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1851 John Tallis Antique map of Tasmania or Van Diemens Land, Australia

1851 John Tallis Antique map of Tasmania or Van Diemens Land, Australia

Description:
This beautifully hand coloured original antique map of Van Diemens Land, Tasmania was engraved by John Rapkin and published by John Tallis in 1851.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original & later 
Colors used: - Yellow, green, red, brown.
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 14 1/2in x 10 1/2in (370mm x 270mm)
Plate size: - 14 1/2in x 10 1/2in (370mm x 270mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (10mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

Background:
The firm of Tallis & Company flourished from 1835 to 1860 with varying imprints. Their illustrated Atlas of 1850-51 was one of the last decorative atlases, all the maps being engraved on steel and all adorned with small vignettes. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

$375.00 USD
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1644 Jan Jansson & Henricus Hondius Antique Map of Italy, Sardinia, Corsica

1644 Jan Jansson & Henricus Hondius Antique Map of Italy, Sardinia, Corsica

Description:
This fine beautifully hand coloured original antique map of Italy, Sicily, Sardinia & the Adriatic Coast by Jan Jansson was published in the 1644 German edition of Mercator's atlas by Jansson and Hondius.
 This map is richly embellished with cartouches, sailing vessels, sea monsters and a wonderful rendering of Neptune and his mate. The image of the two mer-people embracing with bare chests is a hold over from the controversial images present in the first edition of Ortelius' modern map of Italy. Includes portraits of Romulus and Remus in the lower right corner. In subsequent years, Jansson would replace Hondius's name with his own in the bottom left corner.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Green, red, orange, yellow, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic 
Paper size: - 21 1/2in x 19in (545mm x 490mm)
Plate size: - 19 1/2in x 14 1/2in (500mm x 360mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Centrefold re-joined
Plate area: - Centrefold re-joined
Verso: - Centrefold re-joined

Background: Since classical times the countries bordering the enclosed waters of the Mediterranean had been well versed in the use of maps and sea charts and in Italy, more than anywhere else, the traditional knowledge was kept alive during the many hundreds of years following the collapse of the Roman Empire. By the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries the seamen of Venice, Genoa and Amalfi traded to far countries, from the Black Sea ports and the coasts of Palestine and Egypt in the East to Flanders and the southern coasts of England and Ireland in the West, their voyages guided by portulan charts and the use of the newly invented compass. For a time Italian supremacy in cartography passed to Aragon and the Catalan map makers based on Majorca, but by the year 1400 the power and wealth of the city states of Venice, Genoa, Florence and Milan surpassed any in Europe. Florence, especially, under the rule of the Medici family, became not only a great trading and financial centre but also the focal point of the rediscovery of the arts and learning of the ancient world. In this milieu a number of manuscript world maps were produced, of which one by Fra Mauro (c. 1459) is the most notable, but the event of the greatest importance in the history of cartography occurred in the year 1400 when a Florentine, Palla Strozzi, brought from Constantinople a Greek manuscript copy of Claudius Ptolemy'sGeographia, which, 1,250 years after its compilation, came as a revelation to scholars in Western Europe. In the following fifty years or so manuscript copies, translated into Latin and other languages, became available in limited numbers but the invention of movable-type printing transformed the scene: the first copy without maps being printed in 1475 followed by many with copper-engraved maps, at Bologna in 1477, Rome 1478, 1490, 1507 and 1508, and Florence 1482.
About the year 1485 the first book of sea charts, compiled by Bartolommeo dalli Sonetti, was printed in Venice and in the first part of the sixteenth century a number of world maps were published, among them one compiled in 1506 by Giovanni Contarini, engraved by Francesco Rosselli, which was the first printed map to show the discoveries in the New World. In the following years there were many attractive and unusual maps of Islands (Isolano) by Bordone, Camocio and Porcacchi, but more important was the work of Giacomo (Jacopo) Gastaldi, a native of Piedmont who started life as an engineer in the service of the Venetian Republic before turning to cartography as a profession. His maps, produced in great variety and quantity, were beautifully drawn copperplate engravings and his style and techniques were widely copied by his contemporaries. From about 1550 to 1580 many of Gastaldi's maps appeared in the collections of maps known as Lafreri 'atlases', a term applied to groups of maps by different cartographers brought together in one binding. As the contents of such collections varied considerably they were no doubt assembled at the special request of wealthy patrons and are now very rare indeed.
About this time, for a variety of historical and commercial reasons, Italy's position as the leading trading and financial nation rapidly declined and with it her superiority in cartography was lost to the vigorous new states in the Low Countries. That is not to say, of course, that Italian skills as map makers were lost entirely for it was not until 1620 that the first printed maps of Italy by an Italian, Giovanni Magini, appeared, and much later in the century there were fine maps by Giacomo de Rossi and Vincenzo Coronelli, the latter leading a revival of interest in cartography at the end of the century. Coronelli was also famous for the construction of magnificent large-size globes and for the foundation in Venice in 1680 of the first geographical society.
In the eighteenth century the best-known names are Antonio Zatta, Rizzi-Zannoni and Giovanni Cassini.
We ought to mention the work of Baptista Boazio who drew a series of maps in A Summarie and True Discourse of Sir Francis Drake's West Indian Voyage, published in 1588-89, and who is especially noted for a very fine map of Ireland printed in 1599 which was incorporated in the later editions of the Ortelius atlases. It is perhaps appropriate also to refer to two English map makers who spent many years in exile in Italy: the first, George Lily, famous for the splendid map of the British Isles issued in Rome in 1546, and the second, Robert Dudley, who exactly one hundred years later was responsible for the finest sea atlas of the day, Dell' Arcano del Mare,published in Florence. Both of these are described in greater detail elsewhere in this handbook. (Ref: Tooley, Koeman)

$1,250.00 USD
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1639 Hondius & Mercator Antique Map Mughal Empire Northern India, Tibet, Nepal

1639 Hondius & Mercator Antique Map Mughal Empire Northern India, Tibet, Nepal

Description: 
This fine, beautifully hand coloured original  antique and very important map of Mughal Empire of Northern India, Tibet, Nepal and central Asia by Henricus Hondius was published in the 1639 French edition of Gerardi Mercators Atlantis Novi Atlas.

Background: This map centers on the Mughal capital of Agra, with the map covering, roughly, from Kabul to Orissa and Deccan, and from Persia to Bengal. It depicts the empire prior to the conquest of Orissa and Deccan, most likely during the reign of Shah Jahan, of Taj Mahal fame. Relief is shown pictorially. An elaborate title cartouche appears in the upper left quadrant. The map is embellished with images of tigers, elephants, caravans, and galleons.
There is much of interest. In particular, is the map detailed breakdown of the caravan network between Gujarat and Agra, between Agra and the desert outpost of Jaisalmer, and between Agra and the Silk Road center of Kabul. While the map does not show roads, for surely none as such existed at the time, it does show the network of towns, waystations and caravanserai built to support the bustling trade system.
The apocryphal Lake of Chiamay appears just north of the Bay of Bengal as the source of four important Southeast Asian river systems including the Irrawaddy, the Dharla, the Chao Phraya, and the Brahmaputra. The curious Lake of Chiamay (also called Chiam-may or Chian-may), roughly located in the area of Assam but sometimes as far north as Tibet and China, began to appear in maps of this region as early as the 16th century and persisted well into the mid 18th century. Its origins are unknown but may originate in a lost 16th century geography prepared by the Portuguese scholar Jao de Barros. It was speculated to be the source of five important Southeast Asian River systems and was mentioned in the journals of Sven Hedin. There are even records that the King of Siam led an invasionary force to take control of the lake in the 16th century. Nonetheless, the theory of Lake Chiamay was ultimately disproved and it disappeared from maps entirely by the 1760s.
There are two states of this map, the present example being the first state, first issued in 1638 by Henricus Hondius, and the second state a few years later in 1641 by Jan Jannson. With the exception of the signature imprint, the plates are identical.  (Ref: Koeman; M&B)

Condition Report:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, pink, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 23in x 19in (585mm x 485mm)
Plate size: - 19 3/4in x 14 1/2in (500mm x 350mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Bottom centerfold re-joined.
Plate area: - Light colour offset
Verso: - Bottom centerfold re-joined

$850.00 USD
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1770 JN Bellin Very Large Original Antique World Map on Mercators Projection

1770 JN Bellin Very Large Original Antique World Map on Mercators Projection

  • Title : Essay d' une Carte Reduite Contenant les parties connuees Du Globe Terrestre
  • Date : 1770
  • Size: 32in x 23in (815mm x 585mm)
  • Ref #:  61143
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This very large beautifully hand coloured original antique World Map on Mercator's Projection was first engraved in 1748 by Jacques Nicolas Bellin, dated in the title, and was updated to 1770 showing the discoveries by Captain James Cook in Australia & New Zealand in 1769-1770.

Background: The map presents the entire world on Mercator Projection based on a Paris (L’Isle de Fer) meridian, exhibiting post-Cook geography throughout, but most specifically in the Pacific and along the northwest coast of America.
North America to the west of the Mississippi is vaguely rendered according to 16th century expeditions into the region by Coronado, La Salle, De Soto, and others.
Bellin identifies the semi-mythical civilizations of Quivira and Teguayo, both associated with legends of the Seven Cities of Gold, in what is modern day Utah, California, and Nevada. Along the western coast the strait discovered by Martin Aguilar is noted. Further north still the River of the West (Fl. de l’Ouest) extends from the west coast to the Lake of the Woods (Lac de Bois) and thence via additional waterways to the Great Lakes and the Atlantic. The River of the West appeared in many 18th century maps of the Americas and is reflective of French hopes for a water route from their colonies in Canada and Louisiana to the Pacific. Still further north the coastline becomes extremely vague, in places vanishing altogether. The Aleutians are vaguely rendered according to various sightings by Vitus Jonassen Bering and Aleksei Chirikov in the 1740s and identified as the “Archipel de Nord”.
In the Pacific, various Polynesian Island groups are noted though many are slightly or significantly misplaced. The Solomon Islands are vastly oversized referencing the early 17th claims of Quiros. The other lands discovered and erroneously mapped by Quiros in 1606 and Davis in 1686 during their search of the great southern continent are also noted. Hawaii, as yet undiscovered, is absent. New Zealand is rendered twice though is accurate in its form and position. Australia, here labeled “Nouvelle Holland”, has part of its southern coastline ghosted in and Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) is attached to the mainland. The southern coast of New Guinea is similarly ghosted in, suggesting its unexplored state.
It is of interest that there is a common misconception regarding this map that suggests the first edition was dated 1748. There are editions with a printed date of 1748, but these are actually later editions. The 1748 date is a printing error in which “8” and “4” are transposed, the actual date of publication being 1784. The first edition of this map is the 1778 example shown here. 
(Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, green, red, brown.
General color appearance: - Authentic and fresh
Paper size: - 32in x 23in (815mm x 585mm)
Plate size: - 28 1/2n x 20 1/2in (725mm x 520mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Small worm hole restoration adjacent to SW Africa
Verso: - Folds as issued

$1,750.00 USD
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1863 Dangerfield Rare Antique Map of Gettysburg, American Civil War, 1 July 1863

1863 Dangerfield Rare Antique Map of Gettysburg, American Civil War, 1 July 1863

  • Title : Sketch to show the advance of Ewell into Pennsylvania (marked thus_._._._.) also the simultaneous concentration of the armies of Lee and MEADE on Gettysburg on the 1st of July 1863...F Dangerfield Lith. 22 Bedford St Covent Garden
  • Date : 1863
  • Size: 8 1/2in x 5 1/2in (215mm x 140mm)
  • Ref #:  61002
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This rare original antique military map of the intersection of Pennsylvania, Maryland & Virginia centering on Chambersburg & Gettysburg on the 1st of July 1863 was published by Frederick Dangerfield in late 1863.
The map illustrating possibly the most famous battle of the American Civil War also contains a legend showing the position of both the Federal & Confederate Armies on that day.

The Battle of Gettysburg was fought July 1–3, 1863, in and around the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, by Union and Confederate forces during the American Civil War. The battle involved the largest number of casualties of the entire war and is often described as the war's turning point.  Union Maj. Gen. George Meade's Army of the Potomac defeated attacks by Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia, ending Lee's attempt to invade the North.
After his success at Chancellorsville in Virginia in May 1863, Lee led his army through the Shenandoah Valley to begin his second invasion of the North—the Gettysburg Campaign. With his army in high spirits, Lee intended to shift the focus of the summer campaign from war-ravaged northern Virginia and hoped to influence Northern politicians to give up their prosecution of the war by penetrating as far as Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, or even Philadelphia. Prodded by President Abraham Lincoln, Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker moved his army in pursuit, but was relieved of command just three days before the battle and replaced by Meade.
Elements of the two armies initially collided at Gettysburg on July 1, 1863, as Lee urgently concentrated his forces there, his objective being to engage the Union army and destroy it. Low ridges to the northwest of town were defended initially by a Union cavalry division under Brig. Gen. John Buford, and soon reinforced with two corps of Union infantry. However, two large Confederate corps assaulted them from the northwest and north, collapsing the hastily developed Union lines, sending the defenders retreating through the streets of the town to the hills just to the south.
On the second day of battle, most of both armies had assembled. The Union line was laid out in a defensive formation resembling a fishhook. In the late afternoon of July 2, Lee launched a heavy assault on the Union left flank, and fierce fighting raged at Little Round Top, the Wheatfield, Devil's Den, and the Peach Orchard. On the Union right, Confederate demonstrations escalated into full-scale assaults on Culp's Hill and Cemetery Hill. All across the battlefield, despite significant losses, the Union defenders held their lines.
On the third day of battle, fighting resumed on Culp's Hill, and cavalry battles raged to the east and south, but the main event was a dramatic infantry assault by 12,500 Confederates against the center of the Union line on Cemetery Ridge, known as Pickett's Charge. The charge was repulsed by Union rifle and artillery fire, at great loss to the Confederate army.
Lee led his army on a torturous retreat back to Virginia. Between 46,000 and 51,000 soldiers from both armies were casualties in the three-day battle, the most costly in US history.
On November 19, President Lincoln used the dedication ceremony for the Gettysburg National Cemetery to honor the fallen Union soldiers and redefine the purpose of the war in his historic Gettysburg Address. (Ref Tooley M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: -  
Colors used: -  
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 8 1/2in x 5 1/2in (215mm x 140mm)
Plate size: - 8 1/2in x 5 1/2in (215mm x 140mm)
Margins: - Min 1/4in (5mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age top margin cropped closed to title
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$325.00 USD
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1786 Chris. Cellarius Old, Antique Atlas Geographia - w/ 27 Maps and Armillary

1786 Chris. Cellarius Old, Antique Atlas Geographia - w/ 27 Maps and Armillary

  • Title : CHRISTOPHORI CELLARII SMALCALDENSIS GEOGRAPHIA ANTIQUA - Recognita denuo & ad veterum novorumque scriptorium fidem, historicorum maxime identidem castigate & Quinta Editione plurimis locis aucta & immutata
  • Ref #:  61153
  • Size: 8 1/2in x 5 1/2in (21.5cm x 13.5cm)
  • Date : 1786
  • Condition: (A) Good Condition

Description: 
Scarce edition of the Christopher Cellarius unique 1786 Atlas Geographiawith 27 folding maps. Overall condition of the Atlas is Good (see below) with the contents in VG to Fine condition.
Beautiful example of this iconic Atlas complete.

Description: "CHRISTOPHORI CELLARII SMALCALDENSIS GEOGRAPHIA ANTIQUA - Recognita denuo & ad veterum novorumque scriptorium fidem, historicorum maxime identidem castigate & Quinta Editione plurimis locis aucta & immutata - Huic demum Sextae Editioni Tot CHARTAS ex majori auctoris Geographia antiqua quot ad minorem hanc illustrandam requirebantur, DUPLICEMQUE INDICEM QUORUM Priori vetera locorum nomina novis praeponuntur Posteriori nova veteribus, Addidit, totam recensuit & Scholarum usui accommodavit. SAMUEL PATRICK, L.L.D. EDITIO altera & castigatior.LONDINISumptibus J & T. POTE, E. BALLARD, C. BATHURST, J. F. & C. RIVINGTON, T. LONGMAN & G. GINGER M.DCC.LXXXVI" (1786)
Bound in full leather with five raised bands to spine. Volume measures approx. 21.5cm x 13.5cm x 2cm. The front and rear boards are cracked to spine edges and have some movement. Chipped to top and bottom of spine and corners, with small loss. There are a couple of chips to leather. The first page is the title page and last leaf is the last leaf of text. Fixed endpapers are browned.
The title page, and last leaf are browned to edges, and there is an ink mark to last leaf. Couple of leaves and a map are detached. One page has large corner chip, with loss. There are a couple of ink numbers/marks to rear of one of the maps, and the occasional ink mark and splash. Overall the majority of contents are in clean and tight condition.
There are 27 folding maps with armillary Sphere. Atlas content index (see images)

Background: Geographica was one of the most popular geographical publications of the 17th and 18th centuries lasting into the 19th century. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Atlas size: - 8 1/2in x 5 1/2in (21.5cm x 13.5cm)
Map size: - 9 1/2in x 8 1/2in (23cm x 21.5cm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - See above
Plate area: - See above
Verso: - See above

$1,350.00 USD
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1824 Kelly Old, Antique Print of a North American Indian in War Dress & Tomahawk

1824 Kelly Old, Antique Print of a North American Indian in War Dress & Tomahawk

Description:
This wonderful hand coloured original antique print of a North American Indian in war dress was published in the 1824 edition of A New And Complete System Of Universal Geography, Or An Authentic History And Interesting Description Of The Whole World And Its Inhabitants by Christopher Kelly and was printed by Rider and Weed in Little Britain, London

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - Off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Red, yellow, black, gold 
General color appearance: -  Authentic
Paper size: - 10 1/2in x 8in (270mm x 205mm)
Plate size: - 10 1/2in x 8in (270mm x 205mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$99.00 USD
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1550 Sebastian Munster Original Antique Oval World Map - Columbus America

1550 Sebastian Munster Original Antique Oval World Map - Columbus America

Description:
This fine wood-block engraved original antique World Map was engraved by David Kandel, initials engraved bottom left "DK" and was published in the 1550 edition of Cosmographia by Sebastian Munster.
One of the most recognizable maps of the 16th century considered the first map to identify the Pacific Ocean, as here, 'Mare Pacificum.' This is the world of the educated 16th century European, divided into Asia, Europe, India, Africa and America. The southern latitudes are inhabited by a variety of sea monsters and sailing ships.
American continent is nearly unrecognizable, only a scant 58 years after European discovery by Christopher Columbus. North America is defined as Terra Florida showing an enormous inlet extending towards the eastern seaboard in the vicinity of modern day North Carolina named Verrazano's Sea. Apparently Verrazano, coasting the Outer Banks, observed the Pamlico Sound and assumed that beyond the narrow coastal banks, an open sea gave direct access to the pacific - wishful thinking at best. Verrazano's Sea appears so dramatically on few maps, but persisted in lesser forms for nearly a century. 
South America with tentacle like protrusions in all directions, is largely amorphous, but the Rio de la Plata and the Strait of Magellan are clear. Tierra del Fuego is enormous, with no mention of greater Terra Australias, an interesting omission by Munster. 
Europe is vaguely recognizable and connected, via an arctic peninsula, to Greenland and North America. 
Asia/Pacific extends eastward far enough to reappear just north of America. Ceylon is not present, but a landmass bearing roughly the shape and position of Sumatra is identified as Tapobrana (a term more commonly associated with Ceylon). Japan appears as Zipangri. 
Unlike many other world maps of the time, Munster has left out the concept of a 'Terra Australis Incognita' altogether choosing to show ocean instead.
Africa follows the Ptolemaic model with the Nile finding its source in a mountain range and two associated lakes. 
The whole is surrounded by twelve named and prominent wind heads - one for each direction.

Background: This wood-cut engraved World map was prepared for the 1550 edition of Sebastian Münster's Cosmographia to replace the earlier World map by Sebasian Munster which had appeared in the editions of the Geographia and Cosmographia from 1540 onwards. The publisher, from 1552, was Heinrich Petri, Münster's son-in-law. 
This "new world" map is on an oval projection, similar in many respects to the previous Munster world map, but with the woodcutter's initials "DK" added, identified as those of the engraver David Kandel, in the lower left-hand corner.
The titles of the wind-heads are now in banners and the east and west winds, unlike the 1540 version, do not protrude inside the oval circumference. North America still retains its unusual shape almost bisected by water but the earlier note indicating a route to the Moluccas has been omitted...."
The map was first issued in the 1550 edition of Cosmographia, and appeared in all subsequent editions through to 1578, with the title varying according to the language of the edition. On the verso the wood block is the title and text, in Latin.

Sebastian Münster (1488-1552) was a German cartographer, cosmographer, and Hebrew scholar whose work Cosmographia (1544; "Cosmography") was the earliest German description of the world and a major work in the revival of geographic thought in 16th-century Europe. It had numerous editions in different languages including Latin, French, Italian, English, and even Czech. Altogether, about 40 editions of the Cosmographia appeared between 1544 and 1628 and was one of the most successful and popular books of the 16th century. Münster was a major influence in popular thinking in Europe for the next 200 years.
This success was due not only to the level of descriptive detail but also to the fascinating full page maps & views as well as smaller woodcuts that were included in the text. Many of the woodcuts were executed by famous engravers of the time including Hans Holbein the Younger, Urs Graf, Hans Rudolph Manuel Deutsch, and David Kandel. 
Aside from the well-known maps present in the Cosmographia, the text is thickly sprinkled with vigorous views: portraits of kings and princes, costumes and occupations, habits and customs, flora and fauna, monsters, wonders, and horrors about the known -- and unknown -- world, and was undoubtedly one of the most widely read books of its time.
Münster acquired the material for his book in three ways. Firstly he researched all available literary sources across Germany, Switzerland and other parts of Europe. Secondly he obtained original manuscript material from locals all over Europe for description of the countryside, cities, villages, towns, rivers and local history. Finally, he obtained further material first hand on his travels (primarily in south-west Germany, Switzerland, and Alsace). 

In 1588 Sebastian Petri re-released Cosomgraphia and re-issued many of Munsters maps and views in the "copperplate style". The maps in this release were more sophisticated than with earlier publications of Cosomgraphia and were based on the 1570 release of Abraham Ortelius monumental work Theatrum Orbis Terrarum. (Ref: Shirley; Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: -  
Colors used: -  
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 15 3/4in x 12 1/2in (400mm x 310mm)
Plate size: - 15 3/4in x 12 1/2in (400mm x 310mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (10mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - L&R margins extended, not affecting borders or image
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$3,250.00 USD
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1801 Cary Antique map of Turkey in Europe - Greece, Balkans, Bosnia, Moldavia

1801 Cary Antique map of Turkey in Europe - Greece, Balkans, Bosnia, Moldavia

  • Title : A New Map of Turkey in Europe, Divided into its Provinces, from the Best Authorities 1801
  • Ref #:  16433
  • Size: 25in x 21 1/2in (635mm x 545mm) 
  • Date : 1801
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This large beautifully hand coloured original antique map of the Ottoman Empire in Europe from Greece, The Balkans to Hungary by John Cary was engraved in 1801 - the date is engraved in the title - and was published in Cary's large New Universal Atlas.

An exceptionally beautiful example of John Cary’s important 1801 map of Turkey in Europe. Covers from the Adriatic eastward to Crimea and Southwards as far as Crete and Cyprus. While technically a map of Ottoman holdings in Europe, this map is essentially a map of Greece and the Balkans. Includes the modern day countries of Turkey, Greece, Albania, Macedonia, Rumania, Bulgaria, Moldova, Serbia, Bosnia, Croatia and Montenegro. Notes the line of Division between Europe and Asia as it passes through the Black Sea and the Aegean. All in all, one of the most interesting and attractive atlas maps of Greece and the Balkans to appear in first years of the 19th century. (Ref Tooley M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original  
Colors used: - Green, yellow, pink 
General color appearance: - Authentic  
Paper size: - 25in x 21 1/2in (635mm x 545mm) 
Plate size: - 23 1/2in x 20 1/2in (600mm x 520mm) 
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$375.00 USD
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1755 Bellin Antique Map of The Island of Barbados

1755 Bellin Antique Map of The Island of Barbados

Description: 
This beautifully engraved hand coloured original antique map of the Island of Barbados was published in 1755 by Jacques Nicolas Bellin for Antoine-François Prevosts 20 volume edition of L`Histoire Generale des Voyages published by Pierre de Hondt, The Hague between 1747 & 1785. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early 
Colors used: - Red, green, yellow 
General color appearance: - Authentic 
Paper size: - 13 1/2in x 11 1/2in (350mm x 270mm)
Plate size: - 8 1/4in x 6 1/2in (250mm x 170mm)
Margins: - Min 2in (50mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$225.00 USD
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1780 Bonne Cook Antique Map Prince William Sound Alaska

1780 Bonne Cook Antique Map Prince William Sound Alaska

  • Title : Carte De La Riviere De Cook ...Par M. Bonne...
  • Ref #:  40571
  • Size: 15 1/2in x 10in (395mm x 255mm)
  • Date : 1780
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition 

Description: 
This fine beautifully hand coloured original antique map of Prince William Sound and the Cook inlet - with an inset map of Samganoodha inlet and tracks showing Cooks survey routes within Prince William Sound -  was published by Rigobert Bonne in the 1780 edition of Atlas des toutes les parties connues du globe terrestre by Guillaume Raynal. (Ref Tooley M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: -.Pink, green, yellow, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic and fresh
Paper size: - 15 1/2in x 10in (395mm x 255mm)
Plate size: - 14in x 9in (355mm x 230mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Two very small worm holes adjacent to bottom centerfold
Verso: - None

$225.00 USD
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1720 Herman Moll Large Antique Map of The Netherlands - Holland, VII Provinces

1720 Herman Moll Large Antique Map of The Netherlands - Holland, VII Provinces

  • Title : A New and Exact Map of the United Provinces, or Netherlands &c. According to the Newest and Most Exact Observations by Herman Moll Geographer
  • Ref #:  35090
  • Size: 41in x 25in (1.04m x 635mm)
  • Date : 1720
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This very large beautifully hand coloured original antique map* of The Netherlands by Herman Moll was published in 1720 in the atlas The World Described, or a New and Correct Sett of Maps by John Bowles, Thomas Bowles, Philip Overton & John King of London.
In the 18th century many large-scale maps were published by the likes of John Senex and Herman Moll, this trend continued until the end of private mapping in the early 19th century when it was replaced by Ordnance Survey maps.

Background: An attractive, large scale map of The Netherlands or the United Provinces by the highly regarded cartographer and engraver Herman Moll. on the right-hand side views of Amsterdam, Rotterdam, Middelburg, Utrecht, Groningen, Het Loo Palace and a plan of the ancient Roman Castle at the mouth of the Rhine river Arx Britannica (Huis Britten, Brittenberg).  The upper left corner of the map has an inset map of the coasts, sands and banks of the North Sea, the stretch of water that lies between England and The Netherlands. Moll dedicates his map to ‘The Right Hon Charles Lord Viscount of Townsend &c one of his Majesty’s Principal Secretaries of State’
This magnificent map was printed by John Bowles of Cornhill, London and published in Moll’s 1719 New and Complete Atlas, but it may also have been separately issued earlier. Moll came to London probably from Bremen around 1678 and by 1688 he had his own shop in Vanley's Court in London's Blackfriars, between 1691 and 1710 at the corner of Spring Gardens and Charing Cross, when he moved to Beech Street where he remained until his death. In 1701 he published his first work A System of Geography. He was publishing atlases and separately issued maps, and from 1710 was also known as a maker of pocket globes. (Ref: Tooley, Koeman, M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original & later
Colors used: - Pink, yellow, green  
General color appearance: - Original  
Paper size: - 41in x 25in (1.04m x 635mm)
Plate size: - 39 1/4in x 24 1/2in (1.00m x 625mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (10mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light creasing
Plate area: - Re-joined folds as issued, small repair in top L&R folds, no loss
Verso: - Re-enforced along folds

$1,499.00 USD
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1755 De Vaugondy Large Old, Antique Map of Colonial United States - Chesapeake Bay

1755 De Vaugondy Large Old, Antique Map of Colonial United States - Chesapeake Bay

  • Title : Partie De L Amerique Septentrionale, qui Comprend Le Cours De L Ohio...1755
  • Ref #:  61112
  • Size: 11 1/2in x 8in (290mm x 205mm)
  • Date : 1755
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This large, beautifully hand coloured, scarce 1st state original antique map* depicting the eastern colonies between the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers and the Atlantic, including the Great Lakes and a small part of Upper Canada, was engraved in 1755 - the date is engraved in the title cartouche - and  published by Robert Du Vaugondy in his Atlas Universal, Paris 1757. 
This is one of the finest examples of this map I have seen to date. Beautiful hand colour on age toned heavy paper with original margins with a heavy dark ink denoting a very early pressing. T the time of listing there are 2 examples of this 1st state map for sale on the web at $1600 & 1800 respectively.
 

Background: First state of the beautiful and early de Vaugondy map of the British colonies, based upon John Mitchell's great map of North America from the same year, also drawing from Lewis, Evans on the Middle British Colonies and Joshua Fry's and Peter Jefferson's map of Virginia and Maryland. The Mitchell map was the culmination of many years of British surveying in the North American Colonies and was considered one of the best maps of the continent available to Europeans and Americans in the mid-eighteenth century. 
De Vaugondy's rendition does not copy the full scope of Mitchell's map but instead focuses on the colonies stretching from southern Maine to the Carolinas. In the top left corner is an inset of South Carolina and Georgia. De Vaugondy also pays special attention to the river systems and settlements. This map shows some of the earliest accurate information of the trans-Allegheny regions (the Ohio River, Kentucky, Tennessee and Parts of Ohio) and inland areas to the southeast of the Great Lakes and interior of New England. The dotted lines and outline color designate pre-Treaty of Paris (1763) information about the Ohio country. 
Maine is still part of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. During this era, a dispute arose between New Hampshire and New York over who controlled the area which is now Vermont. Here, New York is shown as to contain Vermont within its borders. The outbreak of the French & Indian War (Seven Years War) briefly suspended interest in the disputed area, and it was not until 1764 that the British crown upheld New York's claim to Vermont. The western borders of the British Colonies extend only to the Appalachians, with the exception of "Caroline, "which extends slightly further west. This shows the strong French presence along the western frontier in the days leading up to the French & Indian conflict. Pennsylvania is shown to stretch north almost to Lake Ontario and encompass much of western New York. 
Included is a beautiful title cartouche in the Rococo style. 
(Ref: Tooley; M&B)
 

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original & later
Colors used: - Pink, green, yellow
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper Size: - 30 1/2in x 21in (775mm x 535mm)
Plate size: - 24 1/2in x 19 1/2in (620mm x 495mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)
 

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light uniform age toning
Plate area: - Light age toning along centerfold
Verso: - Light uniform age toning

$1,750.00 USD
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1861-65 Large Antique American Civil War Map of The Potomac River, Alexandria

1861-65 Large Antique American Civil War Map of The Potomac River, Alexandria

Description: 
This very large, highly detailed original antiquemap of the Potomac River and Virginia - stretching from Alexandria in the north, Dumfries in the SW to Cooks Ferry in the south - was published during the American Civil War.

This map does not have a title but research has dated the map to the American Civil War. This was determined by the size and layout of the City of Alexandria but more importantly the existence of Fort Ellsworth to the west of Alexandria, which was built in 1861 and decommissioned after the war in 1865. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: -  
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 29in x 26in (740mm x 660mm)
Plate size: - 29in x 26in (740mm x 660mm)
Margins: - min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$325.00 USD
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1638 Jansson Old, Antique Map of the Turkish Empire, Saudi Arabia, Middle East

1638 Jansson Old, Antique Map of the Turkish Empire, Saudi Arabia, Middle East

Description: 
This beautiful, old original antique map* of The Turkish Empire in Europe, Africa & Asia centering on Saudi Arabia by Jan Jansson was published in the 1638 Latin edition for  Mercator's Atlas by both Henricus Hondius and Jan Jansson.

 

 

Background: This is the standard 17th century view of the Turkish Empire, including the Balkans in south-eastern Europe, the North African littoral, the Levant and the Arabian Peninsula in addition to the area of Modern Turkey & Persia.
Much of the place name information on this map is derived from the maps published in 1561 by the Italian mapmaker, Giacomo Gastaldi, whose maps exercised great influence over later European mapmakers, throughout the 17th century.
Formidable though the barrier presented by the Turkish Empire in the Near East was, by the early years of the 17th century it was beginning to show signs of decadence and weakness, especially after the defeat of the Turkish navy at the hands of the combined Christian forces of Western Europe at the battle of Lepanto in 1571, from which Turkish naval power never fully recovered. 
Centered on the palace of the Sultans at Constantinople, the administration of the empire was passed down through local rulers, the Beys, Deys and Pashas, who never lost an opportunity to enrich themselves and to develop often considerable powers of their own.
Further defeats of the Turks occurred in 1669 when Candia (Crete) was taken by the Venetians, and in 1683 when they suffered a humiliating defeat outside Wien (Vienna) at the north-western extremity of European Turkey. (Ref: Suraz; Koeman; M&B; Tooley)

 

 

Condition Report:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early & Later
Colors used: - Yellow, pink, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 22 1/2in x 19in (570mm x 485mm)
Plate size: - 21in x 16 1/2in (530mm x 420mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

 

 

Imperfections:
Margins: - Several small repairs to margins, no loss
Plate area: - Centerfold re-joined light uplift along centerfold, light age toning
Verso: - Repairs as noted

 

 

$750.00 USD
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1765 De Buffon Large Antique Folio Bird Print of North American Hairy Woodpecker

1765 De Buffon Large Antique Folio Bird Print of North American Hairy Woodpecker

Description: 
This fine, beautifully hand coloured original antique ornithogical bird print of the North American Hairy Woodpecker was engraved by Francois Nicolas Martinet and published in the 1765 edition of George Louis Leclerc or Count de Buffon Histore Naturelle de Oiseauxwith the total volumes printed between 1765 to 1780.
 *Please do not be confused between these larger fine folio prints and the later, smaller  8vo prints.

Histoire Naturelle Des Oiseaux, is a collection of 1,008 hand colored bird prints edited by Georges-Louis Marie Leclerc, the Count of Buffon. This was one of two major de Buffon works, collectively the most comprehensive French natural history sets of their time. Histoire Naturelle Des Oiseaux was published in 42 volumes from 1765 to 1780 by Edme Louis Daubenton in  collaboration with de Buffon, illustrated with engravings by Francois Nicolas Martinet.

Georges-Louis Leclerc or Count de Buffon (1707 - 1788) was a French aristocrat of formidable intellect and achievements, including books on mathematics and natural history. Although his father initially steered him toward law school, Buffon persisted in pursuing his interest in math. At the age of 20, he discovered the binomial theorem and later introduced differential and integral calculus into probability theory. He soon became fascinated with biological science, and his father relented and let him enroll in the faculty of medicine to study botany and zoology. As a young man in Paris, he befriended Voltaire and other intellectuals, and gained admission to the prestigious Academy of Science at age 27. Decades before Darwin introduced his theory of evolution, Buffon dared to challenge religious thought with empirical observations, suggesting that the earth was older than 6,000 years and that the physical resemblance between humans and apes might be explained by their having a common ancestry. While the theories he proposed to explain these phenomena were by and large incorrect, he correctly grasped that a new paradigm was needed.
De Buffon also published a different 44-volume natural history work with various studies, including birds, titled Histoire Naturelle Generale Et Particuliere (Natural History, General and Particular) (Paris, 1749-1804), which included works by various artists including Jacques Eustache de Sève. This work was his major achievement and an ambitious project characteristic of the 18th-century Enlightenment: a 44-volume encyclopedia attempting to include everything known about the natural world and widely disseminate scientific knowledge. It was the first complete natural history survey presented in a popular form, and also broke ground in attempting to separate science from theological dogma.

Francois Nicolas Martinet was a French engraver and draughtsman. In 1756, he was working for the court of France as Graveur du Cabinet du Roi, under the auspices of the Menus Plaisirs du Roi, making engravings after drawings by others of such subjects as the May Ball at Versailles during the Carnival of 1763. In the same period, Martinet produced illustrations for plays or comic operas by such contemporaries as Marmontel, Voltaire and Philidor. Some of these he engraved himself, while others were drawn by him but engraved by his sister Thérèse Martinet (born c. 1731). He is best known for his engravings of birds for Comte de Buffon's, Histoire Naturelle Des Oiseaux published in Paris from 1770-86. In 1768, a comprehensive group of natural history studies drafted by Martinet, and engraved by Robert Bénard were included in the natural history volume of Diderot and Alembert’s Encyclopédie. Martinet also drew and engraved portraits, landscapes and genre scenes. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Green, blue, yellow
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 12in x 9in (305mm x 230mm)
Plate size: - 10in x 8in (255mm x 205mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$375.00 USD
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1765 Count De Buffon Large Folio Antique Print The Giraffe & Rhinoceros Beetles

1765 Count De Buffon Large Folio Antique Print The Giraffe & Rhinoceros Beetles

  • Title : Scarabes Fig. 1 La Giraffette Fig 2. Le Taureau - Volant
  • Ref #:  23515
  • Size: 12in x 9in (305mm x 230mm)
  • Date : 1765
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This fine, beautifully hand coloured original antique large folio print* of the Giraffe Beetle and the Rhinoceros Beetle was engraved by Francois Nicolas Martinet and was  published in Histoire Naturelle Generale Et Particuliere by Georges-Louis Leclerc or Count de Buffon. 
*Please do not be confused between these larger fine folio prints and the later, smaller  8vo prints.

Histoire Naturelle Des Oiseaux, is a collection of 1,008 hand colored bird prints edited by Georges-Louis Marie Leclerc, the Count of Buffon. This was one of two major de Buffon works, collectively the most comprehensive French natural history sets of their time. Histoire Naturelle Des Oiseauxwas published in 42 volumes from 1765 to 1780 by Edme Louis Daubenton in  collaboration with de Buffon, illustrated with engravings by Francois Nicolas Martinet.

Georges-Louis Leclerc or Count de Buffon (1707 - 1788) was a French aristocrat of formidable intellect and achievements, including books on mathematics and natural history. Although his father initially steered him toward law school, Buffon persisted in pursuing his interest in math. At the age of 20, he discovered the binomial theorem and later introduced differential and integral calculus into probability theory. He soon became fascinated with biological science, and his father relented and let him enroll in the faculty of medicine to study botany and zoology. As a young man in Paris, he befriended Voltaire and other intellectuals, and gained admission to the prestigious Academy of Science at age 27. Decades before Darwin introduced his theory of evolution, Buffon dared to challenge religious thought with empirical observations, suggesting that the earth was older than 6,000 years and that the physical resemblance between humans and apes might be explained by their having a common ancestry. While the theories he proposed to explain these phenomena were by and large incorrect, he correctly grasped that a new paradigm was needed.
De Buffon also published a different 44-volume natural history work with various studies, including birds, titled Histoire Naturelle Generale Et Particuliere (Natural History, General and Particular) (Paris, 1749-1804), which included works by various artists including Jacques Eustache de Sève. This work was his major achievement and an ambitious project characteristic of the 18th-century Enlightenment: a 44-volume encyclopedia attempting to include everything known about the natural world and widely disseminate scientific knowledge. It was the first complete natural history survey presented in a popular form, and also broke ground in attempting to separate science from theological dogma.

Francois Nicolas Martinet was a French engraver and draughtsman. In 1756, he was working for the court of France as Graveur du Cabinet du Roi, under the auspices of the Menus Plaisirs du Roi, making engravings after drawings by others of such subjects as the May Ball at Versailles during the Carnival of 1763. In the same period, Martinet produced illustrations for plays or comic operas by such contemporaries as Marmontel, Voltaire and Philidor. Some of these he engraved himself, while others were drawn by him but engraved by his sister Thérèse Martinet (born c. 1731). He is best known for his engravings of birds for Comte de Buffon's, Histoire Naturelle Des Oiseaux published in Paris from 1770-86. In 1768, a comprehensive group of natural history studies drafted by Martinet, and engraved by Robert Bénard were included in the natural history volume of Diderot and Alembert’s Encyclopédie. Martinet also drew and engraved portraits, landscapes and genre scenes. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Green, blue, yellow
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 12in x 9in (305mm x 230mm)
Plate size: - 10in x 8in (255mm x 205mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$375.00 USD
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1811 John Cary Large Old, Antique Map of The Great Lakes of North America

1811 John Cary Large Old, Antique Map of The Great Lakes of North America

  • Title : A New Map of Upper & Lower Canada by John Cary...1811
  • Ref #:  61107
  • Size: 26in x 21 1/2in (660mm x 550mm)
  • Date : 1811
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This large, beautifully hand coloured original antique map of the Great Lakes of North America was engraved by John Cary in 1811 - the date is engraved in the title cartouche - and was published in Cary's New Universal Atlas. (Ref Tooley M&B)

John Cary (1745 - 1835) many regard Cary as one of the finest English cartographers of his time. His maps are not as decorative in the 17th century sense, but he came to on the scene at a time when the large-scale English county maps had recently become available. His fine craftsmanship and ability as an engraver enabled him to produce not only fine English county maps but also world atlases, road maps, town and canal plans sea charts and terrestrial and celestial globes.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original 
Colors used: - Green, yellow, pink
General color appearance: - Authentic 
Paper size: - 26in x 21 1/2in (660mm x 550mm)
Plate size: - 24in x 20 1/2in (610mm x 520mm) 
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$625.00 USD
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1772 Gibson & Sayer Large Antique Map of America - The French Indian War

1772 Gibson & Sayer Large Antique Map of America - The French Indian War

  • Title : A New Map of the Whole Continent of America. Divided Into North and South and West Indies, with a Descriptive Account of the European Possessions, as Settled by the Definitive Treaty of Peace Conducted at Paris Feby 10th 1763...Compiled from Mr D Anville...1772
  • Ref #:  92637
  • Size: 47 1/2in x 42 1/2in (1.20m x 1.08m)
  • Date : 1772
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This rare, very large, hand coloured, original antique map of North & South America - resulting from the outcome of the French & Indian War in North America & the Paris Treaty of 1763 - by John Gibson, was published by Robert Sayer London, in 1772.
Superbly detailed, impressive in size and beauty of design, with geographical detail based on the American maps by the famous French cartographer Jean Baptiste Bourguignon D'Anville, along with recent Spanish explorations in northern California.
The first edition (1763) and second edition (1772) of this map are extremely scarce and hard to find as many of these were working maps and would have been put to use by both the Military and Government. Other editions with revisions were published in 1777, 1783, 1786 & 1794 which emphasised the post revolutionary break up of North America, without the L&R text boxes. 
The Treaty of Paris was signed between Britain, France, and Spain, reshaping the map of North America and ending the colonial phase of the Seven Years' War. France, defeated in the New World and frustrated in its war against Prussia, lost all claims to Canada and gave Louisiana to Spain, while Britain received Spanish Florida, Upper Canada, and various French holdings overseas. France's adventure in India also came to an end, ensuring the colonial supremacy of Britain in coming decades. Five days after the Treaty of Paris, the Treaty of Hubertusburg was signed, acknowledging Prussia's right to the Polish province of Silesia, a claim that seven years earlier had started the war. 

Background: This is John Gibson's celebrated map of the New World, showing the European Possessions and the recently recognized boundaries of North & South as decreed by the 1763 Treaty of Paris. The text box on the left side of the map outlines some of the articles of the Paris Treaty of 1763. The text box on the right hand side shows the possessions of each European Power in North & South America. 
The map is one of the earliest obtainable English language wall maps of  Continental America.  It was periodically updated during the later part of the 18th Century, first to include the information and boundaries established at the conclusion of the French and Indian War in 1763, and later, after the American Revolution and the establishment of the United States.
The map provides a stark contrast between the known and unknown regions, with the eastern parts of North America quite well understood, whereas the mythical River of the West is still shown, seeking a continuous water course from the Atlantic to the Pacific.
The map also includes an excellent treatment of South America at the end of the Spanish Colonial empire, based in part on the recently published Cruz Cano y Olmedilla map of South America (Mapa Geográfico De America Meridional . . .).
Although the United States extends to the Mississippi, the province of Quebec appears to encroach on U.S. territory around the Great Lakes. Details of north-western North America are just beginning to emerge. The map shows a peninsular California, a Chinese colony ("Fou Sang") in British Columbia, and two possible locations for a "River of the West" (one with its source at Pike's lake; the other, further north at Lake Winnipeg).
The South America sheet includes an inset map of northern North America to Baffin's Bay, showing Greenland as part of the North American mainland.
The beautiful title cartouche is a baroque fantasy with New World flora, both temperate and tropical, beaver, alligator, and an Indian chieftain's headdress. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original & later  
Colors used: - Yellow, green, red  
General color appearance: - Authentic   
Paper size: - 47 1/2in x 42 1/2in (1.20m x 1.08m)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Folds & joins as issued
Verso: - Light age toning

$4,250.00 USD
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1755 D Anville Large Old, Antique Map of North America, Great Lakes, Indian Wars

1755 D Anville Large Old, Antique Map of North America, Great Lakes, Indian Wars

  • Title : Canada Louisiane et Terres Anglois Par Le Sr. D Anville...MDCCLV
  • Ref #:  61106
  • Size: 46 1/2in x 35 3/4in (1.17m x 910mm)
  • Date : 1755
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This magnificent, scarce, very large (48in x 35in) & highly detail map of North America was engraved in 1755 - dated in the title cartouche - by George De La Haye and was published by Jean Baptiste Bourguignon D'Anville in his large elephant folio atlas Atlas Generale.
Geopolitically this map is extremely significant drawn as war between the Global Powers of the day, France, England & Spain, was breaking, known in Europe as the Seven Year War known in North America as the French & Indian war. (Please see below for more detail)


This map rivals John Mitchells "A Map of the British and French Dominions in North America published in 1755" - considered to be one of the most significant maps of North America published in the 18th & 19th centuries (a 1st edition of Mitchells map is currently for sale for $165,000).
I have included an image of the Mitchell map for comparison. The D' Anville map is considered by many to be cartographically superior to the Mitchell map, at a fraction of the price.

Background: This extraordinary map of the eastern half of North America extends from Newfoundland, Canada to St. Augustine, Florida, stretching westward beyond the Mississippi as far as modern day Texas. The map includes both the original colonial colonies along the Atlantic seaboard from Maine to Georgia and the French claims in Louisiana (the Mississippi Valley) and modern day Canada. Florida is acknowledged as a Spanish enclave. Elevation is rendered in profile with fortifications, towns, and American Indian villages identified. A large inset map centres on the course of the St. Lawrence River from the Isle Aux Coudres to Lake Ontario.
The is a very significant map, drawn from a definitive French perspective, defining the territorial alignments and claims within North America shortly following the outbreak of the French and Indian War, considered to be a New World reflection of the European Seven Years War. It is however notable that it began before the larger hostilities in Europe and most of the major battles involved primarily parties only loosely aligned with the French or English - most specifically American Indians and lawless frontiersman, who had their own political agenda.
The war began with French incursions into western Pennsylvania and other territories claimed simultaneously by the French, English and American Indian forces. Just prior to the war, the French, in the interest of broadening their hold on the lucrative fur trade, established a series of forts, all of which are here noted, along the length of the Mississippi and further east, including Fort Duquesne (here Fort de Quene, Pittsburgh), Fort de la Presquisle, and for Le Beouf (here, Fort de la Riv Jaus Beufs).
The map also recognizes British claims, only inland as far as the Appalachian Mountains, beyond which place names take on a noticeably French character. These last three forts occupied particularly contested territory under the control of the powerful British allied Iroquois League. The most contested of these was Fort Duquesne (modern day Pittsburgh) in direct opposition to another fort then being constructed by the Ohio Company, a trading and land speculation firm established by prominent Virginia colonials, including George Washington. The Virginian colonial governor responded to Duquesne by sending then Lieutenant George Washington and a band of Virginia militiamen to harass the French. The resulting Jumonville Affair, in which Washington oversaw an attack on a French Canadian diplomatic forces led by Joseph Coulon de Villiers de Jumonville, to warn the Ohio Company fort builders away from French claimed territory. The slaying of Jumonville and several other French diplomats prompted a response from French forces at Fort Duquesne, leading to Washington's retreat and construction of Fort Necessity, really little more than a palisaded shack, marked here just south of Fort Duquesne. These events, all of which occurred in May of 1754, were said to have increased hostilities in Europe and led to the start of the Seven Year War in 1755.
Beyond the political agenda of this map, is the map itself, being one of the finest and most heavily detailed maps of North America published in the mid 18th century. Ranking alongside the large 1755 Mitchell map in detail but judged by many as cartographically superior. Drawing on both French and British cartographical detail, D' Anville identifies countless American Indian tribes, many of which, like the Sioux and Missouri, the British had only vague knowledge. Moreover, he also includes detail such as swamps, rapids, fords, abandoned villages, and even the ancient remnants of mound builder culture in the Ohio Valley. D' Anville notably does not include Mitchell's fictional Lake Superior islands.
This map was originally published to accompany the pamphlet entitledMemoire sur la carte intitulee: Canada, Louisiane, & Terres angloises and was also published in four parts for D' Anville's Atlas General.

These large maps are hard to find in such good condition and make fantastic historical reference tools due to the size and high level of detail as with all D' Anvilles work. (Ref: Tooley, M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: -  Original & late
Colors used: -  Yellow, green, pink
General color appearance: -  Authentic
Paper size: - 46 1/2in x 35 3/4in (1.17m x 910mm)
Plate size: - 45in x 35in (1.12m x 890mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Light soiling & ceasing along folds
Verso: - Light soiling

$4,750.00 USD
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1757 Bellin Antique Map & View of the City of Salvador, Brazil

1757 Bellin Antique Map & View of the City of Salvador, Brazil

  • Title : Plan De La Ville de De St Salvador Capitale du Bresil
  • Ref #:  61100
  • Size: 14in x 10in (355mm x 255mm)
  • Date : 1757
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This beautifully hand coloured original antique map* and view of the Brazilian City of Salvador - with building index - by Jacques Nicolas Bellin was published in the 1757 French & Dutch edition of Antoine-François Prevosts 20 volume L`Histoire Generale des Voyages published by Pierre de Hondt in the Hague between 1747 & 1785.

Background: Salvador, also known as São Salvador, Salvador de Bahia, and Salvador da Bahia (Brazilian Portugueseis the capital of the Brazilian state of Bahia. With 2.9 million people (2013), it is the largest city proper in the Northeast Region and the 3rd-largest city proper in the country, after São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro.
Salvador lies on a small, roughly triangular peninsula that separates the Bay of All Saints from the Atlantic Ocean. The bay is the largest in Brazil and the 2nd-largest in the world. It was first reached by Gaspar de Lemos in 1501, just one year after Cabral's purported discovery of Brazil. During his second voyage for Portugal, the  Italian  explorer Amerigo Vespucci sighted the bay on All Saints' Day (November 1) 1502 and, in honor of the date and his parish church in Florence, he named it the Bay of the Holy Savior of All the Saints. The first European to settle nearby was Diogo Álvares Correia  ("Caramuru"), who was shipwrecked off the end of the peninsula in 1509. He lived among the Tupinambá, marrying Guaibimpara and others. In 1531, Martim Afonso de Sousa led an expedition from Mount St Paul (Morro de São Paulo) and, in 1534,Francisco Pereira Coutinho, the first captain of Bahia, established the settlement of Pereira in modern Salvador's Ladeira da Barra neighborhood. Mistreatment of the Tupinambá by the settlers caused them to turn hostile and the Portuguese were forced to flee to Porto Seguro c. 1546. An attempted restoration of the colony the next year ended in shipwreck and cannibalism.
The present city was established as the fortress of Sao Salvador da Bahia de Todos os Santos ("Holy Savior of the Bay of All Saints") in 1549 by Portuguese settlers  under Tomé de Sousa, Brazil's first governor-general. It is one of the oldest cities founded by Europeans in the Americas. From a cliff overlooking the Bay of All Saints, it served as Brazil's first capital and quickly became a major port for its slave trade  and sugarcane industry. Salvador was long divided into an upper and a lower city, divided by a sharp escarpment some 85 meters (279 ft) high. The upper city formed the administrative, religious, and primary residential districts while the lower city was the commercial center, with a port and market.
In the Catholic Church, Brazil and the rest of the Portuguese Empire were initially administered as part of the Diocese of Funchal in Portugal but, in 1551, Salvador became the seat of the first Catholic diocese erected in Brazil. The first parish church was the mud-and-thatch Church of Our Lady of Help (Igreja da Nossa Senhora da Ajuda) erected by the Jesuits, which served as the first cathedral of the diocese until the Jesuits finished construction of the original basilica on the Terreiro de Jesus in 1553. Its bishop was made independent of Lisbon at the request of King Pedro II in 1676; he served as the primate of Congo and Angola until the elevation of Luanda on 13 January 1844 and still serves as the national primate of Brazil.
In 1572, the Governorate of Brazil was divided into the separate governorates of Bahia in the north and Rio de Janeiro in the south. These were reunited as Brazil six years later, then redivided from 1607 to 1613. By that time, Portugal had become united with Spain and was ruled from Madrid by its kings. In 1621, King Philip III  replaced the Governorate of Brazil with the states of Brazil, still based in Salvador and now controlling the south, and the Maranhão, which was centered on São Luís and controlled what is now northern Brazil. As Spain was then prosecuting a war against the independence of the Dutch, the Dutch East and West India companies tried to conquer Brazil from them. Salvador played a strategically vital role against Dutch Brazil, but was captured and sacked by a West India Company fleet under Jacob Willekens and Piet Hein on 10 May 1624. Johan van Dorth administered the colony before his assassination, freeing its slaves. The city was recaptured by a Luso-Spanish fleet under Fadrique Álvarez de Toledo y Mendoza on 1 May 1625. John Maurice's two subsequent attempts to retake the town in April and May of 1638 were unsuccessful.
In 1763, the colonial administration was removed to Rio de Janeiro and elevated to a viceroyalty. Salvador remained the heart of the Recôncavo, Bahia's rich agricultural maritime district, but was largely outside Brazil's early modernization. The area formed a center of royal support against Pedro I's declaration of independence on September 7, 1822. Its elites initially remained loyal to the Portuguese crown while rebels from Cachoeira besieged them for a year until finally receiving Portugal's surrender of the town on July 2, 1823, which is now celebrated as Bahia Independence Day. The local elite was similarly hesitant during Manuel Deodoro da Fonseca's coup that established the republic by in 1889.
Owing to whales' use of the Bay of All Saints as a mating ground, Salvador became a large whaling port during the 19th century but the trade had already begun to fall off by the 1870s.
Under the empire and republic, however, the town slowly began to industrialize. In 1873, Brazil's first elevator, the powerful hydraulic Elevador Lacerda, was constructed to connect the city's upper and lower towns. Having undergone several upgrades, it continues in use. By the First World War, it was joined by a second elevato and Salvador was connected to four railroads: the Bahia & Alagoinhas to Joazeiro, the Bahia Central, the Nazareth Tramway, and a short line to Santo Amaro. Its central districts and the major suburbs of Bomsim and Victoria were served by four streetcar lines, which had begun to electrify. It also served as a port of call for most steamship lines trading between Europe and South America. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Yellow, green, red, brown.
General color appearance: - Authentic and fresh
Paper size: - 14in x 10in (355mm x 255mm)
Plate size: - 12in x 8in (305mm x 205mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Folds as issued
Verso: - None

$175.00 USD
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1757 Bellin Antique Map - Plan of The City of New Orleans, Louisiana, USA

1757 Bellin Antique Map - Plan of The City of New Orleans, Louisiana, USA

Description: 
This beautifully hand coloured original antique map* a scarce, early plan of the city of New Orleans, Louisiana by Jacques Nicolas Bellin was published in the 1757 French edition of Antoine-François Prevosts 20 volume L`Histoire Generale des Voyages published by Pierre de Hondt in the Hague between 1747 & 1785.

Background: This scarce 1757 map by Bellin is one of the earliest obtainable maps of New Orleans. Oriented to the east, Bellin's map covers the original settlement of New Orleans along the Mississippi River and inland as far theFosse plein d'eau (roughly translated: 'Pit full of Water') near modern day Dauphine Street, and from modern day Iberville Street (shown but not named) to modern day Barracks Street (shown but not named). The map shows some 100 buildings with some 18 specifically identified via an alphabetically coded table set just above the map.
Among the locations noted in the key is one that provides an eerie echo of the slave trade. Item Q is identified as Cabanes des Negroes qui prennent soin Moulin or 'Cabins of Negros that care for mill.' Note how these cabins, as well as the adjacent mill, are both well outside the ordered structure of the city as well as conveniently located near the Corps de Garde des Bourgeois

Antoine François Prévost d'Exiles  1697 - 1763, usually known simply as the Abbé Prévost, was a French author and novelist. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, green, red, brown.
General color appearance: - Authentic and fresh
Paper size: - 14 1/2in x 10in (360mm x 255mm)
Plate size: - 11in x 8in (280mm x 205mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Folds as issued, printers crease along left fold
Verso: - None

$475.00 USD
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1757 Bellin Antique Map Great lakes of United States & Canada, French Indian War

1757 Bellin Antique Map Great lakes of United States & Canada, French Indian War

Description: 
This beautifully hand coloured originalantique map* of The Great Lakes of Canada and the US by Jacques Nicolas Bellin, was engraved in 1757 - the date is engraved in the title cartouche - and was published in the 1757 French edition of Antoine-François Prevosts 20 volume L`Histoire Generale des Voyages published by Pierre de Hondt in the Hague between 1747 & 1785.

Background: Very attractive French & Indian War period map of the Great Lakes drawn under the direction of Jacques Nicolas Bellin (1703-1772) the Royal Hydrographer to the King & Director of the Dept. de La Marine in Paris. Bellin's first map of the Lakes was drawn in 1744 from sketches by P. F. X. De Charlevoix (1682-1761), a French Jesuit Missionary who traveled on foot & canoe extensively throughout the area. Since then a number of updated editions were published but the three apocryphal islands in Lake Superior - Isle St. Anne, Isle Ponchartrain & Isle Maurepas drawn in the Lake by de Charlevoix had not yet been eliminated from the map, which includes the River & Settlement at Chicagou on Lake Michigan's southwest shore, & Le Detroit on the Detroit River where it flows into Lake Erie. The Michigan peninsula is still misshapen with a massive mountain range down its center.Lac Alimipegon appears north of Lake Superior. Numerous forts are located:S. Ignace, Niagara, des Miamis, and Toronto to mention a few.

Antoine François Prévost d'Exiles  1697 - 1763, usually known simply as the Abbé Prévost, was a French author and novelist. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Yellow, green, red, brown.
General color appearance: - Authentic and fresh
Paper size: - 14in x 10in (355mm x 255mm)
Plate size: - 12in x 8 1/2in (305mm x 210mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Folds as issued
Verso: - None

$549.00 USD
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1757 Bellin Antique Map The Colonial United States, Louisiana, Texas, New Mexico

1757 Bellin Antique Map The Colonial United States, Louisiana, Texas, New Mexico

Description: 
This beautifully hand coloured original antique map of The Colonial United States, from the Great Lakes to Louisiana, Texas and New Mexico was engraved in 1757 - the date is engraved in the title cartouche - and was published in the 1757 French edition of Antoine-François Prevosts 20 volume L`Histoire Generale des Voyages published by Pierre de Hondt in the Hague between 1747 & 1785. 
Antoine François Prévost d'Exiles  1697 - 1763, usually known simply as the Abbé Prévost, was a French author and novelist. (Ref: Tooley; M&B) 

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Green, yellow, red
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 14in x 10in (365mm x 260mm)
Plate size: - 12 1/2in x 9 1/2in (320mm x 230mm)
Margins: - min. 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Folds as issued
Verso: - None

$575.00 USD
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1757 Bellin Antique Map of Georgia, Carolinas, Virginia United States of America

1757 Bellin Antique Map of Georgia, Carolinas, Virginia United States of America

Description: 
This beautifully hand coloured original antique map* of Georgia, North & South Carolina by Jacques Nicolas Bellin, was engraved in 1757 - the date is engraved in the title cartouche - and was published in the 1757 French edition of Antoine-François Prevosts 20 volume L`Histoire Generale des Voyages published by Pierre de Hondt in the Hague between 1747 & 1785.

Antoine François Prévost d'Exiles  1697 - 1763, usually known simply as the Abbé Prévost, was a French author and novelist. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Yellow, green, red, brown.
General color appearance: - Authentic and fresh
Paper size: - 14in x 10in (355mm x 255mm)
Plate size: - 12in x 8in (305mm x 205mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Folds as issued
Verso: - None

$375.00 USD
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1752 Bellin Antique Map of The Marianas Islands & the Island of Guam

1752 Bellin Antique Map of The Marianas Islands & the Island of Guam

  • Title : Carte De L Archipel de St Lazare ou les Isles Marianes...1752
  • Ref #:  61066
  • Size: 10in x 7 1/2in (255mm x 185mm)
  • Date : 1752
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This beautifully hand coloured originalantique map* of the Marianas Islands with a large inset map of Guam was engraved byJacques Nicolas Bellin in 1752 - the date is engraved in the title cartouche - for the 1756 French/Dutch edition of Antoine-François Prevosts L`Histoire Generale des Voyagespublished in 20 volumes by Pierre de Hondt in The Hague between 1747 & 1785.

The Mariana Islands (also the Marianas) are a crescent-shaped  archipelago comprising the summits of fifteen mostly dormant volcanic mountains in the western North Pacific Ocean, between the 12th and 21st parallels north and along the 145th meridian east. They lie south-southeast of Japan, west-southwest of Hawaii, north of New Guinea and east of the Philippines, demarcating the Philippine Sea's eastern limit. They are found in the northern part of the western Oceanic sub-region of Micronesia, and are politically divided into two jurisdictions of the United States: the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and, at the southern end of the chain, the territory of Guam.
The islands were named after Queen Mariana by Spaniards, who first arrived in the early 16th century and who eventually annexed and colonized the archipelago. The indigenous inhabitants are the Chamoru. Archaeologists in 2013 reported findings which indicated the people who first settled the Marianas arrived there after making what was at that time the longest uninterrupted ocean voyage in human history. They further reported findings which suggested that Tinian is likely to have been the first island in Oceania to have been settled by humans.

Antoine François Prévost d'Exiles  1697 - 1763, usually known simply as the Abbé Prévost, was a French author and novelist. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Yellow, green, red, brown.
General color appearance: - Authentic and fresh
Paper size: - 10in x 7 1/2in (255mm x 190mm)
Plate size: - 9 1/2n x 7in (240mm x 180mm)
Margins: - Min ½in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$99.00 USD
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1756 Schley & Prevost Antique Print View The City of Manila, Philippines - Rare

1756 Schley & Prevost Antique Print View The City of Manila, Philippines - Rare

Description: 
This beautifully hand coloured large, rare,original antique print a view of the Philippine city of Manila by Jakob van der Schley was published in the 1756 French & Dutch edition of Antoine-François Prevosts 20 volume edition of L`Histoire Generale des Voyages published by Pierre de Hondt in the Hague between 1747 & 1785. 
This print is in fantastic condition on clean heavy paper with a clear heavy plate-mark indicating an early pressing.
This is a scarce and rarely seen print that was only published in a limited numbers of Prevost's Voyages.

Jakob van der Schley aka Jakob van Schley (1715 - 1779) was a Dutch draughtsman and engraver. He studied under Bernard Picart (1673-1733) whose style he subsequently copied. His main interests were engraving portraits and producing illustrations for "La Vie de Marianne" by Pierre Carlet de Chamblain de Marivaux (1688-1763) published in The Hague between 1735 and 1747.
He also engraved the frontispieces for a 15-volume edition of the complete works of Pierre de Brantôme (1540-1614), "Oeuvres du seigneur de Brantôme", published in The Hague in 1740.
He is also responsible for most of the plates in the Hague edition of Prévost'sHistoire générale des voyages. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: -  Early
Colors used: -  Green, yellow, blue, orange
General color appearance: -  Authentic
Paper size: - 15in x 10in (380mm x 255mm)
Plate size: - 11 1/2in x 8in (295mm x 205mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (20mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Folds as issued
Verso: - None

$650.00 USD
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1854 (1813) Valentine, Grimm Large Old, Antique Map of New York City in 1742

1854 (1813) Valentine, Grimm Large Old, Antique Map of New York City in 1742

  • Title : A Plan of the City and Environs of New York as they were in the Years 1742 - 1743 and 1744. Drawn by D... G...in the 76th year of his age who had at this time a perfect & correct recollection of every part of the same
  • Ref #:  35102
  • Size: 23 1/2in x 18 1/2in (600mm x 470mm)
  • Date : 1854 (1813)
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This hand coloured original, antique highly detailed map* of New York City in the 1740's by David Grimm in 1813, was engraved by George Hayward in 1854 - dated in title - and was presented to the New York Historical Society edition of D. T. Valentine's Manual in 1854.

The map features a reference chart of governmental, religious and public buildings, as well as as rivers, farms and wells. Also includes ships sailing in the north and East river. The top of the map are illustrations of religious houses and building and at the bottom of the map is a illustration of Fort George.
Illustration of this map can be found at the New York City Library. 
http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/2af29660-0f61-0132-6b5f-58d385a7b928 (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original  
Colors used: - Yellow, red, green, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic  
Paper size: - 23 1/2in x 18 1/2in (600mm x 470mm)
Paper size: - 23 1/2in x 18 1/2in (600mm x 470mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - Light age toning, brown stain top left corner of map
Verso: - Light age toning

$520.00 USD
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1785 Cook & Benard Old, Antique Map 5 Views of Tongan Islands, South Pacific

1785 Cook & Benard Old, Antique Map 5 Views of Tongan Islands, South Pacific

  • Title : Isle de Sir Charles Saunder ; Isle Ofnabrug ; Isle Boscawen Isle de l'Admiral Keppel
  • Ref #:  21719
  • Size: 13 1/2in x 10 1/2in (345mm x 265mm)
  • Date : 1785
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This finely engraved original antique print depicting five topographical views - perspective from Cooks Ship The Endeavour - of five coastal profiles of islands in or around the Tonga Islands group.
The islands are in order of title;
1. Sir Charles Saunder - Maiao in the Windward Islands of the Society Islands.
2. Isle Ofnabrug - Mehetia in the Society Islands in the vicinity of Wallis Island.
3. Isle Boscawen - Niuatoputapu.
4. Isle de l'Admiral Keppel - Tafahi.
5. Wallis Island in the Wallis and Futuna Island group.
were engraved by Robert Benard (fl 1750-85) and was published in the 1785 French edition of Cooks Voyages of Discovery to the South Pacific.

Cook's First Voyage (1768-1771)
The first voyage under Captain James Cook's command was primarily of a scientific nature. The expedition on the Endeavour initially sailed to Tahiti to observe the transit of the planet Venus in order to calculate the earth's distance from the sun. Cook landed on the South Pacific island in April of 1769 and in June of that year the astronomical observations were successfully completed. In addition to these labors, very good relations with the Tahitians were maintained and the naturalists Joseph Banks and Daniel C. Solander conducted extensive ethnological and botanical research.
Another purpose of the voyage was to explore the South Seas to determine if an inhabitable continent existed in the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Upon leaving Tahiti, Cook named and charted the Society Islands and then continued southwest to New Zealand. His circumnavigation and exploration of that country also resulted in a detailed survey. Cook proceeded to Australia, where he charted the eastern coast for 2,000 miles, naming the area New South Wales. As a result of these surveys, both Australia and New Zealand were annexed by Great Britain. In addition to these explorations, the Endeavour returned to England without a single death from scurvy among its men, an historic feat at the time. The combination of these accomplishments brought Cook prominence, promotion, and the opportunity to lead further expeditions.

Cook's Second Voyage (1772-1775)
Based on the success of his first voyage, Cook was appointed by the Admiralty to lead a second expedition. Two ships were employed with Cook commanding the Resolution and Captain Tobias Furneaux in charge of theAdventure. The purpose was to circumnavigate the globe as far south as possible to confirm the location of a southern continent. Cook proved that there was no "Terra Australis," which supposedly was located between New Zealand and South America. Cook was convinced, however, that there was land beyond the southern ice fields. In his pursuit of this idea, this expedition was the first European voyage to cross the Antarctic Circle. In addition, in two great sweeps through the Southern latitudes, Cook made an incredible number of landfalls including New Zealand, Easter Island, the Marquesas, Tahiti and the Society Islands, the Tonga Islands, the New Hebrides, New Caledonia, and a number of smaller islands.
In addition to these navigational accomplishments and the accompanying expansion of geographical knowledge, the expedition also recorded a vast amount of information regarding the Pacific islands and peoples, proved the value of the chronometer as an instrument for calculating longitude, and improved techniques for preventing scurvy.

Cook's Third Voyage (1776-1779)
In the course of his first two voyages, Cook circumnavigated the globe twice, sailed extensively into the Antarctic, and charted coastlines from Newfoundland to New Zealand. Following these achievements, Cook's third voyage was organized to seek an efficient route from England to southern and eastern Asia that would not entail rounding the Cape of Good Hope. The search for such a Northwest (or Northeast) Passage had been on the agenda of northern European mariners and merchants since the beginning of European expansion in the late fifteenth century. England's growing economic and colonial interests in India in the later eighteenth century provided the stimulus for the latest exploration for this route. 
Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early 
Colors used: -  Green, yellow, red
General color appearance: -  Authentic
Paper size: - 13 1/2in x 10 1/2in (345mm x 265mm)
Plate size: - 10 1/2in x 8in (265mm x 205mm)
Margins: - 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$99.00 USD
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1719 Chatelain Large Old, Antique Map of Saudi Arabia, Egypt, The Horn of Africa

1719 Chatelain Large Old, Antique Map of Saudi Arabia, Egypt, The Horn of Africa

  • Title : Carte Particuliere De L Egypt De La Nubie et De Abyssinie 
  • Ref #:  50627
  • Size: 22in x 17 1/2in (560m x 445m)
  • Date : 1719
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This large beautifully hand coloured original antique map of Saudi Arabia, Egypt and The Horn of Africa was published by Henri Abraham Chatelain in 1719, in his famousAtlas Historique.

Henri Abraham Chatelain (1684 - 1743)
was a Huguenot pastor of Parisian origins. He lived consecutively in Paris, St. Martins, London (c. 1710), the Hague (c. 1721) and Amsterdam (c. 1728).
Chatelain was a skilled artist and knew combining a wealth of historical and geographical information with delicate engraving and an uncomplicated composition. Groundbreaking for its time, this work included studies of geography, history, ethnology, heraldry, and cosmography. His maps with his elegant engraving are a superb example from the golden age of French mapmaking.The publishing firm of Chatelain, Chatelain Frères and Chatelain & Fils is recorded in Amsterdam, from around 1700-1770, with Zacharias living "op den Dam" in 1730.
Henri Abraham Chatelain, his father Zacharie Chatelain (d.1723) and Zacharie Junior (1690-1754), worked as a partnership publishing the Atlas Historique, Ou Nouvelle Introduction à L'Histoire under several different Chatelain imprints, depending on the Chatelain family partnerships at the time of publication. The atlas was published in seven volumes between 1705 and 1720, with a second edition appearing in 1732. The volumes I-IV with a Third edition and volume I with a final edition in 1739.
Henri Abraham Chatelain, whose "Atlas Historique" was one of the most expansive Dutch encyclopedias of the age. First published in 1705, Chatelain's Atlas Historique was part of an immense seven-volume encyclopedia. Although the main focus of the text was geography, the work also included a wealth of historical, political, and genealogical information. The text was compiled by Nicholas Gueudeville and Garillon with a supplement by H.P. de Limiers and the maps were engraved by Chatelain, primarily after charts by De L'Isle. The atlas was published in Amsterdam between 1705 and 1721 and was later reissued by Zacharie Chatelain between 1732 and 1739.

Atlas Historique: First published in Amsterdam from 1705 to 1720, the various volumes were updated at various times up to 1739 when the fourth edition of vol.I appeared, stated as the "dernière edition, corrigée & augmentée."
The first four volumes seem to have undergone four printings with the later printings being the most desirable as they contain the maximum number of corrections and additions. The remaining three final volumes were first issued between 1719-1720 and revised in 1732.
An ambitious and beautifully-presented work, the Atlas Historique was intended for the general public, fascinated in the early eighteenth century by the recently conquered colonies and the new discoveries. Distant countries, such as the Americas, Africa, the Middle East, Mongolia, China, Japan, Indonesia, etc., take an important place in this work.
In addition to the maps, many of which are based on Guillaume De L'Isle, the plates are after the best travel accounts of the period, such as those of Dapper, Chardin, de Bruyn, Le Hay and other.
Other sections deal with the history of the european countries, and covers a wide range of subjects including genealogy, history, cosmography, topography, heraldry and chronology, costume of the world, all illustrated with numerous engraved maps, plates of local inhabitants and heraldic charts of the lineages of the ruling families of the time. The maps, prints and tables required to make up a complete set are listed in detail in each volume.
The accompanying text is in French and often is printed in two columns on the page with maps and other illustrations interspersed. Each map and table is numbered consecutively within its volume and all maps bear the privileges of the States of Holland and West-Friesland.
The encyclopaedic nature of the work as a whole is reflected in this six frontispiece. The pages are the work of the celerated mr. Romeijn de Hooghe. and are engraved by J.Goeree, T.Schynyoet and P.Sluyter.
New scholarship has suggested the compiler of the atlas, who is identified on the title as "Mr. C***" not to be Henri Abraham Châtelain, but Zacharie Châtelain. (See Van Waning's article in the Journal of the International Map Collectors' Society for persuasive evidence of the latter's authorship.) (Ref: M&B; Tooley)   

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Later
Colors used: - Pink, green, yellow, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic 
Paper size: - 22in x 17 1/2in (560m x 445m)
Plate size: - 21 1/2in x 16in (545m x 405mm)
Margins: - min. 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$325.00 USD
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1636 Mercator Hondius Large Old, Antique Map Zurich & Basel Cantons, Switzerland

1636 Mercator Hondius Large Old, Antique Map Zurich & Basel Cantons, Switzerland

Description: 
This beautifully hand coloured original antique map* of the northern Cantons of Zurich & Basel, Switzerland was published in the rare 1636 English edition of Mercator's Atlas, by Henricus Hondius and Jan Jansson.
The map encompasses an area along the Rhine River north from Basel, south to Zurich & Lake Zurich, east into western Austria and as far west to the city of Solothurn. 
As there were so few of these atlases published with English text on the verso,  maps from them are now understandably scarce.

The text running for two pages on the verso of this map describes the region or country name, history (as it was), temperature, seasons, soil and agricultural productivity. Also described is the topography, wildlife, local inhabitants their culture and religion, as well as a description of major European and local towns and cities. This text makes extremely enjoyable reading and a very good insight not only into the area described but the general European attitudes towards alien countries and cultures.

Jodocus Hondius (1563 - 1612), one of the most notable engravers of his time, is known for his work in association with many of the cartographers and publishers prominent at the end of the sixteenth and the beginning of the seventeenth century. 
In 1604 Hondius bought the plates of Mercator's Atlas which, in spite of its excellence, had not competed successfully with the continuing demand of Abraham Ortelius's Theatrum Orbis Terrarum. 
To meet this competition Hondius added about 40 maps to Mercator's original number and from 1606 published enlarged editions in many languages, still under Mercator's name but with his own name as publisher. These atlases have become known as the Mercator/Hondius series. The following year the maps were re-engraved in miniature form and issued as a pocket Atlas Minor. 
After the death of Jodocus Hondius the Elder in 1612, work on the two atlases, folio and miniature, was carried on by his widow and sons, Jodocus II and Henricus, and eventually in conjunction with Jan Jansson in Amsterdam. In all, from 1606 onwards, nearly 50 editions with increasing numbers of maps with texts in the main European languages were printed. (Ref: Koeman; M&B; Tooley)

Condition Report:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, pink, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 22in x 18 1/2in (560mm x 470mm)
Plate size: - 18 1/2in x 14in (470mm x 355mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Uniform age toning
Plate area: - Uniform age toning, light uplift along centerfold
Verso: - Bottom centerfold re-joined, no loss

$225.00 USD
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1646 Hondius Old, Antique Map of Henneberg, Thuringia Region Germany - Meiningen

1646 Hondius Old, Antique Map of Henneberg, Thuringia Region Germany - Meiningen

Description:
This beautifully hand coloured original antique  map of the Henneberg county in the Thuringia region of Southern Germany - centering on the cities of Henneberg and Meiningen was published in the 1646 Latin edition of Mercators Atlas by Jan Jansson and Henricus Hondius. (Ref: Koeman; Tooley; M&B)

Condition Report:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Green, red, orange, yellow, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic and beautiful
Paper size: - 22in x 19in (560mm x 480mm)
Plate size: - 19 1/2in x 15in (495mm x 380mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - Light age toning
Verso: - Light age toning

$175.00 USD
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1639 Hondius Old, Antique Map of Henneberg, Thuringia Region Germany - Meiningen

1639 Hondius Old, Antique Map of Henneberg, Thuringia Region Germany - Meiningen

Description:
This beautifully hand coloured original antique  map of the Henneberg county in the Thuringia region of Southern Germany - centering on the cities of Henneberg andMeiningen was published in the 1639 French edition of  Mercators Atlas published by Henricus Hondius and Jan Jansson. (Ref: Koeman; Tooley; M&B)

Condition Report:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early 
Colors used: - Yellow, pink, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 23in x 19in (585mm x 485mm)
Plate size: - 19 1/2in x 15in (495mm x 380mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$175.00 USD
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1755 Bellin & Homann Large Old, Antique Map of Canada & New England

1755 Bellin & Homann Large Old, Antique Map of Canada & New England

  • Title : Partie Orientale de la Nouvelle France ou du Canada - 1755
  • Ref #:  50678
  • Size: 24in x 21in (610mm x 535mm)
  • Date : 1755
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This large beautifully hand coloured original antique map of Eastern Canada & New England to Cape Cod was engraved in 1755 by Jacques Nicolas Bellin  - the date is engraved in the title cartouche - and published by the re-known German publishers Homann Heirs.

Background: This is Bellin's definitive map of eastern Canada and New England showing the mouth of the St. Lawrence, the length of the river, the Maritime provinces and French claims in the region. There are some very interesting details of the coastal towns, showing Havre de Baston for Boston Harbor, up the coast to Portsmouth in New Hampshire, Wells, York and Cape Elizabeth in Maine. There is considerable information shown on the extent of French exploration in the region. Large decorative cartouche incorporates two distance scales. This example is from the second plate with the imprint "A Paris chez R.J. Julien a l'Hotel…" removed, the date changed and various geographical improvements. Blank verso. This large format Bellin map was published in several atlases by Homann. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
 Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
 Paper color: - Blue
 Age of map color: - Early
 Colors used: - Yellow, green pink, blue 
 General color appearance: - Authentic
 Paper size: - 24in x 21in (610mm x 535mm)
 Plate size: - 22in x 18in (560mm x 460mm)
 Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)
 
 Imperfections:
 Margins: - None
 Plate area: - Old red ink penned in several places on map
 Verso: - Bottom centerfold re-joined, no loss

$750.00 USD
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1630 Jodocus Hondius Antique Map of America

1630 Jodocus Hondius Antique Map of America

Description:
This magnificent and extremely important, hand coloured original antique map of America was drawn and engraved by Jodocus Hondius for inclusion in his editions of Gerard Mercator's Atlas sive Cosmographicae between 1606 and 1630. This actual map is from the last 1630 Latin edition, identified by the text line Mmmmmmmm on the verso of the map.

This map like many of the time was published on a stereographic projection and is an amalgam of various sources. It incorporates a more correct west coast of South America and narrows still further the longitudinal width of New Spain at the Tropic of Cancer, making it just 10°, much closer in reality. However, like all cartography before, it still retains an enlarged North American continent.
A Plancius type depiction of Newfoundland occurs alongside a typical representation of the east coast, with a more protruding Virginia than usual. Various scenes taken from earlier volumes of de Bry's Grand Voyages adorn the whole. Particularly notable is the native Brazilian scene illustrating the method used to make the local beverage, derived from Hans Stadens voyage as recorded by de Bry. 
There are various galleons, kayaks and Indian canoes along with a pair of birds perched on the inset.

Background: This map was engraved by Jodocus Hondius for his first edition of Gerard Mercator's atlas. Intended to be a grand comprehensive work, with the first part originally appearing in 1585, by Mercator's death in 1594 only two parts had been published. Continued by his family, it was still incomplete for the 1602 edition, lacking most importantly a section on the Iberian peninsula. During this time it was also competing with the remarkably successful atlas of Abraham Ortelius which averaged almost one edition per year. By 1604 Jodocus Hondius was flourishing, and in that year acquired all of the plates from Mercator's descendant. He immediately set about engraving many new maps to augment and complete the work, amongst which was a set of the four continents. He also had the original text expanded by Petrus Montanus. In the following year he brought out Mercator's Ptolemy, and in 1606 his first edition of the general atlas which proved instantly popular, selling out within a year. 
Right up until 1630 this attractive map was issued alongside the AMERICA sive INDIA NOVA by Michael Mercator, 1595. Since the text describing America was always used by the Mercator, this one is always lacking one. Produced on a stereographic projection like more and more maps of the time, it is an amalgam of various sources. (Ref: Burden; Koeman; M&B; Tooley)

Condition Report
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original & later
Colors used: - Red, yellow, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 22 1/4in x 18 1/4in (565mm x 465mm)
Plate size: - 19 3/4in x 14 3/4in (500mm x 375mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Professional repair to bottom center-fold and bottom left margin 1 1/2in into image, no loss
Plate area: - None
Verso: - Light age toning

$8,500.00 USD
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1719 Chatelain View of Cape Town, Table Top Mountain South Africa

1719 Chatelain View of Cape Town, Table Top Mountain South Africa

  • Title : Vue et Description Du Cap De Bonne Esperance
  • Ref  :  50640
  • Size: 17 1/2in x 10 1/2in (440mm x 265mm)
  • Date : 1719
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
An exceptional hand coloured original antique page of Abraham Chatelain's 1719 striking view of the Cape of Good Hope, with Dutch ships in the harbour and Table Mountain in the background.  
Separating the two views is an engraved descriptive text which refers mainly to the Company’s gardens, ‘the most beautiful and curious to be seen in a country that is sterile and frightful.’
The lower engraving shows the Dutch fort at the Cape and an observatory established by the Frenchman Tachard and the Jesuit Fathers to observe the southern skies.

Background:
The first Europeans to discover the Cape were the Portuguese, with Bartholomeu Dias arriving in 1488 after journeying south along the west coast of Africa. The next recorded European sighting of the Cape was by Vasco da Gama in 1497 while he was searching for a route that would lead directly from Europe to Asia. Table Mountain was given its name in 1503 by António de Saldanha, a Portuguese admiral and explorer. He called it Taboa da caba ("table of the cape"). The name given to the mountain by the Khoi inhabitants was Hoeri 'kwaggo ("sea mountain")
The area fell out of regular contact with Europeans until 1652, when Jan van Riebeeck and other employees of the Dutch East India Company (Dutch: Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie, or simply VOC) were sent to the Cape to establish a halfway station to provide fresh water, vegetables, and meat for passing ships travelling to and from Asia. Van Riebeeck's party of three vessels landed at the cape on 6 April 1652. The group quickly erected shelters and laid out vegetable gardens and orchards, and are preserved in the Company Gardens. Water from the Fresh River, which descended from Table Mountain, was channelled into canals to provide irrigation. The settlers bartered with the native Khoisan for their sheep and cattle. Forests in Hout Bay and the southern and eastern flanks of Table Mountain provided timber for ships and houses. At this point, the VOC had a monopoly on trade and prohibited any private trade. The Dutch gave their own names to the native inhabitants that they encountered, calling the pastoralists "Hottentots," those that lived on the coast and subsisted on shellfishing," and those who were hunter-gatherers were named "Bushmen."
The first wave of Asian immigration to South Africa started in 1654. These first immigrants were banished to the Cape by the Dutch Batavian High Court. These Asians helped to form the foundation of the Cape Coloured and Cape Malay populations, as well as bringing Islam to the Cape. The first large territorial expansion occurred in 1657, when farms were granted by the VOC to a few servants in an attempt to increase food production. These farms were situated along the Liesbeeck River and the VOC still retained financial control of them. The first slaves were brought to the Cape from Java and Madagascar in the following year to work on the farms. The first of a long series of border conflicts between the inhabitants in the European-controlled area and native inhabitants began in 1658 when settlers clashed with the Khoi, who realised that they were losing territory.
Work on the Castle of Good Hope, the first permanent European fortification in the area, began in 1666. The new castle replaced the previous wooden fort that Van Riebeeck and his men built. Finally completed in 1679, the castle is the oldest building in South Africa.
Simon van der Stel, after whom the town of Stellenbosch is named, arrived in 1679 to replace Van Riebeeck as governor. Van der Stel founded the Cape wine industry by bringing grape vines with him on his ship, an industry which would quickly grow to be important for the region. He also promoted territorial expansion in the Colony.
The first non-Dutch immigrants to the Cape, the Huguenots, arrived in 1688. The Huguenots had fled from anti-Protestant persecution in Catholic France to the Netherlands, where the VOC offered them free passage to the Cape as well as farmland. The Huguenots brought important experience in wine production to the Cape, greatly bolstering the industry, as well as providing strong cultural roots.
By 1754, the population of the settlement on the Cape had reached 5,510 Europeans and 6,729 slaves. But by 1780, France and Great Britain went to war against each other. The Netherlands entered the war on the French side, and thus a small garrison of French troops were sent to the Cape to protect it against the British. These troops, however, left by 1784. By 1795, however, the Netherlands was invaded by France and the VOC was in complete financial ruin. The Prince of Orange fled to England for protection, which allowed for the establishment of the Dutch Batavian Republic. Due to the long time it took to send and receive news from Europe, the Cape Commissioner of the time knew only that the French had been taking territory in the Netherlands and that the Dutch could change sides in the war at any moment. British forces arrived at the Cape bearing a letter from the Prince of Orange asking the Commissioner to allow the British troops to protect the Cape from France until the war. The British informed the Commissioner that the Prince had fled to England. The reaction in the Cape Council was mixed, and eventually the British successfully invaded the Cape in the Battle of Muizenberg. The British immediately announced the beginning of free trade.
As elsewhere in Africa and other parts of the world, trading in slaves was a significant activity. A notable event was the mutiny, in 1766, of the slaves on the slaver ship Meermin. 

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Later
Colors used: - Pink, green, yellow, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic 
Paper size: - 17 1/2in x 10 1/2in (440mm x 265mm)
Margins: - min. 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$175.00 USD
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1628 Seb. Munster Antique Map of Swabia, Bavaria, Germany - Danube, Nordlingen

1628 Seb. Munster Antique Map of Swabia, Bavaria, Germany - Danube, Nordlingen

Description:
This finely engraved hand coloured original antique map of part of German Swaben in Southern Bavaria - centering on the city of Nordlingen stretching to the Danube River - was published in the 1628 last release of Sebastian Munsters Cosmographia published by Sebastian Petri, Basle.

Background:
Swabia - Schwabenland -  is a cultural, historic and linguistic region in south-western Germany. The name is ultimately derived from the medieval Duchy of Swabia, one of the German stem duchies, representing the territory of Alemannia, whose inhabitants interchangeably were called Alemanni or Suebi.
This territory would include all of the Alemannic German area, but the modern concept of Swabia is more restricted, due to the collapse of the duchy of Swabia in the thirteenth century. Swabia as understood in modern ethnography roughly coincides with the Swabian Circle of the Holy Roman Empire as it stood during the Early Modern period, now divided between the states of Bavaria and Baden-Württemberg.
Nördlingen is a town in the Donau-Ries district, in Swabia, Bavaria, Germany, It was first mentioned in recorded history in 898, and in 1998 the town celebrated its 1100th anniversary. The town was the location of two battles during the Thirty Years' War, which took place between 1618–1648.
The remains of a Roman castellum, built in the 85AD and probably called Septemiacum, have been found under the city.  In 1998, Nördlingen celebrated its 1100-year-old history.
Nördlingen was one of Germany's major trading towns, until its importance declined with the battles of the Thirty Years' War. In 1215 Emperor Frederick II declared Nördlingen aFree Imp erial City, and it remained so until 1802 when it changed to become part of present-day Bavaria. The Nördlingen trade fair (Pfingstmesse) was first mentioned in 1219.
A well-documented legal case of 1471 involved the prostitute Els von Eystett who worked in Nördlingen's Frauenhaus, an officially sanctioned municipal brothel.
Nördlingen was one of the first Protestant cities and took part in the Protestation at Speyer in 1529.

Sebastian Petri re-release of Cosomgraphia in 1588 produced some fine woodcut maps in the "copperplate style". The maps in this release were more sophisticated than with earlier publications of Cosomgraphia and were based on the 1570 release of Abraham Ortelius monumental work Theatrum Orbis Terrarum.
For a variety of reasons town plans were comparatively latecomers in the long history of cartography. Few cities in Europe in the middle ages had more than 20,00 inhabitants and even London in the late Elizabethan period had only 100-150,000 people which in itself was probably 10 times that of any other English city. The Nuremberg Chronicle in 1493 included one of the first town views of Jerusalem, thereafter, for most of the sixteenth century, German cartographers led the way in producing town plans in a modern sense. In 1544 Sebastian Munster issued in Basle his Cosmographia containing roughly sixty-six plans and views, some in the plan form, but many in the old panorama or birds eye view. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Blue, green, orange
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 17in x 15in (435mm x 380mm)
Margins: - Min ½in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
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1714 Visscher & Stoopendaal Large Antique Twin Hemisphere World Map

1714 Visscher & Stoopendaal Large Antique Twin Hemisphere World Map

Description: 
This beautifully engraved hand coloured original twin Hemisphere Antique World map by Nicolas Visscher was engraved by Daniel Stoopendaal and published by Pieter Keur, Rotterdam in 1716.

Background:
Nicolas Visschers Twin Hemisphere World Map is regarded as the forerunner of a number of highly decorative Dutch world maps produced throughout the latter part of the 17th & early 18th centuries. 
Essentially based on Blaeu's large world map of 1648, Visscher introduced no substantial new geographical features, however there were minor variations in the still unknown coastline of North America.
The northern part of California (as an Island) has now been flattened and is now called New Albion; still further north a small piece of land or an island "Anian" appears adjacent to a strait leading within striking distance of the west shores of Hudson Bay, a possible early guess at a NW passage. 
The distinctive attractiveness of many 17th century Dutch world maps is to be found in their border decorations and this one is no exception. The original artist assisting Visscher, Nicolas Berchem, introduced dramatic classical scenes. Daniel Stoopendaal carried on this tradition by representing each of the 4 know continents in allographical form in the 4 corners Europe, Asia, Africa & The America's. Another small change was the inclusion of astronomical diagrams replacing the north & south polar projections located at the top and bottom of the map. 
The Keur family produced a number of fine maps from their presses at Dordrecht and later from Rotterdam in the 17th & 18th centuries. This finely executed  twin hemisphere world map is a classic example being first released by Nicolas Visscher and Nicolas Berchem in 1658. (Ref: Shirley; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - Early colour
Colours used: - Yellow, pink, green, orange
General colour appearance: - Beautifully applied
Plate size: - 19 ½in x 17in (495mm x 430mm)
Plate size: - 18 ½in x 14 ½in (470mm x370mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections: 
Margins: - Light age toning in margins
Plate area: - Several small worm holes professionally repaired
Verso: - Light age toning

$1,250.00 USD
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1558 Munster, Hiob Magdeburg Antique Print of Meissen & Dresden Saxonia Germany

1558 Munster, Hiob Magdeburg Antique Print of Meissen & Dresden Saxonia Germany

Description:
This fine wood-blocked engraved hand coloured original antique print a view of the German city of Meissen in Saxonia, Germany(with a view of the city of Dresden on the verso) was engraved in 1558 - date is engraved at the bottom of the image - byHiob Magdeburg and was published in the 1588 edition of Sebastian MunstersCosmographia published by Sebastian Petri, Basle.

Sebastian Petri re-release of Cosomgraphiain 1588 produced some fine woodcut maps in the "copperplate style". The maps in this release were more  sophisticated than with earlier publications of Cosomgraphia and were based on the 1570 release of Abraham Ortelius monumental work Theatrum Orbis Terrarum.

Hiob Magdeburg (1518 - 1595) was a German theologian, educator, cartographer and humanist of the Reformation period. Magdeburg important legacy is not of a theological or educational nature, but cartographic specifically of the region of Saxony, including Meissen.

Background: For a variety of reasons town plans were comparatively latecomers in the long history of cartography. Few cities in Europe in the middle ages had more than 20,00 inhabitants and even London in the late Elizabethan period had only 100-150,000 people which in itself was probably 10 times that of any other English city. The Nuremberg Chronicle in 1493 included one of the first town views of Jerusalem, thereafter, for most of the sixteenth century, German cartographers led the way in producing town plans in a modern sense. In 1544 Sebastian Munster issued in Basle his Cosmographia containing roughly sixty-six plans and views, some in the plan form, but many in the old panorama or birds eye view. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Later
Colors used: - Blue, green, red, brown
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 17in x 15in (435mm x 380mm)
Margins: - Min ½in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - 9cm repair to left and right margins of image, no loss
Plate area: - 9cm repair to left and right of image, no loss
Verso: - 9cm repair to left and right of verso, no loss

$149.00 USD
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1719 Chatelain Antique Print of Canadian Indians, Beavers

1719 Chatelain Antique Print of Canadian Indians, Beavers

  • Title  : Description des Castors & de leur Industrie, des Canots, Habitations, Habillemens, Maniere de Vivre des Sauvages du Canada
  • Date  : 1719
  • Ref # :  50638
  • Size   :  20in x 17 1/2in (510m x 440m)
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This large hand coloured original antique print with illustrations and detailed text on Canada and the Canadian Indians and the important Beavers was published by Henri Abraham Chatelain in 1719, in his famous Atlas Historique

Background:
This is the famous beaver sheet from Volume Six of Chatelain's atlas historique. It contains descriptions and illustrations of beavers and their industry, and of the canoes, dwellings, hunting, fishing, clothes, customs and writing of the Canadian Native Americans. The part of the text entitled Amors & mariages des sauvages details how the prospective groom would woo his bride.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Later
Colors used: - Yellow, orange, blue, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 20in x 17 1/2in (510m x 440m)
Plate size: - 17 1/2in x 15in (440m x 380mm)
Margins: - min. 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$449.00 USD
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1820 J W Lewin Antique Print Early View of Sydney Cove

1820 J W Lewin Antique Print Early View of Sydney Cove

Description:
This wonderful hand coloured original antique print an early view Sydney Cove, - attributed to a drawing, now lost, by the artist John William Lewin in ca 1820 - was published in the 1826 of Nouvelles Annales Des Voyages, De La Geographie et de L Histoire, ou Recueil, volume II.

Background: 
This is an early panorama of Sydney Cove only 32 years after the first European settlement of Sydney Cove. In the foreground is an octagonal two-storey, yellow, sandstone house, built by Governor Macquarie in 1812 for his favourite boatman and former water bailiff, Billy Blue. The drawing of this little house – now the site of the Sydney Opera House — is out of all proportion to its actual modest size. Billy or William Blue (1767–1834) was an African-Jamaican who had been given a seven-year sentence in London for stealing raw sugar. To the left of the house is a sandy beach where the Circular Quay ferry wharves now stand. Facing the beach is First Government House where the Museum of Sydney is now situated.

On the western shore is the Rocks district, with two windmills on the ridge. Known as Tallawoladah by the Cadigal people, the Rocks became the convicts' side of the town. They built traditional vernacular houses, first of wattle and daub, with thatched roofs, later of weatherboards or rubble stone, roofed with timber shingles. They took in lodgers – the newly arrived convicts – who slept in kitchens and skillions. Some emancipists also had convict servants. After November 1790, large numbers of Aboriginal people also came into the town to visit and to live. By 1823, about 1,200 people lived in The Rocks, most of them emancipists and convicts and their children.

To the left of The Rocks area is a long, low, military barracks, built between 1792 and 1818 around Barracks Square/the Parade Ground – which is now Wynyard Park. It was from here that, in 1808, the New South Wales Corps marched to arrest Governor Macquarie's predecessor Governor William Bligh (1754–1817), an event later known as the Rum Rebellion. Heading east is St. Philip's Church  – the earliest Christian church (Church of England) in Australia – erected in stone in 1810 on Church Hill – now Lang Park.[34] In 1798, the original wattle and daub church – on what is now the corner of Bligh and Hunter Streets – was burnt down, allegedly by disgruntled convicts in response to a decree by the second NSW Governor (1795–1800), John Hunter, that all colony residents, including officers and convicts, attend Sunday services. The jail had earlier suffered a similar fate.

Further along the ridge to the east is Fort Phillip, flying the Union Jack, on Windmill (later Observatory) Hill where the Sydney Observatory is now located. Fort Phillip was commissioned in 1804 by the third NSW Governor (1800–1806), Philip Gidley King, partly as a response to external threats and partly due to the internal unrest reflected in Australia's only major convict rebellion at Castle Hill in March 1804. This was dubbed the Battle of Vinegar Hill as most of the convict rebels were Irish. Windmill Hill was chosen as a fort location as it was the highest point above the colony, affording commanding views of the Harbour approaches from east and west, theriver and road to Parramatta, surrounding country and of the entire town below.

On the waterfront below Fort Phillip is the yellow, four-storey, Commissariat Stores, constructed by convicts for Governor Macquarie in 1810 and 1812. One of the largest buildings constructed in the colony at the time, it is now the site of the Museum of Contemporary Art. The foreshore buildings on the extreme right are the warehouse and 'Wharf House' residence of merchant, Robert Campbell (1769–1846) who was to become one of the colony's biggest landholders. This is now the site of the Sydney Harbour Bridge pylons and is just to the left of Dawes Point. Three British Sailing ships, flying either the red ensign of the Merchant Navy or (more likely) the white ensign of the Royal Navy, are anchored in the Cove along with four sailboats and five canoes.
The Sydney Cove panorama on the Museum punchbowl can be dated between 1812 and 1818. The vantage point is from beneath Dawes Point, shown with its flagstaff and before the Dawes Point fortifications built 1818 to 1821. Looking directly into Campbell's Cove, the immediate focal points are Robert Campbell's warehouse and the 'Wharf House' roof of his residence. To the right of Campbell's Wharf are extensive stone walls marking boundaries between properties in this part of the Rocks district. 

First Government House can be seen at the head of Sydney Cove in the distance and around the eastern shore a small rendition of Billy Blue's 1812 house. The Governor and civil personnel lived on the more orderly eastern slopes of the Tank Stream, compared to the disorderly western side where convicts lived. The Tank Stream was the fresh water course emptying into Sydney Cove and supplied the fledgling colony until 1826. Further along is Bennelong Point – with no sign of Fort Macquarie [built from December 1817 – and Garden Island – the colony's first food source. The distant vista of the eastern side of the Harbour goes almost as far as the Macquarie Lighthouse – Australia's first lighthouse – built between 1816–18 on South Head. There are seven Sailing ships flying the white ensign of the British Royal Navy in the Harbour, along with three sailboats and two canoes.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - Off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Green, orange, yellow 
General color appearance: -  Authentic
Paper size: - 7 3/4in x 4 1/2in (195mm x 115mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$425.00 USD
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1596 Hondius Large Antique Map of Greece - Ist Edition

1596 Hondius Large Antique Map of Greece - Ist Edition

  • Title : Exxas; Graecia Sophiani. Ex Contibus Geographicis Abraham Ortelli Antierpiensis Ao. 1596
  • Ref #:  35084
  • Size: 20in x 15 1/2in (510mm x 390mm)
  • Date : 1596
  • Condition: (B) Good Condition

Description:

This fine beautifully hand coloured original  antique scarce map of Greece, Greek Islands & Western Turkey was engraved by Joducus Hondius in 1596 - dated in the title - and was published in P Bertius Atlas Historical Atlas in 1618. Blank verso.
This is a rare 1st edition of this map. It has undergone some professional restoration and is priced accordingly.

There were only 2 editions of this map engraved by Hondius in 1596, one with and one without dots in the sea. This one has the dots. In later editions the Hondius signature was removed as was the date   from the title. (Ref: Koeman; M&B)

Condition Report
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Red, yellow, green, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 20in x 15 1/2in (510mm x 390mm)
Plate size: - 20in x 14 1/4in (510mm x 365mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (7mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling, bottom left corner professionally restored
Plate area: - Profession repairs to centerfold, light soiling
Verso: - Soiling on verso

$475.00 USD
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1811 Delamarche Antique Map of North America, Russian Alaska

1811 Delamarche Antique Map of North America, Russian Alaska

  • Title : Amerique Septentrionale Par F Delmarche fils 1811
  • Ref #:  35093
  • Size: 18in x 12 1/2in (460mm x 310mm)
  • Date : 1811
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This beautifully hand coloured original antique Map of North America by Robert De Vaugondy was published by Charles Francois Delamarche, De Vaugondy's successor, in 1811 - dated in the title. 

Great early 19th century map of North America showing French Spanish and English possessions of North America. Alaska is shown as Russian Territory. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Pink, green, blue, yellow
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper Size: - 18in x 12 1/2in (460mm x 310mm)
Plate size: - 13in x 11 3/4in (330mm x 280mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1838 Sydney Hall Antique Map of The United States of America

1838 Sydney Hall Antique Map of The United States of America

Description:
This fine beautifully hand coloured original antique map of the United States stretching as far west as Missouri was engraved by Sydney Hall and was published in his 1838 General Atlas by Chapman & Hall , London. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, green, red, blue.
General color appearance: - Authentic and fresh
Paper size: - 10 1/2in x 8 1/2in (265mm x 210mm)
Plate size: - 10 1/2in x 8 1/2in (265mm x 210mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Small ink smudge at bottom of map
Verso: - None

$99.00 USD
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1719 Chatelain Large Antique Maps and Views of Mexico & Mexico City

1719 Chatelain Large Antique Maps and Views of Mexico & Mexico City

  • Title : Description, Situation & Vue De La Ville De Mexique, Des Deux Lacs
  • Ref #:  50634
  • Size: 20 3/4in x 17 1/2in (530m x 445m)
  • Date : 1719
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
An exceptionally beautiful example of Abraham Chatelain's 1719 maps and views on Mexico.

This sheet combines two maps and four engraved views with extensive text describing the lands and customs of Mexico. The maps, appearing in the upper right and left quadrants detail central Mexico and Mexico City.
The first map located in the upper left, is centered on Mexico City and details from the Gulf of Mexico to the Pacific and from the Rio de Palmas to Acapulco. The second map, in the upper right, focuses more specifically on Mexico City, revealing the ancient Lake Texcoco, and the cultivated islands that once housed the great Aztec capital.
Between the two maps a large view depicts a typical Aztec temple complex. The lower views detail, from left, traditional Aztec dances with a Spanish galleon in the background, human sacrifice, and a general view of Mexico City combining European and Aztec architectural elements. The extensive surrounding text, in French, attempt to describe the customs, peoples, resources, and geography of Mexico

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Later
Colors used: - Pink, green, yellow, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic 
Paper size: - 20 3/4in x 17 1/2in (530m x 445m)
Plate size: - 17in x 15in (435m x 380mm)
Margins: - min. 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1639 Jansson Large Antique Map of Hungary

1639 Jansson Large Antique Map of Hungary

Description: 
This large hand coloured original antique map of Hungary - centering on the city of Budapest, south to Bosnia east to Transylvania and west to Austria - by Jan Jansson  was published in the 1639 French edition of Mercator's Atlas published by Henricus Hondius and Jan Jansson. (Ref: Koeman; M&B; Tooley)

Condition Report:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Later
Colors used: - Yellow, pink, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 22 3/4in x 19in (575mm x 485mm)
Plate size: - 20 1/2in x 17in (520mm x 430mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Uniform age toning, bottom margin centerfold & border re-joined
Plate area: - Uniform age toning, centerfold re-joined, creasing along centerfold
Verso: - Uniform age toning

$475.00 USD
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1588 Munster Antique Map of Africa

1588 Munster Antique Map of Africa

Description:

This beautifully hand coloured original antique map of Africa was published in the 1588 edition of Sebastian MunstersCosmographia published by Sebastian Petri, Basle.

The first separately printed map of Africa (as with the other known continents) appeared in Munster's Geographia from 1540 onwards and the first atlas devoted to Africa only was published in 1588 in Venice by Livio Sanuto, but the finest individual map of the century was that engraved on 8 sheets by Gastaldi, published in Venice in 1564. Apart from maps in sixteenth-century atlases generally there were also magnificent marine maps of 1596 by Jan van Linschoten (engraved by van Langrens) of the southern half of the continent with highly imaginative and decorative detail in the interior. In the next century there were many attractive maps including those of Mercator/Hondius (1606), Speed (1627), Blaeu (1 630), Visscher (1636), de Wit (c. 1670), all embellished with vignettes of harbours and principal towns and bordered with elaborate and colourful figures of their inhabitants, but the interior remained uncharted with the exception of that part of the continent known as Ethiopia, the name which was applied to a wide area including present-day Abyssinia. Here the legends of Prester John lingered on and, as so often happened in other remote parts of the world, the only certain knowledge of the region was provided by Jesuit missionaries. Among these was Father Geronimo Lobo (1595-1678), whose work A Voyage to Abyssinia was used as the basis for a remarkably accurate map published by a German scholar, Hiob Ludolf in 1683. Despite the formidable problems which faced them, the French cartographers G. Delisle (c. 1700-22), J. B. B. d'Anville (1727-49) and N. Bellin (1754) greatly improved the standards of mapping of the continent, improvements which were usually, although not always, maintained by Homann, Seutter, de Ia Rochette, Bowen, Faden and many others in the later years of the century.

Sebastian Petri re-release of Cosomgraphia in 1588 produced some fine woodcut maps in the "copperplate style". The maps in this release were more sophisticated than with earlier publications of Cosomgraphia and were based on the 1570 release of Abraham Ortelius monumental work Theatrum Orbis Terrarum.

For a variety of reasons town plans were comparatively latecomers in the long history of cartography. Few cities in Europe in the middle ages had more than 20,00 inhabitants and even London in the late Elizabethan period had only 100-150,000 people which in itself was probably 10 times that of any other English city. The Nuremberg Chronicle in 1493 included one of the first town views of Jerusalem, thereafter, for most of the sixteenth century, German cartographers led the way in producing town plans in a modern sense. In 1544 Sebastian Munster issued in Basle his Cosmographia containing roughly sixty-six plans and views, some in the plan form, but many in the old panorama or birds eye view. (Ref: M&B;Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Later
Colors used: - Blue, yellow, green, pink
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 15in x 13in (380mm x 330mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Small repair to bottom right & top left corner margin
Plate area: - None
Verso: - Re-enforced along centerfold

$750.00 USD
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1650 Tirinus Large Antique Map of The Holy Land, Palestine, Israel

1650 Tirinus Large Antique Map of The Holy Land, Palestine, Israel

  • Title : Chorographia Terrae Sanctae in angustiorem Formam Redacta, et ex variis auctoribus a multis errorbus expurgata
  • Ref #:  61041
  • Size: 35in x 14in (890mm x 360mm)
  • Date : 1650
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This large magnificent, hand coloured original antique map of the Holy Land by Johann Belling & Augustus Vindel was published in  Commentarius in Sacram Scripturam (Commentary on the New and Old Testament) by the Belgian Jesuit monk Jacobus Tirinus, ca 1650.

This is without doubt one of the most visually stunning maps of the Holy land ever published and there have been many elaborated & beautiful maps of this important region published since the dark ages, when the Holy Land was considered the geographical center of the world.

Originally prepared in 1632 for Tirinus's study of the Holy Land was originallyengraved by Cornelius Galle and printed in Antwerp by Martinus Nutius. Tirinus's work went through many editions and printings that followed its original issue.

Background: Oriented to the East the map is surrounded with panels of vignettes displaying sacred objects including a menorah, the arc of the covenant, the altar of sacrifices, the Tabernacle, and a plan and elevations of the Temple. At center is an inset bird's-eye plan of ancient Jerusalem based on the Spanish biblical geographer, Juan Bautista Vilalpando. Oriented with east at top, the map includes the territories of the twelve tribes on both sides of the Jordan River and the route of the Exodus and Wandering. The map depicts from Syria and Tyre southward as far as the Sinai, Egypt and Thebes. At the southern most point, in Egypt, is located the city of Thebes and, slightly to the north, near Memphis, the wildly misshapen Pyramids of Egypt. Slightly further north is the city of Tanis, possible resting place for the Ark of the Covenant. In this spirit, slightly to the south of Tanis, the city of Ramesse is indicated as the starting point of the Biblical Exodus and the wandering of the Hebrews. Following their path into the desert and across the Red Sea – where Pharaoh is shown being inundated by the returning waters following Moses’ parting of the Red Sea. Now in the Sinai, we can follow the footsteps of the Hebrews to Mount Sinai (Sinai Mons), where Moses is drawn throwing down the tablets of God. Slightly to the northwest of this location a cleft in the mountains reveals the location of the ancient Nabatean city of Petra. With regard to Petra, the location and gorge detail is surprisingly accurate considering that it was only “discovered” by the Swiss adventurer Johannes L. Burckhardt, in 1812, 200 years after this map was drawn. Heading northward the lands claimed by the various tribes of Israel are beautifully detailed along with major cities, camps, roads, and trade routes. The Mediterranean is decorated with sailing ships and, in the lower left quadrant, a surveying tool between two censors. Surrounding the map proper on the left, right, and bottom margins, there are 19 maps and images of Biblical objects. The largest and most central of these is a stunning inset of Jerusalem, which notes the various temples and important buildings located there. Other images include the Arc of the Covenant, Israelite coins, Roman antiquities, views of a Menorah, various angels, and a plan of the Temple. All in all an extraordinary piece, one of the most attractive maps of the Holy Land ever made.

Jacobus Tirinus (1580 - 1636) or Jacobi Tirini was a Jesuit monk, theologian, historian, and Biblical scholar. His major work is the Commentarius in Sacram Scripturam a two volume Bible commentary. Tirini was born in Antwerp, Belgium in 1580. Following his admission into the Jesuit Order, Tirini became a respected Biblical scholar and a prominent member of the Order. He was assigned "First Superior" to the Antwerp Jesuit House as well as "Directior of the Holland Mission". Tirini's Biblial commentaries are still referenced today.(Ref: Laor; M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Early   
Colors used: - Green, blue, yellow, red, orange
General color appearance: - Authentic   
Paper size: - 35in x 14in (890mm x 360mm)
Plate size: - 33in x 13in (840mm x 330mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (15mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Very light creasing in folds.
Verso: - None

$1,499.00 USD
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