in Augsburg.
After his death in 1724, Wolffs publishing business was inherited by his sons and son-in-law, Johann Balthasar Probst (1673–1750) a notable engraver at the time. The firm continued on in Augsburg under the name Jeremias Wolff Erben.
Together with the Nuremberg copperplate engraver Paul Decker , Wolff published a series of engravings showing the war successes of Prince Eugene of Savoy in Italy , southern Germany and the Spanish Netherlands, during the War of the Spanish Succession . The prints are exhibited in the Museum of Military History, in Vienna .

 

$275.00 USD
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1740 Wolff & Corvinus Antique Arch Print of Charlottenburg Palace Stables Berlin

1740 Wolff & Corvinus Antique Arch Print of Charlottenburg Palace Stables Berlin

  • Title : Der von Hr. Obrist von Eosander inventirte und gebaute Königl. Pferdt Stall zu Charlottenburg, dessen Faciata und Grund Riss. - Das gleichfals von Hr. Joh. Friederich v. Eosander Obristen General Quartier Meistern, und ersten Bau Directorn inventierte und gebaute Rath Hauss zu gedachten Charlottenburg
  • Ref #:  93453
  • Size: 19in x 12 1/2in (490mm x 335mm)
  • Date : 1740
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This large rare, original copper-plate engraved antique architectural print of the Royal Horse Stables at Charlottenburg Palace, Berlin - plate No. 11 of 16 - by Johann August Corvinus 1683 - 1738, after Andreas Mayers 1716 - 1782, was published in Eigentliche Abbildung des Prächtigen Königl. Lust Schlosses Charlottenburg, eine Meile von Berlin, sambt dem darhinden im Walde gelegenen schönen Lust Garten
(Set of 16 numbered plates, the first with the title, with plans and views of the buildings and gardens at Charlottenburg, the palace of the King of Prussia on the outskirts of Berlin.)
 by Jeremias Wolff Erben in 1740.

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: -
Colors used: -
General color appearance: -
Paper size: - 19in x 12 1/2in (490mm x 335mm)
Plate size: - 14 1/2in x 10 1/2in (370mm x 260mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None 

Background:
Berlin straddles the banks of the River Spree, which flows into the River Havel (a tributary of the River Elbe) in the western borough of Spandau. Among the citys main topographical features are the many lakes in the western and southeastern boroughs formed by the Spree, Havel, and Dahme rivers (the largest of which is Lake Müggelsee). Due to its location in the European Plain, Berlin is influenced by a temperate seasonal climate. About one-third of the citys area is composed of forests, parks, gardens, rivers, canals and lakes. The city lies in the Central German dialect area, the Berlin dialect being a variant of the Lusatian-New Marchian dialects.
First documented in the 13th century and situated at the crossing of two important historic trade routes, Berlin became the capital of the Margraviate of Brandenburg (1417–1701), the Kingdom of Prussia (1701–1918), the German Empire (1871–1918), the Weimar Republic (1919–1933), and the Third Reich (1933–1945). Berlin in the 1920s was the third-largest municipality in the world. After World War II and its subsequent occupation by the victorious countries, the city was divided; West Berlin became a de facto West German exclave, surrounded by the Berlin Wall (1961–1989) and East German territory. East Berlin was declared capital of East Germany, while Bonn became the West German capital. Following German reunification in 1990, Berlin once again became the capital of all of Germany.
The Thirty Years War between 1618 and 1648 devastated Berlin. One third of its houses were damaged or destroyed, and the city lost half of its population. Frederick William, known as the Great Elector, who had succeeded his father George William as ruler in 1640, initiated a policy of promoting immigration and religious tolerance. With the Edict of Potsdam in 1685, Frederick William offered asylum to the French Huguenots.
By 1700, approximately 30 percent of Berlins residents were French, because of the Huguenot immigration. Many other immigrants came from Bohemia, Poland, and Salzburg.
Since 1618, the Margraviate of Brandenburg had been in personal union with the Duchy of Prussia. In 1701, the dual state formed the Kingdom of Prussia, as Frederick III, Elector of Brandenburg, crowned himself as king Frederick I in Prussia. Berlin became the capital of the new Kingdom, replacing Königsberg. This was a successful attempt to centralise the capital in the very far-flung state, and it was the first time the city began to grow. In 1709, Berlin merged with the four cities of Cölln, Friedrichswerder, Friedrichstadt and Dorotheenstadt under the name Berlin, Haupt- und Residenzstadt Berlin.
In 1740, Frederick II, known as Frederick the Great (1740–1786), came to power. Under the rule of Frederick II, Berlin became a center of the Enlightenment, but also, was briefly occupied during the Seven Years War by the Russian army. Following Frances victory in the War of the Fourth Coalition, Napoleon Bonaparte marched into Berlin in 1806, but granted self-government to the city. In 1815, the city became part of the new Province of Brandenburg.
The Industrial Revolution transformed Berlin during the 19th century; the citys economy and population expanded dramatically, and it became the main railway hub and economic centre of Germany. Additional suburbs soon developed and increased the area and population of Berlin. In 1861, neighbouring suburbs including Wedding, Moabit and several others were incorporated into Berlin. In 1871, Berlin became capital of the newly founded German Empire. In 1881, it became a city district separate from Brandenburg.

Wolff, Jeremais 1663 - 1724
Wolff was an German engraver and publisher. Born in Augsburg, he originally trained as a clock and automat maker, later changing course and opening a small copperplate engraving shop. His success was impressive and became one of the largest European art, print & map publishers in the first half of the 18th century. Wolff employed some of the best engravers of the time and although not an engraver himself, only Wolffs name was recorded on the engravings. Many of his engravers went uncredited for their work. In 1710 Wolff was one of the founder member of the Empire State Academy of Arts in Augsburg.
After his death in 1724, Wolffs publishing business was inherited by his sons and son-in-law, Johann Balthasar Probst (1673–1750) a notable engraver at the time. The firm continued on in Augsburg under the name Jeremias Wolff Erben.
Together with the Nuremberg copperplate engraver Paul Decker , Wolff published a series of engravings showing the war successes of Prince Eugene of Savoy in Italy , southern Germany and the Spanish Netherlands, during the War of the Spanish Succession . The prints are exhibited in the Museum of Military History, in Vienna .

 

$275.00 USD
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1740 Wolff & Corvinus Antique Arch Print of Berlin Mansions by A. von Schlütter

1740 Wolff & Corvinus Antique Arch Print of Berlin Mansions by A. von Schlütter

  • Title : A. Ist ein von H. Andreas von Schlütter Seel. inventirt- und auff gebautes Landt-Hauss. B. Ist ein von dem renomirten Bau-Werck- und Raths Zimmer-Meister Joh. Mich. Kemmeter, in Riegel oder Holtz auff gebautes Land-Hauß oder so genandte Meyerey
  • Ref #:  93445
  • Size: 19in x 12 1/2in (490mm x 335mm)
  • Date : 1740
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This large rare, original copper-plate engraved antique architectural print of 18th century Mansions in Berlin designed by Andreas von Schlütter - plate No. 9 of 16 - by Johann August Corvinus 1683 - 1738, after Andreas Mayers 1716 - 1782, was published in Eigentliche Abbildung des Prächtigen Königl. Lust Schlosses Charlottenburg, eine Meile von Berlin, sambt dem darhinden im Walde gelegenen schönen Lust Garten
(Set of 16 numbered plates, the first with the title, with plans and views of the buildings and gardens at Charlottenburg, the palace of the King of Prussia on the outskirts of Berlin.)
 by Jeremias Wolff Erben in 1740.

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: -
Colors used: -
General color appearance: -
Paper size: - 19in x 12 1/2in (490mm x 335mm)
Plate size: - 14 1/2in x 10 1/2in (370mm x 260mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None 

Background:
Berlin straddles the banks of the River Spree, which flows into the River Havel (a tributary of the River Elbe) in the western borough of Spandau. Among the citys main topographical features are the many lakes in the western and southeastern boroughs formed by the Spree, Havel, and Dahme rivers (the largest of which is Lake Müggelsee). Due to its location in the European Plain, Berlin is influenced by a temperate seasonal climate. About one-third of the citys area is composed of forests, parks, gardens, rivers, canals and lakes. The city lies in the Central German dialect area, the Berlin dialect being a variant of the Lusatian-New Marchian dialects.
First documented in the 13th century and situated at the crossing of two important historic trade routes, Berlin became the capital of the Margraviate of Brandenburg (1417–1701), the Kingdom of Prussia (1701–1918), the German Empire (1871–1918), the Weimar Republic (1919–1933), and the Third Reich (1933–1945). Berlin in the 1920s was the third-largest municipality in the world. After World War II and its subsequent occupation by the victorious countries, the city was divided; West Berlin became a de facto West German exclave, surrounded by the Berlin Wall (1961–1989) and East German territory. East Berlin was declared capital of East Germany, while Bonn became the West German capital. Following German reunification in 1990, Berlin once again became the capital of all of Germany.
The Thirty Years War between 1618 and 1648 devastated Berlin. One third of its houses were damaged or destroyed, and the city lost half of its population. Frederick William, known as the Great Elector, who had succeeded his father George William as ruler in 1640, initiated a policy of promoting immigration and religious tolerance. With the Edict of Potsdam in 1685, Frederick William offered asylum to the French Huguenots.
By 1700, approximately 30 percent of Berlins residents were French, because of the Huguenot immigration. Many other immigrants came from Bohemia, Poland, and Salzburg.
Since 1618, the Margraviate of Brandenburg had been in personal union with the Duchy of Prussia. In 1701, the dual state formed the Kingdom of Prussia, as Frederick III, Elector of Brandenburg, crowned himself as king Frederick I in Prussia. Berlin became the capital of the new Kingdom, replacing Königsberg. This was a successful attempt to centralise the capital in the very far-flung state, and it was the first time the city began to grow. In 1709, Berlin merged with the four cities of Cölln, Friedrichswerder, Friedrichstadt and Dorotheenstadt under the name Berlin, Haupt- und Residenzstadt Berlin.
In 1740, Frederick II, known as Frederick the Great (1740–1786), came to power. Under the rule of Frederick II, Berlin became a center of the Enlightenment, but also, was briefly occupied during the Seven Years War by the Russian army. Following Frances victory in the War of the Fourth Coalition, Napoleon Bonaparte marched into Berlin in 1806, but granted self-government to the city. In 1815, the city became part of the new Province of Brandenburg.
The Industrial Revolution transformed Berlin during the 19th century; the citys economy and population expanded dramatically, and it became the main railway hub and economic centre of Germany. Additional suburbs soon developed and increased the area and population of Berlin. In 1861, neighbouring suburbs including Wedding, Moabit and several others were incorporated into Berlin. In 1871, Berlin became capital of the newly founded German Empire. In 1881, it became a city district separate from Brandenburg.

Wolff, Jeremais 1663 - 1724
Wolff was an German engraver and publisher. Born in Augsburg, he originally trained as a clock and automat maker, later changing course and opening a small copperplate engraving shop. His success was impressive and became one of the largest European art, print & map publishers in the first half of the 18th century. Wolff employed some of the best engravers of the time and although not an engraver himself, only Wolffs name was recorded on the engravings. Many of his engravers went uncredited for their work. In 1710 Wolff was one of the founder member of the Empire State Academy of Arts in Augsburg.
After his death in 1724, Wolffs publishing business was inherited by his sons and son-in-law, Johann Balthasar Probst (1673–1750) a notable engraver at the time. The firm continued on in Augsburg under the name Jeremias Wolff Erben.
Together with the Nuremberg copperplate engraver Paul Decker , Wolff published a series of engravings showing the war successes of Prince Eugene of Savoy in Italy , southern Germany and the Spanish Netherlands, during the War of the Spanish Succession . The prints are exhibited in the Museum of Military History, in Vienna .

 

$275.00 USD
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1740 Wolff & Corvinus Antique Arch Print of a Poorhouse near Stralau Gate Berlin

1740 Wolff & Corvinus Antique Arch Print of a Poorhouse near Stralau Gate Berlin

  • Title : Das von dem H. von Grünenberg Seel. inventirte sogenandte Armen- oder Waysen-Hauss zu Berlin, nache bey dem Stralauischen Thor gelegen, ....
  • Ref #:  93455
  • Size: 19in x 12 1/2in (490mm x 335mm)
  • Date : 1740
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This large rare, original copper-plate engraved antique architectural print of the Poorhouse near the old Stralau Gate (Stralauer Tor) in Berlin - plate No. 8 of 16 - by Johann August Corvinus 1683 - 1738, after Andreas Mayers 1716 - 1782, was published in Eigentliche Abbildung des Prächtigen Königl. Lust Schlosses Charlottenburg, eine Meile von Berlin, sambt dem darhinden im Walde gelegenen schönen Lust Garten
(Set of 16 numbered plates, the first with the title, with plans and views of the buildings and gardens at Charlottenburg, the palace of the King of Prussia on the outskirts of Berlin.)
 by Jeremias Wolff Erben in 1740.

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: -
Colors used: -
General color appearance: -
Paper size: - 19in x 12 1/2in (490mm x 335mm)
Plate size: - 14 1/2in x 10 1/2in (370mm x 260mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

 

Background:
Berlin straddles the banks of the River Spree, which flows into the River Havel (a tributary of the River Elbe) in the western borough of Spandau. Among the citys main topographical features are the many lakes in the western and southeastern boroughs formed by the Spree, Havel, and Dahme rivers (the largest of which is Lake Müggelsee). Due to its location in the European Plain, Berlin is influenced by a temperate seasonal climate. About one-third of the citys area is composed of forests, parks, gardens, rivers, canals and lakes. The city lies in the Central German dialect area, the Berlin dialect being a variant of the Lusatian-New Marchian dialects.
First documented in the 13th century and situated at the crossing of two important historic trade routes, Berlin became the capital of the Margraviate of Brandenburg (1417–1701), the Kingdom of Prussia (1701–1918), the German Empire (1871–1918), the Weimar Republic (1919–1933), and the Third Reich (1933–1945). Berlin in the 1920s was the third-largest municipality in the world. After World War II and its subsequent occupation by the victorious countries, the city was divided; West Berlin became a de facto West German exclave, surrounded by the Berlin Wall (1961–1989) and East German territory. East Berlin was declared capital of East Germany, while Bonn became the West German capital. Following German reunification in 1990, Berlin once again became the capital of all of Germany.
The Thirty Years War between 1618 and 1648 devastated Berlin. One third of its houses were damaged or destroyed, and the city lost half of its population. Frederick William, known as the Great Elector, who had succeeded his father George William as ruler in 1640, initiated a policy of promoting immigration and religious tolerance. With the Edict of Potsdam in 1685, Frederick William offered asylum to the French Huguenots.
By 1700, approximately 30 percent of Berlins residents were French, because of the Huguenot immigration. Many other immigrants came from Bohemia, Poland, and Salzburg.
Since 1618, the Margraviate of Brandenburg had been in personal union with the Duchy of Prussia. In 1701, the dual state formed the Kingdom of Prussia, as Frederick III, Elector of Brandenburg, crowned himself as king Frederick I in Prussia. Berlin became the capital of the new Kingdom, replacing Königsberg. This was a successful attempt to centralise the capital in the very far-flung state, and it was the first time the city began to grow. In 1709, Berlin merged with the four cities of Cölln, Friedrichswerder, Friedrichstadt and Dorotheenstadt under the name Berlin, Haupt- und Residenzstadt Berlin.
In 1740, Frederick II, known as Frederick the Great (1740–1786), came to power. Under the rule of Frederick II, Berlin became a center of the Enlightenment, but also, was briefly occupied during the Seven Years War by the Russian army. Following Frances victory in the War of the Fourth Coalition, Napoleon Bonaparte marched into Berlin in 1806, but granted self-government to the city. In 1815, the city became part of the new Province of Brandenburg.
The Industrial Revolution transformed Berlin during the 19th century; the citys economy and population expanded dramatically, and it became the main railway hub and economic centre of Germany. Additional suburbs soon developed and increased the area and population of Berlin. In 1861, neighbouring suburbs including Wedding, Moabit and several others were incorporated into Berlin. In 1871, Berlin became capital of the newly founded German Empire. In 1881, it became a city district separate from Brandenburg.

Wolff, Jeremais 1663 - 1724
Wolff was an German engraver and publisher. Born in Augsburg, he originally trained as a clock and automat maker, later changing course and opening a small copperplate engraving shop. His success was impressive and became one of the largest European art, print & map publishers in the first half of the 18th century. Wolff employed some of the best engravers of the time and although not an engraver himself, only Wolffs name was recorded on the engravings. Many of his engravers went uncredited for their work. In 1710 Wolff was one of the founder member of the Empire State Academy of Arts in Augsburg.
After his death in 1724, Wolffs publishing business was inherited by his sons and son-in-law, Johann Balthasar Probst (1673–1750) a notable engraver at the time. The firm continued on in Augsburg under the name Jeremias Wolff Erben.
Together with the Nuremberg copperplate engraver Paul Decker , Wolff published a series of engravings showing the war successes of Prince Eugene of Savoy in Italy , southern Germany and the Spanish Netherlands, during the War of the Spanish Succession . The prints are exhibited in the Museum of Military History, in Vienna .

 

$275.00 USD
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1740 Wolff & Corvinus Antique Arch. Print Jerusalem Church Friedrichstadt.Berlin

1740 Wolff & Corvinus Antique Arch. Print Jerusalem Church Friedrichstadt.Berlin

  • Title : Die von vorgedachten Hr. von Grünenberg invendierte, unter der Direction des Hr. Ioh. Simonetti Hoff Stucator Hoch-Fürstl. Anhaltischen BauMeister aufgebaute so genande Friderich Stättische Kirche sampt dessen Grund u. Faciata.
  • Ref #:  93458
  • Size: 19in x 12 1/2in (490mm x 335mm)
  • Date : 1740
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This large rare, original copper-plate engraved antique architectural print of the Parochialkirche (literally the Reformed parochial church) in the Mitte suburb of Berlin - plate No. 7 of 16 - by Johann August Corvinus 1683 - 1738, after Andreas Mayers 1716 - 1782, was published in Eigentliche Abbildung des Prächtigen Königl. Lust Schlosses Charlottenburg, eine Meile von Berlin, sambt dem darhinden im Walde gelegenen schönen Lust Garten
(Set of 16 numbered plates, the first with the title, with plans and views of the buildings and gardens at Charlottenburg, the palace of the King of Prussia on the outskirts of Berlin.)
 by Jeremias Wolff Erben in 1740.

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: -
Colors used: -
General color appearance: -
Paper size: - 19in x 12 1/2in (490mm x 335mm)
Plate size: - 14 1/2in x 10 1/2in (370mm x 260mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

 

Background:
Berlin straddles the banks of the River Spree, which flows into the River Havel (a tributary of the River Elbe) in the western borough of Spandau. Among the citys main topographical features are the many lakes in the western and southeastern boroughs formed by the Spree, Havel, and Dahme rivers (the largest of which is Lake Müggelsee). Due to its location in the European Plain, Berlin is influenced by a temperate seasonal climate. About one-third of the citys area is composed of forests, parks, gardens, rivers, canals and lakes. The city lies in the Central German dialect area, the Berlin dialect being a variant of the Lusatian-New Marchian dialects.
First documented in the 13th century and situated at the crossing of two important historic trade routes, Berlin became the capital of the Margraviate of Brandenburg (1417–1701), the Kingdom of Prussia (1701–1918), the German Empire (1871–1918), the Weimar Republic (1919–1933), and the Third Reich (1933–1945). Berlin in the 1920s was the third-largest municipality in the world. After World War II and its subsequent occupation by the victorious countries, the city was divided; West Berlin became a de facto West German exclave, surrounded by the Berlin Wall (1961–1989) and East German territory. East Berlin was declared capital of East Germany, while Bonn became the West German capital. Following German reunification in 1990, Berlin once again became the capital of all of Germany.
The Thirty Years War between 1618 and 1648 devastated Berlin. One third of its houses were damaged or destroyed, and the city lost half of its population. Frederick William, known as the Great Elector, who had succeeded his father George William as ruler in 1640, initiated a policy of promoting immigration and religious tolerance. With the Edict of Potsdam in 1685, Frederick William offered asylum to the French Huguenots.
By 1700, approximately 30 percent of Berlins residents were French, because of the Huguenot immigration. Many other immigrants came from Bohemia, Poland, and Salzburg.
Since 1618, the Margraviate of Brandenburg had been in personal union with the Duchy of Prussia. In 1701, the dual state formed the Kingdom of Prussia, as Frederick III, Elector of Brandenburg, crowned himself as king Frederick I in Prussia. Berlin became the capital of the new Kingdom, replacing Königsberg. This was a successful attempt to centralise the capital in the very far-flung state, and it was the first time the city began to grow. In 1709, Berlin merged with the four cities of Cölln, Friedrichswerder, Friedrichstadt and Dorotheenstadt under the name Berlin, Haupt- und Residenzstadt Berlin.
In 1740, Frederick II, known as Frederick the Great (1740–1786), came to power. Under the rule of Frederick II, Berlin became a center of the Enlightenment, but also, was briefly occupied during the Seven Years War by the Russian army. Following Frances victory in the War of the Fourth Coalition, Napoleon Bonaparte marched into Berlin in 1806, but granted self-government to the city. In 1815, the city became part of the new Province of Brandenburg.
The Industrial Revolution transformed Berlin during the 19th century; the citys economy and population expanded dramatically, and it became the main railway hub and economic centre of Germany. Additional suburbs soon developed and increased the area and population of Berlin. In 1861, neighbouring suburbs including Wedding, Moabit and several others were incorporated into Berlin. In 1871, Berlin became capital of the newly founded German Empire. In 1881, it became a city district separate from Brandenburg.

Wolff, Jeremais 1663 - 1724
Wolff was an German engraver and publisher. Born in Augsburg, he originally trained as a clock and automat maker, later changing course and opening a small copperplate engraving shop. His success was impressive and became one of the largest European art, print & map publishers in the first half of the 18th century. Wolff employed some of the best engravers of the time and although not an engraver himself, only Wolffs name was recorded on the engravings. Many of his engravers went uncredited for their work. In 1710 Wolff was one of the founder member of the Empire State Academy of Arts in Augsburg.
After his death in 1724, Wolffs publishing business was inherited by his sons and son-in-law, Johann Balthasar Probst (1673–1750) a notable engraver at the time. The firm continued on in Augsburg under the name Jeremias Wolff Erben.
Together with the Nuremberg copperplate engraver Paul Decker , Wolff published a series of engravings showing the war successes of Prince Eugene of Savoy in Italy , southern Germany and the Spanish Netherlands, during the War of the Spanish Succession . The prints are exhibited in the Museum of Military History, in Vienna .

 

$275.00 USD
More Info
1740 Wolff & Corvinus Antique Arch. Print of the Parochialkirche in Mitte Berlin

1740 Wolff & Corvinus Antique Arch. Print of the Parochialkirche in Mitte Berlin

  • Title : Vordere faciata nebst dem halben Grund Riß der vorigen Parochial-Kirche mit verändertem Thurn wie solcher dermahlen sich würklich presentiert. Frontriß, darunter der halbe Grundriß.
  • Ref #:  93459
  • Size: 19in x 12 1/2in (490mm x 335mm)
  • Date : 1740
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This large rare, original copper-plate engraved antique architectural print of the Parochialkirche (literally the Reformed parochial church) in the Mitte suburb of Berlin - plate No. 6 of 16 - by Johann August Corvinus 1683 - 1738, after Andreas Mayers 1716 - 1782, was published in Eigentliche Abbildung des Prächtigen Königl. Lust Schlosses Charlottenburg, eine Meile von Berlin, sambt dem darhinden im Walde gelegenen schönen Lust Garten.
(Set of 16 numbered plates, the first with the title, with plans and views of the buildings and gardens at Charlottenburg, the palace of the King of Prussia on the outskirts of Berlin.)
 by Jeremias Wolff Erben in 1740.

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: -
Colors used: -
General color appearance: -
Paper size: - 19in x 12 1/2in (490mm x 335mm)
Plate size: - 14 1/2in x 10 1/2in (370mm x 260mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

 

Background:
Berlin straddles the banks of the River Spree, which flows into the River Havel (a tributary of the River Elbe) in the western borough of Spandau. Among the citys main topographical features are the many lakes in the western and southeastern boroughs formed by the Spree, Havel, and Dahme rivers (the largest of which is Lake Müggelsee). Due to its location in the European Plain, Berlin is influenced by a temperate seasonal climate. About one-third of the citys area is composed of forests, parks, gardens, rivers, canals and lakes. The city lies in the Central German dialect area, the Berlin dialect being a variant of the Lusatian-New Marchian dialects.
First documented in the 13th century and situated at the crossing of two important historic trade routes, Berlin became the capital of the Margraviate of Brandenburg (1417–1701), the Kingdom of Prussia (1701–1918), the German Empire (1871–1918), the Weimar Republic (1919–1933), and the Third Reich (1933–1945). Berlin in the 1920s was the third-largest municipality in the world. After World War II and its subsequent occupation by the victorious countries, the city was divided; West Berlin became a de facto West German exclave, surrounded by the Berlin Wall (1961–1989) and East German territory. East Berlin was declared capital of East Germany, while Bonn became the West German capital. Following German reunification in 1990, Berlin once again became the capital of all of Germany.
The Thirty Years War between 1618 and 1648 devastated Berlin. One third of its houses were damaged or destroyed, and the city lost half of its population. Frederick William, known as the Great Elector, who had succeeded his father George William as ruler in 1640, initiated a policy of promoting immigration and religious tolerance. With the Edict of Potsdam in 1685, Frederick William offered asylum to the French Huguenots.
By 1700, approximately 30 percent of Berlins residents were French, because of the Huguenot immigration. Many other immigrants came from Bohemia, Poland, and Salzburg.
Since 1618, the Margraviate of Brandenburg had been in personal union with the Duchy of Prussia. In 1701, the dual state formed the Kingdom of Prussia, as Frederick III, Elector of Brandenburg, crowned himself as king Frederick I in Prussia. Berlin became the capital of the new Kingdom, replacing Königsberg. This was a successful attempt to centralise the capital in the very far-flung state, and it was the first time the city began to grow. In 1709, Berlin merged with the four cities of Cölln, Friedrichswerder, Friedrichstadt and Dorotheenstadt under the name Berlin, Haupt- und Residenzstadt Berlin.
In 1740, Frederick II, known as Frederick the Great (1740–1786), came to power. Under the rule of Frederick II, Berlin became a center of the Enlightenment, but also, was briefly occupied during the Seven Years War by the Russian army. Following Frances victory in the War of the Fourth Coalition, Napoleon Bonaparte marched into Berlin in 1806, but granted self-government to the city. In 1815, the city became part of the new Province of Brandenburg.
The Industrial Revolution transformed Berlin during the 19th century; the citys economy and population expanded dramatically, and it became the main railway hub and economic centre of Germany. Additional suburbs soon developed and increased the area and population of Berlin. In 1861, neighbouring suburbs including Wedding, Moabit and several others were incorporated into Berlin. In 1871, Berlin became capital of the newly founded German Empire. In 1881, it became a city district separate from Brandenburg.

Wolff, Jeremais 1663 - 1724
Wolff was an German engraver and publisher. Born in Augsburg, he originally trained as a clock and automat maker, later changing course and opening a small copperplate engraving shop. His success was impressive and became one of the largest European art, print & map publishers in the first half of the 18th century. Wolff employed some of the best engravers of the time and although not an engraver himself, only Wolffs name was recorded on the engravings. Many of his engravers went uncredited for their work. In 1710 Wolff was one of the founder member of the Empire State Academy of Arts in Augsburg.
After his death in 1724, Wolffs publishing business was inherited by his sons and son-in-law, Johann Balthasar Probst (1673–1750) a notable engraver at the time. The firm continued on in Augsburg under the name Jeremias Wolff Erben.
Together with the Nuremberg copperplate engraver Paul Decker , Wolff published a series of engravings showing the war successes of Prince Eugene of Savoy in Italy , southern Germany and the Spanish Netherlands, during the War of the Spanish Succession . The prints are exhibited in the Museum of Military History, in Vienna .

 

$275.00 USD
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1740 Wolff & Corvinus Antique Architectural Print Parochialkirche, Mitte, Berlin

1740 Wolff & Corvinus Antique Architectural Print Parochialkirche, Mitte, Berlin

  • Title : Die Von dem Vortreslich beruhmten Konigl. Preusichen Architect Land u. Ober Bau Directorn etc. Hr. Martin von Grunenberg Seel. inventirte, u. hier Grund u. Seiten Faciata Vorstellende so genandte Parochial Kirche in Berlin in der Closter Strassen
  • Ref #:  93451
  • Size: 19in x 12 1/2in (490mm x 335mm)
  • Date : 1740
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This large rare, original copper-plate engraved antique architectural print of the Parochialkirche (literally the Reformed parochial church) in the Mitte suburb of Berlin - plate No. 5 of 16 - by Johann August Corvinus 1683 - 1738, after Andreas Mayers 1716 - 1782, was published in Eigentliche Abbildung des Prächtigen Königl. Lust Schlosses Charlottenburg, eine Meile von Berlin, sambt dem darhinden im Walde gelegenen schönen Lust Garten
(Set of 16 numbered plates, the first with the title, with plans and views of the buildings and gardens at Charlottenburg, the palace of the King of Prussia on the outskirts of Berlin.)
 by Jeremias Wolff Erben in 1740.

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: -
Colors used: -
General color appearance: -
Paper size: - 19in x 12 1/2in (490mm x 335mm)
Plate size: - 14 1/2in x 10 1/2in (370mm x 260mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

 

Background:
Berlin straddles the banks of the River Spree, which flows into the River Havel (a tributary of the River Elbe) in the western borough of Spandau. Among the citys main topographical features are the many lakes in the western and southeastern boroughs formed by the Spree, Havel, and Dahme rivers (the largest of which is Lake Müggelsee). Due to its location in the European Plain, Berlin is influenced by a temperate seasonal climate. About one-third of the citys area is composed of forests, parks, gardens, rivers, canals and lakes. The city lies in the Central German dialect area, the Berlin dialect being a variant of the Lusatian-New Marchian dialects.
First documented in the 13th century and situated at the crossing of two important historic trade routes, Berlin became the capital of the Margraviate of Brandenburg (1417–1701), the Kingdom of Prussia (1701–1918), the German Empire (1871–1918), the Weimar Republic (1919–1933), and the Third Reich (1933–1945). Berlin in the 1920s was the third-largest municipality in the world. After World War II and its subsequent occupation by the victorious countries, the city was divided; West Berlin became a de facto West German exclave, surrounded by the Berlin Wall (1961–1989) and East German territory. East Berlin was declared capital of East Germany, while Bonn became the West German capital. Following German reunification in 1990, Berlin once again became the capital of all of Germany.
The Thirty Years War between 1618 and 1648 devastated Berlin. One third of its houses were damaged or destroyed, and the city lost half of its population. Frederick William, known as the Great Elector, who had succeeded his father George William as ruler in 1640, initiated a policy of promoting immigration and religious tolerance. With the Edict of Potsdam in 1685, Frederick William offered asylum to the French Huguenots.
By 1700, approximately 30 percent of Berlins residents were French, because of the Huguenot immigration. Many other immigrants came from Bohemia, Poland, and Salzburg.
Since 1618, the Margraviate of Brandenburg had been in personal union with the Duchy of Prussia. In 1701, the dual state formed the Kingdom of Prussia, as Frederick III, Elector of Brandenburg, crowned himself as king Frederick I in Prussia. Berlin became the capital of the new Kingdom, replacing Königsberg. This was a successful attempt to centralise the capital in the very far-flung state, and it was the first time the city began to grow. In 1709, Berlin merged with the four cities of Cölln, Friedrichswerder, Friedrichstadt and Dorotheenstadt under the name Berlin, Haupt- und Residenzstadt Berlin.
In 1740, Frederick II, known as Frederick the Great (1740–1786), came to power. Under the rule of Frederick II, Berlin became a center of the Enlightenment, but also, was briefly occupied during the Seven Years War by the Russian army. Following Frances victory in the War of the Fourth Coalition, Napoleon Bonaparte marched into Berlin in 1806, but granted self-government to the city. In 1815, the city became part of the new Province of Brandenburg.
The Industrial Revolution transformed Berlin during the 19th century; the citys economy and population expanded dramatically, and it became the main railway hub and economic centre of Germany. Additional suburbs soon developed and increased the area and population of Berlin. In 1861, neighbouring suburbs including Wedding, Moabit and several others were incorporated into Berlin. In 1871, Berlin became capital of the newly founded German Empire. In 1881, it became a city district separate from Brandenburg.

Wolff, Jeremais 1663 - 1724
Wolff was an German engraver and publisher. Born in Augsburg, he originally trained as a clock and automat maker, later changing course and opening a small copperplate engraving shop. His success was impressive and became one of the largest European art, print & map publishers in the first half of the 18th century. Wolff employed some of the best engravers of the time and although not an engraver himself, only Wolffs name was recorded on the engravings. Many of his engravers went uncredited for their work. In 1710 Wolff was one of the founder member of the Empire State Academy of Arts in Augsburg.
After his death in 1724, Wolffs publishing business was inherited by his sons and son-in-law, Johann Balthasar Probst (1673–1750) a notable engraver at the time. The firm continued on in Augsburg under the name Jeremias Wolff Erben.
Together with the Nuremberg copperplate engraver Paul Decker , Wolff published a series of engravings showing the war successes of Prince Eugene of Savoy in Italy , southern Germany and the Spanish Netherlands, during the War of the Spanish Succession . The prints are exhibited in the Museum of Military History, in Vienna .

 

$275.00 USD
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1740 Wolff & Corvinus Antique Architectural Print of Berlin Gate, Leipziger Tor

1740 Wolff & Corvinus Antique Architectural Print of Berlin Gate, Leipziger Tor

  • Title : Das von dem Herrn Baumeister Nering Seel. ausgefuhrte so genandte Leipziger Statt Thor in Berlin
  • Ref #:  93452
  • Size: 19in x 12 1/2in (490mm x 335mm)
  • Date : 1740
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This large fine, original copper-plate engraved antique architectural print of buildings & gardens in 17th & 18th century Berlin - plate No. 3 of 16 - by Johann August Corvinus 1683 - 1738, after Andreas Mayers 1716 - 1782, was published in Eigentliche Abbildung des Prächtigen Königl. Lust Schlosses Charlottenburg, eine Meile von Berlin, sambt dem darhinden im Walde gelegenen schönen Lust Garten
(Set of 16 numbered plates, the first with the title, with plans and views of the buildings and gardens at Charlottenburg, the palace of the King of Prussia on the outskirts of Berlin.)
 by Jeremias Wolff Erben in 1740.

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: -
Colors used: -
General color appearance: -
Paper size: - 19in x 12 1/2in (490mm x 335mm)
Plate size: - 14 1/2in x 10 1/2in (370mm x 260mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

 

Background:
Berlin straddles the banks of the River Spree, which flows into the River Havel (a tributary of the River Elbe) in the western borough of Spandau. Among the citys main topographical features are the many lakes in the western and southeastern boroughs formed by the Spree, Havel, and Dahme rivers (the largest of which is Lake Müggelsee). Due to its location in the European Plain, Berlin is influenced by a temperate seasonal climate. About one-third of the citys area is composed of forests, parks, gardens, rivers, canals and lakes. The city lies in the Central German dialect area, the Berlin dialect being a variant of the Lusatian-New Marchian dialects.
First documented in the 13th century and situated at the crossing of two important historic trade routes, Berlin became the capital of the Margraviate of Brandenburg (1417–1701), the Kingdom of Prussia (1701–1918), the German Empire (1871–1918), the Weimar Republic (1919–1933), and the Third Reich (1933–1945). Berlin in the 1920s was the third-largest municipality in the world. After World War II and its subsequent occupation by the victorious countries, the city was divided; West Berlin became a de facto West German exclave, surrounded by the Berlin Wall (1961–1989) and East German territory. East Berlin was declared capital of East Germany, while Bonn became the West German capital. Following German reunification in 1990, Berlin once again became the capital of all of Germany.
The Thirty Years War between 1618 and 1648 devastated Berlin. One third of its houses were damaged or destroyed, and the city lost half of its population. Frederick William, known as the Great Elector, who had succeeded his father George William as ruler in 1640, initiated a policy of promoting immigration and religious tolerance. With the Edict of Potsdam in 1685, Frederick William offered asylum to the French Huguenots.
By 1700, approximately 30 percent of Berlins residents were French, because of the Huguenot immigration. Many other immigrants came from Bohemia, Poland, and Salzburg.
Since 1618, the Margraviate of Brandenburg had been in personal union with the Duchy of Prussia. In 1701, the dual state formed the Kingdom of Prussia, as Frederick III, Elector of Brandenburg, crowned himself as king Frederick I in Prussia. Berlin became the capital of the new Kingdom, replacing Königsberg. This was a successful attempt to centralise the capital in the very far-flung state, and it was the first time the city began to grow. In 1709, Berlin merged with the four cities of Cölln, Friedrichswerder, Friedrichstadt and Dorotheenstadt under the name Berlin, Haupt- und Residenzstadt Berlin.
In 1740, Frederick II, known as Frederick the Great (1740–1786), came to power. Under the rule of Frederick II, Berlin became a center of the Enlightenment, but also, was briefly occupied during the Seven Years War by the Russian army. Following Frances victory in the War of the Fourth Coalition, Napoleon Bonaparte marched into Berlin in 1806, but granted self-government to the city. In 1815, the city became part of the new Province of Brandenburg.
The Industrial Revolution transformed Berlin during the 19th century; the citys economy and population expanded dramatically, and it became the main railway hub and economic centre of Germany. Additional suburbs soon developed and increased the area and population of Berlin. In 1861, neighbouring suburbs including Wedding, Moabit and several others were incorporated into Berlin. In 1871, Berlin became capital of the newly founded German Empire. In 1881, it became a city district separate from Brandenburg.

Wolff, Jeremais 1663 - 1724
Wolff was an German engraver and publisher. Born in Augsburg, he originally trained as a clock and automat maker, later changing course and opening a small copperplate engraving shop. His success was impressive and became one of the largest European art, print & map publishers in the first half of the 18th century. Wolff employed some of the best engravers of the time and although not an engraver himself, only Wolffs name was recorded on the engravings. Many of his engravers went uncredited for their work. In 1710 Wolff was one of the founder member of the Empire State Academy of Arts in Augsburg.
After his death in 1724, Wolffs publishing business was inherited by his sons and son-in-law, Johann Balthasar Probst (1673–1750) a notable engraver at the time. The firm continued on in Augsburg under the name Jeremias Wolff Erben.
Together with the Nuremberg copperplate engraver Paul Decker , Wolff published a series of engravings showing the war successes of Prince Eugene of Savoy in Italy , southern Germany and the Spanish Netherlands, during the War of the Spanish Succession . The prints are exhibited in the Museum of Military History, in Vienna .

 

$275.00 USD
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1740 Wolff & Corvinus Antique Architectural Print Buildings, Gardens Berlin - No. 14

1740 Wolff & Corvinus Antique Architectural Print Buildings, Gardens Berlin - No. 14

  • Title : Das von Title Hr. Geheimbten Rath von Krossecks Seel. inventirt - und aussgebaute
  • Ref #:  93448
  • Size: 19in x 12 1/2in (490mm x 335mm)
  • Date : 1740
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This large fine, original copper-plate engraved antique architectural print of buildings & gardens in the Charlottenburg suburb of Berlin & Charlottenburg Palace, - plate No. 14 of 16 - by Johann August Corvinus 1683 - 1738, after Andreas Mayers 1716 - 1782, was published in Eigentliche Abbildung des Prächtigen Königl. Lust Schlosses Charlottenburg, eine Meile von Berlin, sambt dem darhinden im Walde gelegenen schönen Lust Garten
(Set of 16 numbered plates, the first with the title, with plans and views of the buildings and gardens at Charlottenburg, the palace of the King of Prussia on the outskirts of Berlin.)
 by Jeremias Wolff Erben in 1740.

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: -
Colors used: -
General color appearance: -
Paper size: - 19in x 12 1/2in (490mm x 335mm)
Plate size: - 14 1/2in x 10 1/2in (370mm x 260mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

Background:

Charlottenburg is an affluent locality of Berlin within the borough of Charlottenburg-Wilmersdorf. Established as a town in 1705 and named after late Sophia Charlotte of Hanover, Queen consort of Prussia, it is best known for Charlottenburg Palace, the largest surviving royal palace in Berlin, and the adjacent museums.
Charlottenburg is located in Berlins inner city, west of the Großer Tiergarten park. Its historic core, the former village green of Alt Lietzow, is situated on the southern shore of the Spree River running through the Berlin glacial valley. The Straße des 17. Juni road, former Charlottenburger Chaussee, which runs eastwards from Charlottenburg Gate through the Tiergarten park to Brandenburg Gate, connects Charlottenburg with the historic centre of Berlin-Mitte.
In the north and west, the Berlin Ringbahn and the Bundesautobahn 100 (Stadtring) mark the border with the Charlottenburg-Nord and Westend suburbs. Adjacent in the south is the territory of Wilmersdorf. Charlottenburg also borders on the district of Halensee in the southwest, as well as on Moabit, Hansaviertel and Tiergarten (all part of the Mitte borough) in the east and on Schöneberg in the southeast.
In 1695, Sophia Charlotte of Hanover received Lietzow from her husband, Elector Frederick III of Brandenburg, in exchange for her estates in Caputh and Langerwisch near Potsdam. Frederick had a summer residence built there for Sophie Charlotte by the architect Johann Arnold Nering between 1695 and 1699. After he had crowned himself Frederick I, King in Prussia, the Lützenburg castle was extended into a stately building with a cour dhonneur. The Swedish master builder Johann Friedrich Eosander supervised this work. Sophie Charlotte died in February 1705; shortly afterwards the settlement facing the palace was called Charlottenburg - the palace itself became Schloss Charlottenburg - and chartered as a town on April 5, 1705. The king served as the towns mayor until the historic village of Lietzow was incorporated into Charlottenburg in 1720.
Fredericks successor as king, Frederick William I of Prussia, rarely stayed at the palace, which depressed the small town of Charlottenburg. Frederick William even tried to revoke the towns privileges. With the coronation of his successor Frederick II in 1740 the towns significance increased, as regular celebrations again took place at the palace. Between 1740 and 1747 Georg Wenzeslaus von Knobelsdorff built the eastern New Wing as Fredericks residence. Later, Frederick II preferred the palace of Sanssouci, which he had partly designed himself.
When Frederick II died in 1786, his nephew Frederick William II succeeded him, and Charlottenburg became the favourite royal residence, and remained so for his son and successor Frederick William III (reigned 1797-1840). After the defeat of the Prussian army at Jena in 1806, the French occupied Berlin. Napoleon took over the palace, while his troops made a camp nearby. Charlottenburg became part of the new Prussian Province of Brandenburg in 1815 after the Napoleonic Wars.
In the late 18th century, Charlottenburgs development did not depend only on the crown. The town became a recreational area for the expanding city of Berlin. Its first true inn opened in the 1770s, in the street then called Berliner Straße (now Otto-Suhr-Allee), and many other inns and beer gardens were to follow, popular for weekend parties especially. Berliners seeking leisure and entertainment came by boat, by carriage and later by horse-drawn trams, above all to a large amusement park at the shore of the Spree river called Flora, that went into bankruptcy in 1904.
From the 1860s on the wealthy Bourgeoisie of Berlin discovered Charlottenburg as a residential area, among the first were Gerson von Bleichröder and Ernst Werner von Siemens, who had a villa built in the Berliner Straße in 1862. At the same time industrial companies like Siemens & Halske and Schering erected large factories in the north-east, at the border with the Moabit district of Berlin. In 1877 Charlottenburg received town privileges and until World War I saw an enormous increase of population with 100,000 inhabitants as of 1893 and a population of 306,000 in 1920, being the second largest city within the Province of Brandenburg, after Berlin. In the course of industrialization in the 19th century, much of Charlottenburg was incorporated in a network of streets laid out in the Hobrecht-Plan in an area that came to be known architecturally as the Wilhelmine Ring.

Wolff, Jeremais 1663 - 1724
Wolff was an German engraver and publisher. Born in Augsburg, he originally trained as a clock and automat maker, later changing course and opening a small copperplate engraving shop. His success was impressive and became one of the largest European art, print & map publishers in the first half of the 18th century. Wolff employed some of the best engravers of the time and although not an engraver himself, only Wolffs name was recorded on the engravings. Many of his engravers went uncredited for their work. In 1710 Wolff was one of the founder member of the Empire State Academy of Arts in Augsburg.
After his death in 1724, Wolffs publishing business was inherited by his sons and son-in-law, Johann Balthasar Probst (1673–1750) a notable engraver at the time. The firm continued on in Augsburg under the name Jeremias Wolff Erben.
Together with the Nuremberg copperplate engraver Paul Decker , Wolff published a series of engravings showing the war successes of Prince Eugene of Savoy in Italy , southern Germany and the Spanish Netherlands, during the War of the Spanish Succession . The prints are exhibited in the Museum of Military History, in Vienna .

$275.00 USD
More Info
1740 Wolff & Corvinus Antique Architectural Print Charlottenburg Palace, Gardens

1740 Wolff & Corvinus Antique Architectural Print Charlottenburg Palace, Gardens

  • Title : Haupt Hof Grund Riss dess Marstalls...Jeremais Wolff exc Aug. Vind
  • Ref #:  93446
  • Size: 19in x 12 1/2in (490mm x 335mm)
  • Date : 1740
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This large fine, original copper-plate engraved antique architectural print of buildings in the Charlottenburg suburb of Berlin & Charlottenburg Palace, - plate No. 4 of 16 - by Johann August Corvinus 1683 - 1738, after Andreas Mayers 1716 - 1782, was published in Eigentliche Abbildung des Prächtigen Königl. Lust Schlosses Charlottenburg, eine Meile von Berlin, sambt dem darhinden im Walde gelegenen schönen Lust Garten
(Set of 16 numbered plates, the first with the title, with plans and views of the buildings and gardens at Charlottenburg, the palace of the King of Prussia on the outskirts of Berlin.)
 by Jeremias Wolff Erben in 1740.

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: -
Colors used: -
General color appearance: -
Paper size: - 19in x 12 1/2in (490mm x 335mm)
Plate size: - 15 1/2in x 10in (385mm x 255mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

Background:
Charlottenburg is an affluent locality of Berlin within the borough of Charlottenburg-Wilmersdorf. Established as a town in 1705 and named after late Sophia Charlotte of Hanover, Queen consort of Prussia, it is best known for Charlottenburg Palace, the largest surviving royal palace in Berlin, and the adjacent museums.
Charlottenburg is located in Berlins inner city, west of the Großer Tiergarten park. Its historic core, the former village green of Alt Lietzow, is situated on the southern shore of the Spree River running through the Berlin glacial valley. The Straße des 17. Juni road, former Charlottenburger Chaussee, which runs eastwards from Charlottenburg Gate through the Tiergarten park to Brandenburg Gate, connects Charlottenburg with the historic centre of Berlin-Mitte.
In the north and west, the Berlin Ringbahn and the Bundesautobahn 100 (Stadtring) mark the border with the Charlottenburg-Nord and Westend suburbs. Adjacent in the south is the territory of Wilmersdorf. Charlottenburg also borders on the district of Halensee in the southwest, as well as on Moabit, Hansaviertel and Tiergarten (all part of the Mitte borough) in the east and on Schöneberg in the southeast.
In 1695, Sophia Charlotte of Hanover received Lietzow from her husband, Elector Frederick III of Brandenburg, in exchange for her estates in Caputh and Langerwisch near Potsdam. Frederick had a summer residence built there for Sophie Charlotte by the architect Johann Arnold Nering between 1695 and 1699. After he had crowned himself Frederick I, King in Prussia, the Lützenburg castle was extended into a stately building with a cour dhonneur. The Swedish master builder Johann Friedrich Eosander supervised this work. Sophie Charlotte died in February 1705; shortly afterwards the settlement facing the palace was called Charlottenburg - the palace itself became Schloss Charlottenburg - and chartered as a town on April 5, 1705. The king served as the towns mayor until the historic village of Lietzow was incorporated into Charlottenburg in 1720.
Fredericks successor as king, Frederick William I of Prussia, rarely stayed at the palace, which depressed the small town of Charlottenburg. Frederick William even tried to revoke the towns privileges. With the coronation of his successor Frederick II in 1740 the towns significance increased, as regular celebrations again took place at the palace. Between 1740 and 1747 Georg Wenzeslaus von Knobelsdorff built the eastern New Wing as Fredericks residence. Later, Frederick II preferred the palace of Sanssouci, which he had partly designed himself.
When Frederick II died in 1786, his nephew Frederick William II succeeded him, and Charlottenburg became the favourite royal residence, and remained so for his son and successor Frederick William III (reigned 1797-1840). After the defeat of the Prussian army at Jena in 1806, the French occupied Berlin. Napoleon took over the palace, while his troops made a camp nearby. Charlottenburg became part of the new Prussian Province of Brandenburg in 1815 after the Napoleonic Wars.
In the late 18th century, Charlottenburgs development did not depend only on the crown. The town became a recreational area for the expanding city of Berlin. Its first true inn opened in the 1770s, in the street then called Berliner Straße (now Otto-Suhr-Allee), and many other inns and beer gardens were to follow, popular for weekend parties especially. Berliners seeking leisure and entertainment came by boat, by carriage and later by horse-drawn trams, above all to a large amusement park at the shore of the Spree river called Flora, that went into bankruptcy in 1904.
From the 1860s on the wealthy Bourgeoisie of Berlin discovered Charlottenburg as a residential area, among the first were Gerson von Bleichröder and Ernst Werner von Siemens, who had a villa built in the Berliner Straße in 1862. At the same time industrial companies like Siemens & Halske and Schering erected large factories in the north-east, at the border with the Moabit district of Berlin. In 1877 Charlottenburg received town privileges and until World War I saw an enormous increase of population with 100,000 inhabitants as of 1893 and a population of 306,000 in 1920, being the second largest city within the Province of Brandenburg, after Berlin. In the course of industrialization in the 19th century, much of Charlottenburg was incorporated in a network of streets laid out in the Hobrecht-Plan in an area that came to be known architecturally as the Wilhelmine Ring.

Wolff, Jeremais 1663 - 1724
Wolff was an German engraver and publisher. Born in Augsburg, he originally trained as a clock and automat maker, later changing course and opening a small copperplate engraving shop. His success was impressive and became one of the largest European art, print & map publishers in the first half of the 18th century. Wolff employed some of the best engravers of the time and although not an engraver himself, only Wolffs name was recorded on the engravings. Many of his engravers went uncredited for their work. In 1710 Wolff was one of the founder member of the Empire State Academy of Arts in Augsburg.
After his death in 1724, Wolffs publishing business was inherited by his sons and son-in-law, Johann Balthasar Probst (1673–1750) a notable engraver at the time. The firm continued on in Augsburg under the name Jeremias Wolff Erben.
Together with the Nuremberg copperplate engraver Paul Decker , Wolff published a series of engravings showing the war successes of Prince Eugene of Savoy in Italy , southern Germany and the Spanish Netherlands, during the War of the Spanish Succession . The prints are exhibited in the Museum of Military History, in Vienna .

$275.00 USD
More Info
1685 G B Falda & Sandrart Antique Print Villa Gardens Doria Pamphili, Rome Italy

1685 G B Falda & Sandrart Antique Print Villa Gardens Doria Pamphili, Rome Italy

  • Title : Prospecto Del Palazzo & Giardino Pamphilio Detto Del Bel Respiro...Architettura del Caualier Alessandro Algardi...Simon Felice delin....Norimburga appresso Gioni. Gac. de Sandart
  • Ref #:  93463
  • Size: 19in x 12 1/2in (490mm x 335mm)
  • Date : 1685
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This fine original copper plate engraved antique print of the Villa & Gardens of Doria Pamphili, Rome was engraved by Simone Felice for the 1685 edition of Giovanni Battista Faldas Li giardini di Roma, disegnati da Giovanni Battista Falda nuovamente dati alle stampe con direttione di Giov. Giacomo de Sandrart (The gardens of Rome, designed by Giovanni Battista Falda again printed with the direction of Giov. Giacomo de Sandrart) published in Nuremberg by Johann von Sandrart.

The work is based on the original series edited by Gian Giacomo de Rossi a few years earlier (the first edition was certainly published after 1677 but before 1683) which included 19 tables of plants and perspective views of the most famous Roman gardens, 14 of which were engraved by GB Falda and 5 by Simon Felice.

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: -
Colors used: -
General color appearance: -
Paper size: - 19in x 12 1/2in (490mm x 335mm)
Plate size: - 16in x 9 1/2in (400mm x 250mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

Background:
The Villa Doria Pamphili is a seventeenth-century villa with what is today the largest landscaped public park in Rome, Italy. It is located in the quarter of Monteverde, on the Gianicolo (or the Roman Janiculum), just outside the Porta San Pancrazio in the ancient walls of Rome where the ancient road of the Via Aurelia commences.
It began as a villa for the Pamphili family and when the line died out in the eighteenth century, it passed to Prince Giovanni Andrea IV Doria, and has been known as the Villa Doria Pamphili since.
The nucleus of the villa property, the Villa Vecchia or old villa, already existed before 1630, when it was bought by Pamfilio Pamfili, who had married the heiress Olimpia Maidalchini, to enjoy as a suburban villa. Thereafter he set about buying up neighbouring vineyards to accumulate a much larger holding, which was often known as the Bel Respiro or beautiful breath as it stood on high ground, above the malarial areas of Rome, and offered spectacular views which were a desirable feature of Baroque villa settings.
In 1644 Cardinal Giambattista Pamphili became elected to the papacy and took the name of Innocent X. In accordance with this change in status, the Pamphili aspired to a grander and more expansively sited new villa. Early designs were made, possibly by Virgilio Spada rather than the traditional attribution to Borromini, but these were rejected. Instead the project was placed in the hands of the Bolognese sculptor Alessandro Algardi in 1644, assisted by Giovanni Francesco Grimaldi.
The initial design had a central casino (not the modern usage as a gambling establishment) with wings, but only the central block was built. There is uncertainty as to who the architect was; Algardi was not an architect, and it may be that he had help from Carlo Rainaldi and that the construction was supervised by Grimaldi. The layout has a central circular room around which the other rooms were arranged. Construction began in 1645 and was complete by 1647 although embellishments and the garden layouts were not finished until 1653. The casino, sometimes known as the Casino del Bel Respiro, was designed as a complement to the Pamphili collection of sculptures both ancient and modern, and other Roman antiquities such as vases, sarcophagi and inscriptions; it was only ever intended for display of the collection and the family and guests resided in the older Vecchia Vigna.
As a show case for sculpture, the somewhat crowded Casino facades have rhythmically alternating windows with niches which were elaborately adorned with sculptures, both antique and modern, with busts in hollowed roundels, with panels of bas-reliefs, and reliefs.
The exterior containing statues gives a rich allure that was architecturally somewhat conservative for its date, looking back towards the Villa Medici or the Casina Pio IV, and rather more Mannerist than Baroque. It offered a foretaste of the richly stuccoed and frescoed interiors, where the iconographic program set out to establish the antiquity of the Pamphili, a family then somewhat parvenu in Rome, with origins in Gubbio. Inside, Algardi provided further bas-reliefs and stucco framing for the heroic frescoes drawn from Roman history painted by Grimaldi.
The casino is set into the hill slope such that the main entrance on the north side is at a level above the giardino segreto or secret garden enclosure on its south side, a parterre garden with low clipped hedges. The gardens on the sloping site were laid out from around 1650 by Innocents nephew, Camillo Pamphili, formalizing the slope as a sequence from the parterres that flank the Casino, to a lower level below, framed by the boschi or formalized woodlands that rose above clipped hedges, and eventually arriving at a rusticated grotto in the form of an exedra, from which sculptured figures emerge from the rockwork. The exedra, now grassed, formerly enframed a Fountain of Venus by Algardi, which is preserved in the Villa Vecchia, together with Algardis bas-reliefs of putti representing Love and the Arts that were formerly here. The fountain spilled into a small cascade that let into a short length of formal canal, which was intended to remind the viewer of the similar Canopus at Hadrians Villa— another programmatic connection of the Pamphili with Antiquity.
When Girolamo Pamphili died in 1760 without male heirs, the disputes which broke out among the possible heirs were settled in 1763 when Pope Clement XIII Rezzonico granted to Prince Giovanni Andrea IV Doria the right to take the surname, the arms and the vast properties of the Pamphili; the Princes claim was based on the marriage between Giovanni Andrea III Doria and Anna Pamphili. Since then, the villa has been known as the Villa Doria Pamphili.
Throughout the 18th century, features were regularly added such as fountains and gateways by Gabriele Valvassori and other architects retained by the Pamphili and their heirs. After the Napoleonic era, more sweeping changes were made. The parterres that were formal extensions of the casino were retained but replanted with the patterned planting of colourful carpet bedding supplied from greenhouses by the old villa. (Today the parterres have been replanted in 16th-century style, with panels of scrolling designs in close-clipped greens set in wide gravel walks.) In the sloping outer gardens the changes were more extensive, recasting them in the naturalistic manner of English landscape gardens. The grounds, filled with many surprise features and picturesque incidents, swept down to a small lake at the bottom, which already had an air of atmospheric maturity when it was painted in the 1830s by Alexandre-Gabriel Decamps. In the wooded, natural-appearing landscapes with clumps of characteristic umbrella-like stone pines along horizons stand statues and vases, which evoke a nostalgic antiquity. The 18th-century English landscape gardens such as Stowe and Stourhead that were the inspiration for this style aimed to bring to life the Italian landscapes with Roman ruins painted by Claude and Poussin. A notable difference is that at the Villa Doria Pamphilis giardino inglese the Roman remains are likely to be genuine. The site of the villa contained several Roman tombs that yielded vases, sarcophagi and inscriptions that were added to the Pamphili collection.

Falda, Giovanni Battista 1643 – 1678
Falda was an Italian architect, engraver and artist. He is known for his engravings of both contemporary and antique structures of Rome.
Falda was sent as a boy to Rome, to work in the studio of Bernini, and his draughtsmanship caught the eye of the publisher Giovanni Giacomo de Rossi. He engraved for Le fontane di Roma (Fountains in Rome) and for Palazzi di Roma (Palaces of Rome). The former books was expanded after Faldas death with engravings by Francesco Venturini. The latter was published in 1655 in collaboration with Pietro Ferrerio. He is sometimes known as Falda da Valduggia because of his birthplace.
His works became particularly popular with the first waves of Grand Tour participants during the latter parts of the 17th century and Falda became a commercial success as a result. His works appealed to tourists keen to retain a detailed and accurate representation of those parts of Rome they had visited.

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1770 Louis-Joseph Mondhare Antique Print View of St Pauls Cathedral, London England

1770 Louis-Joseph Mondhare Antique Print View of St Pauls Cathedral, London England

  • Title : Elevation Du Portail De La Cathedrale De St Paul De Londre
  • Ref #:  93461
  • Size: 14 1/2in x 9in (365mm x 245mm)
  • Date : 1770
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This original copper plate engraved antique print of St Pauls Cathedral, London was engraved and published by Louis-Joseph Mondhare in Paris in 1770

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: -
Colors used: -
General color appearance: -
Paper size: - 14 1/2in x 9in (365mm x 245mm)
Plate size: - 14 1/2in x 9in (365mm x 245mm)
Margins: - Min 1/8in (5mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Margins cropped to plate mark
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

Background:
The task of designing a replacement structure was officially assigned to Sir Christopher Wren on 30 July 1669. He had previously been put in charge of the rebuilding of churches to replace those lost in the Great Fire. More than 50 City churches are attributable to Wren. Concurrent with designing St Pauls, Wren was engaged in the production of his five Tracts on Architecture.
Wren had begun advising on the repair of the Old St Pauls in 1661, five years before the fire in 1666. The proposed work included renovations to interior and exterior to complement the classical facade designed by Inigo Jones in 1630. Wren planned to replace the dilapidated tower with a dome, using the existing structure as a scaffold. He produced a drawing of the proposed dome which shows his idea that it should span nave and aisles at the crossing. After the Fire, it was at first thought possible to retain a substantial part of the old cathedral, but ultimately the entire structure was demolished in the early 1670s.
In July 1668 Dean William Sancroft wrote to Wren that he was charged by the Archbishop of Canterbury, in agreement with the Bishops of London and Oxford, to design a new cathedral that was Handsome and noble to all the ends of it and to the reputation of the City and the nation. The design process took several years, but a design was finally settled and attached to a royal warrant, with the proviso that Wren was permitted to make any further changes that he deemed necessary. The result was the present St Pauls Cathedral, still the second largest church in Britain, with a dome proclaimed as the finest in the world. The building was financed by a tax on coal, and was completed within its architects lifetime with many of the major contractors engaged for the duration.
The topping out of the cathedral (when the final stone was placed on the lantern) took place on 26 October 1708, performed by Wrens son Christopher Jr and the son of one of the masons. The cathedral was declared officially complete by Parliament on 25 December 1711 (Christmas Day). In fact, construction continued for several years after that, with the statues on the roof added in the 1720s. In 1716 the total costs amounted to £1,095,556 (£165 million in 2019).
On 2 December 1697, 31 years and 3 months after the Great Fire destroyed Old St Pauls, the new cathedral was consecrated for use. The Right Reverend Henry Compton, Bishop of London, preached the sermon. It was based on the text of Psalm 122, I was glad when they said unto me: Let us go into the house of the Lord. The first regular service was held on the following Sunday.
Opinions of Wrens cathedral differed, with some loving it: Without, within, below, above, the eye / Is filled with unrestrained delight, while others hated it: There was an air of Popery about the gilded capitals, the heavy arches ... They were unfamiliar, un-English

Mondhare & Jean (active 1759 - 1829)
Louis-Joseph Mondhare (1734 - Paris 1799) & Pierre Jean (1754 - 1829) were prominent Parisian publishers, engravers, print and map sellers who were active in Paris in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.
In 1784 Jean married the daughter of Mondhare, who formed a partnership with his son in law, changing forming a very successful partnership thereafter as Mondhare & Jean.
After Mondhare retirement in 1796, Jean carried on with the publishing & printing business, having inherited all of the printing plates that also included many map plates from the likes of Nolin, Clouet, D Anville , Delsile and others. Both Mondhare and Jean were responsible for the engraving and printing of the very decorative large wall maps by J B Nolin & J B L Clouet, as well as single plate maps and atlases. Mondares premises were located at Rue St Jacques, à lHôtel Saumur later movin

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