Prints (270)

Sort by:

1200 - Template Prints

  • Title : Karstia, Carniola, Histria et Windorum Marchia
  • Ref  :  43152
  • Size: 21 1/2in x 18 1/2in (550mm x 470mm)
  • Date : 1639
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This finely engraved, beautifully hand coloured original 1st edition antique map of America by Johann Baptiste Homann was published in 1710. This map is in beautiful condition, with a heavy, dark impression signifying an early pressing, beautiful original hand colouring on clean heavy and stable paper, a wonderful example of this hard to find map.

Background:
A wonderfully constructed map, an uncommon 1st edition, showing California as an Island based on Nicolas Sanson's second model, with additions of the towns, S Isidoro, Gigante and N S de la Guadalupe inserted in the south of the Island. The Straits of Anian are shown forming a Northwest Passage between California and the mythical Terra Esonis, which forms a nearly continuous land bridge from the Northwest to Asia. The Pays de Moozemleck is shown east of the Straits of Anian. This landmark remains virtually unchanged through all of Homann's maps of America, despite the later transition to a peninsular California, resulting in an odd change from a coastal to an apparently landlocked position for this landmark. The Great Lakes have a little more updated information and the Mississippi River shows the results of the early French Jesuit explorations. The rivers source extends to the far North of the limits of the maps produced 20 and 30 years earlier, although Le Moyne's mythical lake in the Southeastern US remains. The title cartouche is based upon De Fer's landmark map of 1699. The top dedication cartouche is based upon De L'Isle's 1703 map of Canada. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - Off white
Age of map color: - Original color:
Colors used: - Green, yellow, pink, orange.
General color appearance: - Authentic & beautiful
Paper size: - 23in x 20in (585mm x 510mm)
Plate size: - 22 1/2in x 19 1/4in (575mm x 490mm)
Margins: - Min 1/4in (7mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$2,250.00 USD
More Info
1855 Hooker & Fitch Large Antique Print Hodgsonia or Lard Fruit from SE Asia

1855 Hooker & Fitch Large Antique Print Hodgsonia or Lard Fruit from SE Asia

  • Title: Hodgsonia Heteroclita, Hook. fil. et Thoms
  • Date: 1855
  • Ref: 80768
  • Size: 20in x 15in (510mm x 380mm)
  • Condition: A+ Fine

Description:
This is a unique opportunity to acquire a magnificent & rare original antique Lithograph by one of the most famous Botanists of the 19th century, Joseph Dalton Hooker. This original antique print, illustrated by the equally famous botanical artist Walter Hood Fitch, of the Hodgsonia or Lard Fruit plant - that grows from northern India to SE Asia & Indonesia - was published as part of Hookers 1855 publication of the Illustrations of Himalayan plants which contained 24 coloured plates all superbly engraved and hand coloured.

Hodgsonia or Lard Fruit - Although the flesh of Hodgsonia fruit is inedible and considered worthless, the large, oil-rich seeds are an important source of food. The kernels are occasionally eaten raw; they are slightly bitter, possibly due to an unidentified alkaloid or glucoside, but "perfectly safe" to eat. More commonly, the seeds are roasted, after which they taste like pork scraps or lard; many mountain peoples consider these roasted seeds a delicacy. In addition to eating the seeds alone, the Naga incorporate them into various types of curry.

Sir Joseph Dalton Hooker (1817 – 1911) was one of the greatest British botanists and explorers of the 19th century. Hooker was one of the founders of geographical botany, and Charles Darwin's closest friend. He was Director of the Royal Botanical Gardens, Kew, for twenty years, in succession to his father, William Jackson Hooker, and was awarded the highest honours of British science.
On 11 November 1847 Hooker left England for his three year long Himalayan expedition; he would be the first European to collect plants in the Himalaya.
By his travels and his publications, Hooker built up a high scientific reputation at home. In 1855 he was appointed Assistant-Director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and in 1865 he succeeded his father as full Director, holding the post for twenty years. Under the directorship of father and son Hooker, the Royal Botanical gardens of Kew rose to world renown. At the age of thirty, Hooker was elected a fellow of the Royal Society, and in 1873 he was chosen its President (till 1877). He received three of its medals: the Royal Medal in 1854, the Copley in 1887 and the Darwin Medal in 1892. He continued to intersperse work at Kew with foreign exploration and collecting. His journeys to Palestine, Morocco and the United States all produced valuable information and specimens for Kew.
He started the series Flora Indica in 1855, together with Thomas Thompson. Their botanical observations and the publication of the Rhododendrons of Sikkim-Himalaya (1849–51), formed the basis of elaborate works on the rhododendrons of the Sikkim Himalaya and on the flora of India. His works were illustrated with lithographs by Walter Hood Fitch.

Walter Hood Fitch (1817 - 1892) was a botanist and botanical artist. He was born in Glasgow, Scotland.
Fitch was involved in fabric printing from the age of 17 and took to botanical art after being discovered by William Jackson Hooker, the editor of Curtis's Botanical Magazine. Hooker was a Professor of Botany at the University of Glasgow, and a competent botanical artist in his own right.
Fitch's important works are his illustrations for W. J. Hooker's A Century of Orchidaceous Plants (1851), and for James Bateman's A Monograph of Odontoglossum (1864-74). He also created around 500 plates for Hooker's Icones Plantarum (1836-76). Some of his most notable work was for George Bentham and W.J. Hooker's Handbook of the British Flora (1865). When Joseph Dalton Hooker returned from his travels in India, Fitch prepared lithographs from Hooker's sketches for his Rhododendrons of Sikkim Himalaya (1849-51) and, from the drawings of Indian artists, for his Illustrations of Himalayan Plants (1855).
A dispute over pay with Joseph Dalton Hooker ended Fitch's service to both the Botanical Magazine and Kew although he was much sought after and remained active as a botanical artist until 1888. Works during this period included Henry John Elwes's Monograph of the Genus Lilium (1877-80). (Ref: M&B; Tooley)


General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Red, pink, green, brown
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 20in x 15in (510mm x 380mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Discolouration to the top left & right margins
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$975.00 USD
More Info
1855 Hooker Fitch Antique Botanical Print China Mao Er Shi Goat Horn

1855 Hooker Fitch Antique Botanical Print China Mao Er Shi Goat Horn

Description: 
This is a unique opportunity to acquire a magnificent & rare original antique Lithograph by one of the most famous Botanists of the 19th century, Joseph Dalton Hooker. This original antique print, illustrated by the equally famous botanical artist Walter Hood Fitch, of the Decaisnea insignis or by its Chinese name Mao Er Shi (Transcribed Chinese) cat faeces or goat horns - that grows in China & SE Asia - was published as part of Hookers 1855 publication of the Illustrations of Himalayan plants. This publication contained 24 coloured plates all superbly engraved and hand coloured.

Decaisnea insignis Mao Er Shi (Transcribed Chinese - Cat faeces or Goat Horns - is a genus of flowering plant in the family Lardizabalaceae, native to eastern Asia, from China west to Nepal and south to Myanmar.
The genus comprises one or two species, depending on taxonomic opinion. Decaisnea insignis (Griffith) Hook.f. & Thomson was described from Nepal, and is sometimes restricted to the plants occurring in the Himalaya, with Chinese plants distinguished asDecaisnea fargesii Franchet. The only cited distinction (e.g. Bean 1973, Rushforth 1999) between the plants from the two regions is the fruit colour, yellow-green in D. insignis and bluish in D. fargesii. This is of little significance and the two are now combined under the older name D. insignis by some authors (e.g. Flora of China).

Sir Joseph Dalton Hooker (1817 – 1911) was one of the greatest British botanists and explorers of the 19th century. Hooker was one of the founders of geographical botany, and Charles Darwin's closest friend. He was Director of the Royal Botanical Gardens, Kew, for twenty years, in succession to his father, William Jackson Hooker, and was awarded the highest honours of British science.
On 11 November 1847 Hooker left England for his three year long Himalayan expedition; he would be the first European to collect plants in the Himalaya.
By his travels and his publications, Hooker built up a high scientific reputation at home. In 1855 he was appointed Assistant-Director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and in 1865 he succeeded his father as full Director, holding the post for twenty years. Under the directorship of father and son Hooker, the Royal Botanical gardens of Kew rose to world renown. At the age of thirty, Hooker was elected a fellow of the Royal Society, and in 1873 he was chosen its President (till 1877). He received three of its medals: the Royal Medal in 1854, the Copley in 1887 and the Darwin Medal in 1892. He continued to intersperse work at Kew with foreign exploration and collecting. His journeys to Palestine, Morocco and the United States all produced valuable information and specimens for Kew.
He started the series Flora Indica in 1855, together with Thomas Thompson. Their botanical observations and the publication of the Rhododendrons of Sikkim-Himalaya (1849–51), formed the basis of elaborate works on the rhododendrons of the Sikkim Himalaya and on the flora of India. His works were illustrated with lithographs by Walter Hood Fitch.

Walter Hood Fitch (1817 - 1892) was a botanist and botanical artist. He was born in Glasgow, Scotland.
Fitch was involved in fabric printing from the age of 17 and took to botanical art after being discovered by William Jackson Hooker, the editor of Curtis's Botanical Magazine. Hooker was a Professor of Botany at the University of Glasgow, and a competent botanical artist in his own right.
Fitch's important works are his illustrations for W. J. Hooker's A Century of Orchidaceous Plants (1851), and for James Bateman's A Monograph of Odontoglossum (1864-74). He also created around 500 plates for Hooker's Icones Plantarum (1836-76). Some of his most notable work was for George Bentham and W.J. Hooker's Handbook of the British Flora (1865). When Joseph Dalton Hooker returned from his travels in India, Fitch prepared lithographs from Hooker's sketches for his Rhododendrons of Sikkim Himalaya (1849-51) and, from the drawings of Indian artists, for his Illustrations of Himalayan Plants (1855).
A dispute over pay with Joseph Dalton Hooker ended Fitch's service to both the Botanical Magazine and Kew although he was much sought after and remained active as a botanical artist until 1888. Works during this period included Henry John Elwes's Monograph of the Genus Lilium (1877-80). (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Red, pink, green, brown
General color appearance: - Authentic   
Paper size: - 20in x 15in (510mm x 380mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling top left & bottom of margin
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$850.00 USD
More Info
1719 Chatelain Large Antique Print - 14 Views of Indians of Virginia

1719 Chatelain Large Antique Print - 14 Views of Indians of Virginia

  • Title  : Description de la Peche, Habillemens, Habitations, Manieres de Vivre, Superstitions et Autres Usages des Indiens de la Virginie
  • Date  : 1719
  • Ref # :  50636
  • Size   :  20in x 17 1/2in (510m x 440m)
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This large hand coloured original antique print a decorative series of 14 views of the customs, clothing and daily lives of the Native Inhabitants of Virginia was published by Henri Abraham Chatelain in 1719, in his famous Atlas Historique. of the 16th Century.
These 14 views of native American life in Virginia - taken from Theodor de Bry's America, which are engraved from John White's drawings - includes the manner of dressing, fishing, hunting, making canoes, eating, cooking, living, worshipping, as well as burial practices and ceremonies. Each of the 14 scenes includes an explanation in French.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Later
Colors used: - Yellow, orange, blue, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 20in x 17 1/2in (510m x 450m)
Plate size: - 19 1/2in x 16 1/2in (440m x 380mm)
Margins: - min. 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$750.00 USD
More Info
1784 Cook Webber Antique Print of Cooks Visit to Christmas Bay Kerguelen Isles

1784 Cook Webber Antique Print of Cooks Visit to Christmas Bay Kerguelen Isles

Description:
This large beautifully hand coloured original antique print of Capt. James Cooks ships the Resolution and Discovery anchored in Christmas Bay, Kerguelen Islands on Christmas day 1776, was engraved by Edward Newton drawn by John Webber during Cooks 3rd voyage of Discovery. The print was published in the 1784 1st edition of 'A Voyage to the Pacific', James Newton, London.

The Resolution and Discovery are anchored in the bay with two boats putting off, another by the shore to right and a man in the foreground raising a stick to kill penguins; a great hill is sited on the opposite side with a rocky outcrop above, a portion of land separated from the mainland by a small channel and a natural stone arch separated from that, in the distance to left. 
These large 1st edition prints were copied many times over the next 50 years but none rival the expertise and detail evident in this original print.

John Webber (1752-93) was the official artist on Cook's final voyage through the Pacific; his drawings formed the basis for printed illustrations to the account of the voyage 'A Voyage to the Pacific', published in 1784.

The Kerguelen Islands, 
sometimes called the Desolation Islands, are located in the southern Indian Ocean and were discovered by the French navigator Yves de Kerguelen-Trémarec in 1772. On Christmas Day, 1776 Cook’s ships Resolution and Discovery anchored in Oiseau Bay, which he named Christmas Harbour. Cook's men discovered a bottle containing a message in Latin left by Kerguelen's men. Cook wrote in his log: “I could have very properly called the island Desolation Island to signalise its sterility, but in order not to deprive M. de Kerguelen of the glory of having discovered it, I have called it Kerguelen Land.”
The Kerguelen Islands or the Kerguelen Archipelago are located in the southern Indian Ocean. The main island, Grande Terre, is 6,675 km² and it is surrounded by another 300 smaller islands and islets, forming an archipelago of 7,215 km². The climate is cold and very windy and the seas are usually rough. The islands are part of a submarine large igneous province called the Kerguelen Plateau.

Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

Condition Report:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Green, yellow, blue, red  
General color appearance: - Authentic  
Paper size: - 20in x 14 1/2in (510mm x 370mm)
Plate size: - 16in x 10 1/2in (410mm x 270mm)
Margins: - 2in (50mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light spotting
Plate area: - Vertical crease along top of image
Verso: - Light soiling

$650.00 USD
More Info
1780 Cook Basire Large Antique Print of Capt. James Cooks Men Landing in Vanuatu

1780 Cook Basire Large Antique Print of Capt. James Cooks Men Landing in Vanuatu

  • Title: The Landing at Mallicolo one of the New Hebrides...Published Feb 1st 1777 by Wm. Strahan
  • Date:  1780
  • Ref: 91223
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Size: 19in x 12 ½in (485mm x 320mm)

Description:
This large 1st edition original antique print of  Capt James Cook's men landing in the New Hebrides - Vanuatu - in the South Pacific during his 3rd voyage of Discovery (see below) - was engraved by James Basire in 1777 - the date is engraved at the foot of the print - and was published in the 1st edition of John Hawkesworth's accounts of Cooks Voyage's  "A voyage towards the South Pole, and round the World. Performed in His Majesty's ships the Resolution and Adventure, in the years 1772, 1773, 1774, and 1775". 

Please note this original print is from the Ist edition, not from later copies by Hogg, Bankes etc.  (Ref Tooley M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 19in x 12 ½in (485mm x 320mm)
Plate size: - 19in x 12in (480mm x 305mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (10mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light chipping to margin edges
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$650.00 USD
More Info
1844 Durand-Brager Large Antique Print of Wharf at Jamestown St Helena Island

1844 Durand-Brager Large Antique Print of Wharf at Jamestown St Helena Island

Description: 

This large finely coloured original antique  lithograph print - a view of the unloading dock or wharf at the port of Jamestown on the Island of St Helena - was published by Jean-Baptiste Henri Durand-Brager (1814-1879) in the publication "Sainte-Hélène. Translation du Crecueil du l'Empereur Napoléon a bord de la frégate La Belle-Poule. Histoire et vues pittoresques de tous les sites de l'ile se rattachant au mémorial de Saint-Hélène a l'expédition de S.A.R.Mgr. le Prince de Joinville". Paris, 1844. This Lithograph was executed by the famous Cuban lithographer Eduardo Laplante (1818 - 1860).

"Sainte-Hélène. Translation du Crecueil du l'Empereur Napoléon".... is a rare work which included some of the finest views of St. Helena ever published. Durand-Brager was the official artist sent to record the scenery and scenes surrounding the collection of Napoleon's body from St.Helena by an offical French expedition in 1840. The text includes eye-witness accounts of the whole affair together with transcriptions of many of the relevant official documents.

Sainte-Hélène contained 5 lithographic portraits by and after Lévieill or G.Staal, three tinted, two on India paper mounted. 24 tinted lithographic views after Durand-Brager in     cluding 6 'avant-lettre' proofs with titles and inscriptions in pencil, the others by De Laplante and Durand-Brager, De Laplante, Sabatier or Eugène Cicéri, printed by Lemercier or Formentier et Cie. Only two copies of this work are listed as having sold at auction in the past twenty five years.

Jean-Baptiste Henri Durand-Brager 1814-1879 An adventurous soul, inherited partially from his father explorer Jean-Baptiste-Leonard Durand, Henri Durand-Brager explored the world’s reaches. If not for some fateful moments he would have probably settled into a naval career rather than that of an artist. His youthful travels included the coasts of Africa, Asia and South America, and his repertoire contains scenes of these lands and seas. His father had led similar explorations during his career, including a voyage to Senegal on which he was shipwrecked. To avoid such possible hardships, he encouraged Henri to study art.

He trained at the side of Eugene Isabey, who himself produced a significant number of coastal scenes amongst his old master influenced genre paintings. Isabey instilled an emphasis on humanity’s interaction with nature with Durand-Brager, who saw the primal forces of the environment as a subject suitable for fine art on its own. They both worked extensively with numerous technical drawings before committing their works to oil on canvas.

Bordering the edge of the educational art direction which would soon produce the important impressionist and Plein-Air methodologies of art, Durand-Brager’s works demonstrate some of the basic tenants of emotional strength and interpretive loose brush within his seas and skies, while his subject ships and people hold to realistic looks. He found favour and patrons in the royal houses of Russia and Austria, and the French provincial government

Saint Helena: named after St Helena of Constantinople, is an island of volcanic origin in the South Atlantic Ocean. It is part of the British overseas territory of Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha which also includes Ascension Island and the islands of Tristan da Cunha.

The island has a history of over 500 years since it was first discovered as an uninhabited island by the Portuguese in 1502. Britain's second oldest remaining colony (after Bermuda), Saint Helena is one of the most isolated islands in the world and was for several centuries of vital strategic importance to ships sailing to Europe from Asia and South Africa. For several centuries, the British used the island as a place of exile, most notably for Napoleon Bonaparte.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Very heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: -  Blue, brown,  
General color appearance: - Authentic 
Paper size: - 23 1/2in x 16 1/2in (600mm x 420mm)
Margins: - Min 2in (50mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Small repair to bottom margin, no loss
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$525.00 USD
More Info
1841 D Urville Large Antique Folio Print View of Icebergs on the Adélie Coast, Antarctica

1841 D Urville Large Antique Folio Print View of Icebergs on the Adélie Coast, Antarctica

  • Title: Vue d'une Ile De Glacie Le 18 Janvier 1840
  • Date: 1841
  • Condition : (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref: 40417
  • Size: 21in x 13 1/2in (535mm x 345mm)

Description:
This large finely engraved original and antique folio print of the pack ice and icebergs of the Adélie Coast region in Antarctica in January 1840 was published in the 1841 edition of Dumont d'Urville Voyage au Pole Sud during his second circumnavigation of the globe in 1837-40.
In 1840 D Urville penetrated the ice pack south of New Zealand and discovered the Adélie Coast region in Antarctica, the first known human to visit the region.

Voyage au Pole Sud et dan l'Océanie sur les corvettes - In 1836, the French King Louis-Philippe, enthusiastic for Southern Hemisphere exploration, supported J. Dumont d'Urville's plan for a circumnavigation focusing on the South Seas. D'Urville (1790–1842) had already distinguished himself on two Pacific expeditions and was eager to rival the achievements of James Cook. Between 1837 and 1840, the ships Astrolabe and Zélée explored the waters of the Antarctic area and Oceania in extremely harsh conditions: almost forty crew members died or deserted. However, d'Urville discovered a new portion of the Antarctic coast, shed light on the ethnography of several Pacific islands and brought back multitudes of botanical specimens. His impressive contributions to the fields of geography, natural history and ethnography were gathered in this ten-volume work, published between 1841 and 1846. In Volume 10, published in 1846, which includes extracts from his correspondence, as well as a biography, d'Urville shares his immense relief as he returns to France. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: -
Colors used: -
General color appearance: -
Paper size: - 21in x 13 1/2in (535mm x 345mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$475.00 USD
More Info
1575 Braun & Hogenberg Map of Pozzuoli Bay Naples Italy

1575 Braun & Hogenberg Map of Pozzuoli Bay Naples Italy

Description:
This finely engraved beautifully hand coloured original antique 2 x birds-eye view of the Bay of Pozzuoli -in the Gulf of Naples - with The city of Pozzuoli & the Port Of Baia visible was published by Georg Braun & Frans Hogenberg for the 1575 atlas of town plans Civiates Orbis Terrarum Vol II intended as a companion to Abraham Ortelius's master Atlas Theatrum Orbis Terrarum published in 1570.

The Gulf of Naples is a 10-mile wide gulf located in the south western coast of Italy, (province of Naples, Campania region). It opens to the west into the Mediterranean Sea & is bordered on the north by the cities of Naples and Pozzuoli. To the east is Mount Vesuvius, and on the south by the Sorrentine Peninsula and its main town Sorrento; the Peninsula separates it from the Gulf of Salerno.

Pozzuoli began as the Greek colony of Dicaearchia. The Roman colony was established in 194 BC, and took the Latin name Puteoli 'little wells', referring to the many hot springs in the area, most notably Solfatara. This is because Pozzuoli lies in the center of the Campi Flegrei, a caldera.
Puteoli was the great emporium for the Alexandrian grain ships, and other ships from all over the Roman world. It also was the main hub for goods exported from Campania, including blown glass, mosaics, wrought iron, and marble. The Roman naval base at nearby Misenum housed the largest naval fleet in the ancient world. It was also the site of the Roman Dictator Sulla's country villa and the place where he died in 78 BC.
The local volcanic sand, pozzolana formed the basis for the first effective concrete, as it reacted chemically with water. Instead of just evaporating slowly off, the water would turn this sand/lime mix into a mortar strong enough to bind lumps of aggregate into a load-bearing unit. This made possible the cupola of the Pantheon, the first real dome.

Background of Civitates Orbis Terrarum

The first volume of the Civitates Orbis Terrarum was published in Cologne in 1572. The sixth and the final volume appeared in 1617. 
This great city atlas, edited by Georg Braun and largely engraved by Franz Hogenberg, eventually contained 546 prospects, bird-eye views and map views of cities from all over the world. Braun (1541-1622), a cleric of Cologne, was the principal editor of the work, and was greatly assisted in his project by the close, and continued interest of Abraham Ortelius, whose Theatrum Orbis Terrarum of 1570 was, as a systematic and comprehensive collection of maps of uniform style, the first true atlas.

For a variety of reasons town plans were comparatively latecomers in the long history of cartography. Few cities in Europe in the middle ages had more than 20,00 inhabitants and even London in the late Elizabethan period had only 100-150,000 people which in itself was probably 10 times that of any other English city. The Nuremberg Chronicle in 1493 included one of the first town views of Jerusalem, thereafter, for most of the sixteenth century, German cartographers led the way in producing town plans in a modern sense. In 1544 Sebastian Munster issued in Basle his Cosmographia containing roughly sixty-six plans and views, some in the plan form, but many in the old panorama or birds eye view. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

Condition Report:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Green, blue, red, yellow
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 21in x 16in (535mm x 410mm)
Plate size: - 19in x 12in (485mm x 310mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Professional repair to top centre margin
Plate area: - Small professional repairs & light age toning to centrefold
Verso: - None

$475.00 USD
More Info
1774 Cook Webber Antique Print of a New Zealand Maori Chief

1774 Cook Webber Antique Print of a New Zealand Maori Chief

Description:
This finely engraved original antique print of a New Zealand Maori Chief by William Hodges and John Webber - both appointed for the official English and 1st publication of Captain James Cook's voyages - was published in 1774.

Cook's First Voyage (1768-1771)
The first voyage under Captain James Cook's command was primarily of a scientific nature. The expedition on the Endeavour initially sailed to Tahiti to observe the transit of the planet Venus in order to calculate the earth's distance from the sun. Cook landed on the South Pacific island in April of 1769 and in June of that year the astronomical observations were successfully completed. In addition to these labors, very good relations with the Tahitians were maintained and the naturalists Joseph Banks and Daniel C. Solander conducted extensive ethnological and botanical research.

Another purpose of the voyage was to explore the South Seas to determine if an inhabitable continent existed in the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Upon leaving Tahiti, Cook named and charted the Society Islands and then continued southwest to New Zealand. His circumnavigation and exploration of that country also resulted in a detailed survey. Cook proceeded to Australia, where he charted the eastern coast for 2,000 miles, naming the area New South Wales. As a result of these surveys, both Australia and New Zealand were annexed by Great Britain. In addition to these explorations, the Endeavour returned to England without a single death from scurvy among its men, an historic feat at the time. The combination of these accomplishments brought Cook prominence, promotion, and the opportunity to lead further expeditions.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: -  
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 11 1/2in x 8 1/2in (290mm x 230mm)
Plate size: - 9in x 7 1/2in (225mm x 190mm)
Margins: - 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$475.00 USD
More Info
1575 Braun & Hogenberg Antique Map City Plan of Tournai or Doornik, Belgium

1575 Braun & Hogenberg Antique Map City Plan of Tournai or Doornik, Belgium

Description:
This fine beautifully hand coloured original antique map a birds-eye view of the town ofTournai or Doornik, a Walloon city located 85 kilometres west-southwest of Brussels, on the river Scheldt, in the province of Hainaut in Belgium was published by Georg Braun & Frans Hogenberg for the 1575 atlas of town plans Civiates Orbis Terrarum Vol II (1572-1612) intended as a companion to Abraham Ortelius's master Atlas Theatrum Orbis Terrarum published in 1570.

Background: 
Bird's-eye view of the city from the south seen fortified with a Renaissance-style moat and wall with projecting bastions. The Old Town wall, dating from 1290, can be seen inside the city. The 12th-century Gothic cathedral of Notre-Dame (5) stands out in the centre , the most important and influential church building in Belgium. 
Tournai is one of Belgium's oldest cities. A formidable stronghold as early as the 4th century AD, it was the main centre of the Salian Franks until the mid-5th century. Tournai became an Episcopal See at the beginning of the 6th century and belonged then to the Count of Flanders from 1188 to France. 
In the 15th century the city flourished economically and culturally as a result of its tapestry industry (Rogier van der Weyden, among others). In the Treaties of Madrid and Cambrai (1526/29), France had to cede Tournai to Charles V and it thus became part of the Spanish Netherlands.  

Verso Text: "Tornacum or Turnacum is a city in Gallia Belgica, situated on the Schelde in the territory of the Nervii, called Tournai by its French inhabitants, but Dorneck by the Germans. Tournai has always been a large and powerful city, with an abundance of goods and commercial activities and wonderfully resourceful craftsmen, who invent new articles every day, and although some of these go out of use they constantly conceive of other new things, both useful and delightful, so that they have at all times something that provides work and a means of livelihood for the poor." 

Civitates Orbis Terrarum

The first volume of the Civitates Orbis Terrarum was published in Cologne in 1572. The sixth and the final volume appeared in 1617. 
This great city atlas, edited by Georg Braun and largely engraved by Franz Hogenberg, eventually contained 546 prospects, bird-eye views and map views of cities from all over the world. Braun (1541-1622), a cleric of Cologne, was the principal editor of the work, and was greatly assisted in his project by the close, and continued interest of Abraham Ortelius, whose Theatrum Orbis Terrarum of 1570 was, as a systematic and comprehensive collection of maps of uniform style, the first true atlas.

For a variety of reasons town plans were comparatively latecomers in the long history of cartography. Few cities in Europe in the middle ages had more than 20,00 inhabitants and even London in the late Elizabethan period had only 100-150,000 people which in itself was probably 10 times that of any other English city. The Nuremberg Chronicle in 1493 included one of the first town views of Jerusalem, thereafter, for most of the sixteenth century, German cartographers led the way in producing town plans in a modern sense. In 1544 Sebastian Munster issued in Basle his Cosmographia containing roughly sixty-six plans and views, some in the plan form, but many in the old panorama or birds eye view. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

Condition Report:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Green, blue, red, yellow
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 21 1/2in x 16in (550mm x 400mm)
Plate size: - 16 3/4in x 14 1/4in (440mm x 365mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light chipping to margin edges
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$475.00 USD
More Info
1574 Munster Large Antique Print View of The City of Wormbs, Germany

1574 Munster Large Antique Print View of The City of Wormbs, Germany

Description:
This large folding original antique print a View of the important German city ofWormbs, south of Hamburg was published in the 1574 release of Sebastian MunstersCosmographia published by Sebastian Petri, Basle.
(This is a reasonably scarce map as the large fold out maps in Cosmographia were easily damaged and lost)

Background: For a variety of reasons town plans were comparatively latecomers in the long history of cartography. Few cities in Europe in the middle ages had more than 20,00 inhabitants and even London in the late Elizabethan period had only 100-150,000 people which in itself was probably 10 times that of any other English city. The Nuremberg Chronicle in 1493 included one of the first town views of Jerusalem, thereafter, for most of the sixteenth century, German cartographers led the way in producing town plans in a modern sense. In 1544 Sebastian Munster issued in Basle his Cosmographia containing roughly sixty-six plans and views, some in the plan form, but many in the old panorama or birds eye view. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Later
Colors used: - Green, blue, yellow, pink
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 27in x 13in (685mm x 330mm)
Plate size: - 25in x 10in (635 x 255m)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling
Plate area: -Folds re-joined small loss, light soiling, light creasing
Verso: - Light soiling, colour show through, half the map backed in archival material

$475.00 USD
More Info
1719 Chatelain Antique Print of Canadian Indians, Beavers

1719 Chatelain Antique Print of Canadian Indians, Beavers

  • Title  : Description des Castors & de leur Industrie, des Canots, Habitations, Habillemens, Maniere de Vivre des Sauvages du Canada
  • Date  : 1719
  • Ref # :  50638
  • Size   :  20in x 17 1/2in (510m x 440m)
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This large hand coloured original antique print with illustrations and detailed text on Canada and the Canadian Indians and the important Beavers was published by Henri Abraham Chatelain in 1719, in his famous Atlas Historique

Background:
This is the famous beaver sheet from Volume Six of Chatelain's atlas historique. It contains descriptions and illustrations of beavers and their industry, and of the canoes, dwellings, hunting, fishing, clothes, customs and writing of the Canadian Native Americans. The part of the text entitled Amors & mariages des sauvages details how the prospective groom would woo his bride.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Later
Colors used: - Yellow, orange, blue, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 20in x 17 1/2in (510m x 440m)
Plate size: - 17 1/2in x 15in (440m x 380mm)
Margins: - min. 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$475.00 USD
More Info
1656 Daniell King Antique Print of Old St Pauls Cathedral London - Pre 1666

1656 Daniell King Antique Print of Old St Pauls Cathedral London - Pre 1666

  • Title  : Ecclesiae Cathedralis Sti Pauli facies Aquilonaris / The North Prospect of ye Cathedral Church of St Paul in London
  • Date  : 1656
  • Condition: (A+) Fine
  • Ref # :  16365
  • Size   : 15 1/2in x 13 1/2in (395mm x 340mm) 

Description:

This fine original antique print of the Old St Pauls Cathedral in London by Daniel King was published just prior to the Great Fire of London in the 1656 edition of his Cathedral and Conventual Churches of England and Wales.

Old St Paul's Cathedral was the medieval cathedral of the City of London that, until 1666, stood on the site of the present St Paul's Cathedral. Built in 1087–1314 and dedicated to Saint Paul, the cathedral was the fourth church on the site at Ludgate Hill. Work began during the reign of William the Conqueror after a fire in 1087 that destroyed much of the city. Work took more than 200 years, and construction was delayed by another fire in 1135. The church was consecrated in 1240 and enlarged again in 1256 and the early 14th century. At its completion in the middle of the 14th century, the cathedral was one of the longest churches in the world and had one of the tallest spires and some of the finest stained glass. The presence of the shrine of Saint Erkenwald made the cathedral a pilgrimage site during the Medieval period. In addition to serving as the seat of the Diocese of London, the building developed a reputation as a hub of the City of London, with the nave aisle, "Paul's walk", known as a centre for business and the London grapevine. After the Reformation, the open-air pulpit in the churchyard, St Paul's Cross, became the stage for radical evangelical preaching and Protestant bookselling. The cathedral was already severely in decline by the 17th century. Restoration work by Inigo Jones in the 1620s was halted by the English Civil War. Sir Christopher Wren was attempting another restoration in 1666 when the cathedral was destroyed in the Great Fire of London. After demolition of the old structure, the present, domed cathedral was erected on the site, with an English Baroque design by Wren

Daniel King: 1616 - 1661 Topographical etcher, born and based in Chester, England. King was the son of a baker, and was apprenticed in Chester in 1630. He was admitted to the Chester Painter's Company in 1639, and continued working there until about 1643. He then moved away from the town, but sporadically re-appears in the Company lists until 1661 when he is recorded as dead. His etchings all belong to the 1650s, and all emerge from his association with the famous 17th century antiquarian Sir William Dugdale. Anthony Wood recorded that he had been robbed by his wife, and died heart-broken near York House in the Strand. Dugdale later fell out with King, calling him 'a most ignorant silly fellow' and 'an arrant knave'. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 15 1/2in x 13 1/2in (395mm x 340mm)
Plate size: - 14 1/2in x 9in (370mm x 230mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (10mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Small repair to bottom of margin, no loss
Plate area: - Folds as issued
Verso: - None

$425.00 USD
More Info
1841 McKenny Hall Large Folio Antique Print Chippeway Indian Native American

1841 McKenny Hall Large Folio Antique Print Chippeway Indian Native American

Description:
This beautifully hand coloured original antique folio lithograph print of KA-TA-WA-BE-DA (Katawabeda) “Old Tooth” of the Chippeway Tribe was engraved and hand coloured in 1841 - the date is engraved at the foot of the print - by J.T. Bowen and was published in the folio edition of McKenny-Hall`s History of the Indian Tribes of North America published between 1837 and 1844

McKenney and Hall's Indian Tribes of North America has long been renowned for its faithful portraits of Native Americans. The portrait plates are based on paintings by the artist Charles Bird King, who was employed by the War Department to paint the Indian delegates visiting Washington D.C., forming the basis of the War Department's Indian Gallery. Most of King's original paintings were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian, and their appearance in McKenney and Hall's magnificent work is thus our only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century. Numbered among King's sitters were Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. 

As first director, McKenney was to improve the administration of Indian programs in various government offices. His first trip was during the summer of 1826 to the Lake Superior area for a treaty with the Chippewa, opening mineral rights on their land. In 1827, he journeyed west again for a treaty with the Chippewa, Menominee , and Winebago in the present state of Michigan. His journeys provided an unparalleled opportunity to become acquainted with Native American tribes. When President Jackson dismissed him from his government post in 1839, McKenney was able to turn more of his attention to his publishing project. Within a few years, he was joined by James Hall, a lawyer who had written extensively about the west.

Both authors, not unlike George Catlin, whom they tried to enlist in their publishing enterprise, saw their book as a way of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. (Gilreath). McKenney provided the biographies, many based on personal interviews, and Hall wrote the general history of the North American Indian. This was the most elaborate plate book produced in the United States to date, and its publication involved a number of different printers and lithographers. The publication of volume I (in 1836) was initially undertaken by Edward C.Biddle, Biddle's firm was taken over by Frederick W. Greenough, who re-issued vol.I and published the first issue of vol.II in 1842. Later, Greenough's firm was replaced by the printing firm of Rice and Clark who reissued vol. I and vol.II and published the first issue of vol.III in 1844. The printing of the plates was chiefly carried out by Peter Duval of Lehman and Duval and James T. Bowen. 
(Ref: BAL 6934; Bennett p.79; Field 992; Howes M129; Lipperhiede Mc4; Reese, American Color Plate Books 24; Sabin 43410a).

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - Off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Blue, grey, red, brown.
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 18in x 13in (495mm x 344mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning, light spotting
Plate area: - Small repair not affecting the image, light offsetting
Verso: - Light age toning & spotting

$425.00 USD
More Info
1575 Braun & Hogenberg Large Antique Map of the City of Arras, France

1575 Braun & Hogenberg Large Antique Map of the City of Arras, France

Description:
This fine beautifully hand coloured original antique map a birds-eye view of the French City of Arras - the capital of the Pas de Calais region - was published by Georg Braun & Frans Hogenberg for the 1575 atlas of town plans Civiates Orbis Terrarum Vol II (1572-1612) intended as a companion to Abraham Ortelius's master Atlas Theatrum Orbis Terrarum published in 1570.

Background of Civitates Orbis Terrarum
The first volume of the Civitates Orbis Terrarum was published in Cologne in 1572. The sixth and the final volume appeared in 1617. 
This great city atlas, edited by Georg Braun and largely engraved by Franz Hogenberg, eventually contained 546 prospects, bird-eye views and map views of cities from all over the world. Braun (1541-1622), a cleric of Cologne, was the principal editor of the work, and was greatly assisted in his project by the close, and continued interest of Abraham Ortelius, whose Theatrum Orbis Terrarum of 1570 was, as a systematic and comprehensive collection of maps of uniform style, the first true atlas.

For a variety of reasons town plans were comparatively latecomers in the long history of cartography. Few cities in Europe in the middle ages had more than 20,00 inhabitants and even London in the late Elizabethan period had only 100-150,000 people which in itself was probably 10 times that of any other English city. The Nuremberg Chronicle in 1493 included one of the first town views of Jerusalem, thereafter, for most of the sixteenth century, German cartographers led the way in producing town plans in a modern sense. In 1544 Sebastian Munster issued in Basle his Cosmographia containing roughly sixty-six plans and views, some in the plan form, but many in the old panorama or birds eye view. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

Condition Report:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Green, blue, red, yellow
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 21in x 16in (535mm x 410mm)
Plate size: - 19in x 14in (485mm x 355mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$425.00 USD
More Info
1575 Braun & Hogenberg Antique Print Sneek Dokkum Ylst Frisia Sloten Netherlands

1575 Braun & Hogenberg Antique Print Sneek Dokkum Ylst Frisia Sloten Netherlands

  • TitleSneecha, vulgo Sneeck Frisiae Occidentalis Oppidum. - Doccum - Sloten - Ylsta
  • Ref #:  30261
  • Size: 21in x 16in (535mm x 410mm)
  • Date : 1575
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This fine beautifully hand coloured original antique map a birds-eye view of the towns of Sneek, Dokkum, Ylst and Sloten in Frisia, the Netherlands was published by Georg Braun & Frans Hogenberg for the 1575 atlas of town plans Civiates Orbis Terrarum Vol II (1572-1612) intended as a companion to Abraham Ortelius's master Atlas Theatrum Orbis Terrarum published in 1570.

Background of Civitates Orbis Terrarum
The first volume of the Civitates Orbis Terrarum was published in Cologne in 1572. The sixth and the final volume appeared in 1617. 
This great city atlas, edited by Georg Braun and largely engraved by Franz Hogenberg, eventually contained 546 prospects, bird-eye views and map views of cities from all over the world. Braun (1541-1622), a cleric of Cologne, was the principal editor of the work, and was greatly assisted in his project by the close, and continued interest of Abraham Ortelius, whose Theatrum Orbis Terrarum of 1570 was, as a systematic and comprehensive collection of maps of uniform style, the first true atlas.

For a variety of reasons town plans were comparatively latecomers in the long history of cartography. Few cities in Europe in the middle ages had more than 20,00 inhabitants and even London in the late Elizabethan period had only 100-150,000 people which in itself was probably 10 times that of any other English city. The Nuremberg Chronicle in 1493 included one of the first town views of Jerusalem, thereafter, for most of the sixteenth century, German cartographers led the way in producing town plans in a modern sense. In 1544 Sebastian Munster issued in Basle his Cosmographia containing roughly sixty-six plans and views, some in the plan form, but many in the old panorama or birds eye view. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

Condition Report:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Green, blue, red, yellow
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 21in x 16in (535mm x 410mm)
Plate size: - 16 1/2in x 14in (420mm x 355mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling in margins
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$425.00 USD
More Info
1575 Braun & Hogenberg Large Antique Print a View of Mechelen, Belgium

1575 Braun & Hogenberg Large Antique Print a View of Mechelen, Belgium

  • TitleMechelen - Nitidissimae Civitatis Mechlineensis in meditullio Brabantiae sitae, exactis: delineatio
  • Ref #:  16247
  • Size: 21in x 16in (535mm x 410mm)
  • Date : 1575
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This fine beautifully hand coloured original antique map a birds-eye view of the city of Mechelen in the Antwerp province of Flanders, Belgium was published by Georg Braun & Frans Hogenberg for the 1575 atlas of town plans Civiates Orbis Terrarum Vol II (1572-1612) intended as a companion to Abraham Ortelius's master Atlas Theatrum Orbis Terrarum published in 1570.

Franz Hogenberg's birthplace is illustrated twice. In the view presented in Volume I the cityscape is dominated by the massive tower belonging to the cathedral of Sint-Rombout, which measures almost 100 m in height. Behind the cathedral to the right lies the Onze-Lieve-Vrouwe church built in the Brabantine late Gothic style. In the present plate Mechelen is seen in a bird's-eye view from the northwest. Clearly apparent is the almost circular shape of the inner city, which has already spread beyond the bounds of the canal ringing the old city wall. In the Middle Ages staple rights and the cloth trade brought Mechelen great prosperity. In 1336 the city passed to the Duchy of Brabant, later to Burgundy, and developed into a highly regarded centre of commerce. The collapse of the cloth industry prompted the development of new areas of manufacturing, such as cannon and bell founding. In 1477 Mechelen passed to the Habsburgs and from 1507 to 1530, under the regency of Margaret of Austria, was capital of the Habsburg Netherlands. In 1559 Mechelen became an archbishopric and over the course of the Wars of Religion grew into a centre of the Counter-Reformation. For some time it was also the seat of the highest tribunal of the Habsburg Netherlands. (Taschen)

Background of Civitates Orbis Terrarum
The first volume of the Civitates Orbis Terrarum was published in Cologne in 1572. The sixth and the final volume appeared in 1617. 
This great city atlas, edited by Georg Braun and largely engraved by Franz Hogenberg, eventually contained 546 prospects, bird-eye views and map views of cities from all over the world. Braun (1541-1622), a cleric of Cologne, was the principal editor of the work, and was greatly assisted in his project by the close, and continued interest of Abraham Ortelius, whose Theatrum Orbis Terrarum of 1570 was, as a systematic and comprehensive collection of maps of uniform style, the first true atlas.

For a variety of reasons town plans were comparatively latecomers in the long history of cartography. Few cities in Europe in the middle ages had more than 20,00 inhabitants and even London in the late Elizabethan period had only 100-150,000 people which in itself was probably 10 times that of any other English city. The Nuremberg Chronicle in 1493 included one of the first town views of Jerusalem, thereafter, for most of the sixteenth century, German cartographers led the way in producing town plans in a modern sense. In 1544 Sebastian Munster issued in Basle his Cosmographia containing roughly sixty-six plans and views, some in the plan form, but many in the old panorama or birds eye view. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

Condition Report:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Green, blue, red, yellow
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 21in x 16in (535mm x 410mm)
Plate size: - 18 1/2in x 13 1/2in (470mm x 345mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling in margins
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$425.00 USD
More Info
1760 Robert Adams Large Antique Print Gateway to The Old Admiralty Building, London

1760 Robert Adams Large Antique Print Gateway to The Old Admiralty Building, London

  • Title Plan and elevation of the new screen or gateway, before the front of the Admiralty...Robert Adams
  • Ref #:  40450
  • Size: 27 1/2in x 21in (700mm x 535mm)
  • Date : 1760
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This very large original antique print a view & plan of the Gateway to the Admiralty Building, Whitehall, London - designed by the great British architect Robert Adams - was engraved by Fredrick Patton in 1760 - the date is engraved on the plan - and sold by A. Miller in the Strand 1761, Price 2 shillings 6 pence. 

Adam, Robert (1728-1792) An important Scottish architect, born in Kirkaldy, son of the Edinburgh architect William Adam. His three brothers also worked in the architectural profession, and James and William Adam joined Robert Adam in the London-based family practice (the eldest brother, John Adam, like his father, was a Palladian architect and was based in Scotland). Robert Adam studied at Edinburgh University, and then set off on the Grand Tour in 1754, travelling through France and Italy, and returning after 4 years well versed in classical and Italian Renaissance architecture. His own work was mainly Classical, in a lighter style than the Palladians, and some Gothic castles. He became one of the two most important architects of the latter part of the 18th Century - the other being William Chambers.

In London, the Adams Brothers designed the Adelphi scheme (1768-1772), built in Westminster and based on a Thames-side terrace with a parallel row closer to the Strand, with a ladder of side streets between. It was largely demolished in the 1930s. A few remain, in John Adam Street, Robert Street and so forth, among which is the Royal Society of Arts, with an elegant Ionic frontage. The south and east sides of Fitzroy Square are also theirs.

A few of Robert Adam's town houses remain, including 20 Portman Square, 20 St James's Square, and Chandos House in Queen Anne Street. The majority of his work was on large country houses, usually altering existing ones rather than starting from scratch, and partly for this reason, he is particularly known today for his opulent interiors rather than exteriors. Around London we may mention Kenwood House, home of the Iveagh Collection of paintings, Osterley Park, and Syon House (near Kew). An early work of his is the facade for the Admiralty in Whitehall.

Among artists employed by Adam to decorate his interiors are the painter Angelica Kauffman, the sculptor John Flaxman, and the Italian painters Antonio Zucchi and Giovanni Cipriani. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 27 1/2in x 21in (700mm x 535mm)
Plate size: - 25in x 16in (635mm x 635mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Small repairs to margin edges
Plate area: - Light vertical fold
Verso: - None

$425.00 USD
More Info
1820 J W Lewin Antique Print Early View of Sydney Cove

1820 J W Lewin Antique Print Early View of Sydney Cove

Description:
This wonderful hand coloured original antique print an early view Sydney Cove, - attributed to a drawing, now lost, by the artist John William Lewin in ca 1820 - was published in the 1826 of Nouvelles Annales Des Voyages, De La Geographie et de L Histoire, ou Recueil, volume II.

Background: 
This is an early panorama of Sydney Cove only 32 years after the first European settlement of Sydney Cove. In the foreground is an octagonal two-storey, yellow, sandstone house, built by Governor Macquarie in 1812 for his favourite boatman and former water bailiff, Billy Blue. The drawing of this little house – now the site of the Sydney Opera House — is out of all proportion to its actual modest size. Billy or William Blue (1767–1834) was an African-Jamaican who had been given a seven-year sentence in London for stealing raw sugar. To the left of the house is a sandy beach where the Circular Quay ferry wharves now stand. Facing the beach is First Government House where the Museum of Sydney is now situated.

On the western shore is the Rocks district, with two windmills on the ridge. Known as Tallawoladah by the Cadigal people, the Rocks became the convicts' side of the town. They built traditional vernacular houses, first of wattle and daub, with thatched roofs, later of weatherboards or rubble stone, roofed with timber shingles. They took in lodgers – the newly arrived convicts – who slept in kitchens and skillions. Some emancipists also had convict servants. After November 1790, large numbers of Aboriginal people also came into the town to visit and to live. By 1823, about 1,200 people lived in The Rocks, most of them emancipists and convicts and their children.

To the left of The Rocks area is a long, low, military barracks, built between 1792 and 1818 around Barracks Square/the Parade Ground – which is now Wynyard Park. It was from here that, in 1808, the New South Wales Corps marched to arrest Governor Macquarie's predecessor Governor William Bligh (1754–1817), an event later known as the Rum Rebellion. Heading east is St. Philip's Church  – the earliest Christian church (Church of England) in Australia – erected in stone in 1810 on Church Hill – now Lang Park.[34] In 1798, the original wattle and daub church – on what is now the corner of Bligh and Hunter Streets – was burnt down, allegedly by disgruntled convicts in response to a decree by the second NSW Governor (1795–1800), John Hunter, that all colony residents, including officers and convicts, attend Sunday services. The jail had earlier suffered a similar fate.

Further along the ridge to the east is Fort Phillip, flying the Union Jack, on Windmill (later Observatory) Hill where the Sydney Observatory is now located. Fort Phillip was commissioned in 1804 by the third NSW Governor (1800–1806), Philip Gidley King, partly as a response to external threats and partly due to the internal unrest reflected in Australia's only major convict rebellion at Castle Hill in March 1804. This was dubbed the Battle of Vinegar Hill as most of the convict rebels were Irish. Windmill Hill was chosen as a fort location as it was the highest point above the colony, affording commanding views of the Harbour approaches from east and west, theriver and road to Parramatta, surrounding country and of the entire town below.

On the waterfront below Fort Phillip is the yellow, four-storey, Commissariat Stores, constructed by convicts for Governor Macquarie in 1810 and 1812. One of the largest buildings constructed in the colony at the time, it is now the site of the Museum of Contemporary Art. The foreshore buildings on the extreme right are the warehouse and 'Wharf House' residence of merchant, Robert Campbell (1769–1846) who was to become one of the colony's biggest landholders. This is now the site of the Sydney Harbour Bridge pylons and is just to the left of Dawes Point. Three British Sailing ships, flying either the red ensign of the Merchant Navy or (more likely) the white ensign of the Royal Navy, are anchored in the Cove along with four sailboats and five canoes.
The Sydney Cove panorama on the Museum punchbowl can be dated between 1812 and 1818. The vantage point is from beneath Dawes Point, shown with its flagstaff and before the Dawes Point fortifications built 1818 to 1821. Looking directly into Campbell's Cove, the immediate focal points are Robert Campbell's warehouse and the 'Wharf House' roof of his residence. To the right of Campbell's Wharf are extensive stone walls marking boundaries between properties in this part of the Rocks district. 

First Government House can be seen at the head of Sydney Cove in the distance and around the eastern shore a small rendition of Billy Blue's 1812 house. The Governor and civil personnel lived on the more orderly eastern slopes of the Tank Stream, compared to the disorderly western side where convicts lived. The Tank Stream was the fresh water course emptying into Sydney Cove and supplied the fledgling colony until 1826. Further along is Bennelong Point – with no sign of Fort Macquarie [built from December 1817 – and Garden Island – the colony's first food source. The distant vista of the eastern side of the Harbour goes almost as far as the Macquarie Lighthouse – Australia's first lighthouse – built between 1816–18 on South Head. There are seven Sailing ships flying the white ensign of the British Royal Navy in the Harbour, along with three sailboats and two canoes.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - Off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Green, orange, yellow 
General color appearance: -  Authentic
Paper size: - 7 3/4in x 4 1/2in (195mm x 115mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$425.00 USD
More Info
1780 Cook Antique Prints x 2 Man & Woman of Van Diemens Land, Tasmania

1780 Cook Antique Prints x 2 Man & Woman of Van Diemens Land, Tasmania

  • Title  : Une Femme De La Terre Van-Diemen; Un Homme De La Terre Van-Diemen
  • Date  : 1780
  • Ref # : 43194 & 43195
  • Size  : 10 1/4in x 7 3/4in (260mm x 200mm) ea
  • Condition: A+ (Fine)

Description:

These two fine original antique prints  portraits of Man & Woman of Van Diemens Land, Tasmania, was engraved by the Robert Benard - after John Webber, official artist for Captain James Cook's third and final voyage - and was published in the 1780 French edition of Cooks voyages.

Cook's First Voyage (1768-1771)
The first voyage under Captain James Cook's command was primarily of a scientific nature. The expedition on the Endeavour initially sailed to Tahiti to observe the transit of the planet Venus in order to calculate the earth's distance from the sun. Cook landed on the South Pacific island in April of 1769 and in June of that year the astronomical observations were successfully completed. In addition to these labors, very good relations with the Tahitians were maintained and the naturalists Joseph Banks and Daniel C. Solander conducted extensive ethnological and botanical research. Another purpose of the voyage was to explore the South Seas to determine if an inhabitable continent existed in the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Upon leaving Tahiti, Cook named and charted the Society Islands and then continued southwest to New Zealand. His circumnavigation and exploration of that country also resulted in a detailed survey. Cook proceeded to Australia, where he charted the eastern coast for 2,000 miles, naming the area New South Wales. As a result of these surveys, both Australia and New Zealand were annexed by Great Britain. In addition to these explorations, the Endeavour returned to England without a single death from scurvy among its men, an historic feat at the time. The combination of these accomplishments brought Cook prominence, promotion, and the opportunity to lead further expeditions.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - Brown, 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 10 1/4in x 7 3/4in (260mm x 200mm)
Plate size: - 10in x 7 1/2in (245mm x 190mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$375.00 USD
More Info
1765 De Buffon Large Folio Antique Bird Print - The American Jabiru Stork

1765 De Buffon Large Folio Antique Bird Print - The American Jabiru Stork

Description:
This fine, beautifully hand coloured original antique large ornithological folio print of the Jabiru Stork of South & Central America was engraved by Francois Nicolas Martinet and published in the Histoire Naturelle de Oiseaux by Georges-Louis Leclerc or Count de Buffon & Edme Louis Daubenton between 1765-80.
These prints are in extraordinary condition with superb original colour on clean heavy chain laid paper. 

Histoire Naturelle Des Oiseaux, is a collection of 1,008 hand colored bird prints edited by Georges-Louis Marie Leclerc, the Count of Buffon. This was one of two major Buffon works, collectively the most comprehensive French natural history sets of their time. Histoire Naturelle Des Oiseauxwas published in 42 volumes from 1765 to 1780 by Edme Louis Daubenton in collaboration with Buffon, illustrated with engravings by Francois Nicolas Martinet.

Georges-Louis Leclerc or Count de Buffon (1707 - 1788) was a French aristocrat of formidable intellect and achievements, including books on mathematics and natural history. Although his father initially steered him toward law school, Buffon persisted in pursuing his interest in math. At the age of 20, he discovered the binomial theorem and later introduced differential and integral calculus into probability theory. He soon became fascinated with biological science, and his father relented and let him enroll in the faculty of medicine to study botany and zoology. As a young man in Paris, he befriended Voltaire and other intellectuals, and gained admission to the prestigious Academy of Science at age 27. Decades before Darwin introduced his theory of evolution, Buffon dared to challenge religious thought with empirical observations, suggesting that the earth was older than 6,000 years and that the physical resemblance between humans and apes might be explained by their having a common ancestry. While the theories he proposed to explain these phenomena were by and large incorrect, he correctly grasped that a new paradigm was needed.
De Buffon also published a different 44-volume natural history work with various studies, including birds, titled Histoire Naturelle Generale Et Particuliere (Natural History, General and Particular) (Paris, 1749-1804), which included works by various artists including Jacques Eustache de Sève. This work was his major achievement and an ambitious project characteristic of the 18th-century Enlightenment: a 44-volume encyclopedia attempting to include everything known about the natural world and widely disseminate scientific knowledge. It was the first complete natural history survey presented in a popular form, and also broke ground in attempting to separate science from theological dogma.

Francois Nicolas Martinet was a French engraver and draughtsman. In 1756, he was working for the court of France as Graveur du Cabinet du Roi, under the auspices of the Menus Plaisirs du Roi, making engravings after drawings by others of such subjects as the May Ball at Versailles during the Carnival of 1763. In the same period, Martinet produced illustrations for plays or comic operas by such contemporaries as Marmontel, Voltaire and Philidor. Some of these he engraved himself, while others were drawn by him but engraved by his sister Thérèse Martinet (born c. 1731). He is best known for his engravings of birds for Comte de Buffon's, Histoire Naturelle Des Oiseaux published in Paris from 1770-86. In 1768, a comprehensive group of natural history studies drafted by Martinet, and engraved by Robert Bénard were included in the natural history volume of Diderot and Alembert’sEncyclopédie. Martinet also drew and engraved portraits, landscapes and genre scenes. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Green, blue, yellow
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 12in x 9in (305mm x 230mm)
Plate size: - 10in x 8in (255mm x 205mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (15mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$375.00 USD
More Info
1765 De Buffon Large Antique Folio Print of South American Butterfly's

1765 De Buffon Large Antique Folio Print of South American Butterfly's

  • TitlePhalenes 1. La Vitree de Cayenne 2. et 3. la Hachette du Soissonnios
  • Date : 1765
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  23514
  • Size: 12in x 9in (305mm x 230mm)

Description:
This fine, beautifully hand coloured original antique large folio print of three different South American Butterflies was engraved by Francois Nicolas Martinet and published in the Histoire Naturelle de Oiseaux by Georges-Louis Leclerc or Count de Buffon & Edme Louis Daubenton between 1765-80.
These prints are in extraordinary condition with superb original colour on clean heavy chain laid paper. 

Histoire Naturelle Des Oiseaux, is a collection of 1,008 hand colored bird prints edited by Georges-Louis Marie Leclerc, the Count of Buffon. This was one of two major Buffon works, collectively the most comprehensive French natural history sets of their time. Histoire Naturelle Des Oiseauxwas published in 42 volumes from 1765 to 1780 by Edme Louis Daubenton in collaboration with Buffon, illustrated with engravings by Francois Nicolas Martinet.

Georges-Louis Leclerc or Count de Buffon (1707 - 1788) was a French aristocrat of formidable intellect and achievements, including books on mathematics and natural history. Although his father initially steered him toward law school, Buffon persisted in pursuing his interest in math. At the age of 20, he discovered the binomial theorem and later introduced differential and integral calculus into probability theory. He soon became fascinated with biological science, and his father relented and let him enroll in the faculty of medicine to study botany and zoology. As a young man in Paris, he befriended Voltaire and other intellectuals, and gained admission to the prestigious Academy of Science at age 27. Decades before Darwin introduced his theory of evolution, Buffon dared to challenge religious thought with empirical observations, suggesting that the earth was older than 6,000 years and that the physical resemblance between humans and apes might be explained by their having a common ancestry. While the theories he proposed to explain these phenomena were by and large incorrect, he correctly grasped that a new paradigm was needed.
De Buffon also published a different 44-volume natural history work with various studies, including birds, titled Histoire Naturelle Generale Et Particuliere (Natural History, General and Particular) (Paris, 1749-1804), which included works by various artists including Jacques Eustache de Sève. This work was his major achievement and an ambitious project characteristic of the 18th-century Enlightenment: a 44-volume encyclopedia attempting to include everything known about the natural world and widely disseminate scientific knowledge. It was the first complete natural history survey presented in a popular form, and also broke ground in attempting to separate science from theological dogma.

Francois Nicolas Martinet was a French engraver and draughtsman. In 1756, he was working for the court of France as Graveur du Cabinet du Roi, under the auspices of the Menus Plaisirs du Roi, making engravings after drawings by others of such subjects as the May Ball at Versailles during the Carnival of 1763. In the same period, Martinet produced illustrations for plays or comic operas by such contemporaries as Marmontel, Voltaire and Philidor. Some of these he engraved himself, while others were drawn by him but engraved by his sister Thérèse Martinet (born c. 1731). He is best known for his engravings of birds for Comte de Buffon's, Histoire Naturelle Des Oiseaux published in Paris from 1770-86. In 1768, a comprehensive group of natural history studies drafted by Martinet, and engraved by Robert Bénard were included in the natural history volume of Diderot and Alembert’sEncyclopédie. Martinet also drew and engraved portraits, landscapes and genre scenes. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Green, blue, yellow
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 12in x 9in (305mm x 230mm)
Plate size: - 10in x 8in (255mm x 205mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (15mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$375.00 USD
More Info
1632 Henricus David Large Antique Portrait of Cartographer Giovanni A Magini

1632 Henricus David Large Antique Portrait of Cartographer Giovanni A Magini

  • TitleIo. Antonius Maginus Pat. Mathemat. In Bonon. Gymn. Profess
  • Date : 1632
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  92835
  • Size: 17 1/2in x 11in (445mm x 280mm)

Description: 
This fine beautifully hand coloured original antique portrait of the Italian Cartographer Giovanni Antonio Magini was engraved by Henricus David in 1632 - date is engraved below portrait.

Giovanni Antonio Magini (1555-1617) was an Italian mathematician, cartographer and Professor of Astronomy in Bologna. He is responsible for publishing an edition ofPtolemy's Geographia in 1596 that contained 27 maps of the ancient world drawn from the text of Claude Ptolemy, along with 27 contemporary or modern maps. His maps were used by Blaeu in 1640. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, green, red, brown.
General color appearance: - Fresh
Paper size: - 17 1/2in x 11in (445mm x 280mm)
Plate size: - 12n x 8 1/2in (305mm x 215mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light dis-colouration in top margin
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$375.00 USD
More Info