Recent Acquisitions (70)

Sort by:
1841 John Arrowsmith Large Antique Map of Australia & New Zealand

1841 John Arrowsmith Large Antique Map of Australia & New Zealand

  • Title : A Map of Australia, New Zealand and the Adjacent Islands by John Arrowsmith 1841
  • Ref #:  61151
  • Size: 17 1/4in x 14 1/2in (440mm x 365mm)
  • Date : 1841
  • Condition: (A) Very Good Condition

Description: 
This fine incredibly detailed scarce and important original antique folding map of Australia and New Zealand by John Arrowsmith was engraved in 1841 - dated in the title - and was published by Smith Elder & Co. London, 1841

Background: Extremely detailed map especially along the coasts of both countries but also includes county borders in WA & NSW along with details to the West of Sydney and in area of Port Phillip, soon to be the state of Victoria. Arrowsmith perpetaues the myth of the inland Torrens Sea in SA. List of 14 counties in WA, 19 in NSW and 9 Police Divisons in Van Diemens Land.

John Arrowsmith came from a long line of outstanding London map publishers. His maps of Australia were some of the best and most accurate maps published commercially at that time. He based his information on the latest accounts from many coastal and inland explorers and he was accepted as one of the foremost geographers in regards to Australia. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 17 1/4in x 14 1/2in (440mm x 365mm)
Plate size: - 16 3/4in x 13 3/4in (425mm x 350mm)
Margins: - Min 1/4in (5mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Folds as issued, light age toning along folds
Verso: - Light age toning along folds

$475.00 USD
More Info
1670 Dapper & Ogilby Large Old, Antique Print View of Cairo, Egypt

1670 Dapper & Ogilby Large Old, Antique Print View of Cairo, Egypt

Description: 
This finely engraved original antique print a view of the Egyptian city of Cairo was published by John Ogilby in the 1670 edition of An Accurate Description and Complete History of America and Africa based on De Nieuwe en Onbekende Wereld by Olfert Dapper.

Background: A fine bird's-eye view of the ancient city of Cairo, originally featured in Dapper's 'Description of Africa', and heavily based upon the 1549 view of Cairo by Venetian printmaker Matteo Pagono. This striking view of Cairo places the dense city in the centre, surrounded by open landscape. Set to the right of the city, past the River Nile, are depictions of the Pyramids and the Sphinx. In the immediate foreground, several travellers can be seen upon a hilltop that overlooks the city. With them are various animals, including cattle and camels. Two lettered keys are featured, one in Dutch in the upper left corner, and the other, an English translation in the upper right. 
The view was featured in John Ogilby's English edition of Olfert Dapper's 'Description of Africa'.
Olfert Dapper's 'Description of Africa' was an ethnographic book which offered a detailed description of the parts of Africa known to Europeans in the mid-seventeenth century. Despite the work being regarded as one of the most important and detailed seventeenth-century publications on Africa, Dapper himself never actually visited the continent. Instead, he relied on the reports of Jesuit missionaries and Dutch explorers.
Dapper's 'Description of Africa' was first published in 1668 by Jacob van Meurs in Amsterdam, with a second Dutch edition appearing in 1676. In 1670, a German translation of the publication was issued, and in the same year, an English translation, which is generally attributed to John Ogilby. A French edition was published in 1676, although it was not as true to the original as the other translations. 
Olfert Dapper (1636 - 1689) was a Dutch physician and writer. Despite never travelling outside of the Netherlands, Dapper was a writer of world history and geography.
John Ogilby (1600-1676) was a Scottish cartographer and publisher. Ogilby is perhaps best known for his series of road-maps entitled the "Britannia", which was the first road-atlas of any country, published in 1675. (Ref: Tooley, M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 17 1/2in x 14in (445mm x 355mm)
Plate size: - 13 1/2in x 9 1/2in (345mm x 245mm)
Margins: - Min 2in (50mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Slight separation to bottom margin centrefold, not affecting the image
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$375.00 USD
More Info
1695 De Rossi Large Old, Antique Map of The Champagne Region of France

1695 De Rossi Large Old, Antique Map of The Champagne Region of France

  • Title : Governo generale della Ciampagna diviso nelle sue Parti Principali; da Giaco. Cantelli da Vignola geografo del Sermo Sigr. Duca di Moda.; e dato in luce da Domenico de Rossi erede di Gio. Giaco. de Rossi dalle sue Stampe in Roma alla Pace, con Privil. del S.P. e licenza de Sup. l'Anno 1695
  • Ref #:  50224
  • Size: 24in x 18 1/2in (610mm x 470mm)
  • Date : 1695
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This very large, beautifully engraved original antique map of the Champagne Region of France by Giovanni Giacomo de Rossi, (1627-1691) in 1695 - dated in title - and was published by Domenico de Rossi in his monumental Atlas Mercurio Geografico overo Guida Geografica in tutte le parti del Mondo.

Background: A fine example of De Rossi's atlas map, similar to Coronelli's maps of the same period, with engraved decorative title. The atlas included 150 engraved outline hand colored maps with decorative title cartouche, on 181 sheets. Maps are dated between 1669 and 1715, issued by Giov. Giac. de Rossi and Domenico de Rossi, they are mainly derived from Cantelli da Vignola's maps, an important seventeenth-century cartographer who pioneered the Italian style of fine bold engraving that would eventually be embraced and expanded upon by Vincenzo Coronelli, and Nicolas Sanson (1600 – 1667) a French cartographer, termed by some the creator of French geography.
Many of the maps were engraved by Baudrand, Franciscus Donia, G.B. Falda, Jean Lhuilier, Vin Mariotti, Gasparo Pietro Santa, Salomon Rogiers, & Giorgio Widman, Lubin, Titi, Ameti, Magini and Mattei.
Giovanni Giacomo De Rossi (1627 - 1691) was an Italian printer and publisher active in 17th century Rome. Giovanni inherited the important Rome based printing business originally founded by his father, Giuseppe de Rossi (1570-1639). By the mid-17th century the Rossi firm was considered the most active and important press in Rome. (Ref Tooley M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 24in x 18 1/2in (610mm x 470mm)
Plate size: - 20 3/4in x 16 3/4in (525mm x 425mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$175.00 USD
More Info
1695 C. Vermeulen Large Antique Portrait of the Map Maker Alexis Hubert Jaillot

1695 C. Vermeulen Large Antique Portrait of the Map Maker Alexis Hubert Jaillot

  • Title : Alexius Hubertus Iaillot, Regis Christianissimi Geographus Ordiniarius, 1695
  • Ref #:  92818
  • Size: 17 1/2in x 14in (445mm x 355mm)
  • Date : 1695
  • Condition: (A) Very Good Condition

Description: 
This large original antique portrait of the French cartographer Alexis Hubert Jaillot (1632-1712) was engraved by Cornelis Vermeulen and published as the frontispiece to the 1695 edition of "Atlas francois contenant les cartes geographiques dans lesquelles sont tres exactement remarquez les empires, monarchies royaumes et estats de l'Europe, de l'Asie, de l'Afrique et de l'Amerique"
Jaillot rests upon the Atlas Gallicus (Atlas Francois) with a compass in his left hand.

Background: After Nicolas Sanson, Hubert Jaillot and Pierre Duval were the most important French cartographers of the seventeenth century. Jaillot, originally a sculptor, became interested in geography after his marriage to the daughter of Nicolas Berey (1606-65), a famous map colourist, and went into partnership in Paris with Sanson's sons. There, from about 1669, he undertook the re-engraving, enlarging and re-publishing of the Sanson maps in sheet form and in atlases, sparing no effort to fill the gap in the map trade left by the destruction of Blaeu's printing establishment in Amsterdam in 1672. Many of his maps were printed in Amsterdam (by Pierre Mortier) as well as in Paris. One of his most important works was a magnificent sea atlas, Le Neptune François, published in 1693 and compiled in co-operation with J D Cassini. This was re-published shortly afterwards by Pierre Mortier in Amsterdam with French, Dutch and English texts, the charts having been re-engraved. Eventually, after half a century, most of the plates were used again as the basis for a revised issue published by J N Bellin in 1753.(Ref Tooley M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 17 1/2in x 14in (445mm x 355mm)
Plate size: - 16in x 12 1/2in (405mm x 320mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Soling to margins, slight loss to bottom margin not affecting the image
Plate area: - None
Verso: - Soiling

$425.00 USD
More Info
1628 Munster Large Antique Print View of The City of Colmar, Alsace, France

1628 Munster Large Antique Print View of The City of Colmar, Alsace, France

Description:
This finely engraved original antique print* a view of the French city of city of Colmar, in the Alsace region in north-eastern France was published in the 1628 last release of Sebastian Munsters Cosmographia published by Sebastian Petri, Basle.

Sebastian Petri re-release of Cosomgraphia in 1588 produced some fine woodcut maps in the "copperplate style". The maps in this release were more sophisticated than with earlier publications of Cosomgraphia and were based on the 1570 release of Abraham Ortelius monumental work Theatrum Orbis Terrarum.

Background: For a variety of reasons town plans were comparatively latecomers in the long history of cartography. Few cities in Europe in the middle ages had more than 20,00 inhabitants and even London in the late Elizabethan period had only 100-150,000 people which in itself was probably 10 times that of any other English city. The Nuremberg Chronicle in 1493 included one of the first town views of Jerusalem, thereafter, for most of the sixteenth century, German cartographers led the way in producing town plans in a modern sense. In 1544 Sebastian Munster issued in Basle his Cosmographia containing roughly sixty-six plans and views, some in the plan form, but many in the old panorama or birds eye view. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 17in x 15in (435mm x 380mm)
Margins: - Min ½in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - Light age toning
Verso: - Light age toning

$149.00 USD
More Info
1628 Munster Large Antique Print View of The City of Lyon, France

1628 Munster Large Antique Print View of The City of Lyon, France

Description: 
This finely engraved original antique print* a view of the French city of Lyon was published in the 1628 last release of Sebastian Munsters Cosmographia published by Sebastian Petri, Basle.

Sebastian Petri re-release of Cosomgraphia in 1588 produced some fine woodcut maps in the "copperplate style". The maps in this release were more sophisticated than with earlier publications of Cosomgraphia and were based on the 1570 release of Abraham Ortelius monumental work Theatrum Orbis Terrarum.

Background: For a variety of reasons town plans were comparatively latecomers in the long history of cartography. Few cities in Europe in the middle ages had more than 20,00 inhabitants and even London in the late Elizabethan period had only 100-150,000 people which in itself was probably 10 times that of any other English city. The Nuremberg Chronicle in 1493 included one of the first town views of Jerusalem, thereafter, for most of the sixteenth century, German cartographers led the way in producing town plans in a modern sense. In 1544 Sebastian Munster issued in Basle his Cosmographia containing roughly sixty-six plans and views, some in the plan form, but many in the old panorama or birds eye view. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 17in x 15in (435mm x 380mm)
Margins: - Min ½in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$175.00 USD
More Info
1628 Munster Large Antique Print View of The City of Nordlingen, Swaben Germany

1628 Munster Large Antique Print View of The City of Nordlingen, Swaben Germany

Description: 
This finely engraved original antique print* a view of the German city of Nordlingen in the Swaben region of Southern Bavaria was published in the 1628 last release of Sebastian Munsters Cosmographia published by Sebastian Petri, Basle.

Sebastian Petri re-release of Cosomgraphia in 1588 produced some fine woodcut maps in the "copperplate style". The maps in this release were more sophisticated than with earlier publications of Cosomgraphia and were based on the 1570 release of Abraham Ortelius monumental work Theatrum Orbis Terrarum.

Background: For a variety of reasons town plans were comparatively latecomers in the long history of cartography. Few cities in Europe in the middle ages had more than 20,00 inhabitants and even London in the late Elizabethan period had only 100-150,000 people which in itself was probably 10 times that of any other English city. The Nuremberg Chronicle in 1493 included one of the first town views of Jerusalem, thereafter, for most of the sixteenth century, German cartographers led the way in producing town plans in a modern sense. In 1544 Sebastian Munster issued in Basle his Cosmographia containing roughly sixty-six plans and views, some in the plan form, but many in the old panorama or birds eye view. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 17in x 15in (435mm x 380mm)
Margins: - Min ½in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - Light age toning
Verso: - Light age toning

$149.00 USD
More Info
1574 Sebastain Munster Antique Print View of Trier Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany

1574 Sebastain Munster Antique Print View of Trier Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany

Description:
This large finely engraved original antique print a view of German city of Trier in state of Rhineland-Palatinate on the Moselle river near the border with Luxembourg was engraved by David Kandel, initials engraved bottom left DK and was published by Sebastian Munster in the 1574 edition of Cosmographia.

Background: For a variety of reasons town plans were comparatively latecomers in the long history of cartography. Few cities in Europe in the middle ages had more than 20,00 inhabitants and even London in the late Elizabethan period had only 100-150,000 people which in itself was probably 10 times that of any other English city. The Nuremberg Chronicle in 1493 included one of the first town views of Jerusalem, thereafter, for most of the sixteenth century, German cartographers led the way in producing town plans in a modern sense. In 1544 Sebastian Munster issued in Basle his Cosmographia containing roughly sixty-six plans and views, some in the plan form, but many in the old panorama or birds eye view.

Sebastian Münster (1488-1552) was a German cartographer, cosmographer, and Hebrew scholar whose work Cosmographia (1544; "Cosmography") was the earliest German description of the world and a major work in the revival of geographic thought in 16th-century Europe. It had numerous editions in different languages including Latin, French, Italian, English, and even Czech. Altogether, about 40 editions of the Cosmographia appeared between 1544 and 1628 and was one of the most successful and popular books of the 16th century. Münster was a major influence in popular thinking in Europe for the next 200 years.
This success was due not only to the level of descriptive detail but also to the fascinating full page maps & views as well as smaller woodcuts that were included in the text. Many of the woodcuts were executed by famous engravers of the time including Hans Holbein the Younger, Urs Graf, Hans Rudolph Manuel Deutsch, and David Kandel. 
Aside from the well-known maps present in the Cosmographia, the text is thickly sprinkled with vigorous views: portraits of kings and princes, costumes and occupations, habits and customs, flora and fauna, monsters, wonders, and horrors about the known -- and unknown -- world, and was undoubtedly one of the most widely read books of its time.
Münster acquired the material for his book in three ways. Firstly he researched all available literary sources across Germany, Switzerland and other parts of Europe. Secondly he obtained original manuscript material from locals all over Europe for description of the countryside, cities, villages, towns, rivers and local history. Finally, he obtained further material first hand on his travels (primarily in south-west Germany, Switzerland, and Alsace). 

In 1588 Sebastian Petri re-released Cosomgraphia and re-issued many of Munsters maps and views in the "copperplate style". The maps in this release were more sophisticated than with earlier publications of Cosomgraphia and were based on the 1570 release of Abraham Ortelius monumental work Theatrum Orbis Terrarum.(Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 16in x 13in (410mm x 330mm)
Plate size: - 16in x 13in (410mm x 330mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: -None
Verso: - None

$149.00 USD
More Info
1574 Sebastain Munster Large Folding Map View of Heidelberg, Germany - Scarce

1574 Sebastain Munster Large Folding Map View of Heidelberg, Germany - Scarce

Description: 
This large folding wood-block engraved original antique print view of the German City of Heidelberg was published 1574 release of Sebastian Munsters Cosmographia.
There were 2 large folding views in Cosmographia, both German cities, Wormbs and Heidelberg. As these were large folding views they were easily torn and damaged and so quiet rare, especially from the earlier editions.

Background: For a variety of reasons town plans were comparatively latecomers in the long history of cartography. Few cities in Europe in the middle ages had more than 20,00 inhabitants and even London in the late Elizabethan period had only 100-150,000 people which in itself was probably 10 times that of any other English city. The Nuremberg Chronicle in 1493 included one of the first town views of Jerusalem, thereafter, for most of the sixteenth century, German cartographers led the way in producing town plans in a modern sense. In 1544 Sebastian Munster issued in Basle his Cosmographia containing roughly sixty-six plans and views, some in the plan form, but many in the old panorama or birds eye view.

Sebastian Münster (1488-1552) was a German cartographer, cosmographer, and Hebrew scholar whose work Cosmographia (1544; "Cosmography") was the earliest German description of the world and a major work in the revival of geographic thought in 16th-century Europe. It had numerous editions in different languages including Latin, French, Italian, English, and even Czech. Altogether, about 40 editions of the Cosmographia appeared between 1544 and 1628 and was one of the most successful and popular books of the 16th century. Münster was a major influence in popular thinking in Europe for the next 200 years.
This success was due not only to the level of descriptive detail but also to the fascinating full page maps & views as well as smaller woodcuts that were included in the text. Many of the woodcuts were executed by famous engravers of the time including Hans Holbein the Younger, Urs Graf, Hans Rudolph Manuel Deutsch, and David Kandel. 
Aside from the well-known maps present in the Cosmographia, the text is thickly sprinkled with vigorous views: portraits of kings and princes, costumes and occupations, habits and customs, flora and fauna, monsters, wonders, and horrors about the known -- and unknown -- world, and was undoubtedly one of the most widely read books of its time.
Münster acquired the material for his book in three ways. Firstly he researched all available literary sources across Germany, Switzerland and other parts of Europe. Secondly he obtained original manuscript material from locals all over Europe for description of the countryside, cities, villages, towns, rivers and local history. Finally, he obtained further material first hand on his travels (primarily in south-west Germany, Switzerland, and Alsace). 

In 1588 Sebastian Petri re-released Cosomgraphia and re-issued many of Munsters maps and views in the "copperplate style". The maps in this release were more sophisticated than with earlier publications of Cosomgraphia and were based on the 1570 release of Abraham Ortelius monumental work Theatrum Orbis Terrarum. (Ref: Shirley; Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 29in x 13in (740mm x 330mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (20mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Left margin cropped to plate-mark, light age toning repair to right & bottom margins
Plate area: - Left plate small loss along centrer-fold, light spotting
Verso: - Left plate backed

$299.00 USD
More Info
1719 Chatelain Large Antique Print North Africa City Views Algiers, Jijel, Tripoli & Tunis

1719 Chatelain Large Antique Print North Africa City Views Algiers, Jijel, Tripoli & Tunis

  • Title : Vue de Tunis d'Alger & de Gigeri avec quelques particularitez curieuses touchant les moeurs de leur habitans & de quelques autres peuples de Barbarie
  • Ref #:  50646
  • Size: 20in x 17 1/2in (510mm x 445mm)
  • Date : 1719
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This large finely engraved original antique print views of cities of The Barbary Coast of North Africa including Algiers and Jijel, both in Algeria, Tripoli in Libya and Tunis in Tunisia - as well as peoples & animals of the Barbary coast - was published by Henri Abraham Chatelain in 1719, in his famous Atlas Historique.

Henri Abraham Chatelain (1684 - 1743)
was a Huguenot pastor of Parisian origins. He lived consecutively in Paris, St. Martins, London (c. 1710), the Hague (c. 1721) and Amsterdam (c. 1728).
Chatelain was a skilled artist and knew combining a wealth of historical and geographical information with delicate engraving and an uncomplicated composition. Groundbreaking for its time, this work included studies of geography, history, ethnology, heraldry, and cosmography. His maps with his elegant engraving are a superb example from the golden age of French mapmaking.The publishing firm of Chatelain, Chatelain Frères and Chatelain & Fils is recorded in Amsterdam, from around 1700-1770, with Zacharias living "op den Dam" in 1730.
Henri Abraham Chatelain, his father Zacharie Chatelain (d.1723) and Zacharie Junior (1690-1754), worked as a partnership publishing the Atlas Historique, Ou Nouvelle Introduction à L'Histoire under several different Chatelain imprints, depending on the Chatelain family partnerships at the time of publication. The atlas was published in seven volumes between 1705 and 1720, with a second edition appearing in 1732. The volumes I-IV with a Third edition and volume I with a final edition in 1739.
Henri Abraham Chatelain, whose "Atlas Historique" was one of the most expansive Dutch encyclopedias of the age. First published in 1705, Chatelain's Atlas Historique was part of an immense seven-volume encyclopedia. Although the main focus of the text was geography, the work also included a wealth of historical, political, and genealogical information. The text was compiled by Nicholas Gueudeville and Garillon with a supplement by H.P. de Limiers and the maps were engraved by Chatelain, primarily after charts by De L'Isle. The atlas was published in Amsterdam between 1705 and 1721 and was later reissued by Zacharie Chatelain between 1732 and 1739.

Atlas Historique: First published in Amsterdam from 1705 to 1720, the various volumes were updated at various times up to 1739 when the fourth edition of vol.I appeared, stated as the "dernière edition, corrigée & augmentée."
The first four volumes seem to have undergone four printings with the later printings being the most desirable as they contain the maximum number of corrections and additions. The remaining three final volumes were first issued between 1719-1720 and revised in 1732.
An ambitious and beautifully-presented work, the Atlas Historique was intended for the general public, fascinated in the early eighteenth century by the recently conquered colonies and the new discoveries. Distant countries, such as the Americas, Africa, the Middle East, Mongolia, China, Japan, Indonesia, etc., take an important place in this work.
In addition to the maps, many of which are based on Guillaume De L'Isle, the plates are after the best travel accounts of the period, such as those of Dapper, Chardin, de Bruyn, Le Hay and other.
Other sections deal with the history of the european countries, and covers a wide range of subjects including genealogy, history, cosmography, topography, heraldry and chronology, costume of the world, all illustrated with numerous engraved maps, plates of local inhabitants and heraldic charts of the lineages of the ruling families of the time. The maps, prints and tables required to make up a complete set are listed in detail in each volume.
The accompanying text is in French and often is printed in two columns on the page with maps and other illustrations interspersed. Each map and table is numbered consecutively within its volume and all maps bear the privileges of the States of Holland and West-Friesland.
The encyclopaedic nature of the work as a whole is reflected in this six frontispiece. The pages are the work of the celerated mr. Romeijn de Hooghe. and are engraved by J.Goeree, T.Schynyoet and P.Sluyter.
New scholarship has suggested the compiler of the atlas, who is identified on the title as "Mr. C***" not to be Henri Abraham Châtelain, but Zacharie Châtelain. (See Van Waning's article in the Journal of the International Map Collectors' Society for persuasive evidence of the latter's authorship.) (Ref: M&B; Tooley)   

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 20in x 17 1/2in (510mm x 445mm)
Plate size: - 17 1/2in x 15in (445mm x 380mm)
Margins: - min. 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$299.00 USD
More Info
1719 Chatelain Large Antique Print Views of Cairo, Egypt - Nile

1719 Chatelain Large Antique Print Views of Cairo, Egypt - Nile

  • Title : Vue de la Ville Du Grand Caire et de ses Environs
  • Ref #:  50650
  • Size: 20in x 17 1/2in (510mm x 445mm)
  • Date : 1719
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This large finely engraved original antique print of various views of Cairo and Environs was published by Henri Abraham Chatelain in 1719, in his famous Atlas Historique.

Henri Abraham Chatelain (1684 - 1743)
was a Huguenot pastor of Parisian origins. He lived consecutively in Paris, St. Martins, London (c. 1710), the Hague (c. 1721) and Amsterdam (c. 1728). 
Chatelain was a skilled artist and knew combining a wealth of historical and geographical information with delicate engraving and an uncomplicated composition. Groundbreaking for its time, this work included studies of geography, history, ethnology, heraldry, and cosmography. His maps with his elegant engraving are a superb example from the golden age of French mapmaking.The publishing firm of Chatelain, Chatelain Frères and Chatelain & Fils is recorded in Amsterdam, from around 1700-1770, with Zacharias living "op den Dam" in 1730.
Henri Abraham Chatelain, his father Zacharie Chatelain (d.1723) and Zacharie Junior (1690-1754), worked as a partnership publishing the Atlas Historique, Ou Nouvelle Introduction à L'Histoire under several different Chatelain imprints, depending on the Chatelain family partnerships at the time of publication. The atlas was published in seven volumes between 1705 and 1720, with a second edition appearing in 1732. The volumes I-IV with a Third edition and volume I with a final edition in 1739.
Henri Abraham Chatelain, whose "Atlas Historique" was one of the most expansive Dutch encyclopedias of the age. First published in 1705, Chatelain's Atlas Historique was part of an immense seven-volume encyclopedia. Although the main focus of the text was geography, the work also included a wealth of historical, political, and genealogical information. The text was compiled by Nicholas Gueudeville and Garillon with a supplement by H.P. de Limiers and the maps were engraved by Chatelain, primarily after charts by De L'Isle. The atlas was published in Amsterdam between 1705 and 1721 and was later reissued by Zacharie Chatelain between 1732 and 1739.

Atlas Historique: First published in Amsterdam from 1705 to 1720, the various volumes were updated at various times up to 1739 when the fourth edition of vol.I appeared, stated as the "dernière edition, corrigée & augmentée." 
The first four volumes seem to have undergone four printings with the later printings being the most desirable as they contain the maximum number of corrections and additions. The remaining three final volumes were first issued between 1719-1720 and revised in 1732. 
An ambitious and beautifully-presented work, the Atlas Historique was intended for the general public, fascinated in the early eighteenth century by the recently conquered colonies and the new discoveries. Distant countries, such as the Americas, Africa, the Middle East, Mongolia, China, Japan, Indonesia, etc., take an important place in this work. 
In addition to the maps, many of which are based on Guillaume De L'Isle, the plates are after the best travel accounts of the period, such as those of Dapper, Chardin, de Bruyn, Le Hay and other.
Other sections deal with the history of the european countries, and covers a wide range of subjects including genealogy, history, cosmography, topography, heraldry and chronology, costume of the world, all illustrated with numerous engraved maps, plates of local inhabitants and heraldic charts of the lineages of the ruling families of the time. The maps, prints and tables required to make up a complete set are listed in detail in each volume. 
The accompanying text is in French and often is printed in two columns on the page with maps and other illustrations interspersed. Each map and table is numbered consecutively within its volume and all maps bear the privileges of the States of Holland and West-Friesland. 
The encyclopaedic nature of the work as a whole is reflected in this six frontispiece. The pages are the work of the celerated mr. Romeijn de Hooghe. and are engraved by J.Goeree, T.Schynyoet and P.Sluyter. 
New scholarship has suggested the compiler of the atlas, who is identified on the title as "Mr. C***" not to be Henri Abraham Châtelain, but Zacharie Châtelain. (See Van Waning's article in the Journal of the International Map Collectors' Society for persuasive evidence of the latter's authorship.) (Ref: M&B; Tooley)   

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: -  
Colors used: -  
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 20in x 17 1/2in (510mm x 445mm)
Plate size: - 17 1/2in x 15in (445mm x 380mm)
Margins: - min. 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
More Info
1719 Chatelain Very Large Genealogy Chart of the Royal Families of Europe

1719 Chatelain Very Large Genealogy Chart of the Royal Families of Europe

  • Title : Nouvelle carte généalogique des principaux souverains de l'Europe issus de la famille ROYALE DE FRANCE et les branches des maisons souveraines de l'Europe issues de WITEKIND LE GRAND ou des anciens RO

    (Translation...New genealogical map of the main rulers of Europe from the French Royal family and branches of sovereign houses from Europe)

  • Ref #:  50688
  • Size: 43 1/2in x 18 1/2in (1.09m x 470m)
  • Date : 1719
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This large finely engraved original antique genealogy chart of the Royal families of France and wider Europe was published by Henri Abraham Chatelain in 1719, in his famous Atlas Historique.
This very large chart illustrates the relationship between the French Royal families to also Denmark, Germany & German States, Prussia, Sweden and others.

Henri Abraham Chatelain (1684 - 1743)
was a Huguenot pastor of Parisian origins. He lived consecutively in Paris, St. Martins, London (c. 1710), the Hague (c. 1721) and Amsterdam (c. 1728).
Chatelain was a skilled artist and knew combining a wealth of historical and geographical information with delicate engraving and an uncomplicated composition. Groundbreaking for its time, this work included studies of geography, history, ethnology, heraldry, and cosmography. His maps with his elegant engraving are a superb example from the golden age of French mapmaking.The publishing firm of Chatelain, Chatelain Frères and Chatelain & Fils is recorded in Amsterdam, from around 1700-1770, with Zacharias living "op den Dam" in 1730.
Henri Abraham Chatelain, his father Zacharie Chatelain (d.1723) and Zacharie Junior (1690-1754), worked as a partnership publishing the Atlas Historique, Ou Nouvelle Introduction à L'Histoire under several different Chatelain imprints, depending on the Chatelain family partnerships at the time of publication. The atlas was published in seven volumes between 1705 and 1720, with a second edition appearing in 1732. The volumes I-IV with a Third edition and volume I with a final edition in 1739.
Henri Abraham Chatelain, whose "Atlas Historique" was one of the most expansive Dutch encyclopedias of the age. First published in 1705, Chatelain's Atlas Historique was part of an immense seven-volume encyclopedia. Although the main focus of the text was geography, the work also included a wealth of historical, political, and genealogical information. The text was compiled by Nicholas Gueudeville and Garillon with a supplement by H.P. de Limiers and the maps were engraved by Chatelain, primarily after charts by De L'Isle. The atlas was published in Amsterdam between 1705 and 1721 and was later reissued by Zacharie Chatelain between 1732 and 1739.

Atlas Historique: First published in Amsterdam from 1705 to 1720, the various volumes were updated at various times up to 1739 when the fourth edition of vol.I appeared, stated as the "dernière edition, corrigée & augmentée."
The first four volumes seem to have undergone four printings with the later printings being the most desirable as they contain the maximum number of corrections and additions. The remaining three final volumes were first issued between 1719-1720 and revised in 1732.
An ambitious and beautifully-presented work, the Atlas Historique was intended for the general public, fascinated in the early eighteenth century by the recently conquered colonies and the new discoveries. Distant countries, such as the Americas, Africa, the Middle East, Mongolia, China, Japan, Indonesia, etc., take an important place in this work.
In addition to the maps, many of which are based on Guillaume De L'Isle, the plates are after the best travel accounts of the period, such as those of Dapper, Chardin, de Bruyn, Le Hay and other.
Other sections deal with the history of the european countries, and covers a wide range of subjects including genealogy, history, cosmography, topography, heraldry and chronology, costume of the world, all illustrated with numerous engraved maps, plates of local inhabitants and heraldic charts of the lineages of the ruling families of the time. The maps, prints and tables required to make up a complete set are listed in detail in each volume.
The accompanying text is in French and often is printed in two columns on the page with maps and other illustrations interspersed. Each map and table is numbered consecutively within its volume and all maps bear the privileges of the States of Holland and West-Friesland.
The encyclopaedic nature of the work as a whole is reflected in this six frontispiece. The pages are the work of the celerated mr. Romeijn de Hooghe. and are engraved by J.Goeree, T.Schynyoet and P.Sluyter.
New scholarship has suggested the compiler of the atlas, who is identified on the title as "Mr. C***" not to be Henri Abraham Châtelain, but Zacharie Châtelain. (See Van Waning's article in the Journal of the International Map Collectors' Society for persuasive evidence of the latter's authorship.) (Ref: M&B; Tooley)   

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 43 1/2in x 18 1/2in (1.09m x 470m)
Plate size: - 43in x 17in (1.07m x 435mm)
Margins: - min. 1/4in (2mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Right margin cropped to plate-mark, age toning to right margin
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$175.00 USD
More Info
1715 William Dampier Antique Twin Hemisphere World Map, California Is. Australia

1715 William Dampier Antique Twin Hemisphere World Map, California Is. Australia

Description: 
This beautiful copper-plate engraved scarce, original antique Twin Hemisphere World Map by William Dampier was published in the 1715 French edition of A New Voyage Around the World (Nouveau Voyage autour du Monde)
Fantastic map showing the route taken by Dampier on his first voyage in his ship Roebuck, visiting NW Australia, GOM and Southern Africa whilst circumnavigating the world. California is shown as an island as was the popular belief at the time.

Background: William Dampier (1651 - 1715) was an English explorer and navigator who became the first Englishman to explore parts of what is today Australia, and the first person to circumnavigate the world three times. He has also been described as Australia's first natural historian, as well as one of the most important British explorers of the period between Sir Walter Raleigh and James Cook.
After impressing the Admiralty with his book A New Voyage Round the World, Dampier was given command of a Royal Navy ship and made important discoveries in western Australia, before being court-martialled for cruelty. On a later voyage he rescued Alexander Selkirk, a former crewmate who may have inspired Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe. Others influenced by Dampier include James Cook, Horatio Nelson, Charles Darwin.
In 1679, Dampier joined the crew of the buccaneer Captain Bartholomew Sharp on the Spanish Main of Central America, twice visiting the Bay of Campeche, or "Campeachy" as it was then known, on the north coast of Mexico. This led to his first circumnavigation, during which he accompanied a raid across the Isthmus of Darién in Panama and took part in the capture of Spanish ships on the Pacific coast of that isthmus. The pirates then raided Spanish settlements in Peru before returning to the Caribbean.
Dampier made his way to Virginia, where in 1683 he was engaged by the privateer John Cooke. Cooke entered the Pacific via Cape Horn and spent a year raiding Spanish possessions in Peru, the Galápagos Islands, and Mexico. This expedition collected buccaneers and ships as it went along, at one time having a fleet of ten vessels. Cooke died in Mexico, and a new leader, Edward Davis, was elected captain by the crew.
Dampier transferred to the privateer Charles Swan's ship, Cygnet, and on 31 March 1686 they set out across the Pacific to raid the East Indies, calling at Guam and Mindanao. Spanish witnesses saw the predominantly English crew as not only pirates and heretics but also cannibals. Leaving Swan and 36 others behind on Mindanao, the rest of the privateers sailed on to Manila, Poulo Condor, China, the Spice Islands, and New Holland. Contrary to Dampier's later claim that he had not actively participated in actual piratical attacks during this voyage, he was in fact selected in 1687 to command one of the Spanish ships captured by Cygnet's crew off Manila.
On 5 January 1688, Cygnet "anchored two miles from shore in 29 fathoms" on the northwest coast of Australia, near King Sound. Dampier and his ship remained there until March 12, and while the ship was being careened Dampier made notes on the fauna and flora and the indigenous peoples he found there. Among his fellows were a significant number of Spanish sailors, most notably Alonso Ramírez, a native of San Juan, Puerto Rico  Later that year, by agreement, Dampier and two shipmates were marooned on one of the Nicobar Islands. They obtained a small canoe which they modified after first capsizing and then, after surviving a great storm at sea, called at "Acheen" (Aceh) in Sumatra.
Dampier returned to England in 1691 via the Cape of Good Hope, penniless but in possession of his journals. He also had as a source of income a slave known as Prince Jeoly (or Giolo), from Miangas (now Indonesia), who became famous for his tattoos (or "paintings" as they were known at the time). Dampier exhibited Jeoly in London, thereby also generating publicity for a book based on his diaries.
The publication of the book, A New Voyage Round the World, in 1697 was a popular sensation, creating interest at the Admiralty. In 1699, Dampier was given command of the 26-gun warship HMS Roebuck, with a commission from King William III (who had ruled jointly with Queen Mary II until her death in 1694). His mission was to explore the east coast of New Holland, the name given by the Dutch to what is now Australia, and Dampier's intention was to travel there via Cape Horn.
The expedition set out on 14 January 1699, too late in the season to attempt the Horn, so it headed to New Holland via the Cape of Good Hope instead. Following the Dutch route to the Indies, Dampier passed between Dirk Hartog Island and the Western Australian mainland into what he called Shark Bay on 6 August 1699. He landed and began producing the first known detailed record of Australian flora and fauna. The botanical drawings that were made are believed to be by his clerk, James Brand. Dampier then followed the coast north-east, reaching the Dampier Archipelago and Lagrange Bay, just south of what is now called Roebuck Bay, all the while recording and collecting specimens, including many shells. From there he bore northward for Timor. Then he sailed east and on 3 December 1699 rounded New Guinea, which he passed to the north. He traced the south-eastern coasts of New Hanover, New Ireland and New Britain, charting the Dampier Strait between these islands (now the Bismarck Archipelago) and New Guinea. En route, he paused to collect specimens such as giant clams.
By this time, Roebuck was in such bad condition that Dampier was forced to abandon his plan to examine the east coast of New Holland while less than a hundred miles from it. In danger of sinking, he attempted to make the return voyage to England, but the ship foundered at Ascension Island on 21 February 1701. While anchored offshore the ship began to take on more water and the carpenter could do nothing with the worm-eaten planking. As a result, the vessel had to be run aground. Dampier's crew was marooned there for five weeks before being picked up on 3 April by an East Indiaman and returned home in August 1701.
Although many papers were lost with Roebuck, Dampier was able to save some new charts of coastlines, and his record of trade winds and currents in the seas around Australia and New Guinea. He also preserved a few of his specimens. In 2001, the Roebuck wreck was located in Clarence Bay, Ascension Island, by a team from the Western Australian Maritime Museum. Because of his widespread influence, and also because so little exists that can now be linked to him, it has been argued that the remains of his ship and the objects still at the site on Ascension Island – while the property of Britain and subject to the island government's management – are actually the shared maritime heritage of those parts of the world first visited or described by him. His account of the expedition was published as A Voyage to New Holland in 1703.
The War of the Spanish Succession had broken out in 1701, and English privateers were being readied to act against French and Spanish interests. Dampier was appointed commander of the 26-gun ship St George, with a crew of 120 men. They were joined by the 16-gun Cinque Ports with 63 men, and sailed on 11 September 1703 from Kinsale, Ireland. The two ships made a storm-tossed passage round Cape Horn, arriving at the Juan Fernández Islands off the coast of Chile in February 1704.  While watering and provisioning there, they sighted a heavily armed French merchantman, which they engaged in a seven-hour battle but were driven off.
Dampier succeeded in capturing a number of small Spanish ships along the coast of Peru, but released them after removing only a fraction of their cargoes because he believed they "would be a hindrance to his greater designs. The greater design he had in mind was a raid on Santa María, a town on the Gulf of Panama rumoured to hold stockpiles of gold from nearby mines. When the force of seamen he led against the town met with unexpectedly strong resistance, however, he withdrew. In May 1704, Cinque Ports separated from St George and, after putting Alexander Selkirk ashore alone on an island for complaining about the vessel's seaworthiness, sank off the coast of what is today Colombia. Some of its crew survived being shipwrecked but were made prisoners of the Spanish.
It was now left to St George to make an attempt on the Manila galleon, the main object of the expedition. The ship was sighted on 6 December 1704, probably Nuestra Señora del Rosario. It was caught unprepared and had not run out its guns. But while Dampier and his officers argued over the best way to mount an attack, the galleon got its guns loaded and the battle was joined. St George soon found itself out-sized by the galleon's 18- and 24-pounders, and, suffering serious damage, they were forced to break off the attack.
The failure to capture the Spanish galleon completed the break-up of the expedition. Dampier, with about thirty men, stayed in St George, while the rest of the crew took a captured barque across the Pacific to Amboyna in the Dutch settlements. The undermanned and worm-damaged St George had to be abandoned on the coast of Peru. He and his remaining men embarked in a Spanish prize for the East Indies, where they were thrown into prison as pirates by their supposed allies the Dutch but later released. Now without a ship, Dampier made his way back to England at the end of 1707.
In 1708, Dampier was engaged to serve on the privateer Duke, not as captain but as sailing master. Duke beat its way into the South Pacific Ocean round Cape Horn in consort with a second ship, Duchess. Commanded by Woodes Rogers, this voyage was more successful: Selkirk was rescued on 2 February 1709, and the expedition amassed £147,975  (equivalent to £19.9 million today) worth of plundered goods. Most of that came from the capture of a Spanish galleon, Nuestra Señora de la Encarnación y Desengaño, along the coast of Mexico in December 1709.
In January 1710, Dampier crossed the Pacific in Duke, accompanied by Duchess and two prizes. They stopped at Guam before arriving in Batavia. Following a refit at Horn Island (near Batavia) and the sale of one of their prize ships, they sailed for the Cape of Good Hope where they remained for more than three months awaiting a convoy. They left the Cape in company with 25 Dutch and English ships, with Dampier now serving as sailing master of Encarnación. After a further delay at the Texel, they dropped anchor at the Thames in London on 14 October 1711.
Dampier may not have lived to receive all of his share of the expedition's gains. He died in the Parish of St Stephen Coleman Street, London. The exact date and circumstances of his death, and his final resting place, are all unknown. His will was proven on 23 March 1715, and it is generally assumed he died earlier that month, but this is not known with any certainty. (Ref Tooley M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 12in x 7 1/2in (305mm x 190mm)
Plate size: - 12in x 7 1/2in (305mm x 190mm)
Margins: - Min 1/4in (5mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Folds as issued
Plate area: - Folds as issued, light age toning along folds
Verso: - Folds as issued, light age toning along folds

$850.00 USD
More Info
1755 Seale & Postlethweyt Large Antique Map Trade Routes & Forts of West Africa

1755 Seale & Postlethweyt Large Antique Map Trade Routes & Forts of West Africa

  • Title : A New and Correct Map of the Coast of Africa from Cape Blance to the Coast of Angola with Explanatory Notes of all the Forts and settlements belonging to the several European Powers
  • Ref #:  92347
  • Size: 20 1/2in x 17in (520mm x 430mm)
  • Date : 1755
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This large finely engraved, highly detailed original antique map of the west coast of Africa from Senegal To Angola - with a separate inset map of the Gold Coast was engraved by William Seale - after Jean-Baptiste Bourguinon D'Anville - and was published in Malachy Postlethweyt's monumental 2 Volume Dictionary of Trade & Commerce published between 1751 & 1774.
Incredibly detailed map with an in-depth explanation of the different commercial interests of the European countries from Senegal referred to as the Gum Coast, Sierra Leone & Liberia known as the grain coast, Ivory coast, Ghana & Benin known as the Gold Coast all the way down to Angola.
The extensive text, bottom left, gives a detailed explanation to the different trades undertaken in which areas on the West Coast of Africa. This also included the unfortunate Slaves Trade, Ivory, Gold and Grain as well as local & European settlements and forts.
A truly fascinating insight into a vast region of Africa that was so crucial to the commerce and wealth of Western Europe.

Malachy Postlethweyt's Dictionary of Trade & Commerce:
A monumental dictionary of trade and commerce. It is based in part on the Dictionnaire universel de Commerce (Paris: 1723-30) of Jacques Savary de Bruslon, under whose name it is often catalogued, but has been adapted by Postlethwayt for a British audience, with substantial enlargements and improvements, and entirely new material relating to England and her colonies. Postlethwayt devoted twenty years to the preparation of the dictionary, which was first published in 1751-55 &  includes a description of British affairs in North America since the peace of 1763.
As with his other works, the dictionary demonstrates Postlethway’s deep commitment to the expansion and strengthening of English trade. Included are entries for geographical locations (Africa, Antilles, Canada, Japan, Louisiana, &c.), products (brandy, cardamom, codfish, diamonds, sugar, &c.), trading companies (Dutch East India Company, English African Company, &c.), treaties of commerce, and a vast range of other information of value to merchants (bankruptcy, currency, bills of exchange, brokerage, exportation, landed interest, privateering, &c.). The Dictionary is also important for containing almost the whole substance of Richard Cantillon’s Essay on Commerce, its first appearance in print.

Background: Being part of the Mediterranean world, the northern coasts of the African continent as far as the Straits of Gibraltar and even round to the area of the Fortunate Isles (the Canaries) were reasonably well known and quite accurately mapped from ancient times. In particular, Egypt and the Nile Valley were well defined and the Nile itself was, of course, one of the rivers separating the continents in medieval T-O maps. Through Arab traders the shape of the east coast, down the Red Sea as far as the equator, was also known but detail shown in the interior faded into deserts with occasional mountain ranges and mythical rivers. The southern part of the continent, in the Ptolemaic tradition, was assumed to curve to the east to form a land-locked Indian Ocean. The voyages of the Portuguese, organized by Henry the Navigator in the fifteenth century, completely changed the picture and by the end of the century Vasco da Gama had rounded the Cape enabling cartographers to draw a quite presentable coastal outline of the whole continent, even if the interior was to remain largely unknown for the next two or three centuries.
The first separately printed map of Africa (as with the other known continents) appeared in Munster's Geographia from 1540 onwards and the first atlas devoted to Africa only was published in 1588 in Venice by Livio Sanuto, but the finest individual map of the century was that engraved on 8 sheets by Gastaldi, published in Venice in 1564. Apart from maps in sixteenth-century atlases generally there were also magnificent marine maps of 1596 by Jan van Linschoten (engraved by van Langrens) of the southern half of the continent with highly imaginative and decorative detail in the interior. In the next century there were many attractive maps including those of Mercator/Hondius (1606), Speed (1627), Blaeu (1 630), Visscher (1636), de Wit (c. 1670), all embellished with vignettes of harbours and principal towns and bordered with elaborate and colourful figures of their inhabitants, but the interior remained uncharted with the exception of that part of the continent known as Ethiopia, the name which was applied to a wide area including present-day Abyssinia. Here the legends of Prester John lingered on and, as so often happened in other remote parts of the world, the only certain knowledge of the region was provided by Jesuit missionaries. Among these was Father Geronimo Lobo (1595-1678), whose work A Voyage to Abyssinia was used as the basis for a remarkably accurate map published by a German scholar, Hiob Ludolf in 1683. Despite the formidable problems which faced them, the French cartographers G. Delisle (c. 1700-22), J. B. B. d'Anville (1727-49) and N. Bellin (1754) greatly improved the standards of mapping of the continent, improvements which were usually, although not always, maintained by Homann, Seutter, de Ia Rochette, Bowen, Faden and many others in the later years of the century. (Ref: Tooley, M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 20 1/2in x 17in (520mm x 430mm)
Plate size: - 19 1/2in x 15 1/2in (495mm x 395mm)
Margins: - Min 1/4in (5mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Bottom left margin cropped to plate-mark
Plate area: - Folds as issued
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
More Info
1782 Kitchin Large Antique Map Persian Empire - Iran - Caspian to Persian Gulf

1782 Kitchin Large Antique Map Persian Empire - Iran - Caspian to Persian Gulf

  • Title : New Map of Persia divided into its provinces from the latest authorities by T Kitchin geog. Hydrographer to his Majesty
  • Ref #:  61150
  • Size: 18in x 14 1/2in (460mm x 370mm)
  • Date : 1782
  • Condition: (A) Very Good Condition

Description: 
This large, finely engraved, detailed antique map of The Persian Empire from the Caspian Sea to the Persian Gulf by Thomas Kitchin was published in the 1782 edition of Millar's New & Universal System of Geographer, published by Alexander Hogg, London. 

As with all Kitchins map this is beautifully executed with extreme detail from Georgia to the Mouth of The Indus River. (Ref Tooley M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 18in x 14 1/2in (460mm x 370mm)
Plate size: - 15 1/4in x 13 3/4in (385mm x 350mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (15mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Light creasing along folds, as issued
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
More Info
1821 Brue Large Antique World Map of Mercators Projection - New Holland, Texas

1821 Brue Large Antique World Map of Mercators Projection - New Holland, Texas

Description: 
This large original antique World map on Mercator's projection was engraved in 1821 - the date is engraved in the title - and was published in Adrien Brue's (1786 - 1832) large Atlas Universel de Geographie.

A fantastic World map in a time of great change. The map centres on New Holland or Australia (officially named Australia in 1824 by the British) Mexico still holds sway on the western portion of North America. Much of Capt. Cooks discoveries are recognised on this map in NW America and the south Pacific but not his explorations in Antarctica and beyond. Central Africa still remains relatively unexplored by the Europeans as does the Artic north of Canada. A fantastic map. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - Off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 24in x 18in (610mm x 460mm)
Plate size: - 21 1/2in x 15 1/2in (545mm x 395mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Soiling in margins, repair to top margin, no loss
Plate area: - Soiling and spotting to top of map
Verso: - Soiling

$299.00 USD
More Info
1751 D Anville Very Large Antique Map The West Coast of Africa, Gambia & Senegal

1751 D Anville Very Large Antique Map The West Coast of Africa, Gambia & Senegal

  • Title : Carte Particuliere De La Cote Occidentale De L'Afrique Depusi le Cap Blanc jusqu'au Cap De Verga et du Cours Des Rivieres De Senega et de Gambie . .MDCCLI
  • Ref #:  22009
  • Size: 42in x 33in (1.07m x 840mm)
  • Date : 1751
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This very large finely engraved, highly detailed original antique map of of the west coast of Africa covering Gambia and Senegal was engraved in 1751 - dated in the tile cartouche - and was published in Jean-Baptiste Bourguinon D'Anville's large elephant folio atlas Atlas Generale.

Description: D' Anville's maps have a clarity and a directness that is very 'modern'. He incorporated as much known information into his maps as he could. Map extent is from Cap Blanc in the north to Cap de Verga in the south.

Being part of the Mediterranean world, the northern coasts of the African continent as far as the Straits of Gibraltar and even round to the area of the Fortunate Isles (the Canaries) were reasonably well known and quite accurately mapped from ancient times. In particular, Egypt and the Nile Valley were well defined and the Nile itself was, of course, one of the rivers separating the continents in medieval T-O maps. Through Arab traders the shape of the east coast, down the Red Sea as far as the equator, was also known but detail shown in the interior faded into deserts with occasional mountain ranges and mythical rivers. The southern part of the continent, in the Ptolemaic tradition, was assumed to curve to the east to form a land-locked Indian Ocean. The voyages of the Portuguese, organized by Henry the Navigator in the fifteenth century, completely changed the picture and by the end of the century Vasco da Gama had rounded the Cape enabling cartographers to draw a quite presentable coastal outline of the whole continent, even if the interior was to remain largely unknown for the next two or three centuries.
The first separately printed map of Africa (as with the other known continents) appeared in Munster's Geographia from 1540 onwards and the first atlas devoted to Africa only was published in 1588 in Venice by Livio Sanuto, but the finest individual map of the century was that engraved on 8 sheets by Gastaldi, published in Venice in 1564. Apart from maps in sixteenth-century atlases generally there were also magnificent marine maps of 1596 by Jan van Linschoten (engraved by van Langrens) of the southern half of the continent with highly imaginative and decorative detail in the interior. In the next century there were many attractive maps including those of Mercator/Hondius (1606), Speed (1627), Blaeu (1 630), Visscher (1636), de Wit (c. 1670), all embellished with vignettes of harbours and principal towns and bordered with elaborate and colourful figures of their inhabitants, but the interior remained uncharted with the exception of that part of the continent known as Ethiopia, the name which was applied to a wide area including present-day Abyssinia. Here the legends of Prester John lingered on and, as so often happened in other remote parts of the world, the only certain knowledge of the region was provided by Jesuit missionaries. Among these was Father Geronimo Lobo (1595-1678), whose work A Voyage to Abyssinia was used as the basis for a remarkably accurate map published by a German scholar, Hiob Ludolf in 1683. Despite the formidable problems which faced them, the French cartographers G. Delisle (c. 1700-22), J. B. B. d'Anville (1727-49) and N. Bellin (1754) greatly improved the standards of mapping of the continent, improvements which were usually, although not always, maintained by Homann, Seutter, de Ia Rochette, Bowen, Faden and many others in the later years of the century. (Ref: Tooley, M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 42in x 33in (1.07m x 840mm)
Plate size: - 40 1/2in x 28in (1.02m x 710mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Light text offsetting
Verso: - None

$299.00 USD
More Info
1839 James Wyld Large Antique Map Provinces of Lower Canada, St Lawrence River

1839 James Wyld Large Antique Map Provinces of Lower Canada, St Lawrence River

  • Title : A New Map of the Province of Lower Canada, Describing all the Seigneuries, Townships, Grants of Land, &c. Compiled from Plans deposited in the Patent Office Quebec: by Samuel Holland, Esq. Surveyor General
  • Ref #:  50391
  • Size: 35 1/4in x 23 1/4in (895mm x 590mm)
  • Date : 1839
  • Condition: (B) Good Condition

Description: 
This large, rare hand coloured original antique map of the provinces of Lower Canada and The St Lawrence River was engraved in 1839 - dated in title - and was published by James Wyld, Charing Cross, London. 
This map has undergone some repairs and is priced accordingly. Currently this map is priced as high as $1500.

Background:
This boldly engraved map extends westward to include Lake St. Francis and the extreme tip of Upper Canada, eastward to part of New Brunswick showing the River St. John and beyond, and south to just below the Canadian border with New York and Vermont. It is filled with towns and settlements and individual named townships, roads and trails. It includes several interesting notations and delineates the "Boundary awarded to the King of Holland." Samuel Holland was originally a Dutch surveyor who fought on the side of the British during the French and Indian Wars and served as Surveyor General for the Province of Quebec and the Northern District of America. An infrequently seen issue. 

This updated example of this important map of the Lower Province of Canada, first issued by Faden in 1813, which identifies in manuscript the location of the disputed lands southeast of the St. Lawrence River,  the so-called "English Line" and "American Line," which would be the subject of an early boundary dispute between the two countries.
The original Faden map included information concerning over 100 land grants on either side of the St. Lawrence River, including the names of Land Owners. Faden's orginal map showed the surveys conducted in 1796-98 along the Scoudiac and Magaguadavic Rivers, in order to ascertain the true location of the St. Croix River.  In the present map, there is significant new information and topographcal details, showing the remarkable advancement in the surveying of the region in the 12 years after the publication of Faden's map of 1813.
This new addition includes the District of Maine, Moosehad Lake, Penobscot River and the Bowding County Township and Bingham's Purchase.  Whereas the original Faden map had no topographical detail, the present map is a dramatic improvement.
In addition to the topographical improvements, there is now an annotation in the centre of the map identifying the boundary dispute in the region, relating to the existence of two St. Croix Rivers in the region.
The second article of the Treaty of Peace between the US and Britain included  the setting of the boundary between the two nations, "From the northwest angle of Nova Scotia, viz., that angle which is formed by a line drawn due north from the source of St. Croix River to the highlands . . ."  It later became apparent that there was more than one St. Croix River.   A further treaty provision in 1794 appointed a boundary commission, which determined in 1798 that the intended St. Croix was the Schoodiac River and its northern branch Cheputnaticook. The Treaty of Ghent, concluded on December 24, 1814, agreed to provide for a final adjustment of the boundaries described in the Treaty of 1783 that had not yet been determined, which included the boundary line from the source of the River St. Croix to the most north-western point of the Lake of the Woods. 
A further commission was appointed to settle the boundary from the St. Croix to the St. Lawrence.   Joseph Bouchette and John Lawrence were hired to conduct the surveys and the reports submitted for resolution to a third nation and ultimately resolved by the Webster-Ashburton Treaty of 1842. 
The present map shows the two boundary claims at a time when they were not yet fully resolved. (Ref: M&B; Tooley; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, green, blue, red
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 35 1/4in x 23 1/4in (895mm x 590mm)
Plate size: - 35 1/4in x 23 1/4in (895mm x 590mm)
Margins: - min. 1/4in (5mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling, repair to bottom right margin , border into image
Plate area: Light soiling, creasing along left fold
Verso: - Light soiling, repairs as noted

$499.00 USD
More Info
1692 Jaillot Very Large Antique Map of Asia China, SE Asia, Middle East, Russia

1692 Jaillot Very Large Antique Map of Asia China, SE Asia, Middle East, Russia

  • Title : L' Asie divisee en ses Principales Regions....Hubert Jaillot
  • Ref #:  50612
  • Size: 35 1/2in x 23 1/2in (900mm x 595mm)
  • Date : 1692
  • Condition: (B) Good Condition

Description: 
This very large, beautifully hand coloured (with gold highlights) original antique map of Asia was engraved in 1692 - dated in title - and was published by Hubert Jaillot in his monumental Atlas Nouveau.
This map is beautifully hand coloured with gold highlights along some of the country borders and the cartouches indicating it was once part of an Imperial Atlas.
The Imperial atlases were hand coloured using gold highlights and other rare colours which at the time was extremely expensive and available at the time only to royalty and the very rich.

Background: After Nicolas Sanson, Hubert Jaillot and Pierre Duval were the most important French cartographers of the seventeenth & eighteenth centuries. Jaillot, originally a sculptor, became interested in geography after his marriage to the daughter of Nicolas Berey (1606-65), a famous map colourist, and went into partnership in Paris with Sanson's sons. There, from about 1669, he undertook the re-engraving, enlarging and re-publishing of the Sanson maps in sheet form and in atlases, sparing no effort to fill the gap in the map trade left by the destruction of Blaeu's printing establishment in Amsterdam in 1672. Many of his maps were printed in Amsterdam (by Pierre Mortier) as well as in Paris. One of his most important works was a magnificent sea atlas, Le Neptune François, published in 1693 and compiled in co-operation with J D Cassini. This was re-published shortly afterwards by Pierre Mortier in Amsterdam with French, Dutch and English texts, the charts having been re-engraved. Eventually, after half a century, most of the plates were used again as the basis for a revised issue published by J N Bellin in 1753.(Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Condition:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, green, red, brown, gold.
General color appearance: - Authentic and fresh
Paper size: - 35 1/2in x 23 1/2in (900mm x 595mm)
Plate size: - 34 1/2in x 22 1/2in (875mm x 570mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (10mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Age toning
Plate area: - Age toning, re-join to centerfold
Verso: - Age toning, several long separations to paper re-enforced with archival tape

$875.00 USD
More Info
1728 Hermann Moll Large Antique Map and View of Gibraltar - 2nd Spanish Seige

1728 Hermann Moll Large Antique Map and View of Gibraltar - 2nd Spanish Seige

  • Title : A New and Exact plan of Gibraltar with all its fortifications as they are at present….
  • Ref #:  40838
  • Size: 25in x 11in (635mm x 280mm)
  • Date : 1727
  • Condition: (B) Good Condition

Description: 
This finely engraved original antique map and view of the second Spanish siege of Gibraltar by Herman Moll was published in 1727.
Although undated, the legend at the top left of the map, gives an in-depth explanation to the map including no. 5 that refers to 'Place where at this time Barracks building for a Regiment Ap: 15. 1726. 6. The Great Church.', while the dedication is to David Colyear, 1st Earl of Portmore, Governor of Gibraltar. The plan was presumably engraved either in anticipation of, or during the second Spanish siege; Portmore was in England when the siege began, but sailed there with a relief force, arriving on 1st May, 1727. British command of the sea, coupled with the natural features of the Rock of Gibraltar on the landward side of the peninsula, combined to thwart Spanish ambition, and the siege petered to an end in 1728, with the garrison never seriously troubled. 

Background:
 Gibraltar became part of the Visigothic Kingdom of Hispania following the collapse of the Roman Empire and came under Muslim Moorish rule in 711 AD. It was permanently settled for the first time by the Moors and was renamed Jebel Tariq – the Mount of Tariq, later corrupted into Gibraltar. The Christian Crown of Castile annexed it in 1309, lost it again to the Moors in 1333 and finally regained it in 1462. Gibraltar became part of the unified Kingdom of Spain and remained under Spanish rule until 1704. It was captured during the War of the Spanish Succession by an Anglo-Dutch fleet in the name of Charles VI of Austria, the Habsburg contender to the Spanish throne. At the war's end, Spain ceded the territory to Britain under the terms of the Treaty of Utrecht of 1713.

Spain tried to regain control of Gibraltar, which Britain had declared a Crown colony, through military, diplomatic and economic pressure. Gibraltar was besieged and heavily bombarded during three wars between Britain and Spain but the attacks were repulsed on each occasion. By the end of the last siege, in the late 18th century, Gibraltar had faced fourteen sieges in 500 years. In the years after Trafalgar, Gibraltar became a major base in the Peninsular War. The colony grew rapidly during the 19th and early 20th centuries, becoming one of Britain's most important possessions in the Mediterranean. It was a key stopping point for vessels en route to India via the Suez Canal. A large British naval base was constructed there at great expense at the end of the 19th century and became the backbone of Gibraltar's economy.

British control of Gibraltar enabled the Allies to control the entrance to the Mediterranean during the Second World War. It was attacked on several occasions by German, Italian and Vichy French forces, though without causing much damage. The Spanish dictator General Francisco Franco declined to join a Nazi plan to occupy Gibraltar but revived Spain's claim to the territory after the war. As the territorial dispute intensified, Spain closed its border with Gibraltar between 1969 and 1985 and communications links were severed. Spain's position was supported by Latin American countries but was rejected by Britain and the Gibraltarians themselves, who vigorously asserted their right to self-determination. Discussions of Gibraltar's status have continued between Britain and Spain but have not reached any conclusion.
Shortly after Gibraltar's recapture, King Henry IV of Castile declared it Crown property and reinstituted the special privileges which his predecessor had granted during the previous period of Christian rule.  Four years after visiting Gibraltar in 1463, he was overthrown by the Spanish nobility and clergy. His half-brother Alfonso was declared king and rewarded Medina Sidonia for his support with the lordship of Gibraltar. The existing governor, a loyalist of the deposed Henry IV, refused to surrender Gibraltar to Medina Sidonia. After a fifteen-month siege from April 1466 to July 1467, Medina Sidonia took control of the town. He died the following year but his son Enrique was confirmed as lord of Gibraltar by the reinstated Henry IV in 1469.  In 1474 the new Duke of Medina Sidonia sold Gibraltar to a group of Jewish conversos from Cordova and Seville led by Pedro de Herrera in exchange for maintaining the garrison of the town for two years, after which time the 4,350 conversos were expelled by the Duke. His status was further enhanced by Isabella I of Castile in 1478 with the granting of the Marquisate of Gibraltar.
On 2 January 1492, after five years of war, the Moorish emirate in Spain came to an end with the Catholic Monarchs' capture of Granada. The Jews of Gibraltar were, like those elsewhere in the kingdom, expelled from Spain by order of the monarchs in March that year. Gibraltar was used by Medina Sidonia as a base for the Spanish capture of Melilla in North Africa in 1497. Two years later the Muslims of Granada were ordered to convert to Christianity or leave. Those that did not convert left for North Africa, some of them travelling via Gibraltar.
Gibraltar became Crown property again in 1501 at the order of Isabella and the following year it received a new set of royal arms, which is still used by modern Gibraltar, replacing those of Medina Sidonia. In the Royal Warrant accompanying the arms, Isabella highlighted Gibraltar's importance as "the key between these our kingdoms in the Eastern and Western Seas [the Mediterranean and Atlantic]". The metaphor was represented on the royal arms by a golden key hanging from the front gate of a battlemented fortress. The warrant charged all future Spanish monarchs to "hold and retain the said City for themselves and in their own possession; and that no alienation of it, nor any part of it, nor its jurisdiction ... shall ever be made from the Crown of Castile."
At this point in history, "Gibraltar" meant not just the peninsula but the entire surrounding area including the land on which the towns of La Línea de la Concepción, San Roque, Los Barrios and Algeciras now stand. To the east, Gibraltar was bounded by the Guadiaro River, and its northern boundaries lay in the vicinity of Castellar de la Frontera, Jimena de la Frontera, Alcalá de los Gazules, Medina-Sidonia and Tarifa. From the 16th century, the modern meaning of the name came to be adopted – specifically referring only to the town of Gibraltar and the peninsula on which it stands.
Under Spanish Crown rule, the town of Gibraltar fell into severe decline. The end of Muslim rule in Spain and the Christian capture of the southern ports considerably decreased the peninsula's strategic value. It derived some minor economic value from tuna-fishing and wine-producing industries but its usefulness as a fortress was now limited. It was effectively reduced to the status of an unremarkable stronghold on a rocky promontory and Marbella replaced it as the principal Spanish port in the region.
Gibraltar's inhospitable terrain made it an unpopular place to live. To boost the population, convicts from the kingdom of Granada were offered the possibility of serving their sentence in the Gibraltar garrison as an alternative to prison. Despite its apparent unattractiveness, Juan Alfonso de Guzmán, third Duke of Medina Sidonia, nonetheless sought to regain control of the town. In September 1506, following Isabella's death, he laid siege in the expectation that the gates would quickly be opened to his forces. This did not happen, and after a fruitless four-month blockade he gave up the attempt. Gibraltar received the title of "Most Loyal" from the Spanish crown in recognition of its faithfulness (Ref: M&B, Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: -  
Colors used: -  
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 25in x 11in (635mm x 280mm)
Plate size: - 25in x 11in (635mm x 280mm)
Margins: - Min 1/4in (5mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Small loss to the very right figure in the title cartouche not affecting the map, light creasing along folds as issued

$475.00 USD
More Info
1787 D Anville & Niebuhr V. Large Antique Map of The Red Sea Suez, Saudi Arabia

1787 D Anville & Niebuhr V. Large Antique Map of The Red Sea Suez, Saudi Arabia

  • Title : Karte des Arabischen Meerbusens oder des Rothen Meeres...MDCCLXXXVII (1787)
  • Ref #:  61154
  • Size: 31in x 23in (790mm x 585mm)
  • Date : 1787
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This very large, handsome original antique map of the Red Sea, with original decorative colour, from the town of Suez in the north to the Persian Gulf by Jean Baptiste Bourguignon D'Anville, after Carsten Niebuhr, was engraved by Henri Benedicti (in 1787, dated in title) and published by Franz Anton Schraembl (1751-1803) in his large scale Allgemeiner grosser Atlas.
The map is testimony to German cartography & engraving, both beautifully executed with superb original hand colouring. The map is adorned with inset maps of the Gulf of Suez and another scaled map of the Red Sea.

Background: The original author of this map Carsten Niebuhr (1733 - 1815) was a German born mathematician who lived in Denmark from 1760. In 1761 he was sent on a scientific expedition sponsored by Frederick V of Denmark to Egypt, Arabia and Syria together with five other scientists.
Niebuhr was the only one to survive the Danish, Arabic expedition. He returned to Copenhagen in 1767 and published the new discoveries in 1773 in 'Beschreibung von Arabien'. The work was followed with two other volumes with descriptions and maps of Arabian Peninsula in both 1774 and 1778. (Ref: Norwich; Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original 
Colors used: -  Green, yellow, red, brown
General color appearance: -  Original
Paper size: - 31in x 23in (790mm x 585mm)
Plate size: - 27 1/2in x 19 3/4in (700mm x 500mm)
Margins: - Min 2in (50mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$475.00 USD
More Info
1786 Chris. Cellarius Old, Antique Atlas Geographia - w/ 27 Maps and Armillary

1786 Chris. Cellarius Old, Antique Atlas Geographia - w/ 27 Maps and Armillary

  • Title : CHRISTOPHORI CELLARII SMALCALDENSIS GEOGRAPHIA ANTIQUA - Recognita denuo & ad veterum novorumque scriptorium fidem, historicorum maxime identidem castigate & Quinta Editione plurimis locis aucta & immutata
  • Ref #:  61153
  • Size: 8 1/2in x 5 1/2in (21.5cm x 13.5cm)
  • Date : 1786
  • Condition: (A) Good Condition

Description: 
Scarce edition of the Christopher Cellarius unique 1786 Atlas Geographiawith 27 folding maps. Overall condition of the Atlas is Good (see below) with the contents in VG to Fine condition.
Beautiful example of this iconic Atlas complete.

Description: "CHRISTOPHORI CELLARII SMALCALDENSIS GEOGRAPHIA ANTIQUA - Recognita denuo & ad veterum novorumque scriptorium fidem, historicorum maxime identidem castigate & Quinta Editione plurimis locis aucta & immutata - Huic demum Sextae Editioni Tot CHARTAS ex majori auctoris Geographia antiqua quot ad minorem hanc illustrandam requirebantur, DUPLICEMQUE INDICEM QUORUM Priori vetera locorum nomina novis praeponuntur Posteriori nova veteribus, Addidit, totam recensuit & Scholarum usui accommodavit. SAMUEL PATRICK, L.L.D. EDITIO altera & castigatior.LONDINISumptibus J & T. POTE, E. BALLARD, C. BATHURST, J. F. & C. RIVINGTON, T. LONGMAN & G. GINGER M.DCC.LXXXVI" (1786)
Bound in full leather with five raised bands to spine. Volume measures approx. 21.5cm x 13.5cm x 2cm. The front and rear boards are cracked to spine edges and have some movement. Chipped to top and bottom of spine and corners, with small loss. There are a couple of chips to leather. The first page is the title page and last leaf is the last leaf of text. Fixed endpapers are browned.
The title page, and last leaf are browned to edges, and there is an ink mark to last leaf. Couple of leaves and a map are detached. One page has large corner chip, with loss. There are a couple of ink numbers/marks to rear of one of the maps, and the occasional ink mark and splash. Overall the majority of contents are in clean and tight condition.
There are 27 folding maps with armillary Sphere. Atlas content index (see images)

Background: Geographica was one of the most popular geographical publications of the 17th and 18th centuries lasting into the 19th century. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Atlas size: - 8 1/2in x 5 1/2in (21.5cm x 13.5cm)
Map size: - 9 1/2in x 8 1/2in (23cm x 21.5cm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - See above
Plate area: - See above
Verso: - See above

$1,350.00 USD
More Info
1720 Bowen & Owen British Road Maps Collection Consisting of 83 Pages = 166 Maps

1720 Bowen & Owen British Road Maps Collection Consisting of 83 Pages = 166 Maps

Description: 
These wonderful, beautifully detailed original antique copper-plate engraved double sided Road Maps of the counties and regions of England and Wales were compiled by John Owen and Engraved by Emmanual Bowen in the 1720 edition of Britannia Depicta or Ogilby Improved.
We have a total of 83 double sided pages remaining of the original 137 pages. 5 are hand coloured the rest are B&W. All are in VG to fine condition with light age toning to some.

Background: These delightful and fascinating small road maps with their embellishments of coats of arms and historical notes come from an 18th century road atlas - Britannia Depicta. The strip road maps of England and Wales first appeared in 1675 with the publishing of John Ogilby's magnificent atlas Britannia, containing 100 folio sized road maps. By the first part of the 18th century there was public demand for a small road atlas that could be easily carried by travellers on horseback or for those who could afford to take a coach. There were a number of abortive attempts to produce such a handy sized atlas but others succeeded like John Senex who published his small road atlas in 1719. A year later Britannia Depicta was published by Thomas Bowles. The interesting notes that appear on the front and back of each map were compiled by the antiquarian and lawyer John Owen whilst the engraving was undertaken by Emanuel Bowen This was Bowen's first major work as a cartographical engraver for which he received a part share in the atlas in payment for his labours. The format of the atlas and maps met with the public's approval and the atlas was republished many times over the next forty years until the last edition in 1764. The double sided Road Maps each measure about 5 x 7 inches.
The maps are highly entertaining describing the route taken with sights of churches to gallows and many other misc. items of interest for travelers of the 17th and 18th centuries, fascinating maps.

The following list show all the double sided pages numbering no. 1 to 273. Each map follows the road direction indicating city & town names, rivers, mountains and places of interest along the roads shown (the pages missing are struck through)

1/2 CARDIGANSHIRE. / London, Uxbridge, Beaconsfield
3/4 High Wycombe, Tetsworth, Oxford, Islip. Islip, Enston, Morton Broadway.
5/6 Broadway, Pershore, Worcester, Bramyard. / Bramyard Leominster, Presteign.
7/8 Rhayader, Aberystwyth. SUSSEX
9/10 London, Ewell, Leatherhead, Dorking / Billingshurst, Amberley.
11/12 NOTTINGHAMSHIRE. London, Ware, Puckridge.
13/14 Royston, Huntingdon Stilton/Stilton, Stamford.
15/16 Grantham, Newark, Tuxford? Tuxford, Bawtry, Doncaster.
17/18 Wentbridge, Ferrybridge, Tadcaster, York/ York Boroughbridge, North Allerton.
19/20 Darlington, Durham, Chester le Street/Newcastle Morpeth.
21/22 Alnwick, Berwick. MIDDLESEX.
23/24 London, Hounslow, Maidenhead, Reading/Newbury, Hungerford, Marlborough.
25/26 Marlborough, Chippenham, Marshfield/Bristol Axbridge,Huntspil
27/28 NORTHAMPTONSHIRE. London, Uxbridge, Amersham, Missenden.
29/30 Wendover, Aylesbury, Buckingham, Banbury/Banbury Stratford, Caughton
31/32 Bromsgrove, Kidderminster, Bridgnorth. Banbury, Campden. GLAMORGANSHIRE
33/34 London, Brentford, Hounslow Slough/ Maidenhead, Henley, Dorchester,, Abingdon
35/36 Abingdon, Faringdon, Lechlade / Gloucester Monmouth
37/38 Monmouth, Newport, Cardiff/Llandaff, Cowbridge, Burton
39/40 Burton, Swansea,Llanelly, Kidwelly Haverfordwest,St Davids
41/42 London, Deptford,Dartford, Rochester, Rainham. Description of London on verso
43/44 Sittingbourne, Canterbury, Dover. Part of an Description of London  on verso
45/46 London, Romford, Chelmsford, Kelvedon, Colchester, Harwich.
47/48 London, Eltham, Farningham, Wrotham. Part of a description on verso
49/50 Maidstone, Ashford, Hythe. ANGLESEY.
51/52 London, High Barnet, St. Albans, Dunstable, Stony Stratford,Towcester

53/54 Towcester, Daventry, Dunchurch, Coventry, Coleshill, Lichfield
55/56 Lichfield, Rugeley, Stone, Darleston, Nantwich, Tarporley, Chester
57/58 Chester, Hawarden, Northop, Denbigh, Conway Beaumaris, Holyhead
59/60 London, Brentford, Hounslow, Staines, Bagshot. Description  of London on verso.
61/62 Basingstoke, Andover, Salisbury.
63/64 Shaftesbury, Sherborne, Crewkerne, Axminster, Exeter, Chidley
65/66 Ashburton, Plymouth, Looe, Foy, Tregony
67/68 Golsenna, Penzance, Lands End. Part of a description of London on verso
69/70 Southwark, Stretham, Croydon, East Grinstead, Newhaven, Brighton, New Shoreham.
71/72 London, Wandsworth, Kingston, Guildford. Godalming Description of London on verso.
73/74 Lippock, Petersfield, Portsmouth, London, Bromley, Sevenoaks, Tunbridge
75/76 Lamberhurst, Newenden, Rye. Part of a description of London on verso.
77/78 Andover, Amesbury, Warminster. Part of a description on London on verso.
79/80 Bruton, East Lidford, Bridgwater, Dulverton
81/82 South Moulton, Barnstaple, Torrington, Hatherleigh, Launceston, Camelford
83/84 Padstow, Columb, Truro, Part of a description of London on verso.
85/86 Chippenham, Bath Wells, Marlborough, Devises, Trowbridge, Wells
87/88 Stilton, Peterborough, Crowland, Spalding Part of a description of London on verso.
89/90 Boston, Sleaford, Lincoln. STAFFORDSHIRE.
91/92 Darleston Bridge, Newcastle under Lyme, Warrington, Wigan, Whittle, Preston Garstang
93/94 Garstang, Lancaster, Bolton, Kendal, Penrith, Carlisle
95/96 SURREY. Guildford, Godalming, Midhurst, Chichester.
97/98 Midhurst, Petersfield, Winchester. 
DERBYSHIRE.
99/100 Stony Stratford, Northampton, Market Harborough, Leicester, Loughborough, Derby
101/102 Tamesford, Eaton, Stilton, Peterborough. Part of a description of London on verso.
103/104 Market Deeping, Sleaford, Lincoln, Glamfordbridges, Barton.
105/106 Hull, Beverley, Bridlington, Flamborough Head. CAMBRIDGESHIRE.
107/108 Puckeridge, Cambridge, Ely, Downham, Kings Lynn
109/110 MERIONETHSHIRE. Campden, Evesholme, Worcester.
111/112 Tenbury, Ludlow, Bishops Castle, Montgomery. Description of the Fens on verso.
113/114 High Barnet, Hatfield, Baldock, Biggleswade, St. Neots, Oakham
115/116 RUTLANDSHIRE. Puckeridge, Newmarket.
117/118 Thetford, Attleborough, Norwich. 
BEDFORDSHIRE
119/120 St. Albans, Bedford, Wellingborough, Kettering, Rockingham, Oakham.
121/122 Oakham, Melton Mowbray, Nottingham, Mansfield, Rotherham, Barnsley
123/124 Barnsley, Halifax, Skipton, Richmond.
125/126 SHROPSHIRE. Meriden, Birmingham, Dudley, Bridgnorth, Wenlock.
127/128 Shrewsbury, Welshpool. 
ISLANDS IN THE BRITISH OCEAN
129/130 Bagshot, Farnham, Alresford, Southampton, Salisbury
131/132 HERTFORDSHIRE. Newmarket, Swaffham.
133/134 Fakenham, Walsingham, Wells. Newmarket, Bury St. Edmunds.
135/136 Basingstoke, Stockbridge, Cranford, Blandford, Dorchester, Weymouth
137/138 BUCKINGHAMSHIRE. Colchester, Ipswich, Woodbridge.
139/140 Saxmundham, Beccles, Yarmouth. 
OXFORDSHIRE.
141/142 Bristol, Chipping Sodbury, Tetbury, Cirencester, Burford, Banbury.
143/144 HEREFORDSHIRE. Bristol, Chepstow, Monmouth.
145/146 Hereford, Leominster, Ludlow, Church Stretton, Shrewsbury.
147/148 Whitchurch, Chester. DEVONSHIRE.
149/150 Bristol, Wells, Glastonbury, Taunton, Wellington, Exeter.
151/152 WORCESTERSHIRE. Bristol, Dursley.
153/154 Gloucester, Tewksbury, Worcester. 
DORSETSHIRE,
155/156 Bristol, Wells, Glastonbury, Somerton, Crewkerne, Frampton, Weymouth
157/158 Cambridge, St. Neots, Higham Ferrers. Description of Cambridge University on verso.
159/160 Northampton, Rugby, Coventry. EAST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE
161/162 Carlisle, Jedburgh,, Kelso, Berwick.
163/164 BRECONSHIRE. Chester, Wrexham, Sellatyn, Llanfyllin.
165/166 Llanfair, , Tregynon. Newtown, Llanbedr, Builth Wells, Brecon.
167/168
169/170 Dartmouth, Exeter, Silverton, Bumpkin, Minehead.
171/172 PEMBROKESHIRE. St. David's Fishguard, Newport, Cardigan.
173/174 Llanerch, Llanbadern Vawr, Talabont, Machynlleth Dinas Mawddy.
175/176 Bala, Bettws y Coed, Ruthin, , Holywell. Description of Exeter on verso.
177/178 Exeter, Crediton, Barnstaple, Ilfracombe, Bideford, Torrington.
179/180 CORNWALL. Exeter, Tavistock
181/182 St. Ives, Liskeard, Lostwithiel, Truro. 
DENBIGHSHIRE
183/184 Gloucester, Campden, Stratford, Warwick, Coventry.
185/186 MONTGOMERYSHIRE. Gloucester, Huntley, Ross, Hereford
187/188 Pembridge, Presteign, Montgomery. LEICESTERSHIRE.
189/190 Hereford, Worcester,Droitwich,, Bromsgrove, Solihull, Meriden, Coventry, Leicester
191/192 HUNTINGDONSHIRE. Huntingdon, Erith, Ely, Soham
193/194 Bury St. Edmunds, Needham Market, Ipswich. SUFFOLK
195/196 Ipswich, Norwich, Cromer.
197/198 Kings Lynn, Swaffham, Thetford. Description of the British Ocean Islands on verso.
199/200 Ixworth, Ipswich, Harwich. NORFOLK.
201/202 King's Lynn, Billingford, Norwich, Yarmouth.
203/204 MONMOUTHSHIRE. Monmouth, Abergavenny, Crickhowell.
205/206 Brecon, Llandovery, Llanbedor. LINCOLNSHIRE
207/208 Nottingham, Newark. Lincoln, Market Rasen, Grimsby.
209/210 Oxford, Faringdon, Purton. Description of Oxford University on verso.
211.212 Malmesbury, Bristol, Arms of the Colleges of Oxford University on verso.
213/214 Oxford, Burcester, Buckingham, Bedford, Cambridge.
215/216 Cartouche and 21 College Arms of Cambridge. Map on verso Oxford to beyond Newbury.
217/218 Basingstoke, Alton, Petersfield, Chichester. WARWICKSHIRE
219/220 Oxford, Banbury, Southam, Coventry, Nuneaton, Ashby, Derby.
221/222 BERKSHIRE. Oxford, Abingdon, Great Shelford, Hungerford.
223/224 North Tudworth, Salisbury, Cranborne, Wimborne Minster, Poole. RADNORSHIRE
225/226 Presteign, Builth, Carmarthen.
227/228 GLOUCESTERSHIRE. Salisbury, Burbage, Marlborough.
229/230 Burford, Campden. NORTHUMBERLAND.
231/232 Tynemouth, Newcastle, Hexham, Haltwhistle, Carlisle.
233/234 CAERNARVONSHIRE. Welshpool, Dinas Mawddwy, Dollgelley.
235/236 Harlech, Dolbadern, Caernarvon. LANCASHIRE.
237/238 York, Knaresborough, Ripley, Skipton, Settle, Hornby, Lancaster.
239/240 CHESHIRE. York, Tadcaster, Leeds,
241/242 Rochdale, Manchester, Warrington, Frodsham, Chester, Manchester, Stockport.
243/244 Buxton, Derby. CARMARTHENSHIRE
245/246 Carmarthen, Cardigan, Llanbedr, Aberystwyth.
247/248 ESSEX. Chelmsford, Sudbury.
249/250 Bury St. Edmunds, Chelmsford, Saffron Walden. 
KENT
251/252 Chelmsford to Maldon,Rayleigh and Dover
253/254 Exeter, Lyme Regis, Description of Dorchester and Lyme Regis on verso.
255/256 Bridport, Dorchester. Plymouth, Dartmouth. WEST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE.
257/258 Ferrybridge, Boroughbridge,Richmond, Barnard Castle, Ferrybridge, Pontefract, Wakefield.
259/260 CUMBERLAND. Kendal, Keswick.
261/262 Cockermouth. Egremont, Cockermouth, Carlisle.
263/264 Alresford,Winchester, Rumsey, Ringwood, Poole, Lymington, Southampton, Winchester.
265/266 FLINTSHIRE. Shrewsbury, Wrexham.
267/268 Mold, Holywell. Chester, Flint, Holywell. COUNTY DURHAM
269/270 Whitby, Guisborough, Morton, Durham,Sunderland,Tynemouth, Kingscleer.
271/272 WESTMORLAND. York, New Malton, Pickering.
273 Whitby, New Malton, Scarborough,Plain on verso. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early (5)
Colors used: - Red, yellow, blue (5)
General color appearance: - Authentic (5)
Paper size: - 8in x 6in (200mm x 150mm)ea
Plate size: - 8in x 6in (200mm x 150mm)ea
Margins: - Min 1/4in (5mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - Light age toning
Verso: - Light age toning

$1,659.00 USD
More Info
1797 La Perouse Antique Print View De Kastri Bay, Ulchsky Khabarovsk Kai, Russia

1797 La Perouse Antique Print View De Kastri Bay, Ulchsky Khabarovsk Kai, Russia

Description: 
This large original antique copper plate engraved print a view of the very early settlement at De Kastri Bay, in the Ulchsky District of Khabarovsk Kai, Eastern Russia opposite the Sakhalin Islands, by Jean-François de Galaup, Comte de la Pérouse was published in the 1st edition of the Atlas du voyage de La Perouse, Paris 1797.

De-Kastri was named for the former name of the bay on which it stands. The bay was discovered by La Pérouse on July 25, 1787 and named after the sponsor of the expedition—the then Secretary of State of the French Navy, the Marquis de Castries. The bay is a convenient natural refuge for vessels, giving it strategic importance from a military viewpoint.
The settlement was officially  founded in 1853, although the land where it was situated would not officially be Russian territory until the signing of the Treaty of Aigun five years later.
In 1854, the difficult task of defending Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky when it came under siege from the British and French forces during the Crimean War brought to attention the difficulties of supply and defense of the Kamchatka Peninsula, where a large section of the Russian Pacific Fleet was based. It was decided to move the port from Kamchatka without waiting for another attack. In the spring of 1855, the Russian navy's weapons and sailors under the leadership of Rear Admiral Vasily Zavoyko headed toward the mouth of the Amur River; however, the river mouth was still covered with ice. It was decided to wait for the break-up, hiding in the Bay of de Castries from the superior forces of French and English. Russian ships were discovered there, but managed to escape to the Amur River in the Strait of Tartary before the arrival of enemy reinforcements. The British and French did not know that Sakhalin was an island, and spent the later years of the war waiting in vain for the Russian fleet at its southern coast.

La Perouse set sail from France in 1785 to continue the discoveries of Captain Cook. He was shipwrecked in 1788 but his narrative, maps, and views survived and were published in 1797. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: -  
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 17in x 11in (435mm x 280mm)
Plate size: - 17in x 11in (435mm x 280mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (10mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Small repairs to margins, no loss
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$175.00 USD
More Info
1784 Cook & John Webber 1st Edition Antique Print of Dancing Woman of Tahiti

1784 Cook & John Webber 1st Edition Antique Print of Dancing Woman of Tahiti

  • Title : A Young Woman of Otaheite, Dancing - J Webber del - J K Sherwin
  • Ref  :  21370
  • Size: 11in x 9in (280mm x 230mm)
  • Date : 1784
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This finely engraved original antique print of a dancing girl of Tahiti - visited by Captain James Cook during the third voyage - by Cooks original artist during his third Voyage, John Webber - was engraved by J K Sherwin and published in the 1st official English publication of Cooks third Voyage in 1784. 
*Please note, this is not one of the prints produced for the later unofficial publications of Cooks voyages, of which there were many. This was published for the Ist original and official English publication of Cooks Voyages.

John Webber was born in London, of Swiss descent. In the spring of 1776 he showed three works at the Royal Academy's annual exhibition, where they attracted the attention of Dr Daniel Solander, President of the Royal Society and a friend and colleague of botanist Joseph Banks. Both had sailed with Captain James Cook on his first voyage of exploration in the Pacific aboard the 'Endeavour', and were looking for a suitable artist to accompany them on a third trip. Solander recommended Webber to the Admiralty, and he was appointed almost immediately. 
The voyage commenced on 12 July 1776. Upon his return to London in 1780, Webber submitted about 200 finished works to the Admiralty, which he had made on the voyage. From autumn 1780 until summer 1784, he re-drew many of the drawings and supervised the engravers and printers who were preparing the images for publication, under the direction of Lord Sandwich ...

Cook's First Voyage (1768-1771)
The first voyage under Captain James Cook's command was primarily of a scientific nature. The expedition on the Endeavour initially sailed to Tahiti to observe the transit of the planet Venus in order to calculate the earth's distance from the sun. Cook landed on the South Pacific island in April of 1769 and in June of that year the astronomical observations were successfully completed. In addition to these labors, very good relations with the Tahitians were maintained and the naturalists Joseph Banks and Daniel C. Solander conducted extensive ethnological and botanical research. 

Another purpose of the voyage was to explore the South Seas to determine if an inhabitable continent existed in the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Upon leaving Tahiti, Cook named and charted the Society Islands and then continued southwest to New Zealand. His circumnavigation and exploration of that country also resulted in a detailed survey. Cook proceeded to Australia, where he charted the eastern coast for 2,000 miles, naming the area New South Wales. As a result of these surveys, both Australia and New Zealand were annexed by Great Britain. In addition to these explorations, the Endeavour returned to England without a single death from scurvy among its men, an historic feat at the time. The combination of these accomplishments brought Cook prominence, promotion, and the opportunity to lead further expeditions.

Cook's Second Voyage (1772-1775)
Based on the success of his first voyage, Cook was appointed by the Admiralty to lead a second expedition. Two ships were employed with Cook commanding the Resolution and Captain Tobias Furneaux in charge of the Adventure. The purpose was to circumnavigate the globe as far south as possible to confirm the location of a southern continent. Cook proved that there was no "Terra Australis," which supposedly was located between New Zealand and South America. Cook was convinced, however, that there was land beyond the southern ice fields. In his pursuit of this idea, this expedition was the first European voyage to cross the Antarctic Circle. In addition, in two great sweeps through the Southern latitudes, Cook made an incredible number of landfalls including New Zealand, Easter Island, the Marquesas, Tahiti and the Society Islands, the Tonga Islands, the New Hebrides, New Caledonia, and a number of smaller islands. 

In addition to these navigational accomplishments and the accompanying expansion of geographical knowledge, the expedition also recorded a vast amount of information regarding the Pacific islands and peoples, proved the value of the chronometer as an instrument for calculating longitude, and improved techniques for preventing scurvy.

Cook's Third Voyage (1776-1779)
In the course of his first two voyages, Cook circumnavigated the globe twice, sailed extensively into the Antarctic, and charted coastlines from Newfoundland to New Zealand. Following these achievements, Cook's third voyage was organized to seek an efficient route from England to southern and eastern Asia that would not entail rounding the Cape of Good Hope. The search for such a Northwest (or Northeast) Passage had been on the agenda of northern European mariners and merchants since the beginning of European expansion in the late fifteenth century. England's growing economic and colonial interests in India in the later eighteenth century provided the stimulus for the latest exploration for this route.

Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: -  
Colors used: -  
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 11in x 9in (280mm x 230mm)
Plate size: - 11in x 9in (280mm x 230mm)
Margins: - 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - Light soiling

$475.00 USD
More Info
1980 R V Tooley The Mapping of America 1st Edition, Signed

1980 R V Tooley The Mapping of America 1st Edition, Signed

Description:
Signed first edition of R V Tooley's The Mapping of America by RV Tooley, London: Holland Press, 1980, hardcover. Copy #49 from an edition of 300 specially bound copies, Cartographica 2.
Includes numerous black and white maps and an index by Douglas Matthews. A close to near fine copy in three quarter leather binding with marbled paper covered boards and all page edges gilt but with a tiny rub to the spine and some light rubbing to bottom of boards, else fine.
Signed under frontispiece photograph of Tooley.

Ronald Vere Tooley (1898 - 1986) was an English map dealer, an authority on early maps and cartographers, a noted compiler of catalogues on maps, cartography and antiquarian books, author of Maps and Map-makers, and founder of the Map Collectors' Circle which published a series of monographs on historical cartography in the period 1963-1975. He is considered the founder of the antiquarian map trade.
Tooley was born on Michaelmas and adopted the nickname "Mick"

Tooley was born and raised in Islington, London, and educated at the City of London School. Towards the end of World War I he enlisted in the Queen’s Westminster Rifles. After his basic training he left for France and took part in the Battle of Cambrai, where he was one of 120 survivors from an initial force of 400 men. On being demobilised in 1919 and having no definite career plans, he came across an illustrated catalogue of antiquarian books, published by James Tregaskis of Great Russell Street. The idea of working in the bookselling field appealed to him, and armed with a letter of introduction he made the acquaintance of Francis Edwards Ltd., and was summarily employed.
After World War I the book trade enjoyed a time of relative prosperity, but with the Wall Street collapse in 1929, economic depression hit the commercial sector in many countries, the secondhand book trade being no exception. In the 1930s Tooley left Francis Edwards Ltd and opened The Atlas Bookshop, just off Charing Cross Road, and started dealing almost exclusively in antiquarian maps. Between 1932 and 1934 he collaborated with a Mr M. Sinelnikoff of Orion Booksellers Ltd. Sinelnikoff’s passion was old maps, charts and globes, and with Tooley's interest, a fertile conjunction of scholarly minds was created. Tooley had always been interested in Colour Plate books, and in 1935 Batsford published his first book on the subject Some English Books with Coloured Plates. When The Atlas Bookshop closed in 1936 Tooley started work at the Parker Gallery in Albemarle Street - the firm specialising in military and sporting prints as well as old maps. With the outbreak of World War II in 1939 Tooley found work as a telephone operator, but still worked with old books and maps in his spare time.
In 1946 the management of Francis Edwards Ltd, keenly aware of Tooley's considerable business expertise and knowledge of old maps, invited him to rejoin the firm. Here he continued his research, spending long hours in the Map Room of the British Museum. His talents soon led to his being appointed a director of the firm. In 1949 his second book Maps & Map-makers was published, praised as a sound introduction and guide to a complex field, and running to many editions.[3] Tooley retired from Francis Edwards Ltd in 1975 and in 1979 joined Peter Scott and Peter Kalms in setting up a new company R.V.Tooley Ltd, he was joined by his stepson Douglas Adams and in October 1979 his stepson Stephen Luck joined them, first trading at Tring, Hertfordshire and then in the Spring of 1980 33 Museum Street, this company closed in 1982 and became Tooley Adams & Co. Together they developed the firm into one of the leading antique map dealers, supplying maps to dealers, museums and libraries all over the world.
"The Map Collector’s Series" is widely regarded as the greatest of Tooley's achievements. The idea of producing a series of monographs on maps was first discussed in 1960 with Robert Stockwell. The interest generated by this idea was widespread and led to The Map Collector’s Circle being formed in April 1963 under Tooley and David Schrire. The series was acclaimed throughout the world, and seen as an important contribution to cartography. It also led to the founding of the Carta Press, aimed at publishing authoritative works on cartography. The first publication, in 1968, was Maps of the African Continent and Southern Africa, and was followed in 1970 by County Atlases of the British Isles by R.A. Skelton of the Map Room of the British Museum. The Map Collector magazine was started by Tooley in 1977 when the Map Collector’s Circle ceased publishing. Each issue of The Map Collector consisted of articles and information provided by respected authorities, collectors and dealers. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

$375.00 USD
More Info
1874 Colonial Govt. Text & Maps on Boundary between South Australia & Victoria

1874 Colonial Govt. Text & Maps on Boundary between South Australia & Victoria

  • Title : 1874 Victoria - Papers relating to The Boundary Line Between South Australia and victoria - presented to both houses of parliament by his excellencys Command...John Ferres, Gov. Printer, Melbourne
  • Ref #:  91463
  • Size: 4to
  • Date : 1874
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This very scarce original Australian Government report prepared for both houses of Parliament over the boundary between the states of South Australia and Victoria was presented in 1874. The bound submission contains 28 pages of parliamentary conversations, reports and tables relating to the conflict over the boundary and two photo lithograph maps one of the Lower part of the Glenelg River showing the old and new proposed boundary lines and the 2nd map shows the original boundary line between NSW and South Australia and the subsequent Victorian boundary line.
This is an amazingly rare document (I have never seen one outside of the state or federal libraries) giving us a snapshot into a controversial period in the history of the two states.
Bound in 4to (14in x 9in) hard boards with ties, clean paper (some joined at top of page) in fine condition.

Background:
The border between the Australian state of South Australia and what is today the State of Victoria was established in 1836 by imperial letters patent "as the 141st degree meridian of longitude east of Greenwich". In 1836 the land we now call Victoria was part of the colony of New South Wales, so the original Victorian border was actually drawn between the colonies of South Australia and New South Wales. Due to human error by numerous explorers and surveyors, it took more than 75 years and a protracted legal dispute before the precise placement of the border was settled, resulting in the forfeiture of more than 1,300 km2 (500 sq mi) of territory from South Australia to Victoria.
Following the establishment of the colony of South Australia in 1835, the region between the coast and the Murray River was rapidly being settled by squatters selecting large runs for sheep grazing. With no clear border legal oversight was impossible. An accurate border needed to be defined. The earliest relevant reference to the eastern boundary of South Australia is contained in a despatch dated 30 September 1844 from Governor Grey of that Colony to Lord Stanley. The Governor reminded the Secretary of State that it would be extremely difficult to determine with accuracy a number of points upon the earth's surface through which the 141st degree of East longitude passes, and pointed out that in addition to difficulty there would be attendant expense both in ascertainment and maintenance.
In 1839 Charles Tyers was transferred from the Royal Navy to the Colonial Service and instructed by Sir George Gipps, the Governor of New South Wales, to ascertain the precise longitude at the mouth of the Glenelg River so that a distance to the 141st meridian (the eastern border of South Australia) could be measured.
Several months later Tyers completed a survey from Melbourne to the Glenelg River and on an expanse of sandy beach he formed a broad arrow with limestone rocks. This became known as Tyers' Mark and was used to determine the starting point for the border survey. Due to primarily inadequate equipment this was later determined to be 2 miles and 4 chains (3.3 km) in error.
For several years following Tyers' survey no action was taken to extend his work but by 1845 the need to have the boundary line defined on the ground had become urgent, particularly to the east of Mount Gambier. South Australian pastoralists had worked their way east from the coast and there were disputes when they met pastoralists from the Wimmera country pushing their way westwards with flocks of sheep.
There was uncertainty as to which Government should grant pastoral licenses to the squatters and which had legal control. In November 1846 the Colonial Secretary's Office directed surveyor Henry Wade to proceed from Sydney to the disputed territory to define a "Boundary for Police Purposes".
By March 1847 Wade had got his party of seven and equipment at the mouth of the Glenelg River. He was joined by assistant surveyor Edward White who had been appointed by the South Australian government to act as an observer on its behalf.
After much deprivation and hardship due to drought and reluctance by his men to continue with poor work conditions, Wade was still 155 miles (250 km) from the Murray River after nine months of swamp, sand dunes and broken equipment. The expedition collapsed at the 36th parallel of latitude. On 16 December 1847 the South Australian Government published a proclamation that the "line as marked on the ground" by Wade should be "deemed and construed" to be the eastern boundary of South Australia. In March, 1849 New South Wales issued a proclamation in similar terms. Wade later died in 1854.
As the survey was only partially completed the two colonies were in agreement that surveyor White should complete Wade's line to the Murray River as soon as possible. This was doubly urgent as the colony of Victoria was to be proclaimed within twelve months further complicating legal and later political matters.
In August 1849 the extension from Wade's line was begun. White and his party of five were similarly troubled by the severe nature of the Big Desert mallee country: where there was little water in 1847 there was none two years later. Within two weeks mutinous men had deserted him and two of his three horses collapsed from being without water for four days. White led the other until it also lay down, he himself was also on the verge of collapse but he managed to bleed the horse and drink half a pint of the blood. Lost, he did not know how far from the Murray River he was but he managed to stagger on for about two miles (3.2 km) to find himself on the riverbank at the border of three states and the survey completed. After drinking and resting he retreated back to the dead horses and collecting his saddle and bridle he returned to the river, managed to cross it and borrow a horse at Chowilla sheep station. He rode 180 miles (290 km) to Adelaide and filed a report on the survey. White died three years later.
Doubts as to the accuracy of the Wade-White line grew with the availability of better astronomical equipment and the advent of the telegraph. As a result of appointments of Government Astronomers in Sydney and Melbourne there were far more precise values for the longitudes of these places and hence the 141st longitude of the legal border.
By agreement an expedition left Adelaide in April 1868 for Chowilla near the Murray River and the border. It was led by George Smalley, N.S.W. Government Astronomer and Charles Todd South Australian Superindentent of Telegraphs. The purpose was to make transit observations of eleven stars whilst similar observations were made in Melbourne and Sydney. Whilst Tyers had used a small three inch (76 mm) theodolite this expedition had a 45-inch (1,100 mm) telescope, the largest available portable device in Australia at the time.
As a result of their observations Smalley and Todd declared the new 141st meridian. This led to the discovery that the proclaimed border on the ground was at least two miles and 19 chains (3.6 km) to the west of the more accurate measurement of the 141st meridian. The "Disputed Territory" as it was termed between the surveyed border and the actual 141st meridian contained over 500 square miles (1295 km²) of land. By 1849, 47% of it had already been sold freehold or leased out by the Victorian Government. If the more accurate border were adopted, Victoria would not have owned the land to be able to sell or lease it. This was the beginning of the battle of the Disputed Territory, a bone of contention which was to last for more than forty years.
The South Australian Government did not let the matter rest. In 1874 it suggested the value of the land was about £800,000. Between 1883 and 1893 South Australia sent more than 70 letters or telegrams to Melbourne seeking Victorian relinquishment or financial redress. There were many futile conferences. The nearest to an agreement between the two states was in 1908. Then it was decided, subject to ratification by Parliament, that £215,000 should be regarded as compensation to South Australia. Parliament did not ratify the proposal, nor did anything come of the 1909 South Australian premier's plan to send surveyors to subdivide some of the land on the east of White's marked border, the last "legally proclaimed" border.
South Australia finally abandoned all hope of settlement, due to Victoria's intransigence, and in 1911 it appealed to the High Court only to have the appeal dismissed. In 1914, it resorted to an appeal to the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council which unanimously ruled in favour of Victoria. (Ref Tooley M&B)

General Description:
 Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
 Paper color: - White
 Age of map color: - 
 Colors used: - 
 General color appearance: - 
 Map #1 size: - 13 1/2in x 11in (345mm x 280mm)
 Map #2 size: - 14in x 13 1/2in (355mm x 345mm)
 Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)
 
 Imperfections:
 Margins: - None
 Plate area: - None
 Verso: - None

$850.00 USD
More Info
1817 James Cook Antique Atlas, 2nd Voyage Pacific & Antartica - 1 Map 21 Prints

1817 James Cook Antique Atlas, 2nd Voyage Pacific & Antartica - 1 Map 21 Prints

Description: 
This fine original antique French Atlas of Captain James Cooks 2nd Voyage of discovery to the Pacific, The Great South land - Antarctica, translated from the English by M Henry & M Breton, was published by V Lepetit. Paris in 1817 - dated.
This atlas contains 22 (of 27) copper-plate engraved prints & map, listed below, sold as a collection of prints.
The atlas covers have been removed. Pages are generally clean with light aging to borders, overall VG, 8vo, each page size is 7in x 5in (180mm x 125mm)

  1. Carte des Decouvertes saites dans la Mer Pacifique...Capitaine Cook...1774
    2. Isles de Glacee
    3. Crombes de mer
    4. 
    5. 
    6. Coupapow
    7. 
    8. Cimetierre de L Isle d Amesterdam
    9. Homme de Lisle de Paques
    10. Femme de Lisle de Paques
    11. Monumens de Isle de Paques
    12. Baie de la Resolution
    13. Flotte d'Oparee
    14. Cynaimai
    15. Ohedidee
    16. Ile de Rotterdam
    17. Pirogues des Isles des Aimes
    18. Debarquement a Erramanga
    19. Ile de Tanna
    20.  Hommes de la Nouvelle Caledonie
    21. Femme de la nouvelle Caledone
    22. Ornemens et armes de la nouvelle Caledonie
    23. Isle des pines Norfolk
    24.
    25.
    26. Canal de Noel
    27. Baie de la Possession

Cook's Second Voyage (1772-1775)
Two ships were employed with Cook commanding the Resolution and Captain Tobias Furneaux in charge of the Adventure. The purpose was to circumnavigate the globe as far south as possible to confirm the location of a southern continent. Cook proved that there was no "Terra Australis," which supposedly was located between New Zealand and South America. Cook was convinced, however, that there was land beyond the southern ice fields. In his pursuit of this idea, this expedition was the first European voyage to cross the Antarctic Circle.

Captain James Cook navigator, was born on 27 October 1728 at Marton-in-Cleveland, Yorkshire, England, the son of a Scottish labourer and his Yorkshire wife. He grew up on a farm at Great Ayton, attending the village school, and at 17 was apprenticed to a shopkeeper at Staithes. After eighteen months, with the consent of all concerned, he gave this up for a more enticing apprenticeship of three years under John Walker, a Quaker coal-shipper of Whitby. Here he made some headway with mathematics and navigation and served two years before the mast in the Baltic trade. In 1755 Walker offered him a command, but instead Cook joined H.M.S. Eagle and within a month was master's mate. After two years on the Channel service, he was promoted master of the Pembroke, and in 1758 crossed the Atlantic in her and took part in the siege of Louisburg and the survey of the St Lawrence River that led to the capture of Quebec. Transferred to the Northumberland, he began surveying the coasts of Nova Scotia and Newfoundland, in the winter months at Halifax reading solidly in his chosen subjects.
Back in England late in 1762 he married Elizabeth Batts (1742-1832?) of Shadwell, but soon returned to the Newfoundland survey, in 1764 winning his first command in the Grenville. The acquaintance he made here with the future Admiral Sir Hugh Palliser, then governor of Newfoundland and Labrador, the publication of his Newfoundland charts and his observation of a solar eclipse brought him to the attention of the Royal Society and the Admiralty. Although the society recommended Alexander Dalrymple as leader of the expedition to the South Seas to observe the transit of Venus, the Admiralty chose Cook, promoted him from master to lieutenant and gave him command of the Endeavour Bark, 368 tons. He sailed from Plymouth on 26 August 1768 with a complement of ninety-four, including Joseph Banks and his retinue. By way of Cape Horn, they reached Tahiti on 13 April 1769 and duly made their observations on 3 June, meanwhile charting the islands and collecting natural history specimens.
Cook also had secret instructions to determine the existence of a southern continent propounded by geographical philosophers. Accordingly he sailed for New Zealand in August, circumnavigated the islands, charted its coast and took formal possession. This work finished, Cook decided 'to steer to the Westward until we fall in with the E coast of New Holland'. At 6 p.m. on 19 April 1770 Lieutenant Hicks saw land, and a point at the south-east of the Australian mainland was named after him. Cook sailed north, charting the coast and seeking a harbour where the Endeavour's fouled bottom could be scraped. On 29 April he landed at Stingray Bay, where Banks and his naturalists collected such varied specimens that the anchorage was renamed Botany Bay. After a week they sailed again, making their second landing at Bustard Bay and a third near Cape Townshend. Further north Cook found himself within the Barrier Reef amidst dangerous shoals. Sounding their way and often preceded by the long-boat, they crept north, making two more landings in search of water, but at 10 p.m. on 11 June the Endeavour struck fast on a coral reef at high tide. Ballast, guns and decayed stores were jettisoned; then, two tides later she was hauled off with windlass and anchors, and after three days beached in the Endeavour River. Repairs and gales delayed them for seven weeks but, after rounding and naming Cape York, on 22 August at Possession Island, Cook once more 'hoisted English Coulers' and took possession of the whole eastern coast, later adding the name, New South Wales, in his journal. Satisfied that New Guinea and New Holland were separate islands, he sailed for Batavia, arriving on 11 October. Repairs and refitting delayed his departure until 26 December, and he did not reach England until 13 July 1771.
Not even the modesty of Cook's report could obscure the extent or importance of his achievements. His discoveries, apart from New South Wales, were not new, yet without a chronometer he had charted 5000 miles (8047 km) of coast with unusual accuracy. But he lamented his failure to find the southern continent and pleaded for another opportunity to seek it. He was promoted commander and given charge of an expedition, himself in the Resolution and Tobias Furneaux captain of the Adventure. On this second voyage in 1772-75, Cook circumnavigated the world in high southern latitudes. Its chief importance for Australian discovery was in February and March 1773 when the Adventure, parted from the Resolution by fog and gales, made for the south coast of Van Diemen's Land. Here Furneaux renamed Adventure Bay on Bruny Island, sailed round Tasman Peninsula and up the east coast to Flinders Island, but through bad weather failed to reach Point Hicks before proceeding to rendezvous with the Resolution in New Zealand. On his third voyage Cook, now post-captain and fellow of the Royal Society, visited Adventure Bay himself on 26 January 1777, on his way to New Zealand and Tahiti. He went on to explore the Pacific coasts of North America and Siberia. In November 1778 he was at the Sandwich Islands (Hawaii), where at Kealakekua (Karakakooa) Bay he was killed on 14 February 1779.
Cook's strength was his self-confidence. He drove himself as hard as his men yet they followed him loyally, though they sometimes grumbled at his rules of hygiene and at the diet necessary to prevent scurvy, which were singularly successful in preserving the health of his crews. He was also severe on uncompliant natives whom he met on his voyages, and his readiness to use force contributed to his untimely death. His greatest achievements were negative, for they proved where land was not, but his coastal charting set high standards and many of his discoveries helped to create a second British empire.

General Description:
 Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy, stable
 Paper color: - off white
 Age of map color: - 
 Colors used: - 
 General color appearance: - 
 Atlas size: - 8vo
 
 Imperfections:
 Margins: - Age toning
 Plate area: - Age toning
 Verso: - Age toning

$499.00 USD
More Info
1817 Capt. Norden & Lepetit Antique Atlas of Egypt & Nubia - 1 Map & 22 Prints

1817 Capt. Norden & Lepetit Antique Atlas of Egypt & Nubia - 1 Map & 22 Prints

Description:
This fine original antique French Atlas, Voyage d'Egypte et de Nubie, travels to Egypt and Nubia by the Dane, Captain Frederick Louis Norden was translated from the English by M Henry & M Breton and published by V Lepetit. Paris in 1817 - dated.
This atlas contains 1 map of Egypt, Nubia & the Course of the Nile plus 22 copper-plate engraved prints of city views, pyramids and ruins of Egypt, as listed below.
The atlas covers have been removed with front title page partially detached & damaged. Pages are generally clean, with some age toning, overall VG. Size 8vo, each page size is 7in x 5in (180mm x 125mm)

1. Cours du Nil Depuis le Sennaar
2. Vue de Ville d Alexandrie....
3. Vue de la Ville et du Port Neuf d Alexandrie....
4. Vue de la Vieille Alexandrie
5. A: Chateau d Aboukir B: Vue de cote de l Orient meridional C: Plan du Chateau vec son port
6. Fig1: Vue de la villede Rosette Fig 2: Chateau de Rosette Fig 3: Vue du village de Deruth
7. Perspective du Vieux Caire
8. Vue du vieux Caire et d'une Pyramide dans le lointain
9. Vue de la ville de Gize ci-devant Memphis....
10. Coupe du Mokian
11. Plan de l ile de Rodda
12. Village de Dair Etun
13. Vue des Pyramides proche du Caire
14. Vue des Pyramides de Memphis
15. Maisons ordinaires des Arabec
16. Ruines di Palais de Memmon
17. Portail antique plien de Hieroglyphes en couleur et ...
18. Ancien Temple au milieu de la ville d Esnay
19. Deux coupes sur la longueur des superbes..Ruines du temple d Tsia
20. Fig 1: Les Deux Colosses en particular Fig 2: Portail principal des antiquities de Luxor
21. Statues colossales et Ruines du Palais de Memnon
22. Vue des Tombeaux pres d Essouan
23. Maniere de Battre les ris et de porter lEau en Egypte

Frederick Norden sailed to Egypt in 1737-38 to survey the architecture, agriculture, and other curiosities of the country. He was the first European to penetrate as far as Derr in Nubia, and produced the first coherent maps of the country. Seventeen years later, long after Norden’s death, his maps and drawings were published by the Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters, under order of Frederick V of Denmark, as Voyage d’Egypte et de Nubie (1755). Two years later, the physician and naturalist Peter Templeman completed an English translation, which was published in two folio volumes.

Frederic Louis Norden (1708 –1742) was a Danish naval captain and explorer.
Also known as FrederickFrederikFriderickLudwigLudvig and Lewis, the name used on the first publication of his famous Voyage d'Egypte et de Nubie (Copenhagen, 1755) is Frederic Louis Norden. His name is often shortened F. L. Norden.
Norden made a voyage through Egypt all the way down to Sudan in 1737–1738, on the request of King Christian VI of Denmark. Norden made abundant notes, observations and drawings of everything around him, including people, pharaonic monuments, architecture, installations, maps etc., all of which was published in the posthumous Voyage d'Egypte et de Nubie.
On 8 January 1741 he became a Fellow of the Royal Society of London, where his name was registered as Frederic Lewis Norden.

General Description:
 Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy, stable
 Paper color: - off white
 Age of map color: - 
 Colors used: - 
 General color appearance: - 
 Atlas size: - 8vo
 
 Imperfections:
 Margins: - Age toning
 Plate area: - Age toning
 Verso: - Age toning

$499.00 USD
More Info
1817 Tavernier & Lepetit Antique Atlas of Turkey Persia Vietnam, Asia - 22 Prints

1817 Tavernier & Lepetit Antique Atlas of Turkey Persia Vietnam, Asia - 22 Prints

Description:
This fine original antique French Atlas of the travels from Turkey, Persia, Central Asia, Vietnam of Jean Baptist Tavernier's was translated from the English by M Henry & M Breton and published by V Lepetit. Paris in 1817 - dated.
This atlas contains 22 copper-plate engraved prints, as listed below.
The atlas covers have been removed with front title page partially detached. Pages are generally clean with light aging to borders, Print V detached, light toning to pages, overall VG, 8vo, each page size is 7in x 5in (180mm x 125mm)

  1. J B Tavernier
    2. Vue de Constantinople
    3. Point de Serail a Constantionople
    4. Le Trois Eglises
    5. Ervan
    6. Caravanserail de Cachen
    7. Village Camouk ou Circassien
    8. Mosquee Persane
    9. Pont d' Ispahan
    10. Costumes Persan
    11. Femmes Persans
    12. Bas-reliefs de Persepolis
    13. Diamonds
    13 (repeat). Animal qui produit le Musc
    14. Serpent
    15. Diverses Monaies Asie
    16. Poignard Indien
    17. Marche du Roi de Tonquin lorsqu il va a laguerre
    18. Costumes Tonquinois
    19. Spectacle Tonquinois
    20.
    21. Pompe funebre du Roi de Tonquin
    22. Convoi de provisions a l enterrement du Roi de Tonquin

Jean-Baptiste Tavernier (1605 – 1689) was a 17th-century French gem merchant and traveller. Tavernier, a private individual and merchant travelling at his own expense, covered, by his own account, 60,000 leagues in making six voyages to Persia and India between the years 1630 and 1668. In 1675, Tavernier, at the behest of his patron Louis XIV, published Les Six Voyages de Jean-Baptiste Tavernier (Six Voyages, 1676).
Tavernier was born in Paris of a French or Flemish Huguenot family that had emigrated to Antwerp, to escape persecution, and which subsequently returned to Paris after the publication of the Edict of Nantes, which promised protection for French Protestants. Both his father Gabriel and his uncle Melchior were cartographers. Though it is clear from the accuracy of his drawings that Tavernier received some instruction in the art of cartography/engraving, he was possessed of a wanderlust. While still a teenager, he traveled extensively through Europe and achieved a working knowledge of its major languages.
Tavernier is best known for his 1666 discovery/purchase of the 116-carat Tavernier Blue diamond that he subsequently sold to Louis XIV of France in 1668 for 120,000 livres, the equivalent of 172,000 ounces of pure gold, and a letter of ennoblement. (Five years later, Louis had his court jeweler Jean Pitau recut the stone into the 68 carat French Blue and had it set as a hatpin. The gem was reset by his great-grandson Louis XV in The Medal of The Order of the Golden Fleece, stolen in 1792, and was recut and re-emerged in London 30 years later as the Hope Diamond).
In 1669, Tavernier purchased for 60,000 livres the Seigneury of Aubonne, located in the Duchy of Savoy near the city of Geneva, and became Baron of Aubonne.
Tavernier's writings show that he was a keen observer, as well as a remarkable cultural anthropologist. His Six Voyages became a best seller and was translated into German, Dutch, Italian, and English during his lifetime. The work is frequently quoted by modern scholars writing about the period. (Ref Tooley M&B)

General Description:
 Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy, stable canvas backed
 Paper color: - off white
 Age of map color: - 
 Colors used: - 
 General color appearance: - 
 Atlas size: - 8vo
 
 Imperfections:
 Margins: - Age toning
 Plate area: - Plate V detached, age toning
 Verso: - Age toning

$499.00 USD
More Info
1880 FV Greene Lot of 5 Large Antique Lithograph Maps of Washington DC, America

1880 FV Greene Lot of 5 Large Antique Lithograph Maps of Washington DC, America

  • Title : City of Washington Statistical Map No. 4, No. 5, No. 6, No.7, No. 8
  • Ref #:  16266, 16282, 16263, 16265, 16264
  • Size: 30in x 23in (767mm x 585mm) each
  • Date : 1880
  • Condition: (A) Very Good Condition

Description: 
This lot of 5 (of 12 published) first edition, original antique very large lithograph statistical maps of Washington DC by Lieutenant Francis Vinton Greene were published to show the large-scale improvements to the infrastructure of on the June 30th 1880, all maps dated bottom left.

These maps were compiled by Greene to accompany the annual report of the commissioners of the District of Columbia, for the year ending June 30th 1880. Each map carries the title "Statistical Map No.__," is drawn on an identical scale and shows the street pattern of Washington.
Each has a specialized focus, e.g.
No. 4 - Shade trees
No. 5 - Gas Lamps
No. 6 - Water Mains
No. 7 - Sewers
No. 8 - Public Schools
Very interesting details emerge from the maps, e.g., there were 1266 telegraph poles with 30.5 miles of line and 436 miles of wire; New Jersey Ave. was paved with wood and swept once each month. This important set of five of the original 12 provide a remarkable look into the capital's infrastructure in the early 1880's.   (Ref Tooley M&B)

General Description:
 Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy, stable canvas backed
 Paper color: - off white
 Age of map color: - Original
 Colors used: - Pink, blue, yellow, green
 General color appearance: - Authentic
 Paper size: - 30in x 23in (767mm x 585mm)
 Margins: - Min 2in (50mm)
 
 Imperfections:
 Margins: - Light spotting L&R bottom corners
 Plate area: - None
 Verso: - Bottom L&R bottom corner canvas loose on all maps.

$750.00 USD
More Info
1812 Pinkerton Large Antique Azimuthal Projection Map of the Northern Hemisphere

1812 Pinkerton Large Antique Azimuthal Projection Map of the Northern Hemisphere

Description: 
This very large and beautifully hand coloured original antique Stereographic Northern Hemisphere map was engraved by John Neele in 1812 - the date is engraved at the foot of the maps - and was published by the famous Scottish publisher John Pinkerton in his large folio Modern Atlas, which was published between 1809-14. 

Background: The azimuthal equidistant projection is an azimuthal map projection. It has the useful properties that all points on the map are at proportionately correct distances from the center point, and that all points on the map are at the correct azimuth (direction) from the center point. A useful application for this type of projection is a polar projection which shows all meridians (lines of longitude) as straight, with distances from the pole represented correctly.
While it may have been used by ancient Egyptians for star maps in some holy books, the earliest text describing the azimuthal equidistant projection is an 11th-century work by al-Biruni.
The projection appears in many Renaissance maps, and Gerardus Mercator used it for an inset of the north polar regions in sheet 13 and legend 6 of his well-known 1569 map. In France and Russia this projection is named "Postel projection" after Guillaume Postel, who used it for a map in 1581. Many modern star chart planispheres use the polar azimuthal equidistant projection. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - Original & later
Colours used: - Green, pink, yellow
General colour appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 31in x 22in (790mm x 560mm)  
Plate size: - 31in x 22in (790mm x 560mm)  
Margins: - min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$750.00 USD
More Info
1812 Pinkerton Large Antique Azimuthal Projection Map of the Southern Hemisphere

1812 Pinkerton Large Antique Azimuthal Projection Map of the Southern Hemisphere

Description: 
This very large and beautifully hand coloured original antique Stereographic Southern Hemisphere map was engraved by John Neele in 1812 - the date is engraved at the foot of the maps - and was published by the famous Scottish publisher John Pinkerton in his large folio Modern Atlas, which was published between 1809-14. 

Background: The azimuthal equidistant projection is an azimuthal map projection. It has the useful properties that all points on the map are at proportionately correct distances from the center point, and that all points on the map are at the correct azimuth (direction) from the center point. A useful application for this type of projection is a polar projection which shows all meridians (lines of longitude) as straight, with distances from the pole represented correctly.
While it may have been used by ancient Egyptians for star maps in some holy books, the earliest text describing the azimuthal equidistant projection is an 11th-century work by al-Biruni.
The projection appears in many Renaissance maps, and Gerardus Mercator used it for an inset of the north polar regions in sheet 13 and legend 6 of his well-known 1569 map. In France and Russia this projection is named "Postel projection" after Guillaume Postel, who used it for a map in 1581. Many modern star chart planispheres use the polar azimuthal equidistant projection. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - Original & later
Colours used: - Green, pink, yellow
General colour appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 31in x 22in (790mm x 560mm)  
Plate size: - 31in x 22in (790mm x 560mm)  
Margins: - min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$850.00 USD
More Info
1797 Faden & D Anville Large Antique Map of America - Western Hemisphere, NZ

1797 Faden & D Anville Large Antique Map of America - Western Hemisphere, NZ

  • Title : A Map of America or the New World, wherein are introduced all the known parts of the Western Hemisphere From the Map of d'Anville with the necessary alterations and the addition of the Discoveries made since the Year 1761. London: W. Faden 1797.
  • Ref #:  61144
  • Size: 33in x 23in (840mm x 585mm)
  • Date : 1797
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This very large, beautifully hand coloured original 1st edition scarce antique map of America & The Western Hemisphere with New Zealand was engraved by William Palmer in 1797 - date engraved in the title cartouche - and was published by William Faden in his General Atlas, London.

Background: This is the first state of Faden's large beautiful map of America within the Western Hemisphere after D Anville, with the words O Rare Columbus included within the title cartouche, paying homage to Christopher Columbus.
The map illustrates the discoveries of Captains Cook & La Perouse along the NW Coast of America and throughout the Pacific, including the Sandwich Islands during the mid to late 8th century. 
Pope Alexander's 1493 Line of Demarcation is shown in the Atlantic, separating the Portuguese and Spanish possessions. The Antarctic Icy Sea is noted, along with a note reading Cook's Nec Plus Ultra 71 Degrees 10 Minutes Latitude South January 30th 1774.
While the Bay of the West is not shown, there is an annotation in the Northwest which reads A'ASS TOPULSE or GREAT SEA of the Indians SEA of THE WEST of the Geographers. The Arctic Icy Sea or Hyperborean Sea is named. 
Excellent detail along the Northwest Passage, with several additional annotations, along with several discoveries and exploration annotation's appearing in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. Attractive engraved cartouche. (Ref Tooley M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Pink, blue, yellow, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 33in x 23in (840mm x 585mm)
Plate size: - 24in x 21 1/2in (610mm x 545mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$975.00 USD
More Info
1794 Faden & Cook Large Antique Map NW America. Alaska, Canada, Bering Straits

1794 Faden & Cook Large Antique Map NW America. Alaska, Canada, Bering Straits

  • Title : Chart of the NW Coast of America and the NE Coast of Asia Explored in the Years 1778 and 1779. Prepared by Lieut. Heny Roberts under the immediate Inspection of Capt Cook
  • Ref #:  61145
  • Size: 33in x 23in (840mm x 585mm)
  • Date : 1794
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This very large, beautifully hand coloured original 2nd edition antique map of NW America, NE Russia, North Pacific & the Bering Straits by Henry Roberts & Capt James Cook, with later information from other explorers, was engraved by William Palmer in 1794 - date engraved at the foot of the map - and was published by William Faden in London.

This highly detailed chart of the North Pacific, is based upon Captain James Cook's map from his last voyage of 1784, with updates in 1794 to include discoveries and tracks from the voyages of Captain George Vancouver, Sir Alexander MacKenzie, 18th Century Russian sources about the northern arctic regions and others. One interesting feature is the supposed course of the voyage of Columbia Rediviva, commonly known as the Columbia, a privately owned ship under the command of John Kendrick and Captain Robert Gray, with tracks extending due north into British Columbia. The map also includes a nearly daily course of Cook's voyage along Northern Canada and the NW Coast of America, including the region explored by Vancouver. Details on the NW Passage from Hans Sloan's Japanese map of the world are also included, along with information on certain arctic coastlines from Russian sources and many other annotations. 

Background: The map is the second edition of Lieutenant Henry Robert’s chart depicting Captain Cook’s explorations in the North Pacific during his third and final voyage.  The original Roberts map was suppressed and not included in the official atlas of the journey.  It contained details of the Alaskan coastline and Canadian Arctic not presented on the officially sanctioned map and provided the first relatively accurate mapping of the Northwest Coast of North America, dispelling many of the fantastic theories that had plagued the region for years.
Cook’s death left the production of his final expedition’s findings to two camps of editors: Henry Roberts and Captain King, (the authors of the charts and journals, respectively) and Alexander Dalrymple, Cook’s long-time rival, and his political supporters. Dalrymple won out, and Roberts’ chart was replaced with the less-detailed map engraved by T. Harmar.
It was not understood that Roberts’ chart and the Faden were the same until 1985, when the British Library acquired a proof state of the map.  Roberts had sold his copperplate to Faden, who published this map a month after the publication of the official atlas.  The Roberts / Faden map contains fourteen Alaskan place names not on the authorized map, including Bald Head, Cape Denbigh and Cape Darby in Norton Sound. It also shows, for the first time on any printed map, the results of Hearn’s expedition in the Canadian Arctic.
In 1794,  William Faden commissioned the engraver Louis Stanislas D’Arcy de la Rochette to update Roberts’ chart with new data gathered over the last decade. A note on the map states:

The Interesting Discoveries made by the British and American Ships, since the first Publication of this Chart in 1784, Together with the Hydrographical Materials, lately procured from St. Petersburg and other places, have enabled Mr. De la Rochette to lay down the Numerous Improvements which appear in the Present Edition. 

The 1794 edition of the map also incorporates the supposed course of the American sloop Lady Washington into the Gulph of Georgia in 1794, based upon reports by John Meares, an English fur trader active along the coast of British Columbia. The Lady Washington, commanded by Captain Robert Gray, was the first of many ships sailed by the so-called Boston Men, American fur traders competing for the lucrative China trade. Meares had reported to Captain George Vancouver that Captain Gray had sailed completely around the east side of Vancouver Island, confirming its insularity.  

In describing the first edition, Cohen & Taliaferro (Catalogue 62) note:

 This legendary lost chart was drawn by Henry Roberts for the authorized atlas of Cook's third voyage, but because of disputes among the editors, it was never included.  It is now known that the plate for Roberts' chart, " version more elaborate than that [included] in the authorized atlas" (Campbell), was purchased by Faden and published separately.  Th[e] exceptionally rare first state of  the Roberts-Faden chart is the first published map to show the discoveries of Samuel Hearne in the Canadian Arctic. . . .

Although a few examples of the chart were known, including one belonging to the great Americana collector, Thomas Streeter, its true importance was not recognized until 1985, when a proof copy was acquired by the British Library . . .

...the [map] includes a number of Alaskan place-names not found on the authorized version [in the account of Cook's third voyage]. . . 

This Roberts chart also contains information on interior geography not included on the [official map].  The source for this information came from Samuel Hearne's c.1772 manuscript map of the Coppermine River, in the possession of the Hudson's Bay Company, and which had never before appeared in print.  The Company suppressed Hearne's map to protect its interests in the north.  This was important information because Hearne's map showed the impossibility of a Northwest Passage through Hudson's Bay, and it is curious that the Company had not released it to settle arguments over a point that continued to occupy public attention. . .  (Ref Tooley M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Pink, blue, yellow, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 33in x 23in (840mm x 585mm)
Plate size: - 28in x 17in (710mm x 430mm)
Margins: - Min 2in (50mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Slight loss from to top left margin edge
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$1,250.00 USD
More Info
1550 Sebastian Munster Original Antique Oval World Map - Columbus America

1550 Sebastian Munster Original Antique Oval World Map - Columbus America

Description:
This fine wood-block engraved original antique World Map was engraved by David Kandel, initials engraved bottom left "DK" and was published in the 1550 edition of Cosmographia by Sebastian Munster.
One of the most recognizable maps of the 16th century considered the first map to identify the Pacific Ocean, as here, 'Mare Pacificum.' This is the world of the educated 16th century European, divided into Asia, Europe, India, Africa and America. The southern latitudes are inhabited by a variety of sea monsters and sailing ships.
American continent is nearly unrecognizable, only a scant 58 years after European discovery by Christopher Columbus. North America is defined as Terra Florida showing an enormous inlet extending towards the eastern seaboard in the vicinity of modern day North Carolina named Verrazano's Sea. Apparently Verrazano, coasting the Outer Banks, observed the Pamlico Sound and assumed that beyond the narrow coastal banks, an open sea gave direct access to the pacific - wishful thinking at best. Verrazano's Sea appears so dramatically on few maps, but persisted in lesser forms for nearly a century. 
South America with tentacle like protrusions in all directions, is largely amorphous, but the Rio de la Plata and the Strait of Magellan are clear. Tierra del Fuego is enormous, with no mention of greater Terra Australias, an interesting omission by Munster. 
Europe is vaguely recognizable and connected, via an arctic peninsula, to Greenland and North America. 
Asia/Pacific extends eastward far enough to reappear just north of America. Ceylon is not present, but a landmass bearing roughly the shape and position of Sumatra is identified as Tapobrana (a term more commonly associated with Ceylon). Japan appears as Zipangri. 
Unlike many other world maps of the time, Munster has left out the concept of a 'Terra Australis Incognita' altogether choosing to show ocean instead.
Africa follows the Ptolemaic model with the Nile finding its source in a mountain range and two associated lakes. 
The whole is surrounded by twelve named and prominent wind heads - one for each direction.

Background: This wood-cut engraved World map was prepared for the 1550 edition of Sebastian Münster's Cosmographia to replace the earlier World map by Sebasian Munster which had appeared in the editions of the Geographia and Cosmographia from 1540 onwards. The publisher, from 1552, was Heinrich Petri, Münster's son-in-law. 
This "new world" map is on an oval projection, similar in many respects to the previous Munster world map, but with the woodcutter's initials "DK" added, identified as those of the engraver David Kandel, in the lower left-hand corner.
The titles of the wind-heads are now in banners and the east and west winds, unlike the 1540 version, do not protrude inside the oval circumference. North America still retains its unusual shape almost bisected by water but the earlier note indicating a route to the Moluccas has been omitted...."
The map was first issued in the 1550 edition of Cosmographia, and appeared in all subsequent editions through to 1578, with the title varying according to the language of the edition. On the verso the wood block is the title and text, in Latin.

Sebastian Münster (1488-1552) was a German cartographer, cosmographer, and Hebrew scholar whose work Cosmographia (1544; "Cosmography") was the earliest German description of the world and a major work in the revival of geographic thought in 16th-century Europe. It had numerous editions in different languages including Latin, French, Italian, English, and even Czech. Altogether, about 40 editions of the Cosmographia appeared between 1544 and 1628 and was one of the most successful and popular books of the 16th century. Münster was a major influence in popular thinking in Europe for the next 200 years.
This success was due not only to the level of descriptive detail but also to the fascinating full page maps & views as well as smaller woodcuts that were included in the text. Many of the woodcuts were executed by famous engravers of the time including Hans Holbein the Younger, Urs Graf, Hans Rudolph Manuel Deutsch, and David Kandel. 
Aside from the well-known maps present in the Cosmographia, the text is thickly sprinkled with vigorous views: portraits of kings and princes, costumes and occupations, habits and customs, flora and fauna, monsters, wonders, and horrors about the known -- and unknown -- world, and was undoubtedly one of the most widely read books of its time.
Münster acquired the material for his book in three ways. Firstly he researched all available literary sources across Germany, Switzerland and other parts of Europe. Secondly he obtained original manuscript material from locals all over Europe for description of the countryside, cities, villages, towns, rivers and local history. Finally, he obtained further material first hand on his travels (primarily in south-west Germany, Switzerland, and Alsace). 

In 1588 Sebastian Petri re-released Cosomgraphia and re-issued many of Munsters maps and views in the "copperplate style". The maps in this release were more sophisticated than with earlier publications of Cosomgraphia and were based on the 1570 release of Abraham Ortelius monumental work Theatrum Orbis Terrarum. (Ref: Shirley; Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: -  
Colors used: -  
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 15 3/4in x 12 1/2in (400mm x 310mm)
Plate size: - 15 3/4in x 12 1/2in (400mm x 310mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (10mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - L&R margins extended, not affecting borders or image
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$3,250.00 USD
More Info
1719 Chatelain Antique Map of North America, GOM, Caribbean, United States

1719 Chatelain Antique Map of North America, GOM, Caribbean, United States

  • Title : Carte Contenant Le Royaume Du Mexique Et La Floride
  • Date : 1719
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  50621
  • Size: 23 1/4in x 17 1/2in (590m x 445m) 

Description: 
This large beautifully hand coloured original antique foundation map of North America and the Caribbean - after Delisle landmark map of 1703 - was published by Henri Abraham Chatelain in 1719, in his famous Atlas Historique.

Background:
A very attractive example of Chatelain's issue of Guillaume De L'Isle's foundation map of present-day United States, Central America and the West Indies, originally published in 1703. Guillaume De L'Isle brought a new scientific approach to mapmaking at the end of the seventeenth century and his rigorously prepared maps of all areas became the standards for much of the following century.

Amongst his most important works were those relating to the New World, especially North America, where the recent reports of French travellers into the interior were utilised. Sources for this map - the first to show the lower reaches of the Mississippi accurately - included d'Iberville, Tonty and Le Sueur, Father Gravier, and Bienville (later to become Governor of the French colony of Louisiana). Evidence of the contemporary superiority of De L'Isle's maps lies in the numerous copies, published in Paris, Amsterdam, London and Germany, and the republishing of the original plate over many years. Geographically his maps were as correct, however, this map is also remarkable for De L'Isle's political boundaries which squeeze the English Colonies, on the east coast into a narrow strip, thus allocating the greater part of North America to France. Chatelain's map has a large panel of text describing Mexico and Florida at lower left.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Pink, green, yellow, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic 
Paper size: - 23 1/4in x 17 1/2in (590m x 445m)
Plate size: - 20 3/4in x 16 1/4in (530m x 415mm)
Margins: - min. 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections: Margins: - None
Plate area: - Folds as issued
Verso: - None

$1,499.00 USD
More Info
1840 Tokokawa Period Antique Japanese Map Tochigi or Shimotsuke Prefecture Japan

1840 Tokokawa Period Antique Japanese Map Tochigi or Shimotsuke Prefecture Japan

Description:
This is a unique opportunity to acquire an original & rare piece of antique Japanese cartography. This beautiful wood-block hand coloured map of the old Shimotsuke province today the Tochigi Prefecture was published in the late Tokokawa Period ca 1840 by Akiyama Einen.
Although the early 19th century is not considered that old in cartographical terms but it is the high level of artistry & detail that makes these wood-block cut maps unique. I doubt that there is another map from this publisher or illustrator available on the market. There is a level of patience, workmanship & detail about this map that epitomises many parts of the Japanese culture.

Tochigi Prefecture - Prior to the establishment of the present-day system of prefectures, Tochigi was known as the Shimotsuke Province. The establishment of the Nikko Toshogu in 1617 brought Nikko to national attention. The Tokugawa Shogunate developed the Nikko kaido (part of the major road connecting Nikko with Edo) and required lavish processions to worship Ieyasu, the founder of the Tokugawa line of shoguns.
In the late 7th century, Tochigi formed Shimotsuke Province. 
During that time was built the Shimotsuke-Yakushi temple, making it the Buddhist capital of the Kanto Region. In the early 15th century, Ashikaga University, Japan's oldest school of higher education, was re-established, holding over 3000 students by the 16th century. Saint Francis Xavier introduced Ashikaga to the world as the best university in Japan. 
In the early 17th century, Japan was unified by the Shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu. After his death, Toshogu was built in Nikko on what the shoguns thought of as holy ground to protect and worship Ieyasu. The establishment of the Nikkō Toshogu in 1617 brought Nikkō to national attention. The Tokugawa Shogunate developed the Nikkō Kaidō (part of the major road connecting Nikkō with Edo) and required lavish processions to worship Ieyasu, the founder of the Tokugawa line of shoguns.
In the late 19th century the Tokugawa Shogunate fell and the new government established the prefectures. The prefectural capital was established in the city of Tochigi after the unification of Utsunomiya Prefecture and Tochigi Prefecture in 1873.By 1884, however, the capital was transferred to Utsunomiya.

Japanese maps are well known for their exceptional beauty and high quality of workmanship. Early Japanese cartography has its own very distinctive projection and layout system. Japanese maps made prior to the appearance of Commodore Perry and the opening of Japan in the mid to late 1750s often have no firm directional orientation, incorporate views into the map proper, and tend to be hand coloured woodblock prints. 
Later Japanese maps, produced in the late Edo and throughout the Meiji period (early to mid 19th century) draw heavily upon western maps as models for their own work. While many of these later maps maintain elements of traditional Japanese cartography such as the use of rice paper, woodblock printing, and delicate hand color, they also incorporate western directional orientation, projection systems, and structural norms.

As early as the 7th century AD the Japanese acquired knowledge of surveying and map engraving through their cultural links with Korea and China: their earliest surviving map dates from the 14th century. The first uncertain attempts to show Japan on European maps were not made until the mid 15th century (Fra Mauro, 1459) and even in 1540 Munsters map of the New World still show "zipangu". Jesuit influence in the early days were responsible for any data collected about Japan at this time. From 1640 Japan closed its frontiers (except for the Port of Nagasaki) to the "barbarians" from the West and consequently there was little opportunity for compiling data for accurate mapping. It was not until the 18th century that maps by Valck, de Vaugondy and others started to show a better outline of the country, even incorporating Japanese characters into the images. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Very light & stable
Paper color: - Off white
Age of map color: - Original  
Colors used: - Blue, yellow, red, green
General color appearance: - Authentic   
Paper size: - 21in x 14 1/2in (535mm x 370mm)
Margins: - Min 1/4in (5mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light wear
Plate area: - Folds as issued, light wear along folds, several small worm tracks in 10 places on image
Verso: - Light age toning

$850.00 USD
More Info
1845 Johnston Large Antique Map of New South Wales & Victoria, Australia Felix

1845 Johnston Large Antique Map of New South Wales & Victoria, Australia Felix

  • Title : Colony of New South Wales and Australia Felix
  • Ref #:  16298
  • Size: 25 1/2in x 21in (650mm x 535mm) 
  • Date : 1845
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This large fine hand coloured original antique map of NSW & SE Australia stretching from the 10 year old Settlement of Melbourne in the south to the 31st parallel in the north, by W & AK Johnston, was published in the 1845 edition of the General Atlas.

A large, highly detailed regional map of New South Wales and Australia Felix the SE area which quickly became the state of Victoria. The map, with this title, lasted for only a few years, before both NSW and Victoria were quickly settled. The map provides a very early depiction of the region, pre-dating the discovery of gold. 
Also of great interest are the exploration routes by Mitchell (1836) in Red, Tyer's & Townsend's (1840) in Yellow and Streletsky's (Strzelecki) (1840) in Blue.
The 18 counties of NSW are highlighted in beautiful hand colour with extensive detail of towns, tracks and rivers. Historical note included below the title.Decorative Piano Key border and a fine example, on thick heavy paper.

Johnston was one of the master publishers of fine engraved and lithographed maps during the 19th century - this map is no exception. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Red, green, yellow
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 25 1/2in x 21in (650mm x 535mm) 
Plate size: - 25 1/2in x 21in (650mm x 535mm) 
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)
 
Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$750.00 USD
More Info
1773 Bellin Antique Map The Course of the Orinoco River South America

1773 Bellin Antique Map The Course of the Orinoco River South America

Description: 
This large beautifully hand coloured originalantique map of The Course of the Orinoco River, South America by Jacques Nicolas Bellin was engraved in by A van Kreveltin in 1773 for Antoine-François Prevosts 20 volume edition of L`Histoire Generale des Voyages published by Pierre de Hondt, The Hague between 1747 & 1785.

Although the mouth of the Orinoco in the Atlantic Ocean was documented by Columbus on 1 August 1498 during his third voyage, its source at the Cerro Delgado-Chalbaud, in the Parima range, on the Venezuelan-Brazilian border, at 1,047 m of elevation (02°19′05″N 63°21′42″W / 2.31806°N 63.36167°W ), was only explored in 1951, 453 years later, by a joint Venezuelan-French team.
The Orinoco delta, and tributaries in the eastern llanos such as the Apure and Meta, were explored in the 16th century by German expeditions under Ambrosius Ehinger and his successors. In 1531 Diego de Ordaz, starting at the principal outlet in the delta, the Boca de Navios, sailed up the river to the Meta, and Antonio de Berrio sailed down the Casanare, to the Meta, and then down the Orinoco and back to Coro.
Alexander von Humboldt explored the basin in 1800, reporting on the pink river dolphins, and publishing extensively on the flora and fauna. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early  
Colors used: - Red, green, yellow  
General color appearance: - Authentic  
Paper size: - 18 1/2in x 11 1/2in (460mm x 295mm)
Plate size: - 18in x 10in (455mm x 255mm)
Margins: - Min 1/4in (5mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Folds as issued  
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
More Info
1720 Herman Moll Large Antique Map of The Netherlands - Holland, VII Provinces

1720 Herman Moll Large Antique Map of The Netherlands - Holland, VII Provinces

  • Title : A New and Exact Map of the United Provinces, or Netherlands &c. According to the Newest and Most Exact Observations by Herman Moll Geographer
  • Ref #:  35090
  • Size: 41in x 25in (1.04m x 635mm)
  • Date : 1720
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This very large beautifully hand coloured original antique map* of The Netherlands by Herman Moll was published in 1720 in the atlas The World Described, or a New and Correct Sett of Maps by John Bowles, Thomas Bowles, Philip Overton & John King of London.
In the 18th century many large-scale maps were published by the likes of John Senex and Herman Moll, this trend continued until the end of private mapping in the early 19th century when it was replaced by Ordnance Survey maps.

Background: An attractive, large scale map of The Netherlands or the United Provinces by the highly regarded cartographer and engraver Herman Moll. on the right-hand side views of Amsterdam, Rotterdam, Middelburg, Utrecht, Groningen, Het Loo Palace and a plan of the ancient Roman Castle at the mouth of the Rhine river Arx Britannica (Huis Britten, Brittenberg).  The upper left corner of the map has an inset map of the coasts, sands and banks of the North Sea, the stretch of water that lies between England and The Netherlands. Moll dedicates his map to ‘The Right Hon Charles Lord Viscount of Townsend &c one of his Majesty’s Principal Secretaries of State’
This magnificent map was printed by John Bowles of Cornhill, London and published in Moll’s 1719 New and Complete Atlas, but it may also have been separately issued earlier. Moll came to London probably from Bremen around 1678 and by 1688 he had his own shop in Vanley's Court in London's Blackfriars, between 1691 and 1710 at the corner of Spring Gardens and Charing Cross, when he moved to Beech Street where he remained until his death. In 1701 he published his first work A System of Geography. He was publishing atlases and separately issued maps, and from 1710 was also known as a maker of pocket globes. (Ref: Tooley, Koeman, M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original & later
Colors used: - Pink, yellow, green  
General color appearance: - Original  
Paper size: - 41in x 25in (1.04m x 635mm)
Plate size: - 39 1/4in x 24 1/2in (1.00m x 625mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (10mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light creasing
Plate area: - Re-joined folds as issued, small repair in top L&R folds, no loss
Verso: - Re-enforced along folds

$1,499.00 USD
More Info
1755 De Vaugondy Large Old, Antique Map of Colonial United States - Chesapeake Bay

1755 De Vaugondy Large Old, Antique Map of Colonial United States - Chesapeake Bay

  • Title : Partie De L Amerique Septentrionale, qui Comprend Le Cours De L Ohio...1755
  • Ref #:  61112
  • Size: 11 1/2in x 8in (290mm x 205mm)
  • Date : 1755
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This large, beautifully hand coloured, scarce 1st state original antique map* depicting the eastern colonies between the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers and the Atlantic, including the Great Lakes and a small part of Upper Canada, was engraved in 1755 - the date is engraved in the title cartouche - and  published by Robert Du Vaugondy in his Atlas Universal, Paris 1757. 
This is one of the finest examples of this map I have seen to date. Beautiful hand colour on age toned heavy paper with original margins with a heavy dark ink denoting a very early pressing. T the time of listing there are 2 examples of this 1st state map for sale on the web at $1600 & 1800 respectively.
 

Background: First state of the beautiful and early de Vaugondy map of the British colonies, based upon John Mitchell's great map of North America from the same year, also drawing from Lewis, Evans on the Middle British Colonies and Joshua Fry's and Peter Jefferson's map of Virginia and Maryland. The Mitchell map was the culmination of many years of British surveying in the North American Colonies and was considered one of the best maps of the continent available to Europeans and Americans in the mid-eighteenth century. 
De Vaugondy's rendition does not copy the full scope of Mitchell's map but instead focuses on the colonies stretching from southern Maine to the Carolinas. In the top left corner is an inset of South Carolina and Georgia. De Vaugondy also pays special attention to the river systems and settlements. This map shows some of the earliest accurate information of the trans-Allegheny regions (the Ohio River, Kentucky, Tennessee and Parts of Ohio) and inland areas to the southeast of the Great Lakes and interior of New England. The dotted lines and outline color designate pre-Treaty of Paris (1763) information about the Ohio country. 
Maine is still part of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. During this era, a dispute arose between New Hampshire and New York over who controlled the area which is now Vermont. Here, New York is shown as to contain Vermont within its borders. The outbreak of the French & Indian War (Seven Years War) briefly suspended interest in the disputed area, and it was not until 1764 that the British crown upheld New York's claim to Vermont. The western borders of the British Colonies extend only to the Appalachians, with the exception of "Caroline, "which extends slightly further west. This shows the strong French presence along the western frontier in the days leading up to the French & Indian conflict. Pennsylvania is shown to stretch north almost to Lake Ontario and encompass much of western New York. 
Included is a beautiful title cartouche in the Rococo style. 
(Ref: Tooley; M&B)
 

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original & later
Colors used: - Pink, green, yellow
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper Size: - 30 1/2in x 21in (775mm x 535mm)
Plate size: - 24 1/2in x 19 1/2in (620mm x 495mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)
 

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light uniform age toning
Plate area: - Light age toning along centerfold
Verso: - Light uniform age toning

$1,499.00 USD
More Info
1690 Nicolas Visscher Large Old, Antique Map of Great Britain & Ireland

1690 Nicolas Visscher Large Old, Antique Map of Great Britain & Ireland

  •  Title : Magnae Britanniae Tabula...Angliae, Scotiae, Ac Hiberniae Regna...Per Nicol. Visscher...Guilielmo III D.G.
  • Ref #:  61110
  • Size: 24in x 20in (610mm x 515mm)
  • Date : 1690
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: This large rare beautifully hand coloured original antique map of Great Britain & Ireland was published by Nicholas Visscher in 1690
This is a very beautiful map with rich deep colour and heavy engraving on clean and stable paper. It is also an important map, dedicated to William III of Orange (King Billy) who ruled GB & Ireland between 1689 &  1702, a time of great change both in Europe and the New World.

 

 

Background: In 1558 Queen Elizabeth came to the throne in the midst of a fast changing world. In 1563 a nineteen sheet map, copies of which survive only in manuscript form, was completed by Laurence Nowell, and no doubt, the issue of Mercator's large-scale map of the British Isles in 1564 had an important influence on the thought of the period. A few years later a national survey was commissioned privately, although probably at the instigation of Lord Burghley, the Lord Treasurer, but subsequently was completed with royal encouragement. The outcome was Christopher Saxton's Atlas of EngIand and Wales, started about 1570 and published in 1579 - the first printed set of county maps and the first countrywide atlas on such a splendid scale produced anywhere. A Welsh antiquarian, Humphrey Lhuyd completed a set of surveys that were even more successful than Saxton in which he had produced fine manuscript maps of England and Wales which were used by Ortelius in editions of his Atlas from 1573 onwards.
The earliest maps of the 17th century, attributed to William Smith of the College of Heralds, covered only twelve counties based on Saxton/Norden and were presumably intended to be part of a complete new atlas. They were printed in the Low Countries in 1602-3 and were soon followed by maps for the Latin edition of Camden's Britannia dated 1607. In 1610-11 the first edition of John Speed's famous county Atlas The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine was published and immediately replaced Saxton's in popular appeal. Although Speed assembled much of his material from the earlier works of Saxton, Norden and others, a considerable part of the up-to-date information, especially relating to the inset town plans depicted on his maps, was obtained first hand. The maps undoubtedly owed much of their popularity to the splendid engravings of high quality made in the workshops in Amsterdam of Jodocus Hondius to whom Speed sent his manuscripts, the plates subsequently being returned to London for printing.
In 1645, Volume IV of the famous Blaeu World Atlas covering the counties of England and Wales was published in Amsterdam. These maps have always been esteemed as superb examples of engraving and design, the calligraphy being particularly splendid, but nevertheless they were nearly all based on Saxton and Speed and added little to geographical knowledge.
Not until the latter part of the century do we find an English map maker of originality with the capacity to put new ideas into practice. John Ogilby, one of the more colourful figures associated with cartography, started life as a dancing master and finished as King's Cosmographer and Geographic Printer. After publishing a small number of county maps, somewhat on the lines of John Norden he issued in 1675 the Britannia, the first practical series of detailed maps of the post roads of England and Wales on a standard scale of 1,760 yards to the mile. Up to the end of the century and beyond, reprints and revisions of Saxton's and Speed's atlases continued to appear and the only other noteworthy county maps were Richard Blome's Britannia (1673), John Overton's Atlas (c. 1670) and Robert Morden's maps for an English translation of Camden's Britannia published in 1695.
Another noted cartographer of the day was Captain Greenvile Collins, and of his work in surveying the coasts of Great Britain culminating in the issue in 1693 of the Great Britain's Coasting Pilot. Apart from these charts, English cartographers published during the century a number of world atlases. Speed was the first Englishman to produce a world atlas with the issue in 1627 of his A Prospect of the Most Famous Parts of the World. Other atlases appeared later in the century by Peter Heylin, John Seller, William Berry, Moses Pitt and Richard Blome, whilst Ogilby found time to issue maps of Africa, America and Asia. Far more important, from the purely scientific point of view, was the work of Edmund Halley, Astronomer Royal, who compiled and issued meteorological and magnetic charts in 1688 and 1701 respectively.
At the beginning of the eighteenth century the Dutch map trade was finally in decline, the French in the ascendant and the English to a great extent still dominated by Saxton and Speed except, as we have shown, in the spheres of sea charts and road maps. There were atlases by John Senex, the Bowles family, Emanuel and Thomas Bowen, Thomas Badeslade and the unique bird's-eye perspective views of the counties, The British Monarchy by George Bickham. In 1750-60 Bowen and Kitchin's The Large English Atlas containing maps on a rather larger scale than hitherto was published.
In 1759 the Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce offered an award of £100 for the best original surveys on this scale and by the end of the century about thirty counties had been re-surveyed. These maps, many of which formed, in later years, the basis for the first issues of county maps by the Ordnance Survey Office were not only decorative but a tremendous improvement geographically on earlier local maps. As a consequence, the skills and expertise of the new-style cartographers soon enabled them to cover the world as well as the domestic market. Thomas Jefferys was such a man; he was responsible for a number of the new 1 in. to 1 mile county surveys and he issued an edition of Saxton's much battered 200-year-old plates of the county maps, but he is better known for many fine maps of North America and the West Indies. His work was continued on the same lines by William Faden, trading as Faden and Jefferys. Other publishers such as Sayer and Bennett and their successors Laurie and Whittle published a prodigious range of maps, charts and atlases in the second half of the century. A major influence at this time was John Cary who, apart from organizing the first re-survey of post roads since Ogilby and subsequently printing the noted Travellers' Companion, was a prolific publisher of atlases and maps of every kind of all parts of the world. After starting work with Cary, and taking part in the new road survey, Aaron Arrowsmith set up in his own business and went on to issue splendid large-scale maps of many parts of the world. Both Cary's and Arrowsmith's plates were used by other publishers until far into the next century and, in turn, their work was taken up and developed by James Wyld (Elder and Younger) and Tallis and Co.
Later into the 19th century some of the better known cartographers and publishers were by Henry Teesdale (1829-30), Christopher and John Greenwood, surveyors, Thomas Moule, a writer on heraldry and antiques (1830-36) and John Walker (1837) but by about the middle of the century few small-scale publishers survived and their business passed into the hands of large commercial concerns such as Bartholomews of Edinburgh and Philips of London who continue to this day. (Ref: Shirley; Tooley; M&B)

 

 

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Red, yellow, green, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 24in x 20in (610mm x 515mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 19in (585mm x 460mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

 

 

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

 

 

$1,250.00 USD
More Info
1647 Willem Blaeu Old, Antique Map of Switzerland - Helvetia

1647 Willem Blaeu Old, Antique Map of Switzerland - Helvetia

Description:
This fine, beautifully hand coloured original antique map* of Switzerland by Willem Blaeu was published in the 1647 Dutch edition of Atlas Novus. 
This map, engraved by Blaeu but attributed to Gerard Mercator, is in fine condition with fine original margins, clean stable paper and original colour. A beautiful example of this map by Blaeu after Mercator.

Background: The first printed map of Switzerland was published in Martin Waldseemuller's edition of Ptolemy in Strasbourg in 1513, but the manuscript map by Konrad Turst (1497) drawn to scale was a splendid first achievement for its time. Also the research of Vadianus at St Gallen University produced notable work, and along with the Germanic influence in Basle, which became part of the Swiss Confederation in 1501, and the highly developed wood engraving skills there, were important factors in European map publishing.
The almost endless editions of Sebastian Munster's Cosmographia were published in Basle from 1540 for nearly a century and Zurich can claim to have published the first national atlas produced anywhere -that of Johann Stumpf in 1548-52.
By comparison with her larger neighbours, Germany and Italy, Switzerland is considered not to have made a major contribution to Cartographic history. But over the years this has been contradicted, especially starting in the sixteenth century. In the second half of the sixteenth century many maps of the Swiss Cantons, in manuscript or woodcuts appeared, but the mountainous nature of the country produced its own mapping problems and imposed a need for large-scale surveys as well as practical and effective methods of showing land surfaces in relief. Early in the seventeenth century Hans Gyger perfected new ways of doing this but although he published a wide range of very large-scale maps of the cantons and of Switzerland as a whole his techniques did not receive the credit they deserved. On the other hand, his countrymen followed his example of compiling large-scale maps for which they have always been noted for up until the present day. (Ref: Koeman; M&B) 

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, pink, red, blue, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 24in x 20in (610mm x 510mm)
Plate size: - 20in x 15 1/4in (510mm x 390mm)
Margins: - Min 2in (50mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$650.00 USD
More Info
1772 Gibson & Sayer Large Antique Map of America - The French Indian War

1772 Gibson & Sayer Large Antique Map of America - The French Indian War

  • Title : A New Map of the Whole Continent of America. Divided Into North and South and West Indies, with a Descriptive Account of the European Possessions, as Settled by the Definitive Treaty of Peace Conducted at Paris Feby 10th 1763...Compiled from Mr D Anville...1772
  • Ref #:  92637
  • Size: 47 1/2in x 42 1/2in (1.20m x 1.08m)
  • Date : 1772
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This rare, very large, hand coloured, original antique map of North & South America - resulting from the outcome of the French & Indian War in North America & the Paris Treaty of 1763 - by John Gibson, was published by Robert Sayer London, in 1772.
Superbly detailed, impressive in size and beauty of design, with geographical detail based on the American maps by the famous French cartographer Jean Baptiste Bourguignon D'Anville, along with recent Spanish explorations in northern California.
The first edition (1763) and second edition (1772) of this map are extremely scarce and hard to find as many of these were working maps and would have been put to use by both the Military and Government. Other editions with revisions were published in 1777, 1783, 1786 & 1794 which emphasised the post revolutionary break up of North America, without the L&R text boxes. 
The Treaty of Paris was signed between Britain, France, and Spain, reshaping the map of North America and ending the colonial phase of the Seven Years' War. France, defeated in the New World and frustrated in its war against Prussia, lost all claims to Canada and gave Louisiana to Spain, while Britain received Spanish Florida, Upper Canada, and various French holdings overseas. France's adventure in India also came to an end, ensuring the colonial supremacy of Britain in coming decades. Five days after the Treaty of Paris, the Treaty of Hubertusburg was signed, acknowledging Prussia's right to the Polish province of Silesia, a claim that seven years earlier had started the war. 

Background: This is John Gibson's celebrated map of the New World, showing the European Possessions and the recently recognized boundaries of North & South as decreed by the 1763 Treaty of Paris. The text box on the left side of the map outlines some of the articles of the Paris Treaty of 1763. The text box on the right hand side shows the possessions of each European Power in North & South America. 
The map is one of the earliest obtainable English language wall maps of  Continental America.  It was periodically updated during the later part of the 18th Century, first to include the information and boundaries established at the conclusion of the French and Indian War in 1763, and later, after the American Revolution and the establishment of the United States.
The map provides a stark contrast between the known and unknown regions, with the eastern parts of North America quite well understood, whereas the mythical River of the West is still shown, seeking a continuous water course from the Atlantic to the Pacific.
The map also includes an excellent treatment of South America at the end of the Spanish Colonial empire, based in part on the recently published Cruz Cano y Olmedilla map of South America (Mapa Geográfico De America Meridional . . .).
Although the United States extends to the Mississippi, the province of Quebec appears to encroach on U.S. territory around the Great Lakes. Details of north-western North America are just beginning to emerge. The map shows a peninsular California, a Chinese colony ("Fou Sang") in British Columbia, and two possible locations for a "River of the West" (one with its source at Pike's lake; the other, further north at Lake Winnipeg).
The South America sheet includes an inset map of northern North America to Baffin's Bay, showing Greenland as part of the North American mainland.
The beautiful title cartouche is a baroque fantasy with New World flora, both temperate and tropical, beaver, alligator, and an Indian chieftain's headdress. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original & later  
Colors used: - Yellow, green, red  
General color appearance: - Authentic   
Paper size: - 47 1/2in x 42 1/2in (1.20m x 1.08m)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Folds & joins as issued
Verso: - Light age toning

$4,250.00 USD
More Info
1757 Bellin Antique Map of The Port & City of Nagasaki, Japan - Deshima & Shogun

1757 Bellin Antique Map of The Port & City of Nagasaki, Japan - Deshima & Shogun

  • Title : Plan De La Ville et du Port du Nangasaki - Grond Tekening van de Stad en de Haven van Nangasaki
  • Ref #:  61059
  • Size: 15 1/2in x 10in (395mm x 255mm)
  • Date : 1757
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This beautifully hand coloured original antique map* a plan of the Japanese City & Port of Nagasaki by Jacques Nicolas Bellin was published in the 1757 French & Dutch edition of Antoine-François Prevosts 20 volume L`Histoire Generale des Voyages published by Pierre de Hondt in the Hague between 1747 & 1785.

Background: Oriented to the southeast, the map highlights principal points of interest and major buildings with the Deshima central to the map. The Deshima was an artificial island in the bay of Nagasaki where the Dutch East India Company (VOC) were allowed to trade with the representatives of the Shogun in Edo. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

Antoine François Prévost d'Exiles  1697 - 1763, usually known simply as the Abbé Prévost, was a French author and novelist. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Yellow, green, red, brown.
General color appearance: - Authentic and fresh
Paper size: - 15 1/2in x 10in (395mm x 255mm)
Plate size: - 13 1/2in x 8 1/2in (345mm x 215mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Folds as issued
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
More Info
1757 Bellin Antique Maps x 4 of Canada - Hudsons Bay, St Lawrence River, Quebec City

1757 Bellin Antique Maps x 4 of Canada - Hudsons Bay, St Lawrence River, Quebec City

  • Title : Carte De La Baye De Hudson; Carte Du Cours Du Fleuve De St Laurent; Suite Du Cours De St Laurent; Plan de la Ville Quebec
  • Ref #:  61087/61092/61090/61091
  • Size: 15in x 10in (380mm x 255mm)ea
  • Date : 1757
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
These 4 beautifully hand coloured original antique maps* of Canada - Hudson Bay, 2 x maps of The St Lawrence River & a plan of the city of Quebec, by Jacques Nicolas Bellin were engraved in 1757 - the date is engraved in the title cartouche - and were published in the 1757 French edition of Antoine-François Prevosts 20 volume L`Histoire Generale des Voyages published by Pierre de Hondt in the Hague between 1747 & 1785. 

The 4 maps represent:
1. Hudson's Bay
2. The Gulf & River mouth of the St Lawrence River
3. St Lawrence River from Quebec city to Lake Ontario
4. City plan of Quebec and Surrounds. 
(Ref: Tooley; M&B)

Antoine François Prévost d'Exiles  1697 - 1763, usually known simply as the Abbé Prévost, was a French author and novelist.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Yellow, green, red, brown.
General color appearance: - Authentic and fresh
Paper size: - 15in x 10in (380mm x 255mm)ea
Plate size: - 13in x 9in (330mm x 230mm)ea
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Folds as issued
Verso: - None

$750.00 USD
More Info
1757 Bellin Antique Map - Plan of The City of New Orleans, Louisiana, USA

1757 Bellin Antique Map - Plan of The City of New Orleans, Louisiana, USA

Description: 
This beautifully hand coloured original antique map* a scarce, early plan of the city of New Orleans, Louisiana by Jacques Nicolas Bellin was published in the 1757 French edition of Antoine-François Prevosts 20 volume L`Histoire Generale des Voyages published by Pierre de Hondt in the Hague between 1747 & 1785.

Background: This scarce 1757 map by Bellin is one of the earliest obtainable maps of New Orleans. Oriented to the east, Bellin's map covers the original settlement of New Orleans along the Mississippi River and inland as far theFosse plein d'eau (roughly translated: 'Pit full of Water') near modern day Dauphine Street, and from modern day Iberville Street (shown but not named) to modern day Barracks Street (shown but not named). The map shows some 100 buildings with some 18 specifically identified via an alphabetically coded table set just above the map.
Among the locations noted in the key is one that provides an eerie echo of the slave trade. Item Q is identified as Cabanes des Negroes qui prennent soin Moulin or 'Cabins of Negros that care for mill.' Note how these cabins, as well as the adjacent mill, are both well outside the ordered structure of the city as well as conveniently located near the Corps de Garde des Bourgeois

Antoine François Prévost d'Exiles  1697 - 1763, usually known simply as the Abbé Prévost, was a French author and novelist. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, green, red, brown.
General color appearance: - Authentic and fresh
Paper size: - 14 1/2in x 10in (360mm x 255mm)
Plate size: - 11in x 8in (280mm x 205mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Folds as issued, printers crease along left fold
Verso: - None

$475.00 USD
More Info