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1486 Ptolemy Holle Rare Antique Map of Great Britain & Ireland - Extremely Rare

1486 Ptolemy Holle Rare Antique Map of Great Britain & Ireland - Extremely Rare

This is a unique opportunity to acquire one of the earliest published maps of Great Britain and Ireland. A very rare map from an atlases published only 47 years after Johannes Gutenberg invention of the moveable type printing press in 1439. 
This Ptolemy trapezoid projection map was printed as part of Lienhart Holle's 1486 edition of the Claude Ptolemy's Atlas Claudii Ptolomei .... Cosmographie ... Opus Donni Nicolai Germani Secvndvm Ptolomevm Finit, Ulm, Germany. 
From a collecting perspective there are only 4 other maps of Great Britain & Ireland published prior to this.
This large map is in fine condition on strong sturdy paper, the printing impression is heavy and clear. The colour is original and beautifully applied. There has been professional restoration to the L&R bottom corners. No loss of original paper and restrengthened on the verso. The centerfold has been re-strengthened, on the verso, with some light creasing and rippling. Please see the images below. A great map and a unique addition to any collection.

We have found 6 sales records for this map since 1983 with the top price of $19,854. The first edition's of Ptolemy’s ‘Geographia’ was published in Italy in 1477, republished in 1478 & 1482. The next atlas to be published was north of the Alps by Lienhart Holle, in Ulm, Germany in 1482. Holle’s maps were printed from woodcuts, and are distinct with their heavy wash colouring for the sea areas, typically a rich blue for the 1482 edition, and an ochre for the 1486 edition. These bright colours, and the greater sense of age that woodcuts convey, make this series of maps one of the most visually attractive (Ref: Shirley 5; Stevenson; Tooley; M&B; MapForum)

General Condition:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, green, red, brown.
General color appearance: - Authentic and fresh
Paper size: - 20 1/2in x 15 1/2in (552mm x 397mm)
Image size: -14 1/2in x 14 1/2in x 20 1/4in (369mm x 369mm (upper margin) 511 mm (lower margin)
Margins: - Min 1/4in (6mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light discolouration & soiling.
Plate area: - Bottom L&R corners restored, no loss. Light creasing and rippling
Verso: - Re-enforced along center-fold and L&R bottom corners

$27,500.00 USD
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1720 Bowen & Owen British Road Maps Collection Consisting of 83 Pages = 166 Maps

1720 Bowen & Owen British Road Maps Collection Consisting of 83 Pages = 166 Maps

Description: 
These wonderful, beautifully detailed original antique copper-plate engraved double sided Road Maps of the counties and regions of England and Wales were compiled by John Owen and Engraved by Emmanual Bowen in the 1720 edition of Britannia Depicta or Ogilby Improved.
We have a total of 83 double sided pages remaining of the original 137 pages. 5 are hand coloured the rest are B&W. All are in VG to fine condition with light age toning to some.

Background: These delightful and fascinating small road maps with their embellishments of coats of arms and historical notes come from an 18th century road atlas - Britannia Depicta. The strip road maps of England and Wales first appeared in 1675 with the publishing of John Ogilby's magnificent atlas Britannia, containing 100 folio sized road maps. By the first part of the 18th century there was public demand for a small road atlas that could be easily carried by travellers on horseback or for those who could afford to take a coach. There were a number of abortive attempts to produce such a handy sized atlas but others succeeded like John Senex who published his small road atlas in 1719. A year later Britannia Depicta was published by Thomas Bowles. The interesting notes that appear on the front and back of each map were compiled by the antiquarian and lawyer John Owen whilst the engraving was undertaken by Emanuel Bowen This was Bowen's first major work as a cartographical engraver for which he received a part share in the atlas in payment for his labours. The format of the atlas and maps met with the public's approval and the atlas was republished many times over the next forty years until the last edition in 1764. The double sided Road Maps each measure about 5 x 7 inches.
The maps are highly entertaining describing the route taken with sights of churches to gallows and many other misc. items of interest for travelers of the 17th and 18th centuries, fascinating maps.

The following list show all the double sided pages numbering no. 1 to 273. Each map follows the road direction indicating city & town names, rivers, mountains and places of interest along the roads shown (the pages missing are struck through)

1/2 CARDIGANSHIRE. / London, Uxbridge, Beaconsfield
3/4 High Wycombe, Tetsworth, Oxford, Islip. Islip, Enston, Morton Broadway.
5/6 Broadway, Pershore, Worcester, Bramyard. / Bramyard Leominster, Presteign.
7/8 Rhayader, Aberystwyth. SUSSEX
9/10 London, Ewell, Leatherhead, Dorking / Billingshurst, Amberley.
11/12 NOTTINGHAMSHIRE. London, Ware, Puckridge.
13/14 Royston, Huntingdon Stilton/Stilton, Stamford.
15/16 Grantham, Newark, Tuxford? Tuxford, Bawtry, Doncaster.
17/18 Wentbridge, Ferrybridge, Tadcaster, York/ York Boroughbridge, North Allerton.
19/20 Darlington, Durham, Chester le Street/Newcastle Morpeth.
21/22 Alnwick, Berwick. MIDDLESEX.
23/24 London, Hounslow, Maidenhead, Reading/Newbury, Hungerford, Marlborough.
25/26 Marlborough, Chippenham, Marshfield/Bristol Axbridge,Huntspil
27/28 NORTHAMPTONSHIRE. London, Uxbridge, Amersham, Missenden.
29/30 Wendover, Aylesbury, Buckingham, Banbury/Banbury Stratford, Caughton
31/32 Bromsgrove, Kidderminster, Bridgnorth. Banbury, Campden. GLAMORGANSHIRE
33/34 London, Brentford, Hounslow Slough/ Maidenhead, Henley, Dorchester,, Abingdon
35/36 Abingdon, Faringdon, Lechlade / Gloucester Monmouth
37/38 Monmouth, Newport, Cardiff/Llandaff, Cowbridge, Burton
39/40 Burton, Swansea,Llanelly, Kidwelly Haverfordwest,St Davids
41/42 London, Deptford,Dartford, Rochester, Rainham. Description of London on verso
43/44 Sittingbourne, Canterbury, Dover. Part of an Description of London  on verso
45/46 London, Romford, Chelmsford, Kelvedon, Colchester, Harwich.
47/48 London, Eltham, Farningham, Wrotham. Part of a description on verso
49/50 Maidstone, Ashford, Hythe. ANGLESEY.
51/52 London, High Barnet, St. Albans, Dunstable, Stony Stratford,Towcester

53/54 Towcester, Daventry, Dunchurch, Coventry, Coleshill, Lichfield
55/56 Lichfield, Rugeley, Stone, Darleston, Nantwich, Tarporley, Chester
57/58 Chester, Hawarden, Northop, Denbigh, Conway Beaumaris, Holyhead
59/60 London, Brentford, Hounslow, Staines, Bagshot. Description  of London on verso.
61/62 Basingstoke, Andover, Salisbury.
63/64 Shaftesbury, Sherborne, Crewkerne, Axminster, Exeter, Chidley
65/66 Ashburton, Plymouth, Looe, Foy, Tregony
67/68 Golsenna, Penzance, Lands End. Part of a description of London on verso
69/70 Southwark, Stretham, Croydon, East Grinstead, Newhaven, Brighton, New Shoreham.
71/72 London, Wandsworth, Kingston, Guildford. Godalming Description of London on verso.
73/74 Lippock, Petersfield, Portsmouth, London, Bromley, Sevenoaks, Tunbridge
75/76 Lamberhurst, Newenden, Rye. Part of a description of London on verso.
77/78 Andover, Amesbury, Warminster. Part of a description on London on verso.
79/80 Bruton, East Lidford, Bridgwater, Dulverton
81/82 South Moulton, Barnstaple, Torrington, Hatherleigh, Launceston, Camelford
83/84 Padstow, Columb, Truro, Part of a description of London on verso.
85/86 Chippenham, Bath Wells, Marlborough, Devises, Trowbridge, Wells
87/88 Stilton, Peterborough, Crowland, Spalding Part of a description of London on verso.
89/90 Boston, Sleaford, Lincoln. STAFFORDSHIRE.
91/92 Darleston Bridge, Newcastle under Lyme, Warrington, Wigan, Whittle, Preston Garstang
93/94 Garstang, Lancaster, Bolton, Kendal, Penrith, Carlisle
95/96 SURREY. Guildford, Godalming, Midhurst, Chichester.
97/98 Midhurst, Petersfield, Winchester. 
DERBYSHIRE.
99/100 Stony Stratford, Northampton, Market Harborough, Leicester, Loughborough, Derby
101/102 Tamesford, Eaton, Stilton, Peterborough. Part of a description of London on verso.
103/104 Market Deeping, Sleaford, Lincoln, Glamfordbridges, Barton.
105/106 Hull, Beverley, Bridlington, Flamborough Head. CAMBRIDGESHIRE.
107/108 Puckeridge, Cambridge, Ely, Downham, Kings Lynn
109/110 MERIONETHSHIRE. Campden, Evesholme, Worcester.
111/112 Tenbury, Ludlow, Bishops Castle, Montgomery. Description of the Fens on verso.
113/114 High Barnet, Hatfield, Baldock, Biggleswade, St. Neots, Oakham
115/116 RUTLANDSHIRE. Puckeridge, Newmarket.
117/118 Thetford, Attleborough, Norwich. 
BEDFORDSHIRE
119/120 St. Albans, Bedford, Wellingborough, Kettering, Rockingham, Oakham.
121/122 Oakham, Melton Mowbray, Nottingham, Mansfield, Rotherham, Barnsley
123/124 Barnsley, Halifax, Skipton, Richmond.
125/126 SHROPSHIRE. Meriden, Birmingham, Dudley, Bridgnorth, Wenlock.
127/128 Shrewsbury, Welshpool. 
ISLANDS IN THE BRITISH OCEAN
129/130 Bagshot, Farnham, Alresford, Southampton, Salisbury
131/132 HERTFORDSHIRE. Newmarket, Swaffham.
133/134 Fakenham, Walsingham, Wells. Newmarket, Bury St. Edmunds.
135/136 Basingstoke, Stockbridge, Cranford, Blandford, Dorchester, Weymouth
137/138 BUCKINGHAMSHIRE. Colchester, Ipswich, Woodbridge.
139/140 Saxmundham, Beccles, Yarmouth. 
OXFORDSHIRE.
141/142 Bristol, Chipping Sodbury, Tetbury, Cirencester, Burford, Banbury.
143/144 HEREFORDSHIRE. Bristol, Chepstow, Monmouth.
145/146 Hereford, Leominster, Ludlow, Church Stretton, Shrewsbury.
147/148 Whitchurch, Chester. DEVONSHIRE.
149/150 Bristol, Wells, Glastonbury, Taunton, Wellington, Exeter.
151/152 WORCESTERSHIRE. Bristol, Dursley.
153/154 Gloucester, Tewksbury, Worcester. 
DORSETSHIRE,
155/156 Bristol, Wells, Glastonbury, Somerton, Crewkerne, Frampton, Weymouth
157/158 Cambridge, St. Neots, Higham Ferrers. Description of Cambridge University on verso.
159/160 Northampton, Rugby, Coventry. EAST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE
161/162 Carlisle, Jedburgh,, Kelso, Berwick.
163/164 BRECONSHIRE. Chester, Wrexham, Sellatyn, Llanfyllin.
165/166 Llanfair, , Tregynon. Newtown, Llanbedr, Builth Wells, Brecon.
167/168
169/170 Dartmouth, Exeter, Silverton, Bumpkin, Minehead.
171/172 PEMBROKESHIRE. St. David's Fishguard, Newport, Cardigan.
173/174 Llanerch, Llanbadern Vawr, Talabont, Machynlleth Dinas Mawddy.
175/176 Bala, Bettws y Coed, Ruthin, , Holywell. Description of Exeter on verso.
177/178 Exeter, Crediton, Barnstaple, Ilfracombe, Bideford, Torrington.
179/180 CORNWALL. Exeter, Tavistock
181/182 St. Ives, Liskeard, Lostwithiel, Truro. 
DENBIGHSHIRE
183/184 Gloucester, Campden, Stratford, Warwick, Coventry.
185/186 MONTGOMERYSHIRE. Gloucester, Huntley, Ross, Hereford
187/188 Pembridge, Presteign, Montgomery. LEICESTERSHIRE.
189/190 Hereford, Worcester,Droitwich,, Bromsgrove, Solihull, Meriden, Coventry, Leicester
191/192 HUNTINGDONSHIRE. Huntingdon, Erith, Ely, Soham
193/194 Bury St. Edmunds, Needham Market, Ipswich. SUFFOLK
195/196 Ipswich, Norwich, Cromer.
197/198 Kings Lynn, Swaffham, Thetford. Description of the British Ocean Islands on verso.
199/200 Ixworth, Ipswich, Harwich. NORFOLK.
201/202 King's Lynn, Billingford, Norwich, Yarmouth.
203/204 MONMOUTHSHIRE. Monmouth, Abergavenny, Crickhowell.
205/206 Brecon, Llandovery, Llanbedor. LINCOLNSHIRE
207/208 Nottingham, Newark. Lincoln, Market Rasen, Grimsby.
209/210 Oxford, Faringdon, Purton. Description of Oxford University on verso.
211.212 Malmesbury, Bristol, Arms of the Colleges of Oxford University on verso.
213/214 Oxford, Burcester, Buckingham, Bedford, Cambridge.
215/216 Cartouche and 21 College Arms of Cambridge. Map on verso Oxford to beyond Newbury.
217/218 Basingstoke, Alton, Petersfield, Chichester. WARWICKSHIRE
219/220 Oxford, Banbury, Southam, Coventry, Nuneaton, Ashby, Derby.
221/222 BERKSHIRE. Oxford, Abingdon, Great Shelford, Hungerford.
223/224 North Tudworth, Salisbury, Cranborne, Wimborne Minster, Poole. RADNORSHIRE
225/226 Presteign, Builth, Carmarthen.
227/228 GLOUCESTERSHIRE. Salisbury, Burbage, Marlborough.
229/230 Burford, Campden. NORTHUMBERLAND.
231/232 Tynemouth, Newcastle, Hexham, Haltwhistle, Carlisle.
233/234 CAERNARVONSHIRE. Welshpool, Dinas Mawddwy, Dollgelley.
235/236 Harlech, Dolbadern, Caernarvon. LANCASHIRE.
237/238 York, Knaresborough, Ripley, Skipton, Settle, Hornby, Lancaster.
239/240 CHESHIRE. York, Tadcaster, Leeds,
241/242 Rochdale, Manchester, Warrington, Frodsham, Chester, Manchester, Stockport.
243/244 Buxton, Derby. CARMARTHENSHIRE
245/246 Carmarthen, Cardigan, Llanbedr, Aberystwyth.
247/248 ESSEX. Chelmsford, Sudbury.
249/250 Bury St. Edmunds, Chelmsford, Saffron Walden. 
KENT
251/252 Chelmsford to Maldon,Rayleigh and Dover
253/254 Exeter, Lyme Regis, Description of Dorchester and Lyme Regis on verso.
255/256 Bridport, Dorchester. Plymouth, Dartmouth. WEST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE.
257/258 Ferrybridge, Boroughbridge,Richmond, Barnard Castle, Ferrybridge, Pontefract, Wakefield.
259/260 CUMBERLAND. Kendal, Keswick.
261/262 Cockermouth. Egremont, Cockermouth, Carlisle.
263/264 Alresford,Winchester, Rumsey, Ringwood, Poole, Lymington, Southampton, Winchester.
265/266 FLINTSHIRE. Shrewsbury, Wrexham.
267/268 Mold, Holywell. Chester, Flint, Holywell. COUNTY DURHAM
269/270 Whitby, Guisborough, Morton, Durham,Sunderland,Tynemouth, Kingscleer.
271/272 WESTMORLAND. York, New Malton, Pickering.
273 Whitby, New Malton, Scarborough,Plain on verso. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early (5)
Colors used: - Red, yellow, blue (5)
General color appearance: - Authentic (5)
Paper size: - 8in x 6in (200mm x 150mm)ea
Plate size: - 8in x 6in (200mm x 150mm)ea
Margins: - Min 1/4in (5mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - Light age toning
Verso: - Light age toning

$1,659.00 USD
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1646 Blaeu Antique Map of Ireland - Hibernia Regnum

1646 Blaeu Antique Map of Ireland - Hibernia Regnum

Description:
This superbly hand coloured original antique map of Ireland - Hibernia - was published in the 1646 Dutch edition of Joan Blaeu's Atlas Novus.
One of the best I have seen to date, the original colouring is superb and the paper is heavy and stable with original margins.

Background:
This is Willem Blaeu's highly decorative general map of Ireland and is coloured to show in outline the ancient provinces of Connaught, Leinster, Munster and Ulster each of which together with the map of Carlow, was given a separate map in a section at the end of the atlas volume devoted to Scotland.
The map, which Blaeu first issued in 1635 (twenty years prior to the publication of the Scotland and Ireland volume) was based on that published by John Speed in 1611 in his Theatre of the Empire of Great Briatine. In its turn Speed's map was copied Hondius and Blaeu's great rival Jan Jansson. It was the latter version that Willem Blaeu used. His beautifully balanced design is complemented by the Royal arms and the relatively simple title cartouche at the left hand side. (Ref: Koeman; Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, pink, red, blue, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 23 1/2in x 20in (600mm x 510mm)
Plate size: - 19 3/4in x 15 1/4in (505mm x 385mm)
Margins: - Min 2in (50mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Very bottom of margin re-joined, not affecting image
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$1,250.00 USD
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1607 Mercator Hondius Antique Map of Ireland

1607 Mercator Hondius Antique Map of Ireland

Description: 
This fine beautifully hand coloured original antique map of Ireland by Gerald Mercator was published by Rumold Mercator & Jodocus Hondius in the very early 1607 Latin edition of Mercators Atlas.

This map is magnificent with beautiful original hand colouring. Original colouring such as this is scarce and hard to find.
These maps, published in the early editions of Mercators atlas, are the original maps drawn and engraved by Gerald Mercator in the mid to late 16th century, published by his sons Rumold & Henricus as an atlas, after his death, in 1595. After two editions the plates were purchased by Jodocus Hondius in 1604 and  continued to be published until the mid 1630's when the plates were re-engraved and updated by Jan Jansson and Henricus Hondius.

The earliest maps of Ireland up to the year 1500 or so share the shortcomings of those of the rest of the British Isles especially as represented on world maps. It was not to be expected that lands literally on the very edge of the known world could be depicted with any accuracy; very often one feels that the cartographers or engravers placed the islands in the nearest available space consistent with their imagined position. Even in the first printed Ptolemaic map there is still much distortion in Ireland's shape and geographical position but, on the other hand, a quite surprising number of place names and other details are shown, as many, in fact, as in the rest of Britain put together. This detailed knowledge is not as puzzling as it might appear, for the Ptolemy maps, at least the later editions from 1513 onwards, were based on Italian portulan charts and these, in turn, reflected knowledge gained during the long commercial relationship which had existed between Italy and Ireland ever since the thirteenth century. The distortions on land-surveyed maps remained uncorrected until late in the seventeenth century but a quite accurate coastal outline was given in the marine atlases of Waghenaer, Dudley, Blaeu and later Dutch chart makers.

Apart from a few manuscript maps and very rare maps printed in Rome and Venice (George Lily, 1546, and others in the period 1560-66) Ireland is shown on Mercator's large map of the British Isles (1564), and in his Atlas (1595) and as a separate sheet in the Ortelius atlases (from 1 573). The most important map, however, was compiled by an Italian, Baptista Boazio, probably in the 1 5 8os. This has survived in manuscript form and may have been used by Pieter van der Keere for a map published by Jodocus Hondius in 1591. Boazio's map was subsequently published by John Sudbury, who later sold Speed's maps, and this version was included in editions of the Ortelius atlases from 6oz onwards. The Boazio map is a quite splendid map, very decorative, some copies even showing an Eskimo complete with kayak and hunting spear. Thereafter the trend is familiar: Camden, Speed, Blaeu, Jansson, Sanson and others of the Dutch and French schools all included a general map or maps of the Irish provinces in their atlases. Speed's map of the whole of Ireland was based at least partly on surveys by Robert Lythe (c.1570) and Francis Jobson(c.1590) and included figures in national costume; it was for long regarded as the best map available and was much copied by publishers in other countries.

In 1685 the first atlas of Ireland to match Saxton's At/as of Eng/andand Wales was published by Sir William Petty as Hiberniae Detineaho, the result of a highly organized and detailed survey (the 'Down' survey) carried out in the years following 1655. Re-issued in miniature form soon afterwards by Francis Lamb, Petty's Atlas was widely used as the basis for practically all maps of Ireland produced by English, French, Dutch and German publishers in the following century. Apart from re-issues of Petty's Atlas and its many copyists there were maps by George Grierson, a Dublin publisher, John Rocque, the Huguenot surveyor and engraver who spent some years in Dublin, and Bernard Scale, Rocque's brother-in-law. 

Towards the end of the century many large-scale maps were published but, as in England, private mapping was gradually overtaken and eventually replaced by the Ordnance Survey maps produced between the years 1824 and 1846.(Ref: Koeman, Tooley)

Condition Report:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, red, green, purple, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 20in x 18in (560mm x 430mm)
Plate size: - 17 1/2in x 14in (420mm x 330mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning to margins
Plate area: - Old professional repair to 45mm sq to left side
Verso: - Old professional repair to text "H"

$1,250.00 USD
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1761 Rocque Sayer Very Large Antique Map of England & Wales

1761 Rocque Sayer Very Large Antique Map of England & Wales

  • TitleEngland and Wales Drawn from the Most Accurate Surveys...by John Rocque
  • Date : 1761
  • Condition: (A) Very Good Condition
  • Ref:  92242
  • Size: 49in x 37in (1.25m x 1.00m)

Description: 
This very large - 4 sheet joined - famous mid 18th century original antique map of England and Wales by John Rocque was published by Robert Sayer in the large 1761 edition of A General Atlas Describing the Whole Universe.
This map is extremely detailed denoting nearly every town river canal and point of interest. This type of cartography is indicative of the British attention to detail & research that helped Britain become the world power over the next 150 years.

John Rocque c. 1704-62 - Little is known of John Rocque's early life except that he was of Huguenot extraction and was living and working in London as an engraver from about 1734. His early experience in preparing plans of great houses and gardens for the nobility led him to take up large-scale surveying for which he developed a distinctive and effective style involving new ways of indicating land use and hill contours. He is best known for a very large-scale plan of London published in 1746 and for a pocket set of county maps, The English Traveller, issued in the same year. He spent some years in Ireland surveying for estate maps and in 1756 he published a well-known Exact Survey of the City of Dublin.
Rocque was Topographer to the Prince of Wales and attained his new title after the coronation in 1760. He flourished from 1734-62. Sayer, a famous and prolific mapmaker, was taken into partnership by John Overton in 1745. After his death in 1752 Sayer continued on his own forming several associations until his own death in 1792. His association with Rocque began in 1753. (Ref:M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original & later
Colors used: - Blue, brown  
General color appearance: - Authentic  
Paper size: - 49in x 37in (1.25m x 1.00m)
Paper size: - 49in x 37in (1.25m x 1.00m)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Several folds re-enforced and re-joined
Plate area: - Folds as issued, light offsetting, several folds re-enforced and re-joined
Verso: - Several folds re-enforced and re-joined

$1,250.00 USD
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1741 Large Homann Antique Map of London Surrey - Birds Eye View of London

1741 Large Homann Antique Map of London Surrey - Birds Eye View of London

  • TitleRegionis quae est circa Londinum....Homaniamus Heredibus 1741
  • Date : 1741
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  92275
  • Size: 25 ½in x 21 ½in (650mm x 550mm)

Description: 
This beautifully hand coloured original antique map* of the Environs of London - Middlesex, Essex, Surrey and Kent - with a beautiful and a very real view of the city of London in the mid 18th century and the Thames - was engraved in 1741 - dated at the top of the map - and was published by the Homann firm.
A superb map with a deep heavy impression, stunning colour and sound heavy paper, a fine map.

Background: This map is based upon an earlier map of the region by Thomas Bowles and covers the London area from Berkshire (including Windsor Castle) in the west to Shamel in the east, extending north north as far as Bedford. Specifically focuses on Hertfordshire, Middlesex, Surrey, Essex and Kent. Offers extraordinary detail throughout, showing roadways, villages, London Streets, estates, and in many cases, individual homes. The lower portion of the sheet is dominated by a dramatic bird's-eye view of London and Westminster from Southwark across the Thames. View reveals a densely populated showing numerous boats, barges, and sailing vessels.
The beautifully hand coloured view of the city of London & Westminster was published only 90 odd years after the great fire of 1666.The view of London after Thomas Bowles, was one of a number published by Bowles and the Homann firm in the mid 18th century illustrating the growth and change of the great city.
The view is stunning, stretching from old London bridge & the docklands in the east to the farmlands to the west. What is really fascinating is the level of detail. There are a myriad of different sailing vessels occupying both sides of London bridge. The number of shops and residences that occupied the bridge at that time are uniquely displayed as is the number churches and cathedrals that dominate the skyline. To the right you can see the farm land that will one day become the West End and other upmarket areas of London.(Ref: M&B; Tooley)

 General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original & later color
Colors used: - Yellow, green, pink
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 25 ½in x 21 ½in (650mm x 550mm)
Plate size: - 22 ½in x 20in (570mm x 510mm)
Margins: - Min ½in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling in margins
Plate area: - None
Verso: - Bottom left plate-mark a little worn

$1,250.00 USD
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1646 Blaeu Large Antique Map of Scotland

1646 Blaeu Large Antique Map of Scotland

Description:
This large beautifully hand coloured original antique map of Scotland was published in the 1646 Dutch edition of Joan Blaeu's Atlas Novus.

Background: When the Blaeu's  published Volume V - GB & Ireland - of Atlas Novus, Scotland became one of the best-mapped countries in the world. Volume V contained forty-eight plates showing forty-nine separate maps of Scotland (plus a map of Ptolemy British Isles and six maps of Ireland). The first two plates from the atlas show the entire country ancient and modern, whilst the remaining forty-six plates cover most Scotland in forty-seven regional maps. In total the regional maps locate some 20,000 different place names. A clue as to the reason for this extraordinary explosion of geographical information is to be found on thirty-six of the regional maps, which all carry engraved credits to Timothy Pont (1524-1606)
Pont was responsible for surveying the greater part of Scotland between 1583-1600, the resulting Pont Manuscript maps were never published but were put to good use some fifty to seventy years later by Robert Gordon and Joan Blaeu. (Ref: Koeman; Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, pink, red, blue, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 22 3/4in x 19 3/4in (580mm x 500mm)
Plate size: - 20in x 15 1/4in (510mm x 385mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$1,250.00 USD
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1690 Nicolas Visscher Large Old, Antique Map of Great Britain & Ireland

1690 Nicolas Visscher Large Old, Antique Map of Great Britain & Ireland

  •  Title : Magnae Britanniae Tabula...Angliae, Scotiae, Ac Hiberniae Regna...Per Nicol. Visscher...Guilielmo III D.G.
  • Ref #:  61110
  • Size: 24in x 20in (610mm x 515mm)
  • Date : 1690
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: This large rare beautifully hand coloured original antique map of Great Britain & Ireland was published by Nicholas Visscher in 1690
This is a very beautiful map with rich deep colour and heavy engraving on clean and stable paper. It is also an important map, dedicated to William III of Orange (King Billy) who ruled GB & Ireland between 1689 &  1702, a time of great change both in Europe and the New World.

 

 

Background: In 1558 Queen Elizabeth came to the throne in the midst of a fast changing world. In 1563 a nineteen sheet map, copies of which survive only in manuscript form, was completed by Laurence Nowell, and no doubt, the issue of Mercator's large-scale map of the British Isles in 1564 had an important influence on the thought of the period. A few years later a national survey was commissioned privately, although probably at the instigation of Lord Burghley, the Lord Treasurer, but subsequently was completed with royal encouragement. The outcome was Christopher Saxton's Atlas of EngIand and Wales, started about 1570 and published in 1579 - the first printed set of county maps and the first countrywide atlas on such a splendid scale produced anywhere. A Welsh antiquarian, Humphrey Lhuyd completed a set of surveys that were even more successful than Saxton in which he had produced fine manuscript maps of England and Wales which were used by Ortelius in editions of his Atlas from 1573 onwards.
The earliest maps of the 17th century, attributed to William Smith of the College of Heralds, covered only twelve counties based on Saxton/Norden and were presumably intended to be part of a complete new atlas. They were printed in the Low Countries in 1602-3 and were soon followed by maps for the Latin edition of Camden's Britannia dated 1607. In 1610-11 the first edition of John Speed's famous county Atlas The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine was published and immediately replaced Saxton's in popular appeal. Although Speed assembled much of his material from the earlier works of Saxton, Norden and others, a considerable part of the up-to-date information, especially relating to the inset town plans depicted on his maps, was obtained first hand. The maps undoubtedly owed much of their popularity to the splendid engravings of high quality made in the workshops in Amsterdam of Jodocus Hondius to whom Speed sent his manuscripts, the plates subsequently being returned to London for printing.
In 1645, Volume IV of the famous Blaeu World Atlas covering the counties of England and Wales was published in Amsterdam. These maps have always been esteemed as superb examples of engraving and design, the calligraphy being particularly splendid, but nevertheless they were nearly all based on Saxton and Speed and added little to geographical knowledge.
Not until the latter part of the century do we find an English map maker of originality with the capacity to put new ideas into practice. John Ogilby, one of the more colourful figures associated with cartography, started life as a dancing master and finished as King's Cosmographer and Geographic Printer. After publishing a small number of county maps, somewhat on the lines of John Norden he issued in 1675 the Britannia, the first practical series of detailed maps of the post roads of England and Wales on a standard scale of 1,760 yards to the mile. Up to the end of the century and beyond, reprints and revisions of Saxton's and Speed's atlases continued to appear and the only other noteworthy county maps were Richard Blome's Britannia (1673), John Overton's Atlas (c. 1670) and Robert Morden's maps for an English translation of Camden's Britannia published in 1695.
Another noted cartographer of the day was Captain Greenvile Collins, and of his work in surveying the coasts of Great Britain culminating in the issue in 1693 of the Great Britain's Coasting Pilot. Apart from these charts, English cartographers published during the century a number of world atlases. Speed was the first Englishman to produce a world atlas with the issue in 1627 of his A Prospect of the Most Famous Parts of the World. Other atlases appeared later in the century by Peter Heylin, John Seller, William Berry, Moses Pitt and Richard Blome, whilst Ogilby found time to issue maps of Africa, America and Asia. Far more important, from the purely scientific point of view, was the work of Edmund Halley, Astronomer Royal, who compiled and issued meteorological and magnetic charts in 1688 and 1701 respectively.
At the beginning of the eighteenth century the Dutch map trade was finally in decline, the French in the ascendant and the English to a great extent still dominated by Saxton and Speed except, as we have shown, in the spheres of sea charts and road maps. There were atlases by John Senex, the Bowles family, Emanuel and Thomas Bowen, Thomas Badeslade and the unique bird's-eye perspective views of the counties, The British Monarchy by George Bickham. In 1750-60 Bowen and Kitchin's The Large English Atlas containing maps on a rather larger scale than hitherto was published.
In 1759 the Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce offered an award of £100 for the best original surveys on this scale and by the end of the century about thirty counties had been re-surveyed. These maps, many of which formed, in later years, the basis for the first issues of county maps by the Ordnance Survey Office were not only decorative but a tremendous improvement geographically on earlier local maps. As a consequence, the skills and expertise of the new-style cartographers soon enabled them to cover the world as well as the domestic market. Thomas Jefferys was such a man; he was responsible for a number of the new 1 in. to 1 mile county surveys and he issued an edition of Saxton's much battered 200-year-old plates of the county maps, but he is better known for many fine maps of North America and the West Indies. His work was continued on the same lines by William Faden, trading as Faden and Jefferys. Other publishers such as Sayer and Bennett and their successors Laurie and Whittle published a prodigious range of maps, charts and atlases in the second half of the century. A major influence at this time was John Cary who, apart from organizing the first re-survey of post roads since Ogilby and subsequently printing the noted Travellers' Companion, was a prolific publisher of atlases and maps of every kind of all parts of the world. After starting work with Cary, and taking part in the new road survey, Aaron Arrowsmith set up in his own business and went on to issue splendid large-scale maps of many parts of the world. Both Cary's and Arrowsmith's plates were used by other publishers until far into the next century and, in turn, their work was taken up and developed by James Wyld (Elder and Younger) and Tallis and Co.
Later into the 19th century some of the better known cartographers and publishers were by Henry Teesdale (1829-30), Christopher and John Greenwood, surveyors, Thomas Moule, a writer on heraldry and antiques (1830-36) and John Walker (1837) but by about the middle of the century few small-scale publishers survived and their business passed into the hands of large commercial concerns such as Bartholomews of Edinburgh and Philips of London who continue to this day. (Ref: Shirley; Tooley; M&B)

 

 

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Red, yellow, green, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 24in x 20in (610mm x 515mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 19in (585mm x 460mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

 

 

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

 

 

$1,250.00 USD
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1637 Blaeu Antique Map The English County of Cornwall

1637 Blaeu Antique Map The English County of Cornwall

Description: 
This beautifully hand coloured original antique map of English county of Cornwall was published in the 1637 German edition of Joan Blaeu's Atlas Novus. 

Background: Blaeu is one of the most revered map makers of all time and it is easy to see why in this beautiful original map. 
The high level of the topographical detail, the quality of the paper, the artistic professionalism of the engraving and the beauty of the original hand colouring combine to produce a work of art that is both functional and of exceptional beauty. (Ref: Koeman; M&B) 

Condition Report:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, pink, red, blue, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 22in x 18 1/2in (560mm x 470mm)
Plate size: - 19 3/4in x 15 3/4in (500mm x 400mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light spotting
Plate area: - Light spotting & browning
Verso: - Light spotting & browning

$975.00 USD
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1647 Blaeu Antique Map English County of Oxford

1647 Blaeu Antique Map English County of Oxford

Description: 
This finely engraved beautifully hand coloured original antique map of the English county of Oxfordshire was published in the 1647 Dutch edition of Joan Blaeus Atlas Novus. 
There is also the added bonus on the back of the map with an early depiction of Stonehenge.

This along with John Speeds map, is one of the most decorative of Oxfordshire. The basic cartographic information is derived from Speed's map, but presented with Blaeu typical elegance & decoration. These include coats-of-arms of the Oxford colleges along the sides, each expertly coloured, as well crests of nobility, the Royal coat-of-arms, and a title cartouche flanked by two Oxford scholars

Blaeu is one of the most revered map makers of all time and it is easy to see why in this beautiful original map. The high level of the topographical detail, the  quality of the paper, the artistic professionalism of the engraving and the beauty of the original hand colouring combine to produce a work of art that is both functional and of exceptional beauty. (Ref: Koeman; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, pink, red, blue, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 23 1/2in x 19 1/2in (600mm x 495mm)
Plate size: - 20in x 15 1/4in (510mm x 390mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$950.00 USD
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1493 Schedel Antique Pictorial View of England - London - Anglie Provincia

1493 Schedel Antique Pictorial View of England - London - Anglie Provincia

Description: 
This magnificent fine wood block engraved original antique view of Anglia - England - which is believed to be an early representation of London - the earliest known published view of an English Town or City - was published in one of the earliest publications the 1493 edition of Liber Chronicarum or Nuremberg Chronicle by Hartmann Schedel. The Nuremberg Chronicles were published only 40 years after first moveable type publication which revolutionised the modern world.

On the verso is a depiction of part of the family tree of the Kings of Israel: included are Kings Solomon, David and the Queen of Saba (Sheba).
The woodblock engravers were Michael Wolgemut, the well-known teacher of Albrecht Dürer, and his stepson Wilhelm Pleydenwurff. Wohlgemut was Albrecht Dürer's tutor between 1486-90 and recent scholarship has shown, Albrecht Dürer may also have collaborated, since some of the cuts bear a remarkably close resemblance to the Apocalypse illustrations.
The printing was carried out under the supervision of the great scholar-printer Anton Koberger, whose printing were famous throughout Europe.

The following is a translation of the Latin Text below the Wood-Cut.

Anglie Provincia
The island of England was originally called Albion after certain white mountains which were seen by those steering towards it; but was then named Britain perpetuating the name of a fierce son (Brutus) of Silvius, the last king of the Latins, who overcame the giants inhabiting the island. It was called 'Greater' (Great) Britain to distinguish it from the lesser Britain (Brittany) of France which adjoins it. Its present-day name of England is taken from a certain 'Anglus' who was a powerful king. England forms a triangle between North and West and is separated from the continent at all points, beginning near Germany in the North and extending alongside France and Spain towards the West. Solinus regarded the French shore as the limit of this world and the island of Britain almost as belonging to another. And Virgil thought of it as separated from the rest of the globe. But Brutus having decided to settle in England, immediately founded on the banks of the River Thames a city so well fortified that it recalled in all its forces the memory of ancient Troy. This Brutus is said to have had three sons; Locrinus, Albanetus and Camber and they divided the island amonst themselves. To Locrinus, the first horn, fell all of the centre of the kingdom, which later became known as Lochria after him, and his city of London is still greatly celebrated for its merchants and traders. And many say that the Kings and Princes of England and the Parliament of the people meet to this day with the merchants there. To the second son Albanetus fell another part of the island and this was called 'Albania', but nowadays Scocia (Scotland). This Scotland occupies the higher part of the island, which lies towards the North winds and is separated from England by some smallish rivers and a certain mountain range. The third son inherited Cambria, now called Thule, the districts to the North and West which were the last to be explored by the Romans and where, during the summer solstice, the sun passes only from the star of Cancer and there is thus no night; while during the winter there is no day. The greater part of the Island is fertile. It is surrounded by many other islands of some dimensions, the largest of them Hibemia (Ireland) which is divided from Britain by a narrow channel, and some smaller ones called the Orchades (Orkneys). The blessed Pope Gregory, second of this name, sent to Britain the monks Augustine of Miletus and John with other men of outstanding character and they first converted the English. Since then many of their kings have shone forth for their miracles. The dimensions of Britain are given by Pythies and Ysidore as 38,075 [square] miles, and in it are many fine rivers, besides large and varied supplies of metals. Its history is to be found best described in Bede. (Ref: Shirley; M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 18in x 12in (460mm x 305mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$850.00 USD
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1710 Herman Moll Large Antique Map of England & Wales

1710 Herman Moll Large Antique Map of England & Wales

  • TitleThe South Part of Great Britain called England & Wales...by Herman Moll 1710
  • Date : 1710
  • Condition: (A) Very Good Condition
  • Ref:  80662
  • Size: 39in x 24in (1.0m x 610mm)

Description:
This very large beautifully hand coloured original antique map of England & Wales was engraved in 1710 by Herman Moll - the date is engraved in the title cartouche - and was published by John Bowles of London.

In the 18th century many large-scale maps were published by the likes of John Senex and Herman Moll, this trend continued until the end of private mapping in the early 19th century when it was replaced by Ordnance Survey maps. (Ref: M&B, Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original & later
Colors used: - Pink, yellow, green   
General color appearance: - Original   
Paper size: - 39in x 24in (1.0m x 610mm)
Plate size: - 38in x 23in (970mm x 585mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Light age toning along folds, professional repairs to L&R folds
Verso: - None

$750.00 USD
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1676 Pieter Goos Large Antique Map of England, Thames River, London

1676 Pieter Goos Large Antique Map of England, Thames River, London

  • TitlePascaarte van Engelant van t' Voorlandt tot aen Blakeney waer in te Sien is de Mont vande Teemse
  • Date : 1676
  • Condition: (A) Very Good Condition
  • Ref:  42012
  • Size: 22in x 18in (560mm x 455mm)

Description: 
This large, beautifully hand coloured original antique map, a fine early Dutch sea chart of the Thames River and surrounding English coastline, was published by Pieter Goos in 1676 for the Goos De Zee-Atlas, Ofte Water-Weereld, Atlas. 

This chart is oriented with north to the right includes in the upper right is a large inset of the Thames River and plan of London. Beautifully engraved with original coulouring embellished with rhumb lines, two compass roses and a galleon under sail. (Ref: Tooley; M&B; Koeman)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original 
Colors used: - Yellow, green, red, rose madder, red
General color appearance: - Authentic and fresh
Paper size: - 22in x 18in (560mm x 455mm)
Plate size: - 22in x 18in (560mm x 455mm)
Margins: - Min ½in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Top L&R margin corner ink spill not affecting image
Plate area: - None
Verso: - Light soiling

$650.00 USD
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1692 Jaillot Sanson Large Antique Map The English Channel

1692 Jaillot Sanson Large Antique Map The English Channel

  • TitleCarte De La Manche faite par ordre du Roy..a Paris...1692
  • Date : 1692
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  16371
  • Size: 38in x 25in (960m x 635mm)

Description: 
This very large, beautifully hand coloured original 1st edition antique map of English Channel - or La Manche as it is known in French - by Alexis Hubert Jaillot, after Nicolas Sanson - was engraved in 1692 - the date is engraved in the title - and was published in the 1693 edition of Le Neptune Francois. 

A beautiful scarce sea chart showing the English Channel, with the coastline of France from La Baie de Douarnenez to Dunkerque, and the coastline of England from Stroble head to Manning Tree.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, green, red, brown.
General color appearance: - Authentic and fresh
Paper size: - 38in x 25in (960m x 635mm)
Plate size: - 32 1/2in x 23 1/2in (825mm x 5955mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$650.00 USD
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1659 Blaeu Old, Antique Map of The Channel Islands Jersey and Guernsey

1659 Blaeu Old, Antique Map of The Channel Islands Jersey and Guernsey

  • TitleSarnia Insula Vulgo Garnsey: et Insula Caesarrea vernacule Jarsey
  • Date : 1659
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  43170
  • Size: 21in x 19in (535mm x 480mm)

Description:
This finely engraved beautifully hand coloured original map of the Channel Islands Jersey and Guernsey and smaller islands was published in the 1659 Spanish edition of Joan Blaeu's Atlas Novus. 
This map is in beautiful condition, large margins, strong sturdy clean paper and bright fresh original colouring.

The Channel Islands (Norman: Îles d'la Manche, French: Îles Anglo-Normandes orÎles de la Manche) are an archipelago of British Crown Dependencies in the English Channel, off the French coast of Normandy. They include two separate bailiwicks: the Bailiwick of Jersey and the Bailiwick of Guernsey. They are considered the remnants of the Duchy of Normandy, and are not part of the United Kingdom. They have a total population of about 168,000 and their respective capitals, Saint Helier and Saint Peter Port, have populations of 33,500 and 16,488, respectively. The total area of the islands is 194 km.
Both Bailiwicks have been administered separately since the late 13th century; each has its own independent laws, elections, and representative bodies (although in modern times, politicians from the islands' legislatures are in regular contact). Any institution common to both is the exception rather than the rule.

Blaeu is one of the most revered map makers of all time and it is easy to see why in this beautiful original map. The high level of the topographical detail, the  quality of the paper, the artistic professionalism of the engraving and the beauty of the original hand colouring combine to produce a work of art that is both functional and of exceptional beauty. (Ref: Koeman; M&B)

Condition Report:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, pink, red, blue, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 21in x 19in (535mm x 480mm)
Plate size: - 18 1/2in x 15 1/2in (480mm x 400mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Very light crease along centerfold
Verso: - None

$475.00 USD
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1728 Hermann Moll Large Antique Map and View of Gibraltar - 2nd Spanish Seige

1728 Hermann Moll Large Antique Map and View of Gibraltar - 2nd Spanish Seige

  • Title : A New and Exact plan of Gibraltar with all its fortifications as they are at present….
  • Ref #:  40838
  • Size: 25in x 11in (635mm x 280mm)
  • Date : 1727
  • Condition: (B) Good Condition

Description: 
This finely engraved original antique map and view of the second Spanish siege of Gibraltar by Herman Moll was published in 1727.
Although undated, the legend at the top left of the map, gives an in-depth explanation to the map including no. 5 that refers to 'Place where at this time Barracks building for a Regiment Ap: 15. 1726. 6. The Great Church.', while the dedication is to David Colyear, 1st Earl of Portmore, Governor of Gibraltar. The plan was presumably engraved either in anticipation of, or during the second Spanish siege; Portmore was in England when the siege began, but sailed there with a relief force, arriving on 1st May, 1727. British command of the sea, coupled with the natural features of the Rock of Gibraltar on the landward side of the peninsula, combined to thwart Spanish ambition, and the siege petered to an end in 1728, with the garrison never seriously troubled. 

Background:
 Gibraltar became part of the Visigothic Kingdom of Hispania following the collapse of the Roman Empire and came under Muslim Moorish rule in 711 AD. It was permanently settled for the first time by the Moors and was renamed Jebel Tariq – the Mount of Tariq, later corrupted into Gibraltar. The Christian Crown of Castile annexed it in 1309, lost it again to the Moors in 1333 and finally regained it in 1462. Gibraltar became part of the unified Kingdom of Spain and remained under Spanish rule until 1704. It was captured during the War of the Spanish Succession by an Anglo-Dutch fleet in the name of Charles VI of Austria, the Habsburg contender to the Spanish throne. At the war's end, Spain ceded the territory to Britain under the terms of the Treaty of Utrecht of 1713.

Spain tried to regain control of Gibraltar, which Britain had declared a Crown colony, through military, diplomatic and economic pressure. Gibraltar was besieged and heavily bombarded during three wars between Britain and Spain but the attacks were repulsed on each occasion. By the end of the last siege, in the late 18th century, Gibraltar had faced fourteen sieges in 500 years. In the years after Trafalgar, Gibraltar became a major base in the Peninsular War. The colony grew rapidly during the 19th and early 20th centuries, becoming one of Britain's most important possessions in the Mediterranean. It was a key stopping point for vessels en route to India via the Suez Canal. A large British naval base was constructed there at great expense at the end of the 19th century and became the backbone of Gibraltar's economy.

British control of Gibraltar enabled the Allies to control the entrance to the Mediterranean during the Second World War. It was attacked on several occasions by German, Italian and Vichy French forces, though without causing much damage. The Spanish dictator General Francisco Franco declined to join a Nazi plan to occupy Gibraltar but revived Spain's claim to the territory after the war. As the territorial dispute intensified, Spain closed its border with Gibraltar between 1969 and 1985 and communications links were severed. Spain's position was supported by Latin American countries but was rejected by Britain and the Gibraltarians themselves, who vigorously asserted their right to self-determination. Discussions of Gibraltar's status have continued between Britain and Spain but have not reached any conclusion.
Shortly after Gibraltar's recapture, King Henry IV of Castile declared it Crown property and reinstituted the special privileges which his predecessor had granted during the previous period of Christian rule.  Four years after visiting Gibraltar in 1463, he was overthrown by the Spanish nobility and clergy. His half-brother Alfonso was declared king and rewarded Medina Sidonia for his support with the lordship of Gibraltar. The existing governor, a loyalist of the deposed Henry IV, refused to surrender Gibraltar to Medina Sidonia. After a fifteen-month siege from April 1466 to July 1467, Medina Sidonia took control of the town. He died the following year but his son Enrique was confirmed as lord of Gibraltar by the reinstated Henry IV in 1469.  In 1474 the new Duke of Medina Sidonia sold Gibraltar to a group of Jewish conversos from Cordova and Seville led by Pedro de Herrera in exchange for maintaining the garrison of the town for two years, after which time the 4,350 conversos were expelled by the Duke. His status was further enhanced by Isabella I of Castile in 1478 with the granting of the Marquisate of Gibraltar.
On 2 January 1492, after five years of war, the Moorish emirate in Spain came to an end with the Catholic Monarchs' capture of Granada. The Jews of Gibraltar were, like those elsewhere in the kingdom, expelled from Spain by order of the monarchs in March that year. Gibraltar was used by Medina Sidonia as a base for the Spanish capture of Melilla in North Africa in 1497. Two years later the Muslims of Granada were ordered to convert to Christianity or leave. Those that did not convert left for North Africa, some of them travelling via Gibraltar.
Gibraltar became Crown property again in 1501 at the order of Isabella and the following year it received a new set of royal arms, which is still used by modern Gibraltar, replacing those of Medina Sidonia. In the Royal Warrant accompanying the arms, Isabella highlighted Gibraltar's importance as "the key between these our kingdoms in the Eastern and Western Seas [the Mediterranean and Atlantic]". The metaphor was represented on the royal arms by a golden key hanging from the front gate of a battlemented fortress. The warrant charged all future Spanish monarchs to "hold and retain the said City for themselves and in their own possession; and that no alienation of it, nor any part of it, nor its jurisdiction ... shall ever be made from the Crown of Castile."
At this point in history, "Gibraltar" meant not just the peninsula but the entire surrounding area including the land on which the towns of La Línea de la Concepción, San Roque, Los Barrios and Algeciras now stand. To the east, Gibraltar was bounded by the Guadiaro River, and its northern boundaries lay in the vicinity of Castellar de la Frontera, Jimena de la Frontera, Alcalá de los Gazules, Medina-Sidonia and Tarifa. From the 16th century, the modern meaning of the name came to be adopted – specifically referring only to the town of Gibraltar and the peninsula on which it stands.
Under Spanish Crown rule, the town of Gibraltar fell into severe decline. The end of Muslim rule in Spain and the Christian capture of the southern ports considerably decreased the peninsula's strategic value. It derived some minor economic value from tuna-fishing and wine-producing industries but its usefulness as a fortress was now limited. It was effectively reduced to the status of an unremarkable stronghold on a rocky promontory and Marbella replaced it as the principal Spanish port in the region.
Gibraltar's inhospitable terrain made it an unpopular place to live. To boost the population, convicts from the kingdom of Granada were offered the possibility of serving their sentence in the Gibraltar garrison as an alternative to prison. Despite its apparent unattractiveness, Juan Alfonso de Guzmán, third Duke of Medina Sidonia, nonetheless sought to regain control of the town. In September 1506, following Isabella's death, he laid siege in the expectation that the gates would quickly be opened to his forces. This did not happen, and after a fruitless four-month blockade he gave up the attempt. Gibraltar received the title of "Most Loyal" from the Spanish crown in recognition of its faithfulness (Ref: M&B, Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: -  
Colors used: -  
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 25in x 11in (635mm x 280mm)
Plate size: - 25in x 11in (635mm x 280mm)
Margins: - Min 1/4in (5mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Small loss to the very right figure in the title cartouche not affecting the map, light creasing along folds as issued

$475.00 USD
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1664 Joan Blaeu Large Antqiue Map The Welsh County of Montgomery

1664 Joan Blaeu Large Antqiue Map The Welsh County of Montgomery

  • TitleMontgomeria Comitatus et Comitatus Mervinia
  • Date : 1664
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  01-4004
  • Size: 25 1/2in x 21 1/2in (650mm x 545mm)

Description: 
This beautifully hand coloured original antique map of the Welsh County of Montgomery was published in the 1664 Dutch edition of Joan Blaeus Atlas Major. 

Blaeus reference for the topographical data is from John Speeds maps from the 1611 Empire of Great Britaine  -  the beautiful decoration, though, is distinctly Blaeus. (Ref: Koeman; Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Yellow, pink, red, blue, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 25 1/2in x 21 1/2in (650mm x 545mm)
Plate size: - 20in x 16 1/2in (510mm x 420mm)
Margins: - Min 2in (50mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$425.00 USD
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1647 Blaeu Antique Map of The Welsh Counties of Denbigh & Flintshire

1647 Blaeu Antique Map of The Welsh Counties of Denbigh & Flintshire

  • TitleDenbigiensis comitatus et Comitatus Flintensis - Denbigh et Flintshire
  • Ref #:  31034
  • Size: 24in x 20in (610mm x 510mm)
  • Date : 1647
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This beautifully hand coloured original antique map of the Welsh counties of Denbigh & Flintshire was published in the 1647 Dutch edition of Joan Blaeus Atlas Novus. 
Blaeu's reference for the topographical data for this map derive from John Speeds maps of Great Britain from the 1611 Empire of Great Britaine - the beautiful decoration, though, is distinctly Blaeus.

Background: Blaeu is one of the most revered map makers of all time and it is easy to see why in this beautiful original map. 
The high level of the topographical detail, the quality of the paper, the artistic professionalism of the engraving and the beauty of the original hand colouring combine to produce a work of art that is both functional and of exceptional beauty. (Ref: Koeman; M&B) 

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Yellow, pink, red, blue, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 24in x 20in (610mm x 510mm)
Plate size: - 19 1/2in x 15in (495mm x 380mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:

Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$425.00 USD
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1647 Blaeu Old, Antique Map of The English County of Durham

1647 Blaeu Old, Antique Map of The English County of Durham

  • TitleEpiscopatus Dunelmensis Vulgo The Bishoprike of Durham
  • Ref #:  60009
  • Size: 24in x 20in (610mm x 510mm)
  • Date : 1647
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This beautifully hand coloured original antique map of the English county of Durham was published in the 1647 Dutch edition of Joan Blaeus Atlas Novus. 

Blaeu's reference for the topographical data for this map derive from John Speeds maps of Great Britain from the 1611 Empire of Great Britaine - the beautiful decoration, though, is distinctly Blaeus.

Background: Blaeu is one of the most revered map makers of all time and it is easy to see why in this beautiful original map. 
The high level of the topographical detail, the quality of the paper, the artistic professionalism of the engraving and the beauty of the original hand colouring combine to produce a work of art that is both functional and of exceptional beauty. (Ref: Koeman; M&B) 

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, pink, red, blue, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 24in x 20in (610mm x 510mm)
Plate size: - 20in x 15 1/2in (510mm x 395mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:

Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$425.00 USD
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1647 Blaeu Old Antique Map Lindisfarne Holy Islands England - Early Christianity

1647 Blaeu Old Antique Map Lindisfarne Holy Islands England - Early Christianity

Description:
This beautifully hand coloured original antique map of the Holy & Farne Islands off the east coast of Northumberland, England was published in the 1647 Dutch edition of Joan Blaeus Atlas Novus. 
Blaeu's reference for the topographical data for this map derive from John Speeds maps of Great Britain from the 1611 Empire of Great Britaine - the beautiful decoration, though, is distinctly Blaeus.

Background: Blaeu is one of the most revered map makers of all time and it is easy to see why in this beautiful original map. 
The high level of the topographical detail, the quality of the paper, the artistic professionalism of the engraving and the beauty of the original hand colouring combine to produce a work of art that is both functional and of exceptional beauty. (Ref: Koeman; M&B) 

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, pink, red, blue, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 24in x 20in (610mm x 510mm)
Plate size: - 20in x 15 1/2in (510mm x 395mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$375.00 USD
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1657 Blaeu Antique Map of Kintyre Peninsula, Scotland

1657 Blaeu Antique Map of Kintyre Peninsula, Scotland

Description:
This beautifully engraved hand coloured original antique map of Kintyre Peninsula, Scotland was published in the 1657 Spanish edition of Joan Blaeu's Atlas Novus

When the Blaeu's published Volume five of his Atlas Novus in 1654, Scotland became one of the best-mapped countries in the world. The volume contained forty-eight plates showing forty-nine separate maps of Scotland (plus a map of Ptolemy British Isles and six maps of Ireland). The first two plates from the atlas show the entire country ancient and modern, whilst the remaining forty-six plates cover most Scotland in forty-seven regional maps. In total the regional maps locate some 20,000 different place names. A clue as to the reason for this extraordinary explosion of geographical information is to be found on thirty-six of the regional maps, which all carry engraved credits to Timothy Pont (1524-1606) 
Pont was responsible for surveying the greater part of Scotland between 1583-1600, the resulting Pont Manuscript maps were never published but were put to good use some fifty to seventy years later by Robert Gordon and Joan Blaeu. (Ref: Koeman; Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, pink, red, blue, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 24in x 20 1/2in (610mm x 520mm)
Plate size: - 20in x 16 1/2in (510mm x 420mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light dis-colouration
Plate area: - Very light soiling and creasing
Verso: - None

$375.00 USD
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1658 Blaeu Antique Map of the Udrone region of Kilkenny in Carlow, Ireland

1658 Blaeu Antique Map of the Udrone region of Kilkenny in Carlow, Ireland

Description: 
This beautifully hand coloured original antique map of the ancient region of Udrone comprising parts of Carlow and Kilkenny in SE Ireland was published in the 1658 Spanish edition of Joan Blaeu's Atlas Novus.

These maps are some of the best I have seen to date, the original colouring is superb and the paper is thick and exceptionally clean.

Blaeu's fifth map of Ireland seems a strangely remote choice of location for the great cartographer to have singled out for special treatment. For the reasons why this map was engraved in the first place one must go back to power-struggles between the leading Anglo-Irish families in Elizabethan Ireland. 
The Butlers wars of the 1560s and 1570s were the struggles between the Fitzgerald's (Earls of Desmond) and the Butlers (Earls of Ormonde) who fought what is thought to have been the last privately pitched battle in the British Isles at Affane in Waterford in 1565. 
As if matters were not complicated and volatile enough an English adventurer called Sir Peter Carew (1514-75) arrived on the scene. Carew was a man with a fascinatingly chequered career (he was imprisoned in the Tower of London and later Constable of it!), whose claims to the Barony of Idrone were upheld at Dublin Castle, the seat of English power in Ireland. He also claimed ancient title to half of Cork and found himself at war with both Desmond and Butler. These events seem to have caught Mercators - the original publisher of this map - attention in Antwerp and this detailed map of a small corner of Ireland was engraved and included fin most 16th & 17th century sets of Irish maps. (Ref: Koeman; Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, pink, red, blue, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 21in x 12 1/2in (535mm x 320mm)
Plate size: - 15 1/2in x 10in (395mm x 255mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - Light age toning
Verso: - Light age toning

$299.00 USD
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1841 Johnston Large Antique Map of the County of Dumbarton, Scotland

1841 Johnston Large Antique Map of the County of Dumbarton, Scotland

  • Title Johnston's Map of the County of Dumbarton with the Railways
  • Ref #:  70481
  • Size: 29in x 21in (740mm x 535mm) 
  • Date : 1841
  • Condition: (A) Very Good Condition

Description:
This large fine hand coloured original antique map of the Scottish region of Dumbarton, highlighting the beginning of the railway system and centering on Glasgow and the river Clyde - with an inset image of Dumbarton Castle and another of the Firth of Clyde - was published by W & A.K.Johnston in 1841.

Johnston was one of the master publishers of finely engraved and lithographed maps during the 19th century, this map is no exception. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Red, green, yellow, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 29in x 21in (740mm x 535mm) 
Plate size: - 27in x 21in (685mm x 535mm) 
Margins: - Min 1/4in (6mm)
 
Imperfections:
Margins: - Soiling, several small repairs to margins  into border, no loss
Plate area: - Light soiling, centerfold re-joined
Verso: - Soiling, repairs as noted

$275.00 USD
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1693 Slezer Antique Print View of the Town of Alloa on Firth of Forth Scotland

1693 Slezer Antique Print View of the Town of Alloa on Firth of Forth Scotland

  • Title The Prospect of the House & of the Town of Alloua
  • Ref  :  24947
  • Size:  18 ½in x 14 ½in (470mm x 370mm)
  • Date : 1693
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This finely engraved original important antique print a view of the town of Alloa in Clackmannanshire in eastern Scotland on the Firth of Forth, was published in the first edition of John Slezer's 'Theatrum Scotiae', 1693. 
This is an important and rare print as Slezer s Theatrum Scotiae is one of the earliest records of early Scottish towns. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: -  
Colors used: -  
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 18 ½in x 14 ½in (470mm x 370mm)
Plate size: - 16 ½in x 11 in (420mm x 280mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1693 Slezer Antique Print Fortrose View of Ross-shire, Scotland

1693 Slezer Antique Print Fortrose View of Ross-shire, Scotland

Description: 
This fine beautifully hand coloured original antique print a view of Fortrose - in the Shire of Ross, Northern Scotland - was published in the 1718 edition of John Slezer's 'Theatrum Scotiae', published in 1693.

Fortrose in Ross-shire sits on the edge of the Moray Firth. In Slezer's view you see the ruins of the town's cathedral, which fell into decline after the Reformation in 1560.
Fortrose consists of two towns, Chanonry (or as Slezer writes, 'Channery') and Rosemarkie, which were formally united in 1592 under the name Fortrose. From the 12th century, Rosemarkie was the seat of the Bishopric of Ross, but the cathedral and former bishop's residence were largely removed by Cromwell in the 1650s.
In front of the town are run-rigs unenclosed strips of separately cultivated ground. These were typical in the Scottish landscape of the 17th and early 18th centuries.

This is an important and rare print as Slezer s Theatrum Scotiae is one of the earliest records of early Scottish towns. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Green, yellow, orange, blue  
General color appearance: - Authentic  
Paper size: - 16 ½in x 10 ½in (420mm x 270mm)
Plate size: - 16 ½in x 10 ½in (420mm x 270mm)
Margins: - Min 1/4in (7mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Cropped to plate-mark
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1664 Blaeu Large Antique Map of The Welsh County of Breknock

1664 Blaeu Large Antique Map of The Welsh County of Breknock

Description:
This beautifully hand coloured original antique map of the Welsh county of Brecknock was published in the 1664 Dutch edition of Joan Blaeus Atlas Major. 

Blaeus reference for the topographical data is from John Speeds maps from the 1611 Empire of Great Britaine  -  the beautiful decoration, though, is distinctly Blaeus.
This is a beautiful map with a deep impression, original margins, wonderful hand colouring and strong, stable paper. (Ref: Koeman; Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Later
Colors used: - Yellow, pink, red, blue, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 25 1/2in x 21 1/2in (650mm x 545mm)
Plate size: - 20in x 15in (510mm x 380mm)
Margins: - Min 2in (50mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1720 Chatelain Antique Map of England & Wales

1720 Chatelain Antique Map of England & Wales

  • TitleNouvelle Carte De L Angleterre Dans Laquelle Lon Observe Lez Comtez Les Archives
  • Ref #:  16370
  • Size:  25 1/2in x 20 1/2in (650m x 430m)
  • Date : 1720
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This large fine beautifully hand coloured original antique map of England & Wales - with side text on all the different counties - by Henri Abraham Chatelain in 1720 was published in his famous Atlas Historique.
This is a magnificent map with bright hand colouring, clean strong sturdy paper and a heavy clear impression.

The Atlas Historique published by Henri Chatelain was part of a major work of its time, an encyclopedia in seven volumes, including geography as one of its main subjects. The text was by Nicholas Gueudeville and the maps by Chatelain. The Atlas included one of the finest map of America (four sheets) surrounded by vignettes and decorative insets. The Atlas Historique was completed between 1705 and 1720, further issues were published up to 1739. The series was published in Amsterdam, with Chatelain’s maps based on those of G. Delisle. (Ref: M&B; Tooley) 

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Pink, green, yellow, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic  
Paper size: - 25 1/2in x 20 1/2in (650m x 430m)
Plate size: - 25in x 19 1/2in (635m x 495mm)
Margins: - min. 1/2in (10mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Folds as issued
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1610 Saxton Kip Antique Map of The Welsh County of Flintshire

1610 Saxton Kip Antique Map of The Welsh County of Flintshire

Description: 
This beautifully engraved hand coloured original map of the Welsh County of Flintshire was engraved by William Kip & William Holefor the 1610 English edition of Camden`s Britannia, reduced and re-issued from the same map by Christopher Saxton published earlier in the late 16th century.  

William Camden was an historian who first published his Britannia, a description and history of Britain, in 1586. Written in Latin, the book contained only a general map of the country but had a wide circulation and eventually in 1607 an edition (the sixth) was published with a series of maps with Latin text on the reverse. 
Further editions in English were published in 1610 and 1637 but without text. The maps, mostly engraved by William Kip and William Hole, were based on those of Christopher Saxton, but six were copied from Norden. The map of Pembroke is by George Owen and the general maps of England/Wales, Scotland and Ireland were probably taken from Mercator. Kip reduced the size of each map for Britannia from the originals published by Christopher Saxton in 1579. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Pink, yellow, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 15in x 13in (380mm x 330mm)
Plate size: - 13in x 11in (330mm x 280mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling to margin edges
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1750 Isaac Tirion Large Antique Map of Great Britain & Ireland

1750 Isaac Tirion Large Antique Map of Great Britain & Ireland

  • Title : Nieuwe Kaaart van de Eilanden Groot Britannie behelsende Het Koningryk Engeland
  • Ref #:  70087
  • Size: 21 1/2in x 17in (545mm x 435mm)
  • Date : 1750
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This beautifully hand coloured original antique map of Great Britain & Ireland was published by Isaac Tirion in 1750.

Isaac Tirion was a successful publisher in Amsterdam during the 18th century who produced extensive volumes of Dutch town plans as well as a number of atlases with maps usually based on those of G. Delisle. His world atlases were finely engraved and beautifully colored as with this map for auction. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Green, pink, yellow
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 21 1/2in x 17in (545mm x 435mm)
Plate size: - 14 1/2in x 13in (370mm x 330mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1718 Slezer Antique Print View of Kelso Abby & Township, Scotland

1718 Slezer Antique Print View of Kelso Abby & Township, Scotland

  • Title  : The Abby of Kelso
  • Date  : 1718
  • Ref # :  24953
  • Size   : 18 ½in x 14 ½in (470mm x 360mm)
  • Condition: (A+) Fine

Description:

This fine beautifully hand coloured original antique print a view of Kelso Abby & Kelso Town, Scotland was published in the 1718 edition of John Slezer's 'Theatrum Scotiae'.

Kelso Abbey is a ruined Scottish abbey in Kelso, Scotland. It was founded in the 12th century by a community of Tironensian monks first brought to Scotland in the reign of Alexander I. It occupies ground overlooking the confluence of the Tweed and Teviot waters, the site of what was once the Royal Burgh of Roxburgh and the intended southern centre for the developing Scottish kingdom at that time. Kelso thus became the seat of a pre-eminently powerful abbacy in the heart of the Scottish Borders.

In the 14th century, Roxburgh became a focus for periodic attack and occupation by English forces and Kelso's monastic community survived a number of fluctuations in control over the area, restoring the abbey infrastructure after episodes of destruction and ultimately retaining Scottish identity. From 1460 onwards, life for the abbey probably grew more settled, but came once again under attack in the early sixteenth century. By the mid-century, through a turbulent combination of events, the abbey effectively ceased to function and the building fell into ruin.

Although the site of Kelso Abbey has not been fully excavated in modern times, evidence suggests that it was a major building with two crossings. The only remains standing today are the west tower crossing and part of the infirmary. The massive design and solid romanesque style of the tower indicate a very large building of formidable, semi-military construction and appearance, evidence of the importance with which Roxburgh was regarded when the abbacy was at the height of its power.

This is an important and rare print as Slezer s Theatrum Scotiae is one of the earliest records of early Scottish towns & major buildings. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 18 ½in x 14 ½in (470mm x 360mm)
Plate size: - 16 ½in x 11in (420mm x 275mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections: Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - Light age toning
Verso: - Light age toning

$249.00 USD
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1718 Slezer Antique Print View of Falkland Palace, Fife, Scotland

1718 Slezer Antique Print View of Falkland Palace, Fife, Scotland

  • Title  : Palace of Falkland
  • Date  : 1718
  • Ref # :  24958
  • Size   : 18 ½in x 14 ½in (470mm x 360mm)
  • Condition: (A+) Fine

Description:

This fine beautifully hand coloured original antique print a view of the internal courtyard of Falkland Palace, home of the Scottish Kings - was published in the 1718 edition of John Slezer's 'Theatrum Scotiae'.

Falkland Palace in Falkland, Fife, Scotland, is a former royal palace of the Scottish Kings. The Scottish Crown acquired Falkland Castle from MacDuff of Fife in the 14th century. In 1402 Robert Stewart, 1st Duke of Albany imprisoned his nephew David Stewart, Duke of Rothesay, the eldest son of King Robert III of Scotland, at Falkland. The incarcerated Duke eventually died there from neglect and starvation. Albany was exonerated from blame by Parliament, but suspicions of foul play persisted, suspicions which never left Rothesay's younger brother the future James I of Scotland, and which would eventually lead to the downfall of the Albany Stewarts. John Debrett, writing in 1805, was in no doubt of Duke Robert's motives and guilt. This Robert, Duke of Albany, having obtained the entire government from his brother, King Robert, he caused the Duke of Rothesay to be murdered, thinking to bring the Crown into his own family; but to avoid the like fate, King Robert resolved to send his younger son James, to France, then about nine years old, who being sea-sick, and forced to land on the English coast ... was detained a captive in England eighteen years. At these misfortunes King Robert died of grief in 1406. Between 1501 and 1541 Kings James IV and James V of Scotland transformed the old castle into a beautiful royal palace: with Stirling Castle it was one of only two Renaissance palaces in Scotland. To address the poor state of the garden and park, James V appointed a new Captain and Keeper, William Barclay, Master of Rhynd, in March 1527. Ten years later, James V extended his father's buildings in French renaissance style. He died at Falkland in December 1542 after hearing that his wife had given birth to a daughter—Mary, Queen of Scots. Falkland became a popular retreat with all the Stewart monarchs. They practised falconry there and used the vast surrounding forests for hawking and for hunting deer. Wild boar, imported from France, were kept in the Park, within a fence made by the Laird of Fernie. Nearby Myres Castle is the hereditary home of the Royal Macers and Sergeants at Arms who served Falkland Castle since at least the sixteenth century. John Scrimgeour of Myres supervised building at the Palace from 1532 to 1563. After the Union of the Crowns (1606), James VI and I, Charles I, and Charles II all visited Falkland. A fire partially destroyed the palace during its occupation by Cromwell's troops and it quickly fell into ruin.

This is an important and rare print as Slezer s Theatrum Scotiae is one of the earliest records of early Scottish towns & major buildings. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 18 ½in x 14 ½in (470mm x 360mm)
Plate size: - 16 ½in x 11in (420mm x 275mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections: Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$249.00 USD
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1755 Cole Maitland Large Antique Map, Plan of Cheap Ward London England

1755 Cole Maitland Large Antique Map, Plan of Cheap Ward London England

  • Title Cheap Ward with its Division into Parishes according to a New Survey
  • Ref  :  22541
  • Size:  20in x 15 1/2in (510mm x 395mm)
  • Date : 1755
  • Condition: (B) Good Condition

Description:
This large fine original antique print & plan of the Cheap Ward, located in central London - stretching from Aldermambury Street in the North to Bow Lane in the South - was engraved by Benjamin Cole - engraver and mapseller - in 1755 - dated at the foot of the map - for Ward Maps of Maitlands History of London.

Background: This is a beautiful map of the Cheap Ward in London, England by Benjamin Cole. The map covers Cheap (from the Old English word meaning 'market') Ward in the City of London from Milk Street east to Prince's Street and from Guildhall south as far as Queen Victoria Street. Cole identifies various important buildings in profile, many of which still exist, including Guildhall, Blackwell Hall, St. Mary le Bow Church, Mercers Chapel, etc. Guildhall, build in 1440, is the only non-Church building that has survived to this day. Once used a town hall, it is still an administrative and ceremonial center on London.

Four illustrated views are included in each quadrant. The top left quadrant features the Guild Hall Chapel adjoining to Guild Hall, the top right quadrant features the South View of Grocer's Hall, the lower right quadrant features the West view of Blackwell Hall and the lower left quadrant includes the South view of St. Mildred's Church in the Poultry. A decorative title cartouche adorns the left of the map while coat of arms of Samuel Fludyer Esqr., to whom this map is dedicated to, appears along the bottom margin with the inscription 'This Plan is most humbly inscribed to Samuel Fludyer Esqr. Alderman of Cheap Ward and one of the Sheriffs of London in 1755.'

This map was derived from earlier plans by John Strype with the illustrations based on West and Tow's 1736 Prospect Views of Ancient Churches. This map was created by Benjamin Cole and issued as part of William Maitland's History of London from its Foundation to the Present Time. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early  
Colors used: - Pink, yellow, green  
General color appearance: - Authentic 
Paper size: - 20in x 15 1/2in (510mm x 395mm)
Plate size: -  19in x 15in (470mm x 370mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (10mm)
 
Imperfections:
Margins: - Folds as issued, creasing & light soiling along folds
Plate area: - Folds as issued, creasing & light soiling along folds
Verso: - Folds as issued, creasing & light soiling along folds, small repair no loss

$175.00 USD
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1725 Campbell Antique Architectural Print of Greenhouse at Wanstead Manor Essex

1725 Campbell Antique Architectural Print of Greenhouse at Wanstead Manor Essex

  • Title : The Greenhouse at Wanstead in Essex the Seat of Sir Richard Child Bart
  • Ref #:  70547
  • Size: 17in x 10 1/2in (430mm x 270mm)
  • Date : 1725
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This large original antique architectural print of the Greenhouse of the Great Manor House at Wanstead in Essex the home of Sir Richard Child by Colen Campbell and was published in the 1725 edition of Vitruvius Britannicus or The British Architect.

Background: In 1715 Sir Richard Child commissioned the Scottish architect Colen Campbell to design a grand mansion in the then emerging Palladian style, to replace the former house, and to rival contemporary mansions such as Blenheim Palace. When completed it covered an area of 260 ft (79 m). by 70 ft (21 m), the facade having a portico with six Corinthian columns, the earliest in England.
The grounds were landscaped and planted with formal avenues of trees by George London, one of the leading garden designers of his day. Child was created 1st Viscount Castlemaine 3 years later in 1718, the house being completed in 1722. Child had married in 1703 Dorothy Glynne, whose mother was of the Tylney family of Tylney Hall in Rotherwick, Hampshire.
On the death of Ann Tylney, her cousin, in 1730, Dorothy and her husband Viscount Castlemain inherited the Tylney estates. Castlemain was created 1st Earl Tylney the following year (1731) and in 1734 obtained an Act of Parliament to change the name of his family, including his heirs, from the patronymic to Tylney, probably to meet a condition of his wife's inheritance.
On the death of the Earl in 1750 he was succeeded by his 38-year-old son John Tylney, 2nd Earl Tylney, who continued the plantings, but in the then fashionable natural and non-formal style. The 2nd. Earl had no male issue and his estates passed on his death in 1784 to his elder sister Emma's sonSir James Long, 7th Baronet, who being then in possession of the vast estates of the Longs, the Childs and the Tylneys, assumed the surname Tylney-Long for himself and his descendants, again probably in accordance with a requirement of the inheritance.
On the death of the 7th Baronet in 1794 the combined estate passed to his one-year-old infant son Sir James Tylney-Long, 8th Baronet, who died in 1805 aged just 11. The estate then passed to his young sister, eldest of three, Catherine Tylney-Long, who thereby became the richest heiress in England.Like many other settlements, Wanstead first emerged into the light of history in the eleventh century, with the Domesday Survey, compiled on the orders of William I in 1086.

Vitruvius Britannicus or The British Architect is from one of the finest works on architecture ever produced.  Colen Campbell published the work in London in 1725.  The engravings from this work feature illustrations, plans, and cross sections of English country houses and parks.
Campbell was the chief architect to the Prince of Wales.  His work served as a design book that led to the construction of many of Britain’s great houses.  Vitruvius Britannicus established Palladian architecture as the dominant style England in the 18th century.
Vitruvius Britannicus documented the buildings of some of the greatest architects of the times including Indigo Jones, Sir Christopher Wren, and Colen Campbell himself.  The work is essential to the study of 17th and 18th century design and architecture in England.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - Off white
Age of map color: -  
Colors used: -  
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 17in x 10 1/2in (430mm x 270mm)
Plate size: - 15in x 10in (380mm x 255mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Uniform age toning
Plate area: - Uniform age toning
Verso: - Uniform age toning

$125.00 USD
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1695 Morden Antique Map The Welsh County of Monmouth

1695 Morden Antique Map The Welsh County of Monmouth

Description:

This fine beautifully hand coloured original antique map of the Welsh county of Monmouth was engraved by Robert Morden & published by Abel Swale & John Churchil for the 1695 edition of Willam Camden's Britannia

William Camden was an historian who first published his Britannia, a description and history of Britain, in 1586. Written in Latin, the book contained only a general map of the country but had a wide circulation and eventually in 1607 an edition (the sixth) was published with a series of maps with Latin text on the reverse. 
Further editions in English were published in 1610 and 1637 but without text.  (Many more editions were published up until 1806 with map contributions from Blaeu in 1617, John Bill 1626, Robert Morden 1695-1772 and John Cary 1789-1806)
In the 1610 & 1617 editions the maps were mostly engraved by William Kip and William Hole and were based on those of Christopher Saxton, but six were copied from John Norden. 
The map of Pembroke is by George Owen and the general maps of England/Wales, Scotland and Ireland were probably taken from Mercator. Kip reduced the size of each map for Britannia from the originals published by Christopher Saxton in 1579. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Red, yellow, blue, green, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 17 1/2in x 15in (445mm x 380mm)
Plate size: - 16 1/2in x 14in (420mm x 355mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - 4 small repairs to bottom margin
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
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1695 Morden Antique Map The Welsh County of Monmouth

1695 Morden Antique Map The Welsh County of Monmouth

Description:
This fine beautifully hand coloured original antique map of the Welsh county of Monmouth was engraved by Robert Morden & published by Abel Swale & John Churchil for the 1695 edition of Willam Camden's Britannia

William Camden was an historian who first published his Britannia, a description and history of Britain, in 1586. Written in Latin, the book contained only a general map of the country but had a wide circulation and eventually in 1607 an edition (the sixth) was published with a series of maps with Latin text on the reverse. 
Further editions in English were published in 1610 and 1637 but without text.  (Many more editions were published up until 1806 with map contributions from Blaeu in 1617, John Bill 1626, Robert Morden 1695-1772 and John Cary 1789-1806)
In the 1610 & 1617 editions the maps were mostly engraved by William Kip and William Hole and were based on those of Christopher Saxton, but six were copied from John Norden. 
The map of Pembroke is by George Owen and the general maps of England/Wales, Scotland and Ireland were probably taken from Mercator. Kip reduced the size of each map for Britannia from the originals published by Christopher Saxton in 1579. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Red, yellow, blue, green, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 17 1/2in x 15in (445mm x 380mm)
Plate size: - 16 1/2in x 14in (420mm x 355mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - 4 small repairs to bottom margin
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
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1695 Rob. Morden Antique Map English County of Hereford

1695 Rob. Morden Antique Map English County of Hereford

Description:

This attractive original antique map of the English county of Hereford, by Robert Morden, was published in the 1695 edition of Camden's Britannia

William Camden was an historian who first published his Britannia, a description and history of Britain, in 1586. Written in Latin, the book contained only a general map of the country but had a wide circulation and eventually in 1607 an edition (the sixth) was published with a series of maps with Latin text on the reverse. 
Further editions in English were published in 1610 and 1637 but without text.  (Many more editions were published up until 1806 with map contributions from Blaeu in 1617, John Bill 1626, Robert Morden 1695-1772 and John Cary 1789-1806)
In the 1610 & 1617 editions the maps were mostly engraved by William Kip and William Hole and were based on those of Christopher Saxton, but six were copied from John Norden. 
The map of Pembroke is by George Owen and the general maps of England/Wales, Scotland and Ireland were probably taken from Mercator. Kip reduced the size of each map for Britannia from the originals published byChristopher Saxton in 1579. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Red, yellow, blue, green
General color appearance: - Authentic, heavy
Paper size: - 17in x 15in (430mm x 380mm)
Plate size: - 17in x 15in (430mm x 380mm)
Margins: - Min 1/4in (4mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Top margin cropped close to border
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
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1695 Morden Antique Map The English County of Rutland

1695 Morden Antique Map The English County of Rutland

Description:
This beautifully hand coloured original antique map of the English County of Rutland was engraved by Robert Morden for the 1695 edition of Camden's Britannia

William Camden was an historian who first published his Britannia, a description and history of Britain, in 1586. Written in Latin, the book contained only a general map of the country but had a wide circulation and eventually in 1607 an edition (the sixth) was published with a series of maps with Latin text on the reverse. 
Further editions in English were published in 1610 and 1637 but without text.  (Many more editions were published up until 1806 with map contributions from Blaeu in 1617, John Bill 1626, Robert Morden 1695-1772 and John Cary 1789-1806)
In the 1610 & 1617 editions the maps were mostly engraved by William Kip and William Hole and were based on those of Christopher Saxton, but six were copied from John Norden. 
The map of Pembroke is by George Owen and the general maps of England/Wales, Scotland and Ireland were probably taken from Mercator. Kip reduced the size of each map for Britannia from the originals published byChristopher Saxton in 1579. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Red, yellow, blue, green, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 16in x 14in (405mm x 355mm)
Plate size: - 14 1/2in x 11 1/2in (370mm x 290mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25m)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$99.00 USD
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1756 Cole Maitland Antique Map, Evelyns Plan For London after Great Fire of 1666

1756 Cole Maitland Antique Map, Evelyns Plan For London after Great Fire of 1666

  • Title : London Restored or Sir John Evelyns Plan for Rebuilding the Antient Metropolis after the Fire in 1666
  • Ref #:  26338
  • Size: 16in x 9 1/2in (410mm x 245mm)
  • Date : 1756
  • Condition: (A) Very Good Condition

Description:
This fine original antique print a plan for the rebuilding of London by Sir John Evelyn after the great Fire Of London in 1666 - was engraved by Benjamin Cole and published in the 1756 edition of The History of London from its Foundation to the Present Time...', by William Maitland, Osborne & Shipton and Hodges, London

Great Fire of London (1666) 
The Great Plague was immediately followed by another catastrophe, albeit one which helped to put an end to the plague. On the Sunday, 2 September 1666 the Great Fire of London broke out at one o'clock in the morning at a bakery in Pudding Lane in the southern part of the City. Fanned by an eastern wind the fire spread, and efforts to arrest it by pulling down houses to make firebreaks were disorganised to begin with. On Tuesday night the wind fell somewhat, and on Wednesday the fire slackened. On Thursday it was extinguished, but on the evening of that day the flames again burst forth at the Temple. Some houses were at once blown up by gunpowder, and thus the fire was finally mastered. The Monument was built to commemorate the fire: for over a century and a half it bore an inscription attributing the conflagration to a "popish frenzy"

The fire destroyed about 60% of the City, including Old St Paul's Cathedral, 87 parish churches, 44 livery company halls and the Royal Exchange. However, the number of lives lost was surprisingly small; it is believed to have been 16 at most. Within a few days of the fire, three plans were presented to the king for the rebuilding of the city, by Christopher Wren, John Evelyn and Robert Hooke.

Wren proposed to build main thoroughfares north and south, and east and west, to insulate all the churches in conspicuous positions, to form the most public places into large piazzas, to unite the halls of the 12 chief livery companies into one regular square annexed to the Guildhall, and to make a fine quay on the bank of the river from Blackfriars to the Tower of London. Wren wished to build the new streets straight and in three standard widths of thirty, sixty and ninety feet. Evelyn's plan differed from Wren's chiefly in proposing a street from the church of St Dunstan's in the East to the St Paul's, and in having no quay or terrace along the river. These plans were not implemented, and the rebuilt city generally followed the streetplan of the old one, and most of it has survived into the 21st century.

Nonetheless, the new City was different from the old one. Many aristocratic residents never returned, preferring to take new houses in the West End, where fashionable new districts such as St. James's were built close to the main royal residence, which was Whitehall Palace until it was destroyed by fire in the 1690s, and thereafter St. James's Palace. The rural lane of Piccadilly sprouted courtiers mansions such as Burlington House. Thus the separation between the middle class mercantile City of London, and the aristocratic world of the court in Westminster became complete.

In the City itself there was a move from wooden buildings to stone and brick construction to reduce the risk of fire. Parliament's Rebuilding of London Act 1666 stated "building with brick [is] not only more comely and durable, but also more safe against future perils of fire". From then on only doorcases, window-frames and shop fronts were allowed to be made of wood.
Christopher Wren's plan for a new model London came to nothing, but he was appointed to rebuild the ruined parish churches and to replace St Paul's Cathedral. His domed baroque cathedral was the primary symbol of London for at least a century and a half. As city surveyor, Robert Hooke oversaw the reconstruction of the City's houses. The East End, that is the area immediately to the east of the city walls, also became heavily populated in the decades after the Great Fire. London's docks began to extend downstream, attracting many working people who worked on the docks themselves and in the processing and distributive trades. These people lived in Whitechapel, Wapping, Stepney and Limehouse, generally in slum conditions.

In the winter of 1683–4 a frost fair was held on the Thames. The frost, which began about seven weeks before Christmas and continued for six weeks after, was the greatest on record. The Revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685 led to a large migration on Huguenots to London. They established a silk industry at Spitalfields.

At this time the Bank of England was founded, and the British East India Company was expanding its influence. Lloyd's of London also began to operate in the late 17th century. In 1700 London handled 80% of England's imports, 69% of its exports and 86% of its re-exports. Many of the goods were luxuries from the Americas and Asia such as silk, sugar, tea and tobacco. The last figure emphasises London's role as an entrepot: while it had many craftsmen in the 17th century, and would later acquire some large factories, its economic prominence was never based primarily on industry. Instead it was a great trading and redistribution centre. Goods were brought to London by England's increasingly dominant merchant navy, not only to satisfy domestic demand, but also for re-export throughout Europe and beyond.

William III, a Dutchman, cared little for London, the smoke of which gave him asthma, and after the first fire at Whitehall Palace (1691) he purchased Nottingham House and transformed it into Kensington Palace. Kensington was then an insignificant village, but the arrival of the court soon caused it to grow in importance. The palace was rarely favoured by future monarchs, but its construction was another step in the expansion of the bounds of London. During the same reign Greenwich Hospital, then well outside the boundary of London, but now comfortably inside it, was begun; it was the naval complement to the Chelsea Hospital for former soldiers, which had been founded in 1681. During the reign of Queen Anne an act was passed authorising the building of 50 new churches to serve the greatly increased population living outside the boundaries of the City of London. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: -  
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 16in x 9 1/2in (410mm x 245mm)
Plate size: -  13 3/4in x 8 1/4in (350mm x 210mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)
 
Imperfections:
Margins: - Light spotting in margins
Plate area: - Light spotting
Verso: - Light spotting

$90.00 USD
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1836 Moule Antique Map The English County of Cheshire

1836 Moule Antique Map The English County of Cheshire

Description: 
This finely engraved original beautifully hand coloured original antique map of the English county of Cheshire by Thomas Moule was published in the 1836 edition of Barclays Dictionary. Moules maps were some of the the last original decorative maps published in the 19th century. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Yellow, green, red, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 11in x 8 1/2in (280mm x 215mm)
Plate size: - 11in x 8 1/2in (280mm x 215mm)
Margins: - Min 1/4in (6mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$75.00 USD
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1836 Moule Antique Map The English County of Berkshire

1836 Moule Antique Map The English County of Berkshire

Description: 
This finely engraved original beautifully hand coloured original antique map of the English county of Berkshire by Thomas Moule was published in the 1836 edition of Barclays Dictionary. Moules maps were some of the the last original decorative maps published in the 19th century. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Yellow, green, red, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 11in x 8 1/2in (280mm x 215mm)
Plate size: - 11in x 8 1/2in (280mm x 215mm)
Margins: - Min 1/4in (6mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$75.00 USD
More Info