Prints (270)

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1814 John Murray Antique Print of a Chinese Family Having a Meal, China

1814 John Murray Antique Print of a Chinese Family Having a Meal, China

Description: 
This fine beautifully hand coloured original antique print was published in 1814 - the date is engraved below the image - and was published by John Murray in Picturesque Representations of the Dress and Manners of the Chinese by William Alexander. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original 
Colors used: - Green, yellow, red, blue 
General color appearance: - Authentic  
Paper size: - 13in x 11in (330mm x 280mm)
Plate size: - 9 1/2in x 7in (240mm x 180mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
More Info
1814 John Murray Antique Print of a Chinese Soldier with a Matchlock Rifle

1814 John Murray Antique Print of a Chinese Soldier with a Matchlock Rifle

Description: 
This fine beautifully hand coloured original antique print was published in 1814 - the date is engraved below the image - and was published by John Murray in Picturesque Representations of the Dress and Manners of the Chinese by William Alexander. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original 
Colors used: - Green, yellow, red, blue 
General color appearance: - Authentic  
Paper size: - 13in x 11in (330mm x 280mm)
Plate size: - 9 1/2in x 7in (240mm x 180mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
More Info
1809 Wilkinson Large Antique Print of London, Somerset to Whitehall, Westminster

1809 Wilkinson Large Antique Print of London, Somerset to Whitehall, Westminster

  • Title : Somerset House in its Original State With the Various Buildings on the Banks of the River Thames as far as Westminster...October 1809...Rob Wilkinson
  • Date : 1809
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  92599
  • Size: 18in x 12 1/2in (460mm x 320mm)

Description: 

This large finely engraved beautifully hand coloured original antique print of Somerset House - and the Thames as far as Westminster - as it was before the alterations by Indigo Jones was published by Robert Wilkinson 11th of October 1809, the date is engraved at the foot of the print.

Text below the title goes into some detail of the view quote ..."Buildings in the distance are Whitehall and Westminster Abbey opposite to which are Lambeth Church and Palace". (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

Condition Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Blue, green, brown, yellow
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 18in x 12 1/2in (460mm x 320mm)
Plate size: - 17in x 12in (435mm x 305mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Plate-mark re-enforced with archival tape left margin
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
More Info
1870 Murillo Durand Antique Print Self Portrait of Bartolomé Esteban Murillo

1870 Murillo Durand Antique Print Self Portrait of Bartolomé Esteban Murillo

  • Title : Bart Murillo seipsum depin gens. pro filorum votis acprecibus explendis
  • Date : 1870
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  22446
  • Size: 14in x 9 1/2in (350mm x 240mm)

Description: 
This fine original antique wood-cut print of the Spanish artist Bartolomé Esteban Murillo was produced from a reworked 17th century wood-block by Amand Durand in 1870. As a way of clarification this print was printed in 1870 by Durand by means of a wood-block  from the original 17th century wood-block. Please see below for further detail.

The Latin inscription on the cartouche at the centre of the ledge explains that the self-portrait was made at the request of Murillo's children: 'Bart (olo) mé Murillo portraying himself to fulfil the wishes and prayers of his children - or sons'. Despite the unlined appearance of the face the painting is probably relatively late in date, of the early 1670s, when Murillo's children would have been of an age to take pride in their father's achievements. The composition is based on a formula that had been developed for portrait engravings used on the frontispiece of books. The sitter is shown in an oval frame and on the ledge below are the instruments of his profession, a palette and brushes on the right and a drawing and pencil on the left.

Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (born late December 1617, died April 3, 1682) was a Spanish Baroque painter. Although he is best known for his religious works, Murillo also produced a considerable number of paintings of contemporary women and children. These lively, realist portraits of flower girls, street urchins, and beggars constitute an extensive and appealing record of the everyday life of his times.

Amand Durand, born in Paris France, 1831, became a master engraver early in his career. He deeply admired the 15th, 16th, and 17th century Old Masters’ engravings and saw how they lost quality and faded from the ravages of time. This realization, combined with in-depth research throughout public and private collections of these masters, inspired Durands dedication to recreate their images and preserve the original quality for future generations. In 1895 Theo Van Gogh, brother and manager of the infamous Vincent Van Gogh stumbled across the works of this artist in one of his travels. He was so impressed that he sought the artist out and spent an evening with him in his home. Afterward he quickly took to pen and paper to write Vincent to express his enthusiasm for his artistic talents and intellect. The Van Gogh brothers were just two of the many that recognized Amand Durand's talents. However, it would take years to unravel a story book mystery that makes his works and talents even more famed today. Amand Durand was a great admirer of Rembrandt. He desired to study the plates and techniques of this genius. Unfortunately at the time there only remained about 100 known plates, which were available to produce fine quality impressions. For 100 years the bulk of Rembrandt's plates were shrouded in mystery. As time moved on some of Rembrandt’s plates began to surface. By this time Rembrandt’s plates were miserably worn and dull. Amand Durand, who by now had made the ranks of a noted engraver, decided to remedy this with his own gifted talents. He researched and intensely studied pieces that were available only in collections. From here on he spent the major part of his life exactly duplicating Rembrandt’s images onto copper plates. These recreations were called Amand Durand’s after Rembrandt. Their unbelievable clarity and exactness were achieved because Amand Durand used as his guide, not the worn and dull plates, but the first and second state etchings of the master’s original works. By this time Durand’s talent were known to experts of the 19th and 20th centuries. In 1855, Conservator of the Cabinet de Estampes, George Duplessis so appreciated the genius of this man that he had his work published in books which belong to the Bibliotheque Nationale in France. Amand-Durand was used as master etcher in an anthology of European engravings, which became so valuable that they were kept under locked scrutiny in most libraries. What we have is a noted master duplicating a master some 200 years later. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: -  General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 14in x 9 1/2in (350mm x 240mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

 Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
More Info
1724 Kip Large Antique Folio Print of Rochester Cathedral, Kent, England

1724 Kip Large Antique Folio Print of Rochester Cathedral, Kent, England

  • TitleThe North Prospect of the Cathedral Church of Rochester
  • Date : 1724
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  40405
  • Size: 26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)

Description: 
This finely engraved original large folio antique Cathedral print by Johnnes Kip (1653-1722) and engraved by James Collins was published in the 1724 by Joseph Smith monumental work Nouveau Theatre de la Grande Bretagne. This print also appeared in Britannia Illustrata by D. Mortier (brother of Pierre).
This is a finely engraved print being testimony to the beautiful and detailed work produced by Kip whose eye for detail was one of the most acknowledged of his day.

Background:
Being the second oldest cathedral foundation in England, Rochester Cathedrals history goes back to AD604 when Augustine sent Bishop Justus to establish the house founded by King Ethelbert of Kent. Following several invasions by the Danes, the church was in a state of devastation by the time Bishop Gundulf was consecrated in 1077 but immediately he began a major building operation, and introduced a community of Benedictine monks in 1080.
The church suffered misfortune again in the mid 12th century with two serious fires, resulting in a further rebuilding programme. Since that time there has been continuous remodelling, refurbishments and restorations, mainly due to other historical events when the cathedral sustained damage. As a consequence of its very chequered history, Rochester Cathedral displays the varied building styles of each period, from the functional austerity of Gundulf's original structure, through the Romanesque, Gothic and Early English architectural periods, and continuing with renovation and restoration well into the 20th century following war damage.
The sturdy, squat Norman nave contrasts dramatically with the tall, narrow Gothic arches of the crossing. A superbly carved stone archway of the Decorated period (c1345), now enhanced with a solid oak door, leads to the chapter room and is a magnificent feat of craftsmanship. Quite unusually, the Lady Chapel is sited between the nave and the south transept as monastic outbuildings occupied the traditional location at the eastern end of the church when the chapel was added in the late 15th century. Beneath the quire transept is a beautifully preserved and vaulted crypt, with two bays surviving from the original Norman construction. There are also many fragments of medieval ceiling paintings to be found in this lower level sanctuary.
Though one of the smaller Norman cathedrals, Rochester was an important centre for pilgrimage during the 13th century, and even today attracts many visitors who are keen to learn more about its fascinating history. From a photographic perspective, a wonderful view of Rochester cathedral can be seen from the top of Rochester Castle, immediately opposite. We have visited both the Rochester Cathedral and Castle on many occasions, and still manage to uncover more information, or something interesting that we had previously overlooked. Earlier this year, we ventured for the first time into the cloister garth, discovering a substantial section of the ruined Chapter House. On the south side, the entrance arch to the monk's refectory survives and, looking behind it, the 13th century lavatorium and towel recess is still visible.

Johannes Kip was a draughtsman and engraver, who worked first in his native Amsterdam before moving to London at the end of the seventeenth century. He did portraits, views, and book illustrations. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - 
Colours used: - 
General colour appearance: - 
Paper size: - 
26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 18in (585mm x 460mm)
Margins: - min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: -  None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
More Info
1720 Kip Large Folio Antique Print of Durham Cathedral, England

1720 Kip Large Folio Antique Print of Durham Cathedral, England

Description: 
This finely engraved original large folio antique Cathedral print by Johnnes Kip (1653-1722) and engraved by James Collins was published in the 1724 by Joseph Smith monumental work Nouveau Theatre de la Grande Bretagne. This print also appeared in Britannia Illustrata by D. Mortier (brother of Pierre).
This is a finely engraved print being testimony to the beautiful and detailed work produced by Kip whose eye for detail was one of the most acknowledged of his day.

Background:
Durham Cathedral was first built as a shrine to house the uncorrupted body of St. Cuthbert, brought to rest here by his brother monks in the late eleventh century, after their wanderings around the north east. The famous seventh century saint of Lindisfarne had been celebrated by Bede in his writings and it is fitting that this wonderful writer is also buried and commemorated here at Durham, in the dramatic Galilee Chapel. 

On the main entrance door of the cathedral hangs a replica of the elaborately cast Sanctuary Knocker, where those seeking escape from the law would come to grasp the handle, gaining time to sort out their affairs. As you enter the dark nave, the shocking boldness of design almost a thousand years old arrests your attention. The nave pillars are deeply carved with geometric grooves, their circumference equal to their height, producing a feel of solidity and permanence. The emphasis at Durham is of mass and weight, a sharp contrast to the later gothic naves of cathedrals such as Winchester or Canterbury, where light and space are the key. Around 1093, the present cathedral was started by Bishop William of St. Carileph and the Benedictine monks. The shrine of St. Cuthbert attracted many pilgrims and a suitably grand structure was required.
In the early twelfth century, the Chapter house and the Galilee Chapel were built. The Galilee Chapel is one of my favourite architectural spaces, with its abundance of crisp zigzag carving arched over slim stone pillars. Bede is simply and suitably commemorated by a dark marble grave slab and the mixture of ancient and modern sculpture, stained glass and wall painting crosses and unites centuries of Christian belief and artistic devotion. 
Back in the nave, there is ample evidence also of the continuum of belief, interrupted and partly destroyed at times, but still very much alive today. Here is the earliest example in Europe of rib vaulting, there is a memorial to the local minors, reflecting poignantly the double-edged sword of industry and its losses. 
In the south transept is a huge clock, installed at the end of the fifteenth century, when the cathedral was still a priory, whose monks prayed through their daily round of services. At the Reformation, Durham was fortunate to become of the new cathedrals, saved from Henry VIII's destructive power. Between the two transepts, the tower over the crossing dates from around 1490, a replacement for the previous tower which had been destroyed by lightening and fire sixty years before. Despite the discrepancy in age between the main body of the cathedral and the tower, the design is harmonious. 
Beyond the high alter lies the raised site of the shrine of St. Cuthbert, still a place of quiet power and reverence for this unassuming, gentle man. Separating it from the high altar is the Neville Screen, built between 1372 and 1380 by the influential Neville family. Once adorned with 107 statues, supposedly removed before the iconoclasts of the Reformation could deface them, this structure stands out at Durham for its light, vertical, decorated gothic design. Around a hundred years before, the Chapel of the Nine Altars which encompasses the east end of the cathedral displays an earlier and more restrained gothic. Here the pillars are edged with local black 'Frosterley Marble', filled with fossils.    
During the seventeenth and nineteenth centuries, Durham underwent several 'beautification' schemes, best seen in the organ and choir screen areas. The geometric marble inlaid floor is particularly beautiful.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - 
Colours used: - 
General colour appearance: - 
Paper size: - 
26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 18in (585mm x 460mm)
Margins: - min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: -  None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
More Info
1724 Kip Large Antique Folio Print of St Marys Church, The Strand, London

1724 Kip Large Antique Folio Print of St Marys Church, The Strand, London

  • TitleThe South West Prospect of St Mary's Church in ye Strand
  • Date : 1724
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  40400
  • Size: 26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)

Description: 
This finely engraved original large folio antique Cathedral print by Johnnes Kip (1653-1722) and engraved by James Collins was published in the 1724 by Joseph Smith monumental work Nouveau Theatre de la Grande Bretagne. This print also appeared in Britannia Illustrata by D. Mortier (brother of Pierre).
This is a finely engraved print being testimony to the beautiful and detailed work produced by Kip whose eye for detail was one of the most acknowledged of his day.

Background:
The parish of St Mary le Strand may lay a good claim to being one of the oldest parishes in London. It stands dominating a roadway which since prehistory has been the main artery to the west from the City of London. In early Saxon times the Strand area was the very heart of London, for it seems that the City was effectively abandoned by the newly-arrived settlers. The Saxons predominantly inhabited "Lundenwic", an area stretching from Fleet Street to Whitehall and from the Thames to Covent Garden from the sixth to the ninth centuries. Christianity came to this settlement with St Mellitus and his followers in 604, and, despite their brief expulsion in the 620s, became firmly established. We do not know if any of the existing churches in the area date back that far but some, such as St Clement Danes, are known to have existed in later Saxon times. 

There is no record of when St Mary le Strand was founded, but the first church, which was dedicated to the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, stood just south of the present church on a site now covered by Somerset House. Throughout the Middle Ages, the Bishops of Worcester were the Patrons of the parish and had their London residence on an adjoining site. For throughout the period from the Norman Conquest to the Reformation, the Strand was mainly the home of bishops and princes. Within the parish were the "inns" - large town houses with chapels, stables and accommodation for a large retinue - of the Bishops of Worcester, Llandaff, Coventry and Lichfield. A large part of the parish was absorbed by the building of a great house, the Palace of the Savoy, by Count Peter of Savoy, the uncle of Henry III, in the 1240s. A century later this became the home of John of Gaunt, Earl of Lancaster, and the palace became a centre of culture; among its residents was Geoffrey Chaucer, who was married in the palace chapel. Gaunt's unpopularity, as the king's chief minister, caused the palace to be burned in the Peasant's Revolt. Despite its long absence, the fame of the palace has lasted in the area and was recreated in the nineteenth century by the Savoy Hotel and Theatre. 
The site where the present church stands was occupied in medieval times by Strand Cross. The origins of this are unclear. It was not a cross erected in memory of Queen Eleanor - as was Charing Cross - but seems to have dated back at least to Norman times. Perhaps it began as a market cross; by the early fourteenth century it had been rebuilt in a lavish manner, almost certainly following the design of the Eleanor Crosses. Strand Cross was a famous site and it is recorded that in the thirteenth century the local magistrates held their assizes in front of it.
Until the sixteenth century, the Strand was no more than a line of Bishops' palaces on the south side of the roadway stretching all the way to Whitehall. On the north side stood a wall which bounded the Convent - later Covent - Garden, while the churches further away, St Martin's and St Giles, stood "in-the-fields". All this was to change with the Reformation. The bishops' inns around the church were seized by Edward Lord Protector who set about building himself a renaissance palace in what was then the most fashionable part of town. Even with the extensive site that he had now obtained, further space was needed and towards the end of 1548 the Lord Protector's workmen fell upon St Mary's church and demolished it to provide stone for the new palace. Further stone was provided by the demolition of a cloister at St Paul's Cathedral known as Pardon Churchyard and the greater part of the Priory of St John at Clerkenwell. Even by the standards of the time, the demolition of so much sacred property was an outrage. Somerset was never to enjoy living in his new palace; just as it was nearing completion he was overthrown by his political enemies and executed at Tower Hill in 1551.
It is said that Somerset had intended to build a new parish church. If so, all thought of it passed away with his fall. Initially, the parishioners scattered but within a short time we find them gathered in the chapel of St John the Baptist in the Savoy. Here they would remain for the next 175 years. Now known at "St Mary le Savoy", the parishioners chose and paid for their own ministers. The most famous of these was Thomas Fuller, the church historian, who was appointed in 1642, fled during the Civil War and was restored to his living in 1660. 
Following the execution of Somerset, his palace had passed to the possession of the Crown. Elizabeth I occasionally lodged there and it was from Somerset House that she set off to give thanks after the defeat of the Armada. Under the Stuarts, extensive improvements were made to the palace, the most impressive being the lavish Roman Catholic chapel built by Charles I's queen, Henrietta Maria.
The roadway in front of Somerset House, where Strand Cross had stood and where the present church was later to stand, was occupied in the early seventeenth century by a windmill used to pump water. In 1634 the first Hackney Carriage stand in England was established here by one Captain Bailey. Here also a maypole was erected which became the most famous maypole in London. Demolished by the Puritans, a new maypole was erected in 1661. Parts of this maypole remained until 1717, when they were removed and presented to Sir Isaac Newton as the base for a telescope.
In 1711, an Act of Parliament was passed for building 50 New Churches in the fast expanding suburbs of London. These were the so-called "Queen Ann Churches"; among them are Hawksmoor's Chris
t Church Spitalfields, St Anne's Limehouse, and St George's-in-the-East, Archer's St Paul's Depftord and James' St George's, Hanover Square. St Mary le Strand was quick to apply for a church to replace their demolished one and, as the site on the Strand was so prominent, the Commissioners for building the New Churches decided to make the Strand church the most lavish of the churches. Initially, it was intended that there should not be a spire but that a column celebrating the building of the New Churches should stand directly in front of the church.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - 
Colours used: - 
General colour appearance: - 
Paper size: - 
26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 18in (585mm x 460mm)
Margins: - min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: -  None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
More Info
1725 Kip Large Antique Print of the Holy Trinity Cathedral, Chichester, England

1725 Kip Large Antique Print of the Holy Trinity Cathedral, Chichester, England

  • TitleThe Cathedral Church of the Holy Trinity in Chichester
  • Date : 1724
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  40411
  • Size: 26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)

Description: 
This finely engraved original large folio antique Cathedral print by Johnnes Kip (1653-1722) and engraved by James Collins was published in the 1724 by Joseph Smith monumental work Nouveau Theatre de la Grande Bretagne. This print also appeared in Britannia Illustrata by D. Mortier (brother of Pierre).
This is a finely engraved print being testimony to the beautiful and detailed work produced by Kip whose eye for detail was one of the most acknowledged of his day.

Background:
The cathedral of the Holy Trinity at Chichester was founded in 1075, after the seat of the bishop was transferred to the town from nearby Selsey. It was consecrated in 1108, but a subsequent fire created a need for substantial rebuilding, which was not completed until 1184. The cathedral was reconsecrated in 1199. This was not the last stage in its development, by a long way. Richard de la Wyche, (Saint Richard of Chichester in the Anglican Communion), who was bishop from 1245 to 1253, was buried in the cathedral, where his shrine was a place of pilgrimage, until it was ordered destroyed in 1538, during the first stages of the English Reformation. Further damage to the cathedral had been done by fire after the second consecration, and much rebuilding was carried out in the Early English style. The original wooden ceiling had burnt out, and the sublimely simple present vaulting replaced it. The spire, which was originally built in the 14th century, was of poor-quality local stone, and collapsed suddenly in 1861, miraculously without loss of life. It was immediately rebuilt, by Sir Gilbert Scott, a noted scholarly architect.

The cathedral has many other unique features. Under the floor of the nave are the remains of a Roman mosaic pavement, which can be viewed through a glass window. Also in the interior are the grave of the composer Gustav Holst and the Gothic "Arundel tomb" referred to in a famous poem by Philip Larkin.
Despite its age, the cathedral contains several modern works of art, including tapestries by John Piper and Ursula Benker-Schirmer, a window by Marc Chagall, and a sculpture by Graham Sutherland.  

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - 
Colours used: - 
General colour appearance: - 
Paper size: - 
26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 18in (585mm x 460mm)
Margins: - min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: -  None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
More Info
1720 Kip Large Folio Antique Print of Bath Cathedral, Somerset, England

1720 Kip Large Folio Antique Print of Bath Cathedral, Somerset, England

Description: 
This finely engraved original large folio antique Cathedral print by Johnnes Kip (1653-1722) and engraved by James Collins was published in the 1724 by Joseph Smith monumental work Nouveau Theatre de la Grande Bretagne. This print also appeared in Britannia Illustrata by D. Mortier (brother of Pierre).
This is a finely engraved print being testimony to the beautiful and detailed work produced by Kip whose eye for detail was one of the most acknowledged of his day.

Background:
Bath Abbey stands at the heart of the city of Bath; during the past twelve and a half centuries, three different churches have occupied this site:
An Anglo-Saxon Abbey Church dating from 757, pulled down by the Norman conquerors of England soon after 1066.
A massive Norman cathedral begun about 1090. It was larger than the monastery could afford to maintain and by the end of the 15th century was in ruins.
The present Abbey church founded in 1499, ruined after the dissolution of the monasteries in 1539 by order of Henry VIII.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - 
Colours used: - 
General colour appearance: - 
Paper size: - 
26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 18in (585mm x 460mm)
Margins: - min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: -  None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
More Info
1724 Kip Large Antique Print of Chester Cathedral Church, Cheshire, England

1724 Kip Large Antique Print of Chester Cathedral Church, Cheshire, England

Description: 
This finely engraved original large folio antique Cathedral print by Johnnes Kip (1653-1722) and engraved by James Collins was published in the 1724 by Joseph Smith monumental work Nouveau Theatre de la Grande Bretagne. This print also appeared in Britannia Illustrata by D. Mortier (brother of Pierre).
This is a finely engraved print being testimony to the beautiful and detailed work produced by Kip whose eye for detail was one of the most acknowledged of his day.

Background:
Standing on the site of a 10th century Saxon church, the present cathedral at Chester dates from the mid 13th century. Dedicated to St Werburgh, this Christian church was transformed into a Benedictine Abbey in 1092, colonised by a small group of monks from Normandy. Building of the new abbey church began immediately and took the best part of 150 years to complete but little evidence of the first church remains. The traditional sturdy Norman architecture was eventually replaced over the next two centuries by a more elegant Gothic style. Henry VIII dissolved the monastery in 1540 just as the monks of St Werburgh's Abbey were beginning to enjoy their new surroundings. A year later the abbey was given back as a cathedral, the last abbot of St Werburgh's becoming the first Dean of Chester Cathedral. 

Over the next two hundred years the cathedral slipped into a bad state of disrepair but was eventually saved from total collapse by the efforts of Sir George Gilbert Scott. His 19th century restoration of Chester Cathedral, both externally and internally, not only put in place essential repairs but also enhanced the appearance of the great church immensely. Most of the stained glass comes from this period and highlights the abbey's dedication to St Werburgh, as well as the long history of the cathedral. On the northern aisle of the nave, at the side of one of the large windows, sits the 'Chester Imp'. A charming little figure in chains, carved by one of the medieval monks, to protect the church from evil spirits.
Most medieval cathedrals have beautifully carved stalls in the quire but the quality of oak carving at Chester Cathedral is quite exceptional. Each stall is topped with an elaborately carved canopy set above a row of small corbels, and below each seat a magnificently carved misericord. This area of the church is so richly carved with such a diverse array of religious artefacts, animals, birds and grotesque figures that it is quite overwhelming.
Apart from the main church many of the monastic buildings from the ancient Benedictine Abbey have been remarkably preserved. The original cloisters, although largely rebuilt during the first half of the 16th century and subsequently restored at the beginning of the 20th century, are a constant reminder of the important part they played in monastic life. All the bays of the undercroft, containing some wonderful vaulting, have been utilised to provide an exhibition centre, gift shop and workshop. The monks' dining room or refectory is still used regularly, as is the superb Chapter House. .

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - 
Colours used: - 
General colour appearance: - 
Paper size: - 
26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 18in (585mm x 460mm)
Margins: - min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: -  None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
More Info
1724 Kip Large Antique Folio Print of St Marys Church The Strand London England

1724 Kip Large Antique Folio Print of St Marys Church The Strand London England

  • TitleAdmodum Reverendis Amplissimis...Templi St Maria in Vico dicto The Strand
  • Date : 1724
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  40399
  • Size: 26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)

Description: 
This finely engraved original large folio antique Cathedral print by Johnnes Kip (1653-1722) and engraved by James Collins was published in the 1724 by Joseph Smith monumental work Nouveau Theatre de la Grande Bretagne. This print also appeared in Britannia Illustrata by D. Mortier (brother of Pierre).
This is a finely engraved print being testimony to the beautiful and detailed work produced by Kip whose eye for detail was one of the most acknowledged of his day.

Background:
The parish of St Mary le Strand may lay a good claim to being one of the oldest parishes in London. It stands dominating a roadway which since prehistory has been the main artery to the west from the City of London. In early Saxon times the Strand area was the very heart of London, for it seems that the City was effectively abandoned by the newly-arrived settlers. The Saxons predominantly inhabited "Lundenwic", an area stretching from Fleet Street to Whitehall and from the Thames to Covent Garden from the sixth to the ninth centuries. Christianity came to this settlement with St Mellitus and his followers in 604, and, despite their brief expulsion in the 620s, became firmly established. We do not know if any of the existing churches in the area date back that far but some, such as St Clement Danes, are known to have existed in later Saxon times. 

There is no record of when St Mary le Strand was founded, but the first church, which was dedicated to the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, stood just south of the present church on a site now covered by Somerset House. Throughout the Middle Ages, the Bishops of Worcester were the Patrons of the parish and had their London residence on an adjoining site. For throughout the period from the Norman Conquest to the Reformation, the Strand was mainly the home of bishops and princes. Within the parish were the "inns" - large town houses with chapels, stables and accommodation for a large retinue - of the Bishops of Worcester, Llandaff, Coventry and Lichfield. A large part of the parish was absorbed by the building of a great house, the Palace of the Savoy, by Count Peter of Savoy, the uncle of Henry III, in the 1240s. A century later this became the home of John of Gaunt, Earl of Lancaster, and the palace became a centre of culture; among its residents was Geoffrey Chaucer, who was married in the palace chapel. Gaunt's unpopularity, as the king's chief minister, caused the palace to be burned in the Peasant's Revolt. Despite its long absence, the fame of the palace has lasted in the area and was recreated in the nineteenth century by the Savoy Hotel and Theatre. 
The site where the present church stands was occupied in medieval times by Strand Cross. The origins of this are unclear. It was not a cross erected in memory of Queen Eleanor - as was Charing Cross - but seems to have dated back at least to Norman times. Perhaps it began as a market cross; by the early fourteenth century it had been rebuilt in a lavish manner, almost certainly following the design of the Eleanor Crosses. Strand Cross was a famous site and it is recorded that in the thirteenth century the local magistrates held their assizes in front of it.
Until the sixteenth century, the Strand was no more than a line of Bishops' palaces on the south side of the roadway stretching all the way to Whitehall. On the north side stood a wall which bounded the Convent - later Covent - Garden, while the churches further away, St Martin's and St Giles, stood "in-the-fields". All this was to change with the Reformation. The bishops' inns around the church were seized by Edward Lord Protector who set about building himself a renaissance palace in what was then the most fashionable part of town. Even with the extensive site that he had now obtained, further space was needed and towards the end of 1548 the Lord Protector's workmen fell upon St Mary's church and demolished it to provide stone for the new palace. Further stone was provided by the demolition of a cloister at St Paul's Cathedral known as Pardon Churchyard and the greater part of the Priory of St John at Clerkenwell. Even by the standards of the time, the demolition of so much sacred property was an outrage. Somerset was never to enjoy living in his new palace; just as it was nearing completion he was overthrown by his political enemies and executed at Tower Hill in 1551.
It is said that Somerset had intended to build a new parish church. If so, all thought of it passed away with his fall. Initially, the parishioners scattered but within a short time we find them gathered in the chapel of St John the Baptist in the Savoy. Here they would remain for the next 175 years. Now known at "St Mary le Savoy", the parishioners chose and paid for their own ministers. The most famous of these was Thomas Fuller, the church historian, who was appointed in 1642, fled during the Civil War and was restored to his living in 1660. 
Following the execution of Somerset, his palace had passed to the possession of the Crown. Elizabeth I occasionally lodged there and it was from Somerset House that she set off to give thanks after the defeat of the Armada. Under the Stuarts, extensive improvements were made to the palace, the most impressive being the lavish Roman Catholic chapel built by Charles I's queen, Henrietta Maria.
The roadway in front of Somerset House, where Strand Cross had stood and where the present church was later to stand, was occupied in the early seventeenth century by a windmill used to pump water. In 1634 the first Hackney Carriage stand in England was established here by one Captain Bailey. Here also a maypole was erected which became the most famous maypole in London. Demolished by the Puritans, a new maypole was erected in 1661. Parts of this maypole remained until 1717, when they were removed and presented to Sir Isaac Newton as the base for a telescope.
In 1711, an Act of Parliament was passed for building 50 New Churches in the fast expanding suburbs of London. These were the so-called "Queen Ann Churches"; among them are Hawksmoor's Chris
t Church Spitalfields, St Anne's Limehouse, and St George's-in-the-East, Archer's St Paul's Depftord and James' St George's, Hanover Square. St Mary le Strand was quick to apply for a church to replace their demolished one and, as the site on the Strand was so prominent, the Commissioners for building the New Churches decided to make the Strand church the most lavish of the churches. Initially, it was intended that there should not be a spire but that a column celebrating the building of the New Churches should stand directly in front of the church.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - 
Colours used: - 
General colour appearance: - 
Paper size: - 
26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 18in (585mm x 460mm)
Margins: - min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: -  None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1724 Kip Large Antique Folio Print of Peterborough Cathedral, England

1724 Kip Large Antique Folio Print of Peterborough Cathedral, England

Description: 
This finely engraved original large folio antique Cathedral print by Johnnes Kip (1653-1722) and engraved by James Collins was published in the 1724 by Joseph Smith monumental work Nouveau Theatre de la Grande Bretagne. This print also appeared in Britannia Illustrata by D. Mortier (brother of Pierre).
This is a finely engraved print being testimony to the beautiful and detailed work produced by Kip whose eye for detail was one of the most acknowledged of his day.

Background:
An abbey was founded on the site around 655 by either Saxulf or Peada, the first Christian king of Mercia. The abbey was conconsecrated by the Archbishop of Canterbury in 655. at the end of the 9th century, the Danes invaded and raised the abbey to the ground. The abbey lay in ruins until the Bishop of Winchester, Aethelwold with help from King Edgar rebuilt the abbey and consecrated it in 972, in the presence of Archbishops Dunstan of Canterbury and Oswald of York. The second abbey was run under the rule of the Benedictines. The abbey dedicated to St. Peter had a wall built around it for defense and the name changed to Burgh St. Peter, where Burgh means fortified. In 1066, the abbot of Peterborough, Leofric, stood at Harold's side at Hastings but was wounded and died. His successor Brando mistakenly supported Edgar the Atheling instead of William and when William enforced his rule, Brando had to pay William a fine. A Norman abbot was installed at Peterborough when Brando died in 1069. In 1116 fire struck the abbey and the building was badly damaged. Building work begun in 1118. Building work took 120 years to complete. The building was consecrated in 1238 by the Bishop of Lincoln, Grosseteste. The abbey became a Cathedral in 1541 after the abbeys were dissolved in 1539. Notable people buried here are Catherine of Aragon, divorced from Henry VIII, and Mary, Queen of Scots was buried here first before being moved to Westminster Abbey.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - 
Colours used: - 
General colour appearance: - 
Paper size: - 
26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 18in (585mm x 460mm)
Margins: - min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: -  None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1724 Kip Large Folio Antique Print of Worcester Cathedral, England

1724 Kip Large Folio Antique Print of Worcester Cathedral, England

Description: 
This finely engraved original large folio antique Cathedral print by Johnnes Kip (1653-1722) and engraved by James Collins was published in the 1724 by Joseph Smith monumental work Nouveau Theatre de la Grande Bretagne. This print also appeared in Britannia Illustrata by D. Mortier (brother of Pierre).
This is a finely engraved print being testimony to the beautiful and detailed work produced by Kip whose eye for detail was one of the most acknowledged of his day.

Background:
The history of Worcester goes back a long way. In 672, a council of the English Church was held, Worcester became the centre of five new dioceses formed. In the ninth century invasions from the Danes brought fighting to England, but Worcester being on the edge of the conflict escaped without much damage. In 983, Oswald founded a monastery at Worcester under the Benedictine rule, dedicated to St. Mary the Virgin. Wulfstan, in 1040 became a monk at Worcester and made such an impression, he became Bishop of Worcester in 1062. Wulfstan was the only Anglo-Saxon bishop to remain at his post after the Norman Conquest of 1066. In 1084, Wulfstan began rebuilding Worcester Cathedral, starting with the crypt, some of which still survives. He was canonised in 1203. Building work continued for some time, including rebuilding the two western bays of the nave in 1170 and around 1202 the central tower collapsed and there was a serious fire. In 1216, King John was buried at Worcester and he seems to have a devotion to St. Wulfstan. In 1224, Bishop William de Blois built the Lady Chapel, where he was buried when he died in 1236. In the fourteenth century the nave was completely rebuilt apart from the western bays. The central tower and the cloisters were completed built by 1374.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - 
Colours used: - 
General colour appearance: - 
Paper size: - 
26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 18in (585mm x 460mm)
Margins: - min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: -  None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1724 Kip Large Antique Folio Print of Gloucester Cathedral, England

1724 Kip Large Antique Folio Print of Gloucester Cathedral, England

  • TitleThe South Prospect of The Cathedral of St Peters Glocester
  • Date : 1724
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  40415
  • Size: 26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)

Description: 
This finely engraved original large folio antique Cathedral print by Johnnes Kip (1653-1722) and engraved by James Collins was published in the 1724 by Joseph Smith monumental work Nouveau Theatre de la Grande Bretagne. This print also appeared in Britannia Illustrata by D. Mortier (brother of Pierre).
This is a finely engraved print being testimony to the beautiful and detailed work produced by Kip whose eye for detail was one of the most acknowledged of his day.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - 
Colours used: - 
General colour appearance: - 
Paper size: - 
26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 18in (585mm x 460mm)
Margins: - min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: -  None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1724 Kip Large Folio Antique Print a View of Carlisle Church in Cumbria, England

1724 Kip Large Folio Antique Print a View of Carlisle Church in Cumbria, England

Description: 
Carlisle Cathedral bears the scars of 900 years spent in this most tumultuous of regions. The scarred exterior and tower, has the effect of making the cathedral look more like a Border castle than a church! The cathedral suffered badly in the Civil War, when Parliamentary troops under General Leslie almost destroyed the nave, leaving only two bays standing.

The original nave was built by secular canons in 1092 as a collegiate church. That early church was built, but by 1123 the Augustinian order had taken over. The choir aisles are late 13th century, but the body of the choir was not completed until a century later.

The transepts and tower date from the 15th century. The glories of Carlisle are the east window, one of the best examples of decorated tracery anywhere, and the delicately carved capitals in the choir, depicting the seasons. The east window is believed to be the work of Ivo de Ragheton, who was also responsible for the west front of York Minster.

The barrel-vaulted choir ceiling is painted in vivid blue with gold trim. Medieval paintings in the north and south aisles and the choir represent the lives of the Apostles and saints Anthony and Cuthbert. The choir stalls and misericords are decorated with wonderful carvings dating from the early 15th century.

This is a finely engraved print being testimony to the beautiful and detailed work produced by Kip whose eye for detail was one of the most acknowledged of his day.

Condition Report
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - Early
Colours used: - Yellow, brown, green, red
General colour appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 
24 1/2in x 19 1/2in (610mm x 495mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 18in (585mm x 470mm)
Margins: - min 1/4in (6mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: -  None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1693 Slezer Antique Print Fortrose View of Ross-shire, Scotland

1693 Slezer Antique Print Fortrose View of Ross-shire, Scotland

Description: 
This fine beautifully hand coloured original antique print a view of Fortrose - in the Shire of Ross, Northern Scotland - was published in the 1718 edition of John Slezer's 'Theatrum Scotiae', published in 1693.

Fortrose in Ross-shire sits on the edge of the Moray Firth. In Slezer's view you see the ruins of the town's cathedral, which fell into decline after the Reformation in 1560.
Fortrose consists of two towns, Chanonry (or as Slezer writes, 'Channery') and Rosemarkie, which were formally united in 1592 under the name Fortrose. From the 12th century, Rosemarkie was the seat of the Bishopric of Ross, but the cathedral and former bishop's residence were largely removed by Cromwell in the 1650s.
In front of the town are run-rigs unenclosed strips of separately cultivated ground. These were typical in the Scottish landscape of the 17th and early 18th centuries.

This is an important and rare print as Slezer s Theatrum Scotiae is one of the earliest records of early Scottish towns. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Green, yellow, orange, blue  
General color appearance: - Authentic  
Paper size: - 16 ½in x 10 ½in (420mm x 270mm)
Plate size: - 16 ½in x 10 ½in (420mm x 270mm)
Margins: - Min 1/4in (7mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Cropped to plate-mark
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1693 Slezer Antique Print View of the Town of Alloa on Firth of Forth Scotland

1693 Slezer Antique Print View of the Town of Alloa on Firth of Forth Scotland

  • Title The Prospect of the House & of the Town of Alloua
  • Ref  :  24947
  • Size:  18 ½in x 14 ½in (470mm x 370mm)
  • Date : 1693
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This finely engraved original important antique print a view of the town of Alloa in Clackmannanshire in eastern Scotland on the Firth of Forth, was published in the first edition of John Slezer's 'Theatrum Scotiae', 1693. 
This is an important and rare print as Slezer s Theatrum Scotiae is one of the earliest records of early Scottish towns. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: -  
Colors used: -  
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 18 ½in x 14 ½in (470mm x 370mm)
Plate size: - 16 ½in x 11 in (420mm x 280mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1822 Louis Freycinet Large Antique Bird Print of The Wood Kingfisher, New Guinea

1822 Louis Freycinet Large Antique Bird Print of The Wood Kingfisher, New Guinea

Description: 
This beautifully hand coloured original antique print of the Wood Kingfisherdacélonidés of New Guinea was engraved by Coutant and published in the 1822 edition ofVoyage autour du monde sur les corvettes Uranie et la Physicienne by Louis de Freycinetaboard the ship Uranie and its voyage of discovery. Also accompanying Freycinet on this expedition was Louis lsidore Duperry instrumental in the surveying and mapping of many of the regions explored by the Uranie

Louis Claude Desaulces de Freycinet (1779-1842) was a French marine officer and explorer, who participated in several significant early 19th-century expeditions to relatively unknown areas in the southern hemisphere. In 1800, he joined one of the most important early explorations of Australia, which was commissioned by the French government and commanded by Nicholas Baudin (1754-1803). On this voyage, which included stops in Mauritius and Tasmania, Freycinet served as a surveyor and was responsible for conducting a thorough cartographic survey of the Australian coast. Upon returning to France years later, he completed a detailed account of the journey begun by the naturalist Françis Péron that was published as Voyage de decouvertes aux Terres Australes between 1807 and 1816.

In 1817, Freycinet embarked on the Uranie on a major scientific expedition around the world to record information regarding the geography, meteorology, terrestrial magnetism, ethnology, and indigenous flora and fauna of various locations in the southern hemisphere. Accompanied by the talented artist Jacques Arago, he explored the Sandwich Islands, the Hawaii Islands as well as Rio de Janeiro, the Cape of Good Hope, Tonga, Gibraltar, Tenerife, Mauritius, Timor, Tierra del Fuego, Montevideo, Mauritius, New South Wales, and the Caroline Islands. After being shipwrecked near the Falklands, Freycinet eventually returned to Paris on the Physicienne in 1820, where he published a comprehensive illustrated account of the expedition in a colossal thirteen-volume work entitled Voyage Autor de Monde.

Louis lsidore Duperry a French naval officer was born in Paris, 21 October 1786 and died there on the 10th of September 1865. 
He entered the French navy in 1802, was promoted 2nd lieutenant, and sailed in 1817 for a voyage round the world in the corvette " Uranie," under the command of Louis Claude Desaules De Freycinet, which was wrecked on the Malouine islands. Duperrey was picked up by a passing American vessel, returned to France, and was promoted to 1st lieutenant. 
In 1822 he received his commission as captain, and, in command of the corvette "La Coquille," sailed on a scientific expedition to the South American coasts and the Pacific Ocean, from which he returned on 24 March 1825. During that time he  repeatedly visited the coasts of Chili and Peru from where he sent to the navy department interesting reports upon the geology and institutions of those countries, and brought home many thousand zoological and botanical specimens. 
The observations of many Pendulum Measurements taken during this voyage at many different points proved the flattening of the earth at the poles, Duperrey also determined the position of the magnetic poles and the figure of the magnetic equator. 
He designed charts of the coast of South America that are valued, especially one showing the bifurcation of the current at the mouth of the Plate. Duperrey in 1836 was appointed officer of the Legion of Honor, and in 1842 a member of the French academy. He published Voyage autour du Monde....pendant les annes 1822 - 25 in Paris between 1826 & 1830. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Blue, yellow, red
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 18in x 12in (460mm x 305mm)
Plate size: - 12 1/2in x 9 1/2in (315mm x 240mm)
Margins: - Min 2in (50mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Spotting and light soiling
Plate area: - Light soiling, spotting & offsetting
Verso: - Light soiling, spotting 

$275.00 USD
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1822 Louis Freycinet Large Antique Bird Print The Wood Shrike, Papua New Guinea

1822 Louis Freycinet Large Antique Bird Print The Wood Shrike, Papua New Guinea

Description: 
This large beautifully hand coloured original antique print of The Yellow Bellied Wood Shrike of New Guinea was engraved by Jean Louis Denis Coutant in 1822 from the voyages of the ship the Uranie and published by Louis de Freycinet in Voyage autour du monde sur les corvettes Uranie et la Physicienne.

Louis Claude Desaulces de Freycinet (1779-1842) was a French marine officer and explorer, who participated in several significant early 19th-century expeditions to relatively unknown areas in the southern hemisphere. In 1800, he joined one of the most important early explorations of Australia, which was commissioned by the French government and commanded by Nicholas Baudin (1754-1803). On this voyage, which included stops in Mauritius and Tasmania, Freycinet served as a surveyor and was responsible for conducting a thorough cartographic survey of the Australian coast. Upon returning to France years later, he completed a detailed account of the journey begun by the naturalist Françis Péron that was published asVoyage de decouvertes aux Terres Australes between 1807 and 1816.

In 1817, Freycinet embarked on the Uranie on a major scientific expedition around the world to record information regarding the geography, meteorology, terrestrial magnetism, ethnology, and indigenous flora and fauna of various locations in the southern hemisphere. Accompanied by the talented artist Jacques Arago, he explored the Sandwich Islands, the Hawaii Islands as well as Rio de Janeiro, the Cape of Good Hope, Tonga, Gibraltar, Tenerife, Mauritius, Timor, Tierra del Fuego, Montevideo, Mauritius, New South Wales, and the Caroline Islands. After being shipwrecked near the Falklands, Freycinet eventually returned to Paris on the Physicienne in 1820, where he published a comprehensive illustrated account of the expedition in a colossal thirteen-volume work entitled Voyage Autor de Monde. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Pink, yellow, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 18in x 12in (460mm x 305mm)
Plate size: - 13in x 9 ½in (330mm x 240mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light spotting, age toning
Plate area: - Light spotting, age toning
Verso: - Light spotting, age toning

$275.00 USD
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1784 Cook Parkinson Antique Print of an Australian Kangaroo 1st European Drawing

1784 Cook Parkinson Antique Print of an Australian Kangaroo 1st European Drawing

  • TitleQuadrupedo chiamato Kanguroo, ritrovato su la Costa della nuova Olanda
  • Ref #: 35517
  • Size:  9in x 7in (225mm x 175mm)
  • Date : 1784
  • Condition: (A) Very Good Condition

Description: 
This fine hand coloured original antique print of a Kangaroo - after Sydney Parkinson Captain Cooks artist during his first voyage on the Endeavour - was first drawn during Cook's survey of the East Coast of Australia in 1770 and was published in 1784 for the Italian edition of Cooks voyages.

Cook's First Voyage (1768-1771)
The first voyage under Captain James Cook's command was primarily of a scientific nature. The expedition on the Endeavour initially sailed to Tahiti to observe the transit of the planet Venus in order to calculate the earth's distance from the sun. Cook landed on the South Pacific island in April of 1769 and in June of that year the astronomical observations were successfully completed. In addition to these labors, very good relations with the Tahitians were maintained and the naturalists Joseph Banks and Daniel C. Solander conducted extensive ethnological and botanical research.

Another purpose of the voyage was to explore the South Seas to determine if an inhabitable continent existed in the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Upon leaving Tahiti, Cook named and charted the Society Islands and then continued southwest to New Zealand. His circumnavigation and exploration of that country also resulted in a detailed survey. Cook proceeded to Australia, where he charted the eastern coast for 2,000 miles, naming the area New South Wales. As a result of these surveys, both Australia and New Zealand were annexed by Great Britain. In addition to these explorations, the Endeavour returned to England without a single death from scurvy among its men, an historic feat at the time. The combination of these accomplishments brought Cook prominence, promotion, and the opportunity to lead further expeditions.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Brown, yellow,
General color appearance: - Authentic 
Paper size: - 9in x 7in (225mm x 175mm)
Plate size: - 9in x 7in (225mm x 175mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1719 Chatelain Large Antique Print of St Christopher Island, Antilles, Caribbean

1719 Chatelain Large Antique Print of St Christopher Island, Antilles, Caribbean

  • Title : Particularitez Curieuses De L'ile De St. Christopher et de la Province de Bemarin Dans Les Antilles
  • Ref  :  50630
  • Size: 20in x 17in (510m x 430m)
  • Date : 1719.
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This large original antique sheet with engraved illustrations to text on the West Indian Island of St Christopher was published by Henri Abraham Chatelain in 1719, in his famous Atlas Historique.
This large sheet from Volume Six of Chatelain's Atlas Historique , contains six engraved views of the Island of the main French settlement, local Indians, plantations,  different types of birds, reptiles, fish and general wildlife.

Henri Abraham Chatelain (1684 - 1743)
was a Huguenot pastor of Parisian origins. He lived consecutively in Paris, St. Martins, London (c. 1710), the Hague (c. 1721) and Amsterdam (c. 1728).
Chatelain was a skilled artist and knew combining a wealth of historical and geographical information with delicate engraving and an uncomplicated composition. Groundbreaking for its time, this work included studies of geography, history, ethnology, heraldry, and cosmography. His maps with his elegant engraving are a superb example from the golden age of French mapmaking.The publishing firm of Chatelain, Chatelain Frères and Chatelain & Fils is recorded in Amsterdam, from around 1700-1770, with Zacharias living "op den Dam" in 1730.
Henri Abraham Chatelain, his father Zacharie Chatelain (d.1723) and Zacharie Junior (1690-1754), worked as a partnership publishing the Atlas Historique, Ou Nouvelle Introduction à L'Histoire under several different Chatelain imprints, depending on the Chatelain family partnerships at the time of publication. The atlas was published in seven volumes between 1705 and 1720, with a second edition appearing in 1732. The volumes I-IV with a Third edition and volume I with a final edition in 1739.
Henri Abraham Chatelain, whose "Atlas Historique" was one of the most expansive Dutch encyclopedias of the age. First published in 1705, Chatelain's Atlas Historique was part of an immense seven-volume encyclopedia. Although the main focus of the text was geography, the work also included a wealth of historical, political, and genealogical information. The text was compiled by Nicholas Gueudeville and Garillon with a supplement by H.P. de Limiers and the maps were engraved by Chatelain, primarily after charts by De L'Isle. The atlas was published in Amsterdam between 1705 and 1721 and was later reissued by Zacharie Chatelain between 1732 and 1739.

Atlas Historique: First published in Amsterdam from 1705 to 1720, the various volumes were updated at various times up to 1739 when the fourth edition of vol.I appeared, stated as the "dernière edition, corrigée & augmentée." 
The first four volumes seem to have undergone four printings with the later printings being the most desirable as they contain the maximum number of corrections and additions. The remaining three final volumes were first issued between 1719-1720 and revised in 1732. 
An ambitious and beautifully-presented work, the Atlas Historique was intended for the general public, fascinated in the early eighteenth century by the recently conquered colonies and the new discoveries. Distant countries, such as the Americas, Africa, the Middle East, Mongolia, China, Japan, Indonesia, etc., take an important place in this work. 
In addition to the maps, many of which are based on Guillaume De L'Isle, the plates are after the best travel accounts of the period, such as those of Dapper, Chardin, de Bruyn, Le Hay and other.
Other sections deal with the history of the european countries, and covers a wide range of subjects including genealogy, history, cosmography, topography, heraldry and chronology, costume of the world, all illustrated with numerous engraved maps, plates of local inhabitants and heraldic charts of the lineages of the ruling families of the time. The maps, prints and tables required to make up a complete set are listed in detail in each volume. 
The accompanying text is in French and often is printed in two columns on the page with maps and other illustrations interspersed. Each map and table is numbered consecutively within its volume and all maps bear the privileges of the States of Holland and West-Friesland. 
The encyclopaedic nature of the work as a whole is reflected in this six frontispiece. The pages are the work of the celerated mr. Romeijn de Hooghe. and are engraved by J.Goeree, T.Schynyoet and P.Sluyter. 
New scholarship has suggested the compiler of the atlas, who is identified on the title as "Mr. C***" not to be Henri Abraham Châtelain, but Zacharie Châtelain. (See Van Waning's article in the Journal of the International Map Collectors' Society for persuasive evidence of the latter's authorship.) (Ref: M&B; Tooley)   

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: -  
Colors used: -  
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 20in x 17in (510m x 430m)
Plate size: - 17 1/4in x 15in (440m x 380mm)
Margins: - min. 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1818 C J McLeod Antique Print of Chief & Attendants of Ryukyu Isles of Japan

1818 C J McLeod Antique Print of Chief & Attendants of Ryukyu Isles of Japan

Description:
This fine original antique hand coloured and pen ink outline drawing of a Chief and Attendants of the Japanese Island of Lew Chew or Ryukyu Islands was drawn by an artist signing his name as C.J. from the exquisite hand coloured prints by the surgeon John McLeod, published in the 1818 edition of Voyage of His Majesty's Ship Alceste.

Voyage of His Majesty's Ship Alceste, Along the Coast of Corea to the Island of Lewchew; with an Account of Her Subsequent Shipwreck, London, John Murray, printed by W. Clowes, 1818. The book is of the expedition (February 1816 - August 1817) of the British Naval ships the Alceste and the Lyra under the command of Captain Murray Maxwell to transport the Lord Amherst's Embassy to China and explore the relatively little known East China Sea and the Yellow Sea. The book contained extensive sections on visits to China, Korea, Lew Chew and St Helena. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: -Blue, yellow, red, purple  
General color appearance: -  Fresh
Paper size: - 10in x 7 1/2in (255mm x 190mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (10mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Very light toning
Verso: - Old glue residue on back margins not affecting the image

$275.00 USD
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1650 Fuller Antique Print a View of Neros Palace Rome

1650 Fuller Antique Print a View of Neros Palace Rome

Description:
This finely engraved hand coloured original antique print a view of Neros Golden Palace in Rome was published in 1650 by Thomas Fuller in his unique book of the Holy Land A Pisagh-Sight of Palestine

Fuller, a loyalist during the English Civil War of the mid 17th century, wrote Pisagh-Sightduring a forced exile in Waltham. 
The book was an early success and confirmed the genial divines contention the “the booksellers have always done well by me”. His earlier studies in poetry and history and his droll humor contribute to the geographical description in “Pisagh-Sight” while the cartography in the book is derived from that of Adrichom sixty years before. 
The book contained 21 wonderfully engraved maps on the Holy Land and displayed unusual charm in their Vignettes and scenes. For all its lively and playful erudition, Pisagh-Sight is one of the great books on the topography of the Holy Land. (Ref: Nebenzahl; Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - Off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Yellow, pink, orange, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 17in X 13in (435mm x 330mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm) 

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Folds as issued
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1617 Schouten Antique Print of Unity Bay, South Seas Island of Futuna, Wallis

1617 Schouten Antique Print of Unity Bay, South Seas Island of Futuna, Wallis

  • Title  : Hoornse Eijlandt - Isle de Hoorn
  • Date  : 1617
  • Ref # : 42000
  • Size  : 10in x 7 1/2in (260mm x 190mm)
  • Condition: B+ (Very Good)

Description:

This fine, somewhat scarce, original hand coloured antique print a view of a natural harbour, on the sw coast of the South Seas island of Futuna (Hoorn) which they called after the ship the Eendrachts baai (Unity bay) was published in the 1617 French edition of Willem Cornelis Schouten book of exploration of the South Seas published by Aris Classen "Scheeps-Journal en Beschrijving van de bewonderensvaardige Reis gemaakt door Willem Cornelis Schouten, geboren te Hoorn, toen hy heeft outdekt ten Zuiden van de zee-engte van Magellan een nieuwe doorgang in de groote Zuidzee" (Ship-Journal and description of the bewonderensvaardige Trip created by Willem Cornelis Schouten, born in Hoorn, when hy has outdekt South of the Strait of Magellan a new passage in the great South Sea) Schouten, Willem Cornelis Dutch navigator, b. in Hoorn in 1567; d. in Antongil bay, Madagascar, in 1625. He had been for years in the employ of the Dutch East India company, when he quarrelled with one of the directors and resigned in 1610. From that time he resolved to find a new route to the Indies, eluding the charter of the East India company. He interested in his scheme Hoorn's richest citizen, Isaac Lemaire, and they formed a company with a capital of 200,000 florins, one half being furnished by Isaac Lemaire and an eighth by Schouten. The expedition left the Texel, 14 June, 1615, Schouten being the commander, and a son of Isaac, James Lemaire, acting as his deputy and director-general. The details of the discoveries are to be found in the article Lemaire, James. The navigators were arrested in Batavia by George Spielbergen for infringing upon the privileges of the East India company, but, on Schouten's arrival in Holland, he secured an acquittal, and even compelled the company to pay him heavy damages. He resumed the exercise of his profession, and was returning to Europe after a successful voyage to the Indies, when stress of weather forced him to enter the Bay of Antongil, and he died there. A narrative of Schouten's expedition was written by Aris Classen, the clerk of the admiral, and published under the title “Scheeps-Journal en Beschrijving van de bewonderensvaardige Reis gemaakt door Willem Cornelis Schouten, geboren te Hoorn, toen hy heeft outdekt ten Zuiden van de zee-engte van Magellan een nieuwe doorgang in de groote Zuidzee” (Amsterdam, 1617). It was translated into French (Amsterdam, 1617), into German (Arnheim, 1618), and into Latin (Amsterdam, 1619). The name of Schouten has been given to an island that he discovered on the northern coast of New Guinea. Wallis and Futuna, officially the Territory of the Wallis and Futuna Islands is a French island collectivity in the South Pacific between Tuvalu to the northwest, Rotuma of Fiji to the west, the main part of Fiji to the southwest, Tonga to the southeast, Samoa to the east, the New Zealand territory of Tokelau to the northeast and to a more distant north the Phoenix Islands (Kiribati). Wallis and Futuna is not part of French Polynesia, nor even contiguous with it, as the former are located at the very opposite western end of Polynesia. Futuna and Alofi were put on the European maps by Willem Schouten and Jacob Le Maire during their famous circumnavigation of the globe with the ship the Eendracht in 1616. After having come from Niuafo ou, they suddenly changed their course from west to northwest and so stumbled on this island pair. They called it Hoorn Eylanden, after the city of Hoorn, Schouten's birthplace, which became Horne in both French and English. Wise from their earlier experiences, they started with a show of force to the natives who approached them, which resulted in a peaceful barter with coconuts, yams and hogs from one side and iron nails, beads and knives from the other. They found a beautiful bay, a natural harbour along the southwest coast of Futuna, which they called after the ship the Eendrachts baai (Unity bay). This must be the Anse de Sigave near Leava of today. They went ashore on to get water and met the king, who told his subjects that their guests were not to be disturbed by petty thieving. In this amiable way the Dutch were able to replenish their stocks. A few days later the king of the other island, Alofi, came to visit with 300 men. The two kings were extremely courteous to each other, and a big feast was prepared. A kava ceremony and ʻumu were organised. Schouten and LeMaire were probably the first Europeans ever to witness these, and the description they gave still rings familiar tones nowadays. Not having been bothered by thieving and hostilities, Schouten and LeMaire had the opportunity to study Futuna a little bit more carefully than the Niua islands. (They did not go to Alofi). But their description of the islanders is not flattering. Although they praise the men for being well proportioned, the women they found ugly, ill-shaped with breasts hanging down to their bellies as empty satchels. They all went naked and copulated in public, even in front of their revered king. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)


General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: -  Early
Colors used: -  Green, brown, blue
General color appearance: -  Light
Paper size: - 10in x 7 1/2in (260mm x 190mm)
Image Size: - 8 1/2in x 6in (220mm x 145mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - Backed onto contemporary heavy rag paper

 

$225.00 USD
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