Portraits (43)

Sort by:
1841 McKenny Hall Large Folio Antique Print Chippeway Indian Native American

1841 McKenny Hall Large Folio Antique Print Chippeway Indian Native American

Description:
This beautifully hand coloured original antique folio lithograph print of KA-TA-WA-BE-DA (Katawabeda) “Old Tooth” of the Chippeway Tribe was engraved and hand coloured in 1841 - the date is engraved at the foot of the print - by J.T. Bowen and was published in the folio edition of McKenny-Hall`s History of the Indian Tribes of North America published between 1837 and 1844

McKenney and Hall's Indian Tribes of North America has long been renowned for its faithful portraits of Native Americans. The portrait plates are based on paintings by the artist Charles Bird King, who was employed by the War Department to paint the Indian delegates visiting Washington D.C., forming the basis of the War Department's Indian Gallery. Most of King's original paintings were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian, and their appearance in McKenney and Hall's magnificent work is thus our only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century. Numbered among King's sitters were Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. 

As first director, McKenney was to improve the administration of Indian programs in various government offices. His first trip was during the summer of 1826 to the Lake Superior area for a treaty with the Chippewa, opening mineral rights on their land. In 1827, he journeyed west again for a treaty with the Chippewa, Menominee , and Winebago in the present state of Michigan. His journeys provided an unparalleled opportunity to become acquainted with Native American tribes. When President Jackson dismissed him from his government post in 1839, McKenney was able to turn more of his attention to his publishing project. Within a few years, he was joined by James Hall, a lawyer who had written extensively about the west.

Both authors, not unlike George Catlin, whom they tried to enlist in their publishing enterprise, saw their book as a way of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. (Gilreath). McKenney provided the biographies, many based on personal interviews, and Hall wrote the general history of the North American Indian. This was the most elaborate plate book produced in the United States to date, and its publication involved a number of different printers and lithographers. The publication of volume I (in 1836) was initially undertaken by Edward C.Biddle, Biddle's firm was taken over by Frederick W. Greenough, who re-issued vol.I and published the first issue of vol.II in 1842. Later, Greenough's firm was replaced by the printing firm of Rice and Clark who reissued vol. I and vol.II and published the first issue of vol.III in 1844. The printing of the plates was chiefly carried out by Peter Duval of Lehman and Duval and James T. Bowen. 
(Ref: BAL 6934; Bennett p.79; Field 992; Howes M129; Lipperhiede Mc4; Reese, American Color Plate Books 24; Sabin 43410a).

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - Off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Blue, grey, red, brown.
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 18in x 13in (495mm x 344mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning, light spotting
Plate area: - Small repair not affecting the image, light offsetting
Verso: - Light age toning & spotting

$650.00 USD
More Info
1695 C. Vermeulen Large Antique Portrait of the Map Maker Alexis Hubert Jaillot

1695 C. Vermeulen Large Antique Portrait of the Map Maker Alexis Hubert Jaillot

  • Title : Alexius Hubertus Iaillot, Regis Christianissimi Geographus Ordiniarius, 1695
  • Ref #:  92818
  • Size: 17 1/2in x 14in (445mm x 355mm)
  • Date : 1695
  • Condition: (A) Very Good Condition

Description: 
This large original antique portrait of the French cartographer Alexis Hubert Jaillot (1632-1712) was engraved by Cornelis Vermeulen and published as the frontispiece to the 1695 edition of "Atlas francois contenant les cartes geographiques dans lesquelles sont tres exactement remarquez les empires, monarchies royaumes et estats de l'Europe, de l'Asie, de l'Afrique et de l'Amerique"
Jaillot rests upon the Atlas Gallicus (Atlas Francois) with a compass in his left hand.

Background: After Nicolas Sanson, Hubert Jaillot and Pierre Duval were the most important French cartographers of the seventeenth century. Jaillot, originally a sculptor, became interested in geography after his marriage to the daughter of Nicolas Berey (1606-65), a famous map colourist, and went into partnership in Paris with Sanson's sons. There, from about 1669, he undertook the re-engraving, enlarging and re-publishing of the Sanson maps in sheet form and in atlases, sparing no effort to fill the gap in the map trade left by the destruction of Blaeu's printing establishment in Amsterdam in 1672. Many of his maps were printed in Amsterdam (by Pierre Mortier) as well as in Paris. One of his most important works was a magnificent sea atlas, Le Neptune François, published in 1693 and compiled in co-operation with J D Cassini. This was re-published shortly afterwards by Pierre Mortier in Amsterdam with French, Dutch and English texts, the charts having been re-engraved. Eventually, after half a century, most of the plates were used again as the basis for a revised issue published by J N Bellin in 1753.(Ref Tooley M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 17 1/2in x 14in (445mm x 355mm)
Plate size: - 16in x 12 1/2in (405mm x 320mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Soling to margins, slight loss to bottom margin not affecting the image
Plate area: - None
Verso: - Soiling

$425.00 USD
More Info
1780 Cook Antique Prints x 2 Man & Woman of Van Diemens Land, Tasmania

1780 Cook Antique Prints x 2 Man & Woman of Van Diemens Land, Tasmania

  • Title  : Une Femme De La Terre Van-Diemen; Un Homme De La Terre Van-Diemen
  • Date  : 1780
  • Ref # : 43194 & 43195
  • Size  : 10 1/4in x 7 3/4in (260mm x 200mm) ea
  • Condition: A+ (Fine)

Description:

These two fine original antique prints  portraits of Man & Woman of Van Diemens Land, Tasmania, was engraved by the Robert Benard - after John Webber, official artist for Captain James Cook's third and final voyage - and was published in the 1780 French edition of Cooks voyages.

Cook's First Voyage (1768-1771)
The first voyage under Captain James Cook's command was primarily of a scientific nature. The expedition on the Endeavour initially sailed to Tahiti to observe the transit of the planet Venus in order to calculate the earth's distance from the sun. Cook landed on the South Pacific island in April of 1769 and in June of that year the astronomical observations were successfully completed. In addition to these labors, very good relations with the Tahitians were maintained and the naturalists Joseph Banks and Daniel C. Solander conducted extensive ethnological and botanical research. Another purpose of the voyage was to explore the South Seas to determine if an inhabitable continent existed in the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Upon leaving Tahiti, Cook named and charted the Society Islands and then continued southwest to New Zealand. His circumnavigation and exploration of that country also resulted in a detailed survey. Cook proceeded to Australia, where he charted the eastern coast for 2,000 miles, naming the area New South Wales. As a result of these surveys, both Australia and New Zealand were annexed by Great Britain. In addition to these explorations, the Endeavour returned to England without a single death from scurvy among its men, an historic feat at the time. The combination of these accomplishments brought Cook prominence, promotion, and the opportunity to lead further expeditions.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - Brown, 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 10 1/4in x 7 3/4in (260mm x 200mm)
Plate size: - 10in x 7 1/2in (245mm x 190mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$375.00 USD
More Info
1632 Henricus David Large Antique Portrait of Cartographer Giovanni A Magini

1632 Henricus David Large Antique Portrait of Cartographer Giovanni A Magini

  • TitleIo. Antonius Maginus Pat. Mathemat. In Bonon. Gymn. Profess
  • Date : 1632
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  92835
  • Size: 17 1/2in x 11in (445mm x 280mm)

Description: 
This fine beautifully hand coloured original antique portrait of the Italian Cartographer Giovanni Antonio Magini was engraved by Henricus David in 1632 - date is engraved below portrait.

Giovanni Antonio Magini (1555-1617) was an Italian mathematician, cartographer and Professor of Astronomy in Bologna. He is responsible for publishing an edition ofPtolemy's Geographia in 1596 that contained 27 maps of the ancient world drawn from the text of Claude Ptolemy, along with 27 contemporary or modern maps. His maps were used by Blaeu in 1640. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, green, red, brown.
General color appearance: - Fresh
Paper size: - 17 1/2in x 11in (445mm x 280mm)
Plate size: - 12n x 8 1/2in (305mm x 215mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light dis-colouration in top margin
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$375.00 USD
More Info
1712 Winter Antique Large Print Portrait of Johann Baptiste Homann

1712 Winter Antique Large Print Portrait of Johann Baptiste Homann

Description:
This finely engraved original antique print, a portrait of the early 18th century German Cartographer Johann Baptiste Homann after a painting by Joannes Krenckel was engraved by Wilhelm Winter and published in 1716 for Homann's Grosser Atlas.

Stunning full portrait of the Imperial Geographer of the Holy Roman Empire, Johann Baptist Homann (1664-1724) who was born in the Bavarian town of Kammlach.
Educated at a Jesuit school, he eventually became a member of the Prussian Academy of Sciences. As an Imperial Geographer he had special printing privileges, which were not only the best reference for customers but also gave him exclusive rights in his various endeavours as an engraver, publisher, cartographer, and a scientist. Homann died in Nuremberg, with the company, under his heirs, lasting until 1848.
After a painting by Joannes Krenckel (1688–1722), engraved by Wilhelm Winter (1696–1765). (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - Off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 21in x 11 3/4in (560mm x 295mm)
Plate size: - 15 1/4in x 11in (390mm x 280mm)
Margins: - Min 1/4in (7mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling bottom right corner
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$325.00 USD
More Info
1870 Amand Durand Antique Print of 15th century Italian Nobels

1870 Amand Durand Antique Print of 15th century Italian Nobels

Description: 
This finely engraved, beautifully detailed original antique print - of 15th century Italian Nobles - was engraved and published in 1870.

Charles Amand Durand (1831-1905) was an innovation and passionate engraver & artist who resurrected the fading copper & wood plates of various Old Masters from the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries such as Rembarant, Albrect Drurer, Hans Sebald Beham and others. He admired their etchings and engravings which he noted through the ravages of time had faded and were no longer producing quality impressions.

Durand's re-engravings are so well respected major collectors throughout Europe sought to acquire them, including the French Biblioteque Nationale and the Louvre Museum in Paris. Born in Paris and became a master engraver early in his career. He deeply admired the 15th, 16th, and 17th century Old Masters’ engravings and saw how they lost quality and faded from the ravages of time. This realization, combined with in-depth research throughout public and private collections of these masters, inspired Durands dedication to recreate their images and preserve the original quality for future generations.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - Off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 14in x 9 1/2in (350mm x 240mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None 

$275.00 USD
More Info
1870 Amand Durand Antique Print of The Virgin Mary & Angel - 17th Century

1870 Amand Durand Antique Print of The Virgin Mary & Angel - 17th Century

Description: 
This finely engraved, beautifully detailed, high quality original antique print - an early representation of The Virgin Mary visited by an Angel - was engraved and published by the famous French Artist Amand Durand in 1870.

Charles Amand Durand (1831-1905) was an innovation and passionate engraver & artist who resurrected the fading copper & wood plates of various Old Masters from the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries such as Rembarant, Albrect Drurer, Hans Sebald Beham and others. He admired their etchings and engravings which he noted through the ravages of time had faded and were no longer producing quality impressions.

Durand's re-engravings are so well respected major collectors throughout Europe sought to acquire them, including the French Biblioteque Nationale and the Louvre Museum in Paris. Born in Paris and became a master engraver early in his career. He deeply admired the 15th, 16th, and 17th century Old Masters’ engravings and saw how they lost quality and faded from the ravages of time. This realization, combined with in-depth research throughout public and private collections of these masters, inspired Durands dedication to recreate their images and preserve the original quality for future generations.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - Off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 14in x 9 1/2in (350mm x 240mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None 

$275.00 USD
More Info
1870 Amand Durand & Heinrich Aldegrever Antique Prints of Lazarus, 16th century

1870 Amand Durand & Heinrich Aldegrever Antique Prints of Lazarus, 16th century

  • Title : Erumnos hic lazar iages ad ianva divitis/Dives epvlo elamis
  • Date : 1870
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  22444
  • Size: 14in x 9 1/2in (350mm x 240mm) 

Description: 
This fine original antique print of 2 amazingly detailed engravings by Amand Durand after the German printmaker Heinrich Aldegrever or Aldegraf (signed A G & dated 1554 & 1561) - who was part of the 16th century German school of artists known as the "Little Masters" renown for their small and finely detailed engravings. This one details the parable of the rich man and Lazarus: Lazarus asks for bread  - was engraved and published by Durand in 1870.

Charles Amand Durand (1831-1905) was an innovation and passionate engraver & artist who resurrected the fading copper & wood plates of various Old Masters from the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries such as Rembarant, Albrect Drurer, Hans Sebald Beham and others. He admired their etchings and engravings which he noted through the ravages of time had faded and were no longer producing quality impressions.

Durand's re-engravings are so well respected major collectors throughout Europe sought to acquire them, including the French Biblioteque Nationale and the Louvre Museum in Paris. Born in Paris and became a master engraver early in his career. He deeply admired the 15th, 16th, and 17th century Old Masters’ engravings and saw how they lost quality and faded from the ravages of time. This realization, combined with in-depth research throughout public and private collections of these masters, inspired Durands dedication to recreate their images and preserve the original quality for future generations.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - Off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 14in x 9 1/2in (350mm x 240mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None 

$275.00 USD
More Info
1878 Léon Richeton Antique Print - Gainsborough Portrait

1878 Léon Richeton Antique Print - Gainsborough Portrait

Description: 
This finely engraved, beautifully detailed, high quality original antique print of a Gainsborough Child Portrait was engraved by Léon Richeton - signature engraved at the base of the print - and published in the 1878 edition of The Portfolio.

Léon Richeton (1854 - 1934) was an etcher, etched landscapes, and copied works by other artists, such as Sir Thomas Lawrence and Gainsborough. He published etchings in The Portfolio, and etched illustrations for Alfred Egmont Hake's Paris Originals..., London, 1878.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - Off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 14in x 9 1/2in (350mm x 240mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None 

$275.00 USD
More Info
1878 Léon Richeton Antique Print - Gainsborough Boy Print

1878 Léon Richeton Antique Print - Gainsborough Boy Print

Description: 
This finely engraved, beautifully detailed, high quality original antique print of a Gainsborough Child Print was engraved by Léon Richeton - signature engraved at the base of the print - and published in the 1878 edition of The Portfolio.

Léon Richeton (1854 - 1934) was an etcher, etched landscapes, and copied works by other artists, such as Sir Thomas Lawrence and Gainsborough. He published etchings in The Portfolio, and etched illustrations for Alfred Egmont Hake's Paris Originals..., London, 1878.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - Off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 14in x 9 1/2in (350mm x 240mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None 

$275.00 USD
More Info
1870 Amand Durand Antique Print of Card 49 of 15th Century Mantegna Tarocchi or Tarot Card

1870 Amand Durand Antique Print of Card 49 of 15th Century Mantegna Tarocchi or Tarot Card

Description: 
This finely engraved, beautifully detailed, high quality original antique print of card 49 of the Mantegna Tarocchi or Tarot Cards, was engraved and published by the famous French Artist Amand Durand in 1870 after a 15th century wood-cut plate.

The Tarocchi di Mantegna is a set of 50 copper-engraved emblematical images (c.1465) which were probably a social pastime, or an instructional or educational series. It is not clear whether they were produced by Andrea Mantegna (1431-1503), however, the subjects of the set are mentioned by Giorgio Vasari who writes in his Lives about Mantegna that he created copper prints of trionfi - another name for the tarot Trumps. 

There are no suits and the images are numbered consecutively from 1 to 50, divided into the following groups: Society; Apollo and the Nine Muses; the Arts and the Sciences; the Seven Virtues and Sun, Time and the World; the Planets and the Spheres. Thus we have a system of divine activities and functions reflecting an ideological structure. There are a number of versions and copies by different artists. Of the known examples none were made into a pack of playing cards, but were printed onto thin paper as black and white outlines. However, woodcut copies of these engraved images occur in later educational or didactic books 

In the debates and speculation regarding the origin, purpose and meaning of the “Mantegna Tarocchi” series, some misconceptions have been perpetuated from earlier literature. Possibly they represent a humanist world view or cosmology of the day; the outward design and hierarchical structure, beginning with the fool and leading up via craftsmen to the aristocracy, the king and the pope, through the muses, virtues and planets to the Cosmic Principles, reflects an androcratic ideology. Each figure has a name and a number. In some respects they remind us of the Hofämterspiel. A distinction is that the Tarocchi reflects a world order prompted by humanism, with the aristocracy and the church ranking lower than the arts, the sciences, the virtues, the planets and the spheres. The Hofämterspiel reflects feudal society.

Card games based around the Virtues and Vices, or Social Subjects, have of course been produced from time to time over the centuries. Possibly the tarot trumps were merely an alternative or condensed version of these images, which most educated people would recognise, added to a pack of cards for the purpose of making a new card game.

Charles Amand Durand (1831-1905) was an innovation and passionate engraver & artist who resurrected the fading copper & wood plates of various Old Masters from the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries such as Rembarant, Albrect Drurer, Hans Sebald Beham and others. He admired their etchings and engravings which he noted through the ravages of time had faded and were no longer producing quality impressions.

Durand's re-engravings are so well respected major collectors throughout Europe sought to acquire them, including the French Biblioteque Nationale and the Louvre Museum in Paris. Born in Paris and became a master engraver early in his career. He deeply admired the 15th, 16th, and 17th century Old Masters’ engravings and saw how they lost quality and faded from the ravages of time. This realization, combined with in-depth research throughout public and private collections of these masters, inspired Durands dedication to recreate their images and preserve the original quality for future generations.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - Off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 14in x 9 1/2in (350mm x 240mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None 

$275.00 USD
More Info
1870 Murillo Durand Antique Print Self Portrait of Bartolomé Esteban Murillo

1870 Murillo Durand Antique Print Self Portrait of Bartolomé Esteban Murillo

  • Title : Bart Murillo seipsum depin gens. pro filorum votis acprecibus explendis
  • Date : 1870
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  22446
  • Size: 14in x 9 1/2in (350mm x 240mm)

Description: 
This fine original antique wood-cut print of the Spanish artist Bartolomé Esteban Murillo was produced from a reworked 17th century wood-block by Amand Durand in 1870. As a way of clarification this print was printed in 1870 by Durand by means of a wood-block  from the original 17th century wood-block. Please see below for further detail.

The Latin inscription on the cartouche at the centre of the ledge explains that the self-portrait was made at the request of Murillo's children: 'Bart (olo) mé Murillo portraying himself to fulfil the wishes and prayers of his children - or sons'. Despite the unlined appearance of the face the painting is probably relatively late in date, of the early 1670s, when Murillo's children would have been of an age to take pride in their father's achievements. The composition is based on a formula that had been developed for portrait engravings used on the frontispiece of books. The sitter is shown in an oval frame and on the ledge below are the instruments of his profession, a palette and brushes on the right and a drawing and pencil on the left.

Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (born late December 1617, died April 3, 1682) was a Spanish Baroque painter. Although he is best known for his religious works, Murillo also produced a considerable number of paintings of contemporary women and children. These lively, realist portraits of flower girls, street urchins, and beggars constitute an extensive and appealing record of the everyday life of his times.

Amand Durand, born in Paris France, 1831, became a master engraver early in his career. He deeply admired the 15th, 16th, and 17th century Old Masters’ engravings and saw how they lost quality and faded from the ravages of time. This realization, combined with in-depth research throughout public and private collections of these masters, inspired Durands dedication to recreate their images and preserve the original quality for future generations. In 1895 Theo Van Gogh, brother and manager of the infamous Vincent Van Gogh stumbled across the works of this artist in one of his travels. He was so impressed that he sought the artist out and spent an evening with him in his home. Afterward he quickly took to pen and paper to write Vincent to express his enthusiasm for his artistic talents and intellect. The Van Gogh brothers were just two of the many that recognized Amand Durand's talents. However, it would take years to unravel a story book mystery that makes his works and talents even more famed today. Amand Durand was a great admirer of Rembrandt. He desired to study the plates and techniques of this genius. Unfortunately at the time there only remained about 100 known plates, which were available to produce fine quality impressions. For 100 years the bulk of Rembrandt's plates were shrouded in mystery. As time moved on some of Rembrandt’s plates began to surface. By this time Rembrandt’s plates were miserably worn and dull. Amand Durand, who by now had made the ranks of a noted engraver, decided to remedy this with his own gifted talents. He researched and intensely studied pieces that were available only in collections. From here on he spent the major part of his life exactly duplicating Rembrandt’s images onto copper plates. These recreations were called Amand Durand’s after Rembrandt. Their unbelievable clarity and exactness were achieved because Amand Durand used as his guide, not the worn and dull plates, but the first and second state etchings of the master’s original works. By this time Durand’s talent were known to experts of the 19th and 20th centuries. In 1855, Conservator of the Cabinet de Estampes, George Duplessis so appreciated the genius of this man that he had his work published in books which belong to the Bibliotheque Nationale in France. Amand-Durand was used as master etcher in an anthology of European engravings, which became so valuable that they were kept under locked scrutiny in most libraries. What we have is a noted master duplicating a master some 200 years later. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: -  General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 14in x 9 1/2in (350mm x 240mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

 Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
More Info
1878 Augustin Mongin Antique Print - Classical Art Woman with a Bow

1878 Augustin Mongin Antique Print - Classical Art Woman with a Bow

Description: 
This finely engraved, beautifully detailed, high quality original antique print of a Classical figure Woman with Bow was engraved by Augustin Mongin - signature engraved at the base of the print - and published in the 1878 edition of The Portfolio.

Augustin Mongin: A nineteenth century French painter and etcher, Augustin Mongin studied art in Paris under Gaucherel. He first exhibited at the Paris Salon in 1874 and during the following years received medals in 1876, 1885, 1887 and 1889. Augustin Mongin was elected to the Societe des Artistes Francais in 1887 and, in 1900, was awarded both the Chevalier de la Legion d'honneur and the medaille d'honneur. In his etchings, Augustin Mongin was best known for his for works after the art of old masters such as Karel du Jardin, Reynolds and Peter Lely. He was also commissioned by publishers in both France and England for etchings after contemporary artists, such as H. G. Glindoni.

.General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - Off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 14in x 9 1/2in (350mm x 240mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None 

$225.00 USD
More Info
1780 Cook Benard Antique Prints x 2 of Man & Woman Tanna Island, Tafea, Vanuatu

1780 Cook Benard Antique Prints x 2 of Man & Woman Tanna Island, Tafea, Vanuatu

  • Title  : Femme De L'Isle De Tanna; Homme De L'Isle De Tanna
  • Date  : 1780
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref # : 16344 & 16345
  • Size  : 10 1/4in x 7 3/4in (260mm x 200mm) ea

Description:

These two fine original antique prints of portraits of the Man & Woman of Tanna Island of Tafea Province, Vanuatu was engraved by the Frenchman Robert Benard - after John Webber who was the officially appointed artist for Captain James Cook's third and final voyage - for the French edition of Cooks voyages published in 1780. The images were drawn for Cook after his third first Voyage of Discovery between 1776 & 1779.

Cook's Third Voyage (1776-1779) In the course of his first two voyages, Cook circumnavigated the globe twice, sailed extensively into the Antarctic, and charted coastlines from Newfoundland to New Zealand. Following these achievements, Cook's third voyage was organized to seek an efficient route from England to southern and eastern Asia that would not entail rounding the Cape of Good Hope. The search for such a Northwest (or Northeast) Passage had been on the agenda of northern European mariners and merchants since the beginning of European expansion in the late fifteenth century. England's growing economic and colonial interests in India in the later eighteenth century provided the stimulus for the latest exploration for this route.

Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 10 1/4in x 7 3/4in (260mm x 200mm)
Plate size: - 10in x 7 1/2in (245mm x 190mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$200.00 USD
More Info
1780 Cook Benard Antique Prints x 2 of the Tahitians of Patatow & Omai

1780 Cook Benard Antique Prints x 2 of the Tahitians of Patatow & Omai

  • Title  : Otoo Roi de Tahiti; Potatow Chef de Tahiti
  • Date  : 1780
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref # : 16352 & 16353
  • Size  : 10 1/4in x 7 3/4in (260mm x 200mm) ea

Description:

These two fine original antique prints  portraits of Tahitians of Patatow & Omai - the first people to visit England from the South Seas  - was engraved by the Frenchman Robert Benard - after Captain James Cook's second voyage - for the French edition of Cooks voyages published in 1780.

In 1774, the first Polynesian to visit London travelled to England with the crew of Captain Cook's second Pacific voyage and became an overnight sensation. Seen as a living example of the 'Noble Savage', Omai as he was known, was discussed by scientists and philosophers, celebrated in all the best circles and written about in everything from poetry to pornography. He proved a lightning rod for European anxieties regarding imperialism, civilisation and the true nature of mankind. The artistic and literary legacy of Omai's encounter with Europe provides a fascinating insight into European culture in a moment of transition, when old certainties were collapsing and new ones were yet to form. Omai arrived at Portsmouth on 14 July 1774 as a crew-member on board HMS Adventure, captained by Tobias Furneaux. Taken immediately to meet Lord Sandwich, the First Lord of the Admiralty, he was then placed in the care of Joseph Banks and Dr Solander, both of whom he claimed to remember from their visit to Tahiti five years earlier. Three days later, on 17 July, he was presented to King George III and Queen Charlotte at Kew. It was at this introduction that Omai would reveal the grace and ‘natural’ good manners that first astounded and then delighted his audience. Once approved by the highest in the land, Omai’s career as a ‘social lion’ was assured. When Omai returned to the Pacific in 1776, many felt that the failure to convert him to Christianity was an important opportunity missed. 

Cook's Second Voyage (1772-1775) Based on the success of his first voyage, Cook was appointed by the Admiralty to lead a second expedition. Two ships were employed with Cook commanding the Resolution and Captain Tobias Furneaux in charge of the Adventure. The purpose was to circumnavigate the globe as far south as possible to confirm the location of a southern continent. Cook proved that there was no "Terra Australis," which supposedly was located between New Zealand and South America. Cook was convinced, however, that there was land beyond the southern ice fields. In his pursuit of this idea, this expedition was the first European voyage to cross the Antarctic Circle. In addition, in two great sweeps through the Southern latitudes, Cook made an incredible number of landfalls including New Zealand, Easter Island, the Marquesas, Tahiti and the Society Islands, the Tonga Islands, the New Hebrides, New Caledonia, and a number of smaller islands. In addition to these navigational accomplishments and the accompanying expansion of geographical knowledge, the expedition also recorded a vast amount of information regarding the Pacific islands and peoples, proved the value of the chronometer as an instrument for calculating longitude, and improved techniques for preventing scurvy. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 10 1/4in x 7 3/4in (260mm x 200mm)
Plate size: - 10in x 7 1/2in (245mm x 190mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$200.00 USD
More Info
1780 Cook Benard Antique Prints x 2 of Man & Woman Santa Christina Island, Tahua

1780 Cook Benard Antique Prints x 2 of Man & Woman Santa Christina Island, Tahua

  • Title  : Femme De L'Isle Ste. Christine; Homme De L'Isle Ste. Christine
  • Date  : 1780
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref # : 16348 & 16349
  • Size  : 10 1/4in x 7 3/4in (260mm x 200mm) ea

Description:

These two fine original antique prints  portraits of the Man & Woman of Santa Christina Island, Tahuata island's in French Polynesia was engraved by the Frenchman Robert Benard - after John Webber who was the officially appointed artist for Captain James Cook's third and final voyage - for the French edition of Cooks voyages published in 1780. The images were drawn for Cook after his third first Voyage of Discovery between 1776 & 1779.

Cook's Third Voyage (1776-1779) In the course of his first two voyages, Cook circumnavigated the globe twice, sailed extensively into the Antarctic, and charted coastlines from Newfoundland to New Zealand. Following these achievements, Cook's third voyage was organized to seek an efficient route from England to southern and eastern Asia that would not entail rounding the Cape of Good Hope. The search for such a Northwest (or Northeast) Passage had been on the agenda of northern European mariners and merchants since the beginning of European expansion in the late fifteenth century. England's growing economic and colonial interests in India in the later eighteenth century provided the stimulus for the latest exploration for this route.

Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 10 1/4in x 7 3/4in (260mm x 200mm)
Plate size: - 10in x 7 1/2in (245mm x 190mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$200.00 USD
More Info
1822 Freycinet Large Antique Print of the Chiefs of West Papua Islands Indonesia

1822 Freycinet Large Antique Print of the Chiefs of West Papua Islands Indonesia

Description: 
This large beautifully coloured original antique print of the village chiefs of Indonesian West Papau was engraved by Choubard (fl. 1807 - 1830) in 1822 and was published in the voyages of the ship the Uranie by Louis de Freycinet in Voyage autour du monde sur les corvettes Uranie et la Physicienne.

Louis Claude Desaulces de Freycinet (1779-1842) was a French marine officer and explorer, who participated in several significant early 19th-century expeditions to relatively unknown areas in the southern hemisphere. In 1800, he joined one of the most important early explorations of Australia, which was commissioned by the French government and commanded by Nicholas Baudin (1754-1803). On this voyage, which included stops in Mauritius and Tasmania, Freycinet served as a surveyor and was responsible for conducting a thorough cartographic survey of the Australian coast. Upon returning to France years later, he completed a detailed account of the journey begun by the naturalist Françis Péron that was published as Voyage de decouvertes aux Terres Australes between 1807 and 1816.

In 1817, Freycinet embarked on the Uranie on a major scientific expedition around the world to record information regarding the geography, meteorology, terrestrial magnetism, ethnology, and indigenous flora and fauna of various locations in the southern hemisphere. Accompanied by the talented artist Jacques Arago, he explored the Sandwich Islands, the Hawaii Islands as well as Rio de Janeiro, the Cape of Good Hope, Tonga, Gibraltar, Tenerife, Mauritius, Timor, Tierra del Fuego, Montevideo, Mauritius, New South Wales, and the Caroline Islands. After being shipwrecked near the Falklands, Freycinet eventually returned to Paris on the Physicienne in 1820, where he published a comprehensive illustrated account of the expedition in a colossal thirteen-volume work entitled Voyage Autor de Monde. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Pink, yellow, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 20in x 13in (510mm x 330mm)
Plate size: - 13in x 9 ½in (330mm x 240mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Light offsetting
Verso: - None

$175.00 USD
More Info
1725 Antique Print of Colly Molly Puff, Legendary 17th Century Pastryman, London

1725 Antique Print of Colly Molly Puff, Legendary 17th Century Pastryman, London

  • Title : Colly Molly Puff; Bonne Patisserie a Vendre; Torte e Pasticci
  • Date : ca 1725
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  20722
  • Size: 13in x 8in (330mm x 205mm) 

Description: 
This handsome, original antique Copper-Plate print of Colly Molly Puff - a famous street pastry seller of 17th century London - was published in the early 18th century. Beautifully engraved and printed onto laid 17th century hand made paper. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - Off white
Age of map color: -
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 13in x 8in (330mm x 205mm)
Plate size: - 9 1/2in x 6 1/2in (240mm x 160mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - Light age toning
Verso: - Light age toning

$149.00 USD
More Info
1803 Mayer Large Antique Print of a Woman & Child of Karaman, Turkey

1803 Mayer Large Antique Print of a Woman & Child of Karaman, Turkey

Description: 

This large fine beautifully coloured original early antique aquatint of a woman and children of the ancient southern Turkish region of Caramania (Karaman) was engraved in 1803 - the date is engraved at the foot of the image - and was published in Luigi Mayer's "Views in Egypt, Palestine and Other Parts of the Ottoman Empire" R Bowyer, Historic Gallery Pall Mall.

This engraving is characteristic of those made during Regency period, a time of exploration of the Middle East spurred by Napoleon's explorations and conquests in Egypt. Often these expeditions were published as books, containing descriptions and illustrations of the ancient architecture, customs and culture of indigenous peoples.

Italian orientalist Luigi Mayer, active in the 18th and begin 19th century travelled extensively in the middle east. His work "Views in Egypt, Palestine and Other Parts of the Ottoman Empire" was published between 1801 and 1804 with historical observations, and incidental illustrations of the manners and customs of the natives of that country. During Mayer’s time, while Britain and France were vying for control of colonial territories, Views in Egypt captivated and informed audiences in Europe about the country’s prevailing culture and even political structures. "Mamalukes exercising in the Square of Muurad Bey’s Palace," for instance, provides a valuable visual record of the military elite’s training exercises, and perhaps a hint of the Ottoman ruler’s efforts to impose centralized authority. Such highly descriptive drawings continue to make the volume an invaluable primary source.

The aquatint engraver, Thomas Milton studied under William Woollett, and was extolled by scholar W. Bell Scott as having "a unique power of distinguishing the foliage of trees and the texture of bodies, especially water, as it never had been done before, and never will be done again." (Ref: Abbey, Travel, 369. Blackmer 1097. Colas 2018-2022. Gay 2145. Hiler, pp. 577-8. HBS 15571)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Haevy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Yellow, green, pink, orange
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 18 1/2 in x 13in (460mm x 330mm)
Plate size: -  15 in x 12in (380mm x 305mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)  

Imperfections:
Margins: None
Plate area: None
Verso: None

$125.00 USD
More Info
1842 d'Urville Original Antique Folio Print of Peha Chief of Uplou Islands, Samoa

1842 d'Urville Original Antique Folio Print of Peha Chief of Uplou Islands, Samoa

Description: 
This large finely engraved original antique lithograph folio print was engraved by Thierry de Freres and was published in the 1841 edition of Jules Sébastien César Dumont d'Urville's (1790–1842) publication: Voyage au Pole Sud et dan l'Océanie sur les corvettes l'Astrolabe et la Zélée, exécuté par ordre du Roi pendant les années 1837-1838-1839-1840, sous le Commandement de M.J. Dumont d'Urville, Capitaine de vaisseau.

Voyage au Pole Sud et dan l'Océanie sur les corvettes - In 1836, the French King Louis-Philippe, enthusiastic for Southern Hemisphere exploration, supported J. Dumont d'Urville's plan for a circumnavigation focusing on the South Seas. D'Urville (1790–1842) had already distinguished himself on two Pacific expeditions and was eager to rival the achievements of James Cook. Between 1837 and 1840, the ships Astrolabe and Zélée explored the waters of the Antarctic area and Oceania in extremely harsh conditions: almost forty crew members died or deserted. However, d'Urville discovered a new portion of the Antarctic coast, shed light on the ethnography of several Pacific islands and brought back multitudes of botanical specimens. His impressive contributions to the fields of geography, natural history and ethnography were gathered in this ten-volume work, published between 1841 and 1846. In Volume 10, published in 1846, which includes extracts from his correspondence, as well as a biography, d'Urville shares his immense relief as he returns to France. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy
Paper color: - Off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 21in x 15 1/2in (535mm x 395mm)
Margins: - Min 2in (50mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Browning to margins
Plate area: - None
Verso: - Browning to margins

$125.00 USD
More Info
1841 Dumont d' Urville Antique Folio Print of Man, Woman, Child of Samoan Isles

1841 Dumont d' Urville Antique Folio Print of Man, Woman, Child of Samoan Isles

  • Title : Chef D Apia; Jeune Fille D'Apia; Femme De Lefouga
  • Date : 1841
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  31754
  • Size: 21in x 15 1/2in (535mm x 395mm)

Description: 
This large finely engraved original antique lithograph folio print was engraved by Thierry de Freres and was published in the 1841 edition of Jules Sébastien César Dumont d'Urville's (1790–1842) publication: Voyage au Pole Sud et dan l'Océanie sur les corvettes l'Astrolabe et la Zélée, exécuté par ordre du Roi pendant les années 1837-1838-1839-1840, sous le Commandement de M.J. Dumont d'Urville, Capitaine de vaisseau.

Voyage au Pole Sud et dan l'Océanie sur les corvettes - In 1836, the French King Louis-Philippe, enthusiastic for Southern Hemisphere exploration, supported J. Dumont d'Urville's plan for a circumnavigation focusing on the South Seas. D'Urville (1790–1842) had already distinguished himself on two Pacific expeditions and was eager to rival the achievements of James Cook. Between 1837 and 1840, the ships Astrolabe and Zélée explored the waters of the Antarctic area and Oceania in extremely harsh conditions: almost forty crew members died or deserted. However, d'Urville discovered a new portion of the Antarctic coast, shed light on the ethnography of several Pacific islands and brought back multitudes of botanical specimens. His impressive contributions to the fields of geography, natural history and ethnography were gathered in this ten-volume work, published between 1841 and 1846. In Volume 10, published in 1846, which includes extracts from his correspondence, as well as a biography, d'Urville shares his immense relief as he returns to France. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy
Paper color: - Off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 21in x 15 1/2in (535mm x 395mm)
Margins: - Min 2in (50mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
More Info
1841 D 'Urville Large Antique Folio Print Inhabitants Nuku Hiva Isle, French Polynesia

1841 D 'Urville Large Antique Folio Print Inhabitants Nuku Hiva Isle, French Polynesia

Description: 
This large finely engraved original antique lithograph folio print was engraved by Thierry de Freres and was published in the 1841 edition of Jules Sébastien César Dumont d'Urville's (1790–1842) publication: Voyage au Pole Sud et dan l'Océanie sur les corvettes l'Astrolabe et la Zélée, exécuté par ordre du Roi pendant les années 1837-1838-1839-1840, sous le Commandement de M.J. Dumont d'Urville, Capitaine de vaisseau.

Voyage au Pole Sud et dan l'Océanie sur les corvettes - In 1836, the French King Louis-Philippe, enthusiastic for Southern Hemisphere exploration, supported J. Dumont d'Urville's plan for a circumnavigation focusing on the South Seas. D'Urville (1790–1842) had already distinguished himself on two Pacific expeditions and was eager to rival the achievements of James Cook. Between 1837 and 1840, the ships Astrolabe and Zélée explored the waters of the Antarctic area and Oceania in extremely harsh conditions: almost forty crew members died or deserted. However, d'Urville discovered a new portion of the Antarctic coast, shed light on the ethnography of several Pacific islands and brought back multitudes of botanical specimens. His impressive contributions to the fields of geography, natural history and ethnography were gathered in this ten-volume work, published between 1841 and 1846. In Volume 10, published in 1846, which includes extracts from his correspondence, as well as a biography, d'Urville shares his immense relief as he returns to France. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy
Paper color: - Off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 21in x 15 1/2in (535mm x 395mm)
Margins: - Min 2in (50mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
More Info
1842 d'Urville Original Antique Folio Print of Peha Chief of Uplou Islands, Samoa

1842 d'Urville Original Antique Folio Print of Peha Chief of Uplou Islands, Samoa

Description: 
This large finely engraved original antique folio print of Peha the Chief of the Opoloo - Upolu - island's of Samoa was published in the 1842 edition of Dumont d'Urville Voyage au pole sud et dans l'Oceanie

Voyage au pole sud et dans l'Oceanie... reported on the geography, geology, anthropology and natural history of Oceania and the South Pacific, which d'Urville had explored. He enlisted scientific collaborators to write and illustrate each section. The zoology section contained about 110 plates, including 29 of mammals.

Jules Sebastien Cesar Dumont d'Urville was a French navigator who surveyed and explored the Falklands, Oceania and the South Pacific on two voyages between 1822 and 1829. During his second circumnavigation of the world between 1837 and 1840, on the Astrolabe and the Zélée, he penetrated the ice pack south of New Zealand and discovered the Adélie Coast region of Antarctica, which he named for his wife. Earlier in his career, D'Urville encountered the newly-discovered Venus de Milo while surveying the Mediterranean, and brought it to the attention of the Louvre, where it remains a featured part of the collection.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy
Paper color: - Brown
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 21in x 15in (535mm x 380mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Age toning
Plate area: - Age toning
Verso: - Age toning

$125.00 USD
More Info
1842 d' Urville Antique Folio Print of Men of Mauga, Savai'i Island, Somoa

1842 d' Urville Antique Folio Print of Men of Mauga, Savai'i Island, Somoa

Description: 
This large fine original antique folio print of 2 x men of Mauga, Savai'i Island, Somoa was published in the 1841 edition of Dumont d'Urville Voyage au Pole Sud during his second circumnavigation of the globe in 1837-40.

Voyage au Pole Sud et dan l'Océanie sur les corvettes - In 1836, the French King Louis-Philippe, enthusiastic for Southern Hemisphere exploration, supported J. Dumont d'Urville's plan for a circumnavigation focusing on the South Seas. D'Urville (1790–1842) had already distinguished himself on two Pacific expeditions and was eager to rival the achievements of James Cook. Between 1837 and 1840, the ships Astrolabe and Zélée explored the waters of the Antarctic area and Oceania in extremely harsh conditions: almost forty crew members died or deserted. However, d'Urville discovered a new portion of the Antarctic coast, shed light on the ethnography of several Pacific islands and brought back multitudes of botanical specimens. His impressive contributions to the fields of geography, natural history and ethnography were gathered in this ten-volume work, published between 1841 and 1846. In Volume 10, published in 1846, which includes extracts from his correspondence, as well as a biography, d'Urville shares his immense relief as he returns to France. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 22in x 14in (560mm x 355mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Two repairs to margins, browning to margins
Plate area: - None
Verso: - Browning to margins

$125.00 USD
More Info
1842 Dumont d'Urville Folio Antique Print Men of Magareva Isle. French Polynesia

1842 Dumont d'Urville Folio Antique Print Men of Magareva Isle. French Polynesia

Description: 
This large finely engraved original antique lithograph print of two inhabitants of the island of Magareva - Mangaréva - of French Polynesia by Thierry, was published in the 1841 edition of Dumont d'Urville Voyage au Pole Sud

Voyage au Pole Sud et dan l'Océanie sur les corvettes - In 1836, the French King Louis-Philippe, enthusiastic for Southern Hemisphere exploration, supported J. Dumont d'Urville's plan for a circumnavigation focusing on the South Seas. D'Urville (1790–1842) had already distinguished himself on two Pacific expeditions and was eager to rival the achievements of James Cook. Between 1837 and 1840, the ships Astrolabe and Zélée explored the waters of the Antarctic area and Oceania in extremely harsh conditions: almost forty crew members died or deserted. However, d'Urville discovered a new portion of the Antarctic coast, shed light on the ethnography of several Pacific islands and brought back multitudes of botanical specimens. His impressive contributions to the fields of geography, natural history and ethnography were gathered in this ten-volume work, published between 1841 and 1846. In Volume 10, published in 1846, which includes extracts from his correspondence, as well as a biography, d'Urville shares his immense relief as he returns to France. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 21in x 15 1/2in (535mm x 395mm)
Margins: - Min 2in (50mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Browning to margins
Plate area: - None
Verso: - Browning to margins

$125.00 USD
More Info
1841 D'Urville Antique Print People of Nuku Hiva Marquesas Is. French Polynesia

1841 D'Urville Antique Print People of Nuku Hiva Marquesas Is. French Polynesia

Description: 
This large fine original antique print of the peoples and costumes of war on Nuku Hiva the largest of the Marquesas Islands of French Polynesia was published in the 1841 edition of Dumont d'Urville Voyage au Pole Sud during his second circumnavigation of the globe

Voyage au Pole Sud et dan l'Océanie sur les corvettes - In 1836, the French King Louis-Philippe, enthusiastic for Southern Hemisphere exploration, supported J. Dumont d'Urville's plan for a circumnavigation focusing on the South Seas. D'Urville (1790–1842) had already distinguished himself on two Pacific expeditions and was eager to rival the achievements of James Cook. Between 1837 and 1840, the ships Astrolabe and Zélée explored the waters of the Antarctic area and Oceania in extremely harsh conditions: almost forty crew members died or deserted. However, d'Urville discovered a new portion of the Antarctic coast, shed light on the ethnography of several Pacific islands and brought back multitudes of botanical specimens. His impressive contributions to the fields of geography, natural history and ethnography were gathered in this ten-volume work, published between 1841 and 1846. In Volume 10, published in 1846, which includes extracts from his correspondence, as well as a biography, d'Urville shares his immense relief as he returns to France. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 21in x 15 1/2in (535mm x 395mm)
Margins: - Min 2in (50mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Browning to margins
Plate area: - None
Verso: - Browning

$125.00 USD
More Info
1785 Cook Antique Print of a Boxing Match on Ha’apai Tonga, South Pacific

1785 Cook Antique Print of a Boxing Match on Ha’apai Tonga, South Pacific

  • Title:  Combat A Coups De Poing Des Insulaires De Hapaee
  • Ref  :  21356
  • Size: 10 1/4in x 8in (260mm x 200mm)
  • Date : 1785
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This fine original antique prints of boxing on the Ha’apai a group of Islands in Tonga,  South Pacific was engraved by the Robert Benard - after John Webber, official artist for Captain James Cook's third and final voyage - and was published in the 1785 French edition of Cooks voyages.

Cook's First Voyage (1768-1771)
The first voyage under Captain James Cook's command was primarily of a scientific nature. The expedition on the Endeavour initially sailed to Tahiti to observe the transit of the planet Venus in order to calculate the earth's distance from the sun. Cook landed on the South Pacific island in April of 1769 and in June of that year the astronomical observations were successfully completed. In addition to these labors, very good relations with the Tahitians were maintained and the naturalists Joseph Banks and Daniel C. Solander conducted extensive ethnological and botanical research.

Another purpose of the voyage was to explore the South Seas to determine if an inhabitable continent existed in the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Upon leaving Tahiti, Cook named and charted the Society Islands and then continued southwest to New Zealand. His circumnavigation and exploration of that country also resulted in a detailed survey. Cook proceeded to Australia, where he charted the eastern coast for 2,000 miles, naming the area New South Wales. As a result of these surveys, both Australia and New Zealand were annexed by Great Britain. In addition to these explorations, the Endeavour returned to England without a single death from scurvy among its men, an historic feat at the time. The combination of these accomplishments brought Cook prominence, promotion, and the opportunity to lead further expeditions.

Cook's Second Voyage (1772-1775)
Based on the success of his first voyage, Cook was appointed by the Admiralty to lead a second expedition. Two ships were employed with Cook commanding the Resolution and Captain Tobias Furneaux in charge of theAdventure. The purpose was to circumnavigate the globe as far south as possible to confirm the location of a southern continent. Cook proved that there was no "Terra Australis," which supposedly was located between New Zealand and South America. Cook was convinced, however, that there was land beyond the southern ice fields. In his pursuit of this idea, this expedition was the first European voyage to cross the Antarctic Circle. In addition, in two great sweeps through the Southern latitudes, Cook made an incredible number of landfalls including New Zealand, Easter Island, the Marquesas, Tahiti and the Society Islands, the Tonga Islands, the New Hebrides, New Caledonia, and a number of smaller islands.

In addition to these navigational accomplishments and the accompanying expansion of geographical knowledge, the expedition also recorded a vast amount of information regarding the Pacific islands and peoples, proved the value of the chronometer as an instrument for calculating longitude, and improved techniques for preventing scurvy.

Cook's Third Voyage (1776-1779)
In the course of his first two voyages, Cook circumnavigated the globe twice, sailed extensively into the Antarctic, and charted coastlines from Newfoundland to New Zealand. Following these achievements, Cook's third voyage was organized to seek an efficient route from England to southern and eastern Asia that would not entail rounding the Cape of Good Hope. The search for such a Northwest (or Northeast) Passage had been on the agenda of northern European mariners and merchants since the beginning of European expansion in the late fifteenth century. England's growing economic and colonial interests in India in the later eighteenth century provided the stimulus for the latest exploration for this route.

Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 10 1/4in x 8in (260mm x 200mm)
Plate size: - 10in x 7 1/2in (245mm x 190mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
More Info
1780 Cook Benard Antique Print Portrait of a Woman from Raiatea French Polynesia

1780 Cook Benard Antique Print Portrait of a Woman from Raiatea French Polynesia

  • Title  : Tynai-Mai, Jeune Femme de Isle d Ulietea
  • Date  : 1780
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref # : 16357
  • Size  : 10 1/4in x 7 3/4in (260mm x 200mm)

Description:

This fine original antique print a portrait of a woman from the Island of Ulietea or Raiatea near Bora Bora in the French Polynesia island group in the South Pacific was engraved by the Frenchman Robert Benard - after John Webber who was the officially appointed artist for Captain James Cook's third and final voyage - for the French edition of Cooks voyages published in 1780.

Cook's Third Voyage (1776-1779) In the course of his first two voyages, Cook circumnavigated the globe twice, sailed extensively into the Antarctic, and charted coastlines from Newfoundland to New Zealand. Following these achievements, Cook's third voyage was organized to seek an efficient route from England to southern and eastern Asia that would not entail rounding the Cape of Good Hope. The search for such a Northwest (or Northeast) Passage had been on the agenda of northern European mariners and merchants since the beginning of European expansion in the late fifteenth century. England's growing economic and colonial interests in India in the later eighteenth century provided the stimulus for the latest exploration for this route.

Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 10 1/4in x 7 3/4in (260mm x 200mm)
Plate size: - 10in x 7 1/2in (245mm x 190mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - None
Verso: - Light age toning

$110.00 USD
More Info
1780 Cook Benard Antique Print Portrait of a Man of Malekula Island of Vanuatu

1780 Cook Benard Antique Print Portrait of a Man of Malekula Island of Vanuatu

Description:

This fine original antique print a portrait of a man from the Mallicolo or Malekula island of Vanuatu in the South Pacific was engraved by the Frenchman Robert Benard - after John Webber who was the officially appointed artist for Captain James Cook's third and final voyage - for the French edition of Cooks voyages published in 1780.

Cook's Third Voyage (1776-1779) In the course of his first two voyages, Cook circumnavigated the globe twice, sailed extensively into the Antarctic, and charted coastlines from Newfoundland to New Zealand. Following these achievements, Cook's third voyage was organized to seek an efficient route from England to southern and eastern Asia that would not entail rounding the Cape of Good Hope. The search for such a Northwest (or Northeast) Passage had been on the agenda of northern European mariners and merchants since the beginning of European expansion in the late fifteenth century. England's growing economic and colonial interests in India in the later eighteenth century provided the stimulus for the latest exploration for this route.

Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 10 1/4in x 7 3/4in (260mm x 200mm)
Plate size: - 10in x 7 1/2in (245mm x 190mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - None
Verso: - Light age toning

$110.00 USD
More Info
1785 Cook Benard Antique Print Woman St Christina Island, Tonga

1785 Cook Benard Antique Print Woman St Christina Island, Tonga

Description:

This fine original antique print a portrait of a woman of the Santa Christina Island, in the Tonga group of Islands in the South Pacific was engraved by the Frenchman Robert Benard - after John Webber who was the officially appointed artist for Captain James Cook's third and final voyage - for the French edition of Cooks voyages published in 1780.

Cook's Third Voyage (1776-1779) In the course of his first two voyages, Cook circumnavigated the globe twice, sailed extensively into the Antarctic, and charted coastlines from Newfoundland to New Zealand. Following these achievements, Cook's third voyage was organized to seek an efficient route from England to southern and eastern Asia that would not entail rounding the Cape of Good Hope. The search for such a Northwest (or Northeast) Passage had been on the agenda of northern European mariners and merchants since the beginning of European expansion in the late fifteenth century. England's growing economic and colonial interests in India in the later eighteenth century provided the stimulus for the latest exploration for this route.

Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 10 1/4in x 7 3/4in (260mm x 200mm)
Plate size: - 10in x 7 1/2in (245mm x 190mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - None
Verso: - Light age toning

$110.00 USD
More Info
1780 Cook Benard Antique Print of a Chief Santa Christina Isle. French Polynesia

1780 Cook Benard Antique Print of a Chief Santa Christina Isle. French Polynesia

Description:

This fine original antique print a portrait of a a Chief of the island of Santa Christina in the Marquesas Islands part of the French Polynesia group of islands, was engraved by the Frenchman Robert Benard - after John Webber who was the officially appointed artist for Captain James Cook's third and final voyage - for the French edition of Cooks voyages published in 1780..

Cook's Third Voyage (1776-1779) In the course of his first two voyages, Cook circumnavigated the globe twice, sailed extensively into the Antarctic, and charted coastlines from Newfoundland to New Zealand. Following these achievements, Cook's third voyage was organized to seek an efficient route from England to southern and eastern Asia that would not entail rounding the Cape of Good Hope. The search for such a Northwest (or Northeast) Passage had been on the agenda of northern European mariners and merchants since the beginning of European expansion in the late fifteenth century. England's growing economic and colonial interests in India in the later eighteenth century provided the stimulus for the latest exploration for this route.

Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 10in x 8in (255mm x 205mm)
Plate size: - 10in x 7 1/2in (245mm x 190mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - None
Verso: - Light age toning

$110.00 USD
More Info
1780 Cook Benard Antique Print Portrait of a Man from Tongatapu Island, Tonga

1780 Cook Benard Antique Print Portrait of a Man from Tongatapu Island, Tonga

Description:

This fine original antique print a portrait of Otago a Chief from Amsterdam Island (Tongatapu) island in the Tonga group of Islands in the South Pacific was engraved by the Frenchman Robert Benard - after John Webber who was the officially appointed artist for Captain James Cook's third and final voyage - for the French edition of Cooks voyages published in 1780.

Cook's Third Voyage (1776-1779) In the course of his first two voyages, Cook circumnavigated the globe twice, sailed extensively into the Antarctic, and charted coastlines from Newfoundland to New Zealand. Following these achievements, Cook's third voyage was organized to seek an efficient route from England to southern and eastern Asia that would not entail rounding the Cape of Good Hope. The search for such a Northwest (or Northeast) Passage had been on the agenda of northern European mariners and merchants since the beginning of European expansion in the late fifteenth century. England's growing economic and colonial interests in India in the later eighteenth century provided the stimulus for the latest exploration for this route.

Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 10in x 8in (255mm x 205mm)
Plate size: - 10in x 7 1/2in (245mm x 190mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - None
Verso: - Light age toning

$110.00 USD
More Info
1780 Cook Benard Antique Print Portrait a Man of Bolabala Isle French Polynesia

1780 Cook Benard Antique Print Portrait a Man of Bolabala Isle French Polynesia

Description:

This fine original antique print a portrait of a man from the Island of Bolabala in the French Polynesia Island Group in the South Pacific was engraved by the Frenchman Robert Benard - after John Webber who was the officially appointed artist for Captain James Cook's third and final voyage - for the French edition of Cooks voyages published in 1780.

Cook's Third Voyage (1776-1779) In the course of his first two voyages, Cook circumnavigated the globe twice, sailed extensively into the Antarctic, and charted coastlines from Newfoundland to New Zealand. Following these achievements, Cook's third voyage was organized to seek an efficient route from England to southern and eastern Asia that would not entail rounding the Cape of Good Hope. The search for such a Northwest (or Northeast) Passage had been on the agenda of northern European mariners and merchants since the beginning of European expansion in the late fifteenth century. England's growing economic and colonial interests in India in the later eighteenth century provided the stimulus for the latest exploration for this route.

Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 10in x 8in (255mm x 205mm)
Plate size: - 10in x 7 1/2in (245mm x 190mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - None
Verso: - Light age toning

$110.00 USD
More Info
1780 Cook Benard Antique Print Portrait of Omai 1st Polynesian to Visit England

1780 Cook Benard Antique Print Portrait of Omai 1st Polynesian to Visit England

  • Title  : Omai Amene en Angleterre par le Cap Furneaux
  • Date  : 1780
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref # : 16355
  • Size  : 10in x 8in (955mm x 205mm)

Description:

This finely engraved original antique print a portrait of Omai the first Tahitian to visit England after Cooks second voyage to the South Seas was engraved by Robert Benard after Webber for the French edition of Cooks voyages published in 1780.

In 1774, the first Polynesian to visit London travelled to England with the crew of Captain Cook's second Pacific voyage and became an overnight sensation. Seen as a living example of the 'Noble Savage', Omai as he was known, was discussed by scientists and philosophers, celebrated in all the best circles and written about in everything from poetry to pornography. He proved a lightning rod for European anxieties regarding imperialism, civilisation and the true nature of mankind. The artistic and literary legacy of Omai's encounter with Europe provides a fascinating insight into European culture in a moment of transition, when old certainties were collapsing and new ones were yet to form. Omai arrived at Portsmouth on 14 July 1774 as a crew-member on board HMS Adventure, captained by Tobias Furneaux. Taken immediately to meet Lord Sandwich, the First Lord of the Admiralty, he was then placed in the care of Joseph Banks and Dr Solander, both of whom he claimed to remember from their visit to Tahiti five years earlier. Three days later, on 17 July, he was presented to King George III and Queen Charlotte at Kew. It was at this introduction that Omai would reveal the grace and ‘natural’ good manners that first astounded and then delighted his audience. Once approved by the highest in the land, Omai’s career as a ‘social lion’ was assured. When Omai returned to the Pacific in 1776, many felt that the failure to convert him to Christianity was an important opportunity missed. 

Cook's Third Voyage (1776-1779) In the course of his first two voyages, Cook circumnavigated the globe twice, sailed extensively into the Antarctic, and charted coastlines from Newfoundland to New Zealand. Following these achievements, Cook's third voyage was organized to seek an efficient route from England to southern and eastern Asia that would not entail rounding the Cape of Good Hope. The search for such a Northwest (or Northeast) Passage had been on the agenda of northern European mariners and merchants since the beginning of European expansion in the late fifteenth century. England's growing economic and colonial interests in India in the later eighteenth century provided the stimulus for the latest exploration for this route.

Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 10in x 8in (255mm x 205mm)
Plate size: - 10in x 7 1/2in (245mm x 190mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - None
Verso: - Light age toning

$110.00 USD
More Info
1780 Cook Benard Antique Print Portrait a Man of Tierra Del Fuego, South America

1780 Cook Benard Antique Print Portrait a Man of Tierra Del Fuego, South America

  • Title  : Homme Du Canal De Noel Dans La Terre De Feu
  • Date  : 1780
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref # : 16354
  • Size  : 10in x 8in (955mm x 205mm)

Description:

This fine original antique print a portrait of a man from southern south America, specifically Tierra Del Fuego, was engraved by the Frenchman Robert Benard - after John Webber who was the officially appointed artist for Captain James Cook's third and final voyage - for the French edition of Cooks voyages published in 1780 

Cook's Third Voyage (1776-1779) In the course of his first two voyages, Cook circumnavigated the globe twice, sailed extensively into the Antarctic, and charted coastlines from Newfoundland to New Zealand. Following these achievements, Cook's third voyage was organized to seek an efficient route from England to southern and eastern Asia that would not entail rounding the Cape of Good Hope. The search for such a Northwest (or Northeast) Passage had been on the agenda of northern European mariners and merchants since the beginning of European expansion in the late fifteenth century. England's growing economic and colonial interests in India in the later eighteenth century provided the stimulus for the latest exploration for this route.

Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 10in x 8in (255mm x 205mm)
Plate size: - 10in x 7 1/2in (245mm x 190mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - None
Verso: - Light age toning

$110.00 USD
More Info
1780 Cook Benard Antique Print A Woman of the Island of Paques or Easter Island

1780 Cook Benard Antique Print A Woman of the Island of Paques or Easter Island

Description:

This finely engraved original antique Print of a Woman from Easter Island - visited by Cook during his second voyage of discovery - was engraved by Robert Benard after Webber for the French edition of Cooks voyages published in 1777.

Early European visitors to Easter Island recorded the local oral traditions about the original settlers. In these traditions, Easter Islanders claimed that a chief Hotu Matu'a arrived on the island in one or two large canoes with his wife and extended family.  They are believed to have been Polynesian. There is considerable uncertainty about the accuracy of this legend as well as the date of settlement. Published literature suggests the island was settled around 300-400 CE, or at about the time of the arrival of the earliest settlers in Hawaii. Some scientists say that Easter Island was not inhabited until 700-800 CE. This date range is based on glottochronological calculations and on three radiocarbon dates from charcoal that appears to have been produced during forest clearance activities. Moreover, a recent study which included radiocarbon dates from what is thought to be very early material suggests that the island was settled as recently as 1200 CE. This seems to be supported by a 2006 study of the island's deforestation, which could have started around the same time. A large now extinct palm, Paschalococos disperta, related to the Chilean wine palm (Jubaea chilensis), was one of the dominant trees as attested by fossil evidence; this species, whose sole occurrence was Easter Island, became extinct due to deforestation by the early settlers. The Austronesian Polynesians, who first settled the island, are likely to have arrived from the Marquesas Islands from the west. These settlers brought bananas, taro, sugarcane, and paper mulberry, as well as chickens and Polynesian rats. The island at one time supported a relatively advanced and complex civilization. It is suggested that the reason settlers sought an isolated island was because of high levels of Ciguatera fish poisoning in their then current surrounding area.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 10in x 8in (255mm x 205mm)
Plate size: - 10in x 7 1/2in (245mm x 190mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - None
Verso: - Light age toning

$110.00 USD
More Info
1785 Cook Antique Print A Woman of Nootka Sound, British Columbia, Canada

1785 Cook Antique Print A Woman of Nootka Sound, British Columbia, Canada

Description: 
This finely engraved original antique print a portrait of a woman from Nootka Sound, British Columbia, Canada was engraved by the Frenchman Robert Benard after Webber for the French edition of Cooks voyages published in 1780. The images were drawn for Cook after his first Voyage of Discovery between 1768 & 1771.

Nootka Sound is a complex inlet or sound of the Pacific Ocean on the rugged west coast of Vancouver Island, in the Canadian province of British Columbia. Historically also known asKing George's Sound as a strait it separates Vancouver Island and Nootka Island.

Cook's First Voyage (1768-1771)
The first voyage under Captain James Cook's command was primarily of a scientific nature. The expedition on the Endeavour initially sailed to Tahiti to observe the transit of the planet Venus in order to calculate the earth's distance from the sun. Cook landed on the South Pacific island in April of 1769 and in June of that year the astronomical observations were successfully completed. In addition to these labors, very good relations with the Tahitians were maintained and the naturalists Joseph Banks and Daniel C. Solander conducted extensive ethnological and botanical research.

Another purpose of the voyage was to explore the South Seas to determine if an inhabitable continent existed in the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Upon leaving Tahiti, Cook named and charted the Society Islands and then continued southwest to New Zealand. His circumnavigation and exploration of that country also resulted in a detailed survey. Cook proceeded to Australia, where he charted the eastern coast for 2,000 miles, naming the area New South Wales. As a result of these surveys, both Australia and New Zealand were annexed by Great Britain. In addition to these explorations, the Endeavour returned to England without a single death from scurvy among its men, an historic feat at the time. The combination of these accomplishments brought Cook prominence, promotion, and the opportunity to lead further expeditions.

Cook's Second Voyage (1772-1775)
Based on the success of his first voyage, Cook was appointed by the Admiralty to lead a second expedition. Two ships were employed with Cook commanding the Resolution and Captain Tobias Furneaux in charge of theAdventure. The purpose was to circumnavigate the globe as far south as possible to confirm the location of a southern continent. Cook proved that there was no "Terra Australis," which supposedly was located between New Zealand and South America. Cook was convinced, however, that there was land beyond the southern ice fields. In his pursuit of this idea, this expedition was the first European voyage to cross the Antarctic Circle. In addition, in two great sweeps through the Southern latitudes, Cook made an incredible number of landfalls including New Zealand, Easter Island, the Marquesas, Tahiti and the Society Islands, the Tonga Islands, the New Hebrides, New Caledonia, and a number of smaller islands.

In addition to these navigational accomplishments and the accompanying expansion of geographical knowledge, the expedition also recorded a vast amount of information regarding the Pacific islands and peoples, proved the value of the chronometer as an instrument for calculating longitude, and improved techniques for preventing scurvy.

Cook's Third Voyage (1776-1779)
In the course of his first two voyages, Cook circumnavigated the globe twice, sailed extensively into the Antarctic, and charted coastlines from Newfoundland to New Zealand. Following these achievements, Cook's third voyage was organized to seek an efficient route from England to southern and eastern Asia that would not entail rounding the Cape of Good Hope. The search for such a Northwest (or Northeast) Passage had been on the agenda of northern European mariners and merchants since the beginning of European expansion in the late fifteenth century. England's growing economic and colonial interests in India in the later eighteenth century provided the stimulus for the latest exploration for this route.

Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 10 1/4in x 8in (260mm x 200mm)
Plate size: - 10in x 7 1/2in (245mm x 190mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$110.00 USD
More Info
1785 Cook Antique Print of Poulaho the King of the Tonga or Friendly Islands

1785 Cook Antique Print of Poulaho the King of the Tonga or Friendly Islands

Description: 
This finely engraved original antique print a portrait of Poulaho the King of the Tonga or Friendly Islands - first discovered by Cook in 1774 - was engraved by the Frenchman Robert Benard after Webber for the French edition of Cooks voyages published in 1785.

Cook's First Voyage (1768-1771)
The first voyage under Captain James Cook's command was primarily of a scientific nature. The expedition on the Endeavour initially sailed to Tahiti to observe the transit of the planet Venus in order to calculate the earth's distance from the sun. Cook landed on the South Pacific island in April of 1769 and in June of that year the astronomical observations were successfully completed. In addition to these labors, very good relations with the Tahitians were maintained and the naturalists Joseph Banks and Daniel C. Solander conducted extensive ethnological and botanical research.

Another purpose of the voyage was to explore the South Seas to determine if an inhabitable continent existed in the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Upon leaving Tahiti, Cook named and charted the Society Islands and then continued southwest to New Zealand. His circumnavigation and exploration of that country also resulted in a detailed survey. Cook proceeded to Australia, where he charted the eastern coast for 2,000 miles, naming the area New South Wales. As a result of these surveys, both Australia and New Zealand were annexed by Great Britain. In addition to these explorations, the Endeavour returned to England without a single death from scurvy among its men, an historic feat at the time. The combination of these accomplishments brought Cook prominence, promotion, and the opportunity to lead further expeditions.

Cook's Second Voyage (1772-1775)
Based on the success of his first voyage, Cook was appointed by the Admiralty to lead a second expedition. Two ships were employed with Cook commanding the Resolution and Captain Tobias Furneaux in charge of theAdventure. The purpose was to circumnavigate the globe as far south as possible to confirm the location of a southern continent. Cook proved that there was no "Terra Australis," which supposedly was located between New Zealand and South America. Cook was convinced, however, that there was land beyond the southern ice fields. In his pursuit of this idea, this expedition was the first European voyage to cross the Antarctic Circle. In addition, in two great sweeps through the Southern latitudes, Cook made an incredible number of landfalls including New Zealand, Easter Island, the Marquesas, Tahiti and the Society Islands, the Tonga Islands, the New Hebrides, New Caledonia, and a number of smaller islands.

In addition to these navigational accomplishments and the accompanying expansion of geographical knowledge, the expedition also recorded a vast amount of information regarding the Pacific islands and peoples, proved the value of the chronometer as an instrument for calculating longitude, and improved techniques for preventing scurvy.

Cook's Third Voyage (1776-1779)
In the course of his first two voyages, Cook circumnavigated the globe twice, sailed extensively into the Antarctic, and charted coastlines from Newfoundland to New Zealand. Following these achievements, Cook's third voyage was organized to seek an efficient route from England to southern and eastern Asia that would not entail rounding the Cape of Good Hope. The search for such a Northwest (or Northeast) Passage had been on the agenda of northern European mariners and merchants since the beginning of European expansion in the late fifteenth century. England's growing economic and colonial interests in India in the later eighteenth century provided the stimulus for the latest exploration for this route.

Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 10 1/4in x 8in (260mm x 200mm)
Plate size: - 10in x 7 1/2in (245mm x 190mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$110.00 USD
More Info
1785 Cook Antique Print Man of Mangea Island - Society Island, South Pacific

1785 Cook Antique Print Man of Mangea Island - Society Island, South Pacific

Description: 
This finely engraved original antique print a portrait of man of Mangea Island - west of the Society Islands in the south Pacific -visited by Cook in 1777 during his third voyage - was engraved by the Frenchman Robert Benard after Webber for the French edition of Cooks voyages published in 1785.

Cook's First Voyage (1768-1771)
The first voyage under Captain James Cook's command was primarily of a scientific nature. The expedition on the Endeavour initially sailed to Tahiti to observe the transit of the planet Venus in order to calculate the earth's distance from the sun. Cook landed on the South Pacific island in April of 1769 and in June of that year the astronomical observations were successfully completed. In addition to these labors, very good relations with the Tahitians were maintained and the naturalists Joseph Banks and Daniel C. Solander conducted extensive ethnological and botanical research.

Another purpose of the voyage was to explore the South Seas to determine if an inhabitable continent existed in the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Upon leaving Tahiti, Cook named and charted the Society Islands and then continued southwest to New Zealand. His circumnavigation and exploration of that country also resulted in a detailed survey. Cook proceeded to Australia, where he charted the eastern coast for 2,000 miles, naming the area New South Wales. As a result of these surveys, both Australia and New Zealand were annexed by Great Britain. In addition to these explorations, the Endeavour returned to England without a single death from scurvy among its men, an historic feat at the time. The combination of these accomplishments brought Cook prominence, promotion, and the opportunity to lead further expeditions.

Cook's Second Voyage (1772-1775)
Based on the success of his first voyage, Cook was appointed by the Admiralty to lead a second expedition. Two ships were employed with Cook commanding the Resolution and Captain Tobias Furneaux in charge of theAdventure. The purpose was to circumnavigate the globe as far south as possible to confirm the location of a southern continent. Cook proved that there was no "Terra Australis," which supposedly was located between New Zealand and South America. Cook was convinced, however, that there was land beyond the southern ice fields. In his pursuit of this idea, this expedition was the first European voyage to cross the Antarctic Circle. In addition, in two great sweeps through the Southern latitudes, Cook made an incredible number of landfalls including New Zealand, Easter Island, the Marquesas, Tahiti and the Society Islands, the Tonga Islands, the New Hebrides, New Caledonia, and a number of smaller islands.

In addition to these navigational accomplishments and the accompanying expansion of geographical knowledge, the expedition also recorded a vast amount of information regarding the Pacific islands and peoples, proved the value of the chronometer as an instrument for calculating longitude, and improved techniques for preventing scurvy.

Cook's Third Voyage (1776-1779)
In the course of his first two voyages, Cook circumnavigated the globe twice, sailed extensively into the Antarctic, and charted coastlines from Newfoundland to New Zealand. Following these achievements, Cook's third voyage was organized to seek an efficient route from England to southern and eastern Asia that would not entail rounding the Cape of Good Hope. The search for such a Northwest (or Northeast) Passage had been on the agenda of northern European mariners and merchants since the beginning of European expansion in the late fifteenth century. England's growing economic and colonial interests in India in the later eighteenth century provided the stimulus for the latest exploration for this route.

Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 10 1/4in x 8in (260mm x 200mm)
Plate size: - 10in x 7 1/2in (245mm x 190mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$110.00 USD
More Info
1785 Cook Antique Print Woman of New Caledonia Island, South Pacific

1785 Cook Antique Print Woman of New Caledonia Island, South Pacific

Description: 
This finely engraved original antique print a portrait of woman of South Pacific Island of New Caledonia - visited by Cook in 1777 during his third voyage - was engraved by the Frenchman Robert Benard after Webber for the French edition of Cooks voyages published in 1785.

Cook's First Voyage (1768-1771)
The first voyage under Captain James Cook's command was primarily of a scientific nature. The expedition on the Endeavour initially sailed to Tahiti to observe the transit of the planet Venus in order to calculate the earth's distance from the sun. Cook landed on the South Pacific island in April of 1769 and in June of that year the astronomical observations were successfully completed. In addition to these labors, very good relations with the Tahitians were maintained and the naturalists Joseph Banks and Daniel C. Solander conducted extensive ethnological and botanical research.

Another purpose of the voyage was to explore the South Seas to determine if an inhabitable continent existed in the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Upon leaving Tahiti, Cook named and charted the Society Islands and then continued southwest to New Zealand. His circumnavigation and exploration of that country also resulted in a detailed survey. Cook proceeded to Australia, where he charted the eastern coast for 2,000 miles, naming the area New South Wales. As a result of these surveys, both Australia and New Zealand were annexed by Great Britain. In addition to these explorations, the Endeavour returned to England without a single death from scurvy among its men, an historic feat at the time. The combination of these accomplishments brought Cook prominence, promotion, and the opportunity to lead further expeditions.

Cook's Second Voyage (1772-1775)
Based on the success of his first voyage, Cook was appointed by the Admiralty to lead a second expedition. Two ships were employed with Cook commanding the Resolution and Captain Tobias Furneaux in charge of theAdventure. The purpose was to circumnavigate the globe as far south as possible to confirm the location of a southern continent. Cook proved that there was no "Terra Australis," which supposedly was located between New Zealand and South America. Cook was convinced, however, that there was land beyond the southern ice fields. In his pursuit of this idea, this expedition was the first European voyage to cross the Antarctic Circle. In addition, in two great sweeps through the Southern latitudes, Cook made an incredible number of landfalls including New Zealand, Easter Island, the Marquesas, Tahiti and the Society Islands, the Tonga Islands, the New Hebrides, New Caledonia, and a number of smaller islands.

In addition to these navigational accomplishments and the accompanying expansion of geographical knowledge, the expedition also recorded a vast amount of information regarding the Pacific islands and peoples, proved the value of the chronometer as an instrument for calculating longitude, and improved techniques for preventing scurvy.

Cook's Third Voyage (1776-1779)
In the course of his first two voyages, Cook circumnavigated the globe twice, sailed extensively into the Antarctic, and charted coastlines from Newfoundland to New Zealand. Following these achievements, Cook's third voyage was organized to seek an efficient route from England to southern and eastern Asia that would not entail rounding the Cape of Good Hope. The search for such a Northwest (or Northeast) Passage had been on the agenda of northern European mariners and merchants since the beginning of European expansion in the late fifteenth century. England's growing economic and colonial interests in India in the later eighteenth century provided the stimulus for the latest exploration for this route.

Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 10 1/4in x 8in (260mm x 200mm)
Plate size: - 10in x 7 1/2in (245mm x 190mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$110.00 USD
More Info
1785 Cook Antique Print Portrait of The Chief of Tahiti, Potatow

1785 Cook Antique Print Portrait of The Chief of Tahiti, Potatow

Description:
This finely engraved original antique print a portrait of The Chief of Tahiti, Potatow - visited by Cook in 1769 during his first voyage - was engraved by the Frenchman Robert Benard after Webber for the French edition of Cooks voyages published in 1785.

Cook's First Voyage (1768-1771)
The first voyage under Captain James Cook's command was primarily of a scientific nature. The expedition on the Endeavour initially sailed to Tahiti to observe the transit of the planet Venus in order to calculate the earth's distance from the sun. Cook landed on the South Pacific island in April of 1769 and in June of that year the astronomical observations were successfully completed. In addition to these labors, very good relations with the Tahitians were maintained and the naturalists Joseph Banks and Daniel C. Solander conducted extensive ethnological and botanical research.

Another purpose of the voyage was to explore the South Seas to determine if an inhabitable continent existed in the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Upon leaving Tahiti, Cook named and charted the Society Islands and then continued southwest to New Zealand. His circumnavigation and exploration of that country also resulted in a detailed survey. Cook proceeded to Australia, where he charted the eastern coast for 2,000 miles, naming the area New South Wales. As a result of these surveys, both Australia and New Zealand were annexed by Great Britain. In addition to these explorations, the Endeavour returned to England without a single death from scurvy among its men, an historic feat at the time. The combination of these accomplishments brought Cook prominence, promotion, and the opportunity to lead further expeditions.

Cook's Second Voyage (1772-1775)
Based on the success of his first voyage, Cook was appointed by the Admiralty to lead a second expedition. Two ships were employed with Cook commanding the Resolution and Captain Tobias Furneaux in charge of theAdventure. The purpose was to circumnavigate the globe as far south as possible to confirm the location of a southern continent. Cook proved that there was no "Terra Australis," which supposedly was located between New Zealand and South America. Cook was convinced, however, that there was land beyond the southern ice fields. In his pursuit of this idea, this expedition was the first European voyage to cross the Antarctic Circle. In addition, in two great sweeps through the Southern latitudes, Cook made an incredible number of landfalls including New Zealand, Easter Island, the Marquesas, Tahiti and the Society Islands, the Tonga Islands, the New Hebrides, New Caledonia, and a number of smaller islands.

In addition to these navigational accomplishments and the accompanying expansion of geographical knowledge, the expedition also recorded a vast amount of information regarding the Pacific islands and peoples, proved the value of the chronometer as an instrument for calculating longitude, and improved techniques for preventing scurvy.

Cook's Third Voyage (1776-1779)
In the course of his first two voyages, Cook circumnavigated the globe twice, sailed extensively into the Antarctic, and charted coastlines from Newfoundland to New Zealand. Following these achievements, Cook's third voyage was organized to seek an efficient route from England to southern and eastern Asia that would not entail rounding the Cape of Good Hope. The search for such a Northwest (or Northeast) Passage had been on the agenda of northern European mariners and merchants since the beginning of European expansion in the late fifteenth century. England's growing economic and colonial interests in India in the later eighteenth century provided the stimulus for the latest exploration for this route.

Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 10 1/4in x 8in (260mm x 200mm)
Plate size: - 10in x 7 1/2in (245mm x 190mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$110.00 USD
More Info
1785 Cook Antique Print Portrait Dancing Girl of Tahiti - South Pacific

1785 Cook Antique Print Portrait Dancing Girl of Tahiti - South Pacific

Description:
This finely engraved original antique print a dancing girl of Tahiti - visited by Cook in 1769 during his first voyage - was engraved by the Frenchman Robert Benard after Webber for the French edition of Cooks voyages published in 1785.

Cook's First Voyage (1768-1771)
The first voyage under Captain James Cook's command was primarily of a scientific nature. The expedition on the Endeavour initially sailed to Tahiti to observe the transit of the planet Venus in order to calculate the earth's distance from the sun. Cook landed on the South Pacific island in April of 1769 and in June of that year the astronomical observations were successfully completed. In addition to these labors, very good relations with the Tahitians were maintained and the naturalists Joseph Banks and Daniel C. Solander conducted extensive ethnological and botanical research.

Another purpose of the voyage was to explore the South Seas to determine if an inhabitable continent existed in the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Upon leaving Tahiti, Cook named and charted the Society Islands and then continued southwest to New Zealand. His circumnavigation and exploration of that country also resulted in a detailed survey. Cook proceeded to Australia, where he charted the eastern coast for 2,000 miles, naming the area New South Wales. As a result of these surveys, both Australia and New Zealand were annexed by Great Britain. In addition to these explorations, the Endeavour returned to England without a single death from scurvy among its men, an historic feat at the time. The combination of these accomplishments brought Cook prominence, promotion, and the opportunity to lead further expeditions.

Cook's Second Voyage (1772-1775)
Based on the success of his first voyage, Cook was appointed by the Admiralty to lead a second expedition. Two ships were employed with Cook commanding the Resolution and Captain Tobias Furneaux in charge of theAdventure. The purpose was to circumnavigate the globe as far south as possible to confirm the location of a southern continent. Cook proved that there was no "Terra Australis," which supposedly was located between New Zealand and South America. Cook was convinced, however, that there was land beyond the southern ice fields. In his pursuit of this idea, this expedition was the first European voyage to cross the Antarctic Circle. In addition, in two great sweeps through the Southern latitudes, Cook made an incredible number of landfalls including New Zealand, Easter Island, the Marquesas, Tahiti and the Society Islands, the Tonga Islands, the New Hebrides, New Caledonia, and a number of smaller islands.

In addition to these navigational accomplishments and the accompanying expansion of geographical knowledge, the expedition also recorded a vast amount of information regarding the Pacific islands and peoples, proved the value of the chronometer as an instrument for calculating longitude, and improved techniques for preventing scurvy.

Cook's Third Voyage (1776-1779)
In the course of his first two voyages, Cook circumnavigated the globe twice, sailed extensively into the Antarctic, and charted coastlines from Newfoundland to New Zealand. Following these achievements, Cook's third voyage was organized to seek an efficient route from England to southern and eastern Asia that would not entail rounding the Cape of Good Hope. The search for such a Northwest (or Northeast) Passage had been on the agenda of northern European mariners and merchants since the beginning of European expansion in the late fifteenth century. England's growing economic and colonial interests in India in the later eighteenth century provided the stimulus for the latest exploration for this route.

Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 10 1/4in x 8in (260mm x 200mm)
Plate size: - 10in x 7 1/2in (245mm x 190mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$110.00 USD
More Info
1841 Dumont d'Urville Large Antique Folio Print Men of Magareva Isle. French Polynesia

1841 Dumont d'Urville Large Antique Folio Print Men of Magareva Isle. French Polynesia

Description: 
This large finely engraved original antique lithograph folio print of two inhabitants of the island of Magareva - Mangaréva - of French Polynesia was engraved by Thierry de Freres and was published in the 1841 edition of Jules Sébastien César Dumont d'Urville's (1790–1842) publication: Voyage au Pole Sud et dan l'Océanie sur les corvettes l'Astrolabe et la Zélée, exécuté par ordre du Roi pendant les années 1837-1838-1839-1840, sous le Commandement de M.J. Dumont d'Urville, Capitaine de vaisseau.

Voyage au Pole Sud et dan l'Océanie sur les corvettes - In 1836, the French King Louis-Philippe, enthusiastic for Southern Hemisphere exploration, supported J. Dumont d'Urville's plan for a circumnavigation focusing on the South Seas. D'Urville (1790–1842) had already distinguished himself on two Pacific expeditions and was eager to rival the achievements of James Cook. Between 1837 and 1840, the ships Astrolabe and Zélée explored the waters of the Antarctic area and Oceania in extremely harsh conditions: almost forty crew members died or deserted. However, d'Urville discovered a new portion of the Antarctic coast, shed light on the ethnography of several Pacific islands and brought back multitudes of botanical specimens. His impressive contributions to the fields of geography, natural history and ethnography were gathered in this ten-volume work, published between 1841 and 1846. In Volume 10, published in 1846, which includes extracts from his correspondence, as well as a biography, d'Urville shares his immense relief as he returns to France. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy
Paper color: - Off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 21in x 15 1/2in (535mm x 395mm)
Margins: - Min 2in (50mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Matt burn to margins
Plate area: - None
Verso: - Matt burn to margins

$99.00 USD
More Info