Prints (262)

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1841 McKenny Hall Large Folio Antique Print Chippeway Indian Native American

1841 McKenny Hall Large Folio Antique Print Chippeway Indian Native American

Description:
This beautifully hand coloured original antique folio lithograph print of KA-TA-WA-BE-DA (Katawabeda) “Old Tooth” of the Chippeway Tribe was engraved and hand coloured in 1841 - the date is engraved at the foot of the print - by J.T. Bowen and was published in the folio edition of McKenny-Hall`s History of the Indian Tribes of North America published between 1837 and 1844

McKenney and Hall's Indian Tribes of North America has long been renowned for its faithful portraits of Native Americans. The portrait plates are based on paintings by the artist Charles Bird King, who was employed by the War Department to paint the Indian delegates visiting Washington D.C., forming the basis of the War Department's Indian Gallery. Most of King's original paintings were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian, and their appearance in McKenney and Hall's magnificent work is thus our only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century. Numbered among King's sitters were Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. 

As first director, McKenney was to improve the administration of Indian programs in various government offices. His first trip was during the summer of 1826 to the Lake Superior area for a treaty with the Chippewa, opening mineral rights on their land. In 1827, he journeyed west again for a treaty with the Chippewa, Menominee , and Winebago in the present state of Michigan. His journeys provided an unparalleled opportunity to become acquainted with Native American tribes. When President Jackson dismissed him from his government post in 1839, McKenney was able to turn more of his attention to his publishing project. Within a few years, he was joined by James Hall, a lawyer who had written extensively about the west.

Both authors, not unlike George Catlin, whom they tried to enlist in their publishing enterprise, saw their book as a way of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. (Gilreath). McKenney provided the biographies, many based on personal interviews, and Hall wrote the general history of the North American Indian. This was the most elaborate plate book produced in the United States to date, and its publication involved a number of different printers and lithographers. The publication of volume I (in 1836) was initially undertaken by Edward C.Biddle, Biddle's firm was taken over by Frederick W. Greenough, who re-issued vol.I and published the first issue of vol.II in 1842. Later, Greenough's firm was replaced by the printing firm of Rice and Clark who reissued vol. I and vol.II and published the first issue of vol.III in 1844. The printing of the plates was chiefly carried out by Peter Duval of Lehman and Duval and James T. Bowen. 
(Ref: BAL 6934; Bennett p.79; Field 992; Howes M129; Lipperhiede Mc4; Reese, American Color Plate Books 24; Sabin 43410a).

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - Off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Blue, grey, red, brown.
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 18in x 13in (495mm x 344mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning, light spotting
Plate area: - Small repair not affecting the image, light offsetting
Verso: - Light age toning & spotting

$425.00 USD
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1774 Cook Webber Antique Print of a New Zealand Maori Chief

1774 Cook Webber Antique Print of a New Zealand Maori Chief

Description:
This finely engraved original antique print of a New Zealand Maori Chief by William Hodges and John Webber - both appointed for the official English and 1st publication of Captain James Cook's voyages - was published in 1774.

Cook's First Voyage (1768-1771)
The first voyage under Captain James Cook's command was primarily of a scientific nature. The expedition on the Endeavour initially sailed to Tahiti to observe the transit of the planet Venus in order to calculate the earth's distance from the sun. Cook landed on the South Pacific island in April of 1769 and in June of that year the astronomical observations were successfully completed. In addition to these labors, very good relations with the Tahitians were maintained and the naturalists Joseph Banks and Daniel C. Solander conducted extensive ethnological and botanical research.

Another purpose of the voyage was to explore the South Seas to determine if an inhabitable continent existed in the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Upon leaving Tahiti, Cook named and charted the Society Islands and then continued southwest to New Zealand. His circumnavigation and exploration of that country also resulted in a detailed survey. Cook proceeded to Australia, where he charted the eastern coast for 2,000 miles, naming the area New South Wales. As a result of these surveys, both Australia and New Zealand were annexed by Great Britain. In addition to these explorations, the Endeavour returned to England without a single death from scurvy among its men, an historic feat at the time. The combination of these accomplishments brought Cook prominence, promotion, and the opportunity to lead further expeditions.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: -  
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 11 1/2in x 8 1/2in (290mm x 230mm)
Plate size: - 9in x 7 1/2in (225mm x 190mm)
Margins: - 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$475.00 USD
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1575 Braun & Hogenberg Map of Pozzuoli Bay Naples Italy

1575 Braun & Hogenberg Map of Pozzuoli Bay Naples Italy

Description:
This finely engraved beautifully hand coloured original antique 2 x birds-eye view of the Bay of Pozzuoli -in the Gulf of Naples - with The city of Pozzuoli & the Port Of Baia visible was published by Georg Braun & Frans Hogenberg for the 1575 atlas of town plans Civiates Orbis Terrarum Vol II intended as a companion to Abraham Ortelius's master Atlas Theatrum Orbis Terrarum published in 1570.

The Gulf of Naples is a 10-mile wide gulf located in the south western coast of Italy, (province of Naples, Campania region). It opens to the west into the Mediterranean Sea & is bordered on the north by the cities of Naples and Pozzuoli. To the east is Mount Vesuvius, and on the south by the Sorrentine Peninsula and its main town Sorrento; the Peninsula separates it from the Gulf of Salerno.

Pozzuoli began as the Greek colony of Dicaearchia. The Roman colony was established in 194 BC, and took the Latin name Puteoli 'little wells', referring to the many hot springs in the area, most notably Solfatara. This is because Pozzuoli lies in the center of the Campi Flegrei, a caldera.
Puteoli was the great emporium for the Alexandrian grain ships, and other ships from all over the Roman world. It also was the main hub for goods exported from Campania, including blown glass, mosaics, wrought iron, and marble. The Roman naval base at nearby Misenum housed the largest naval fleet in the ancient world. It was also the site of the Roman Dictator Sulla's country villa and the place where he died in 78 BC.
The local volcanic sand, pozzolana formed the basis for the first effective concrete, as it reacted chemically with water. Instead of just evaporating slowly off, the water would turn this sand/lime mix into a mortar strong enough to bind lumps of aggregate into a load-bearing unit. This made possible the cupola of the Pantheon, the first real dome.

Background of Civitates Orbis Terrarum

The first volume of the Civitates Orbis Terrarum was published in Cologne in 1572. The sixth and the final volume appeared in 1617. 
This great city atlas, edited by Georg Braun and largely engraved by Franz Hogenberg, eventually contained 546 prospects, bird-eye views and map views of cities from all over the world. Braun (1541-1622), a cleric of Cologne, was the principal editor of the work, and was greatly assisted in his project by the close, and continued interest of Abraham Ortelius, whose Theatrum Orbis Terrarum of 1570 was, as a systematic and comprehensive collection of maps of uniform style, the first true atlas.

For a variety of reasons town plans were comparatively latecomers in the long history of cartography. Few cities in Europe in the middle ages had more than 20,00 inhabitants and even London in the late Elizabethan period had only 100-150,000 people which in itself was probably 10 times that of any other English city. The Nuremberg Chronicle in 1493 included one of the first town views of Jerusalem, thereafter, for most of the sixteenth century, German cartographers led the way in producing town plans in a modern sense. In 1544 Sebastian Munster issued in Basle his Cosmographia containing roughly sixty-six plans and views, some in the plan form, but many in the old panorama or birds eye view. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

Condition Report:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Green, blue, red, yellow
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 21in x 16in (535mm x 410mm)
Plate size: - 19in x 12in (485mm x 310mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Professional repair to top centre margin
Plate area: - Small professional repairs & light age toning to centrefold
Verso: - None

$475.00 USD
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1780 Cook Basire Large Antique Print of Capt. James Cooks Men Landing in Vanuatu

1780 Cook Basire Large Antique Print of Capt. James Cooks Men Landing in Vanuatu

  • Title: The Landing at Mallicolo one of the New Hebrides...Published Feb 1st 1777 by Wm. Strahan
  • Date:  1780
  • Ref: 91223
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Size: 19in x 12 ½in (485mm x 320mm)

Description:
This large 1st edition original antique print of  Capt James Cook's men landing in the New Hebrides - Vanuatu - in the South Pacific during his 3rd voyage of Discovery (see below) - was engraved by James Basire in 1777 - the date is engraved at the foot of the print - and was published in the 1st edition of John Hawkesworth's accounts of Cooks Voyage's  "A voyage towards the South Pole, and round the World. Performed in His Majesty's ships the Resolution and Adventure, in the years 1772, 1773, 1774, and 1775". 

Please note this original print is from the Ist edition, not from later copies by Hogg, Bankes etc.  (Ref Tooley M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 19in x 12 ½in (485mm x 320mm)
Plate size: - 19in x 12in (480mm x 305mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (10mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light chipping to margin edges
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$650.00 USD
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1784 Cook Webber Antique Print of Cooks Visit to Christmas Bay Kerguelen Isles

1784 Cook Webber Antique Print of Cooks Visit to Christmas Bay Kerguelen Isles

Description:
This large beautifully hand coloured original antique print of Capt. James Cooks ships the Resolution and Discovery anchored in Christmas Bay, Kerguelen Islands on Christmas day 1776, was engraved by Edward Newton drawn by John Webber during Cooks 3rd voyage of Discovery. The print was published in the 1784 1st edition of 'A Voyage to the Pacific', James Newton, London.

The Resolution and Discovery are anchored in the bay with two boats putting off, another by the shore to right and a man in the foreground raising a stick to kill penguins; a great hill is sited on the opposite side with a rocky outcrop above, a portion of land separated from the mainland by a small channel and a natural stone arch separated from that, in the distance to left. 
These large 1st edition prints were copied many times over the next 50 years but none rival the expertise and detail evident in this original print.

John Webber (1752-93) was the official artist on Cook's final voyage through the Pacific; his drawings formed the basis for printed illustrations to the account of the voyage 'A Voyage to the Pacific', published in 1784.

The Kerguelen Islands, 
sometimes called the Desolation Islands, are located in the southern Indian Ocean and were discovered by the French navigator Yves de Kerguelen-Trémarec in 1772. On Christmas Day, 1776 Cook’s ships Resolution and Discovery anchored in Oiseau Bay, which he named Christmas Harbour. Cook's men discovered a bottle containing a message in Latin left by Kerguelen's men. Cook wrote in his log: “I could have very properly called the island Desolation Island to signalise its sterility, but in order not to deprive M. de Kerguelen of the glory of having discovered it, I have called it Kerguelen Land.”
The Kerguelen Islands or the Kerguelen Archipelago are located in the southern Indian Ocean. The main island, Grande Terre, is 6,675 km² and it is surrounded by another 300 smaller islands and islets, forming an archipelago of 7,215 km². The climate is cold and very windy and the seas are usually rough. The islands are part of a submarine large igneous province called the Kerguelen Plateau.

Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

Condition Report:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Green, yellow, blue, red  
General color appearance: - Authentic  
Paper size: - 20in x 14 1/2in (510mm x 370mm)
Plate size: - 16in x 10 1/2in (410mm x 270mm)
Margins: - 2in (50mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light spotting
Plate area: - Vertical crease along top of image
Verso: - Light soiling

$650.00 USD
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1855 Hooker Fitch Antique Botanical Print China Mao Er Shi Goat Horn

1855 Hooker Fitch Antique Botanical Print China Mao Er Shi Goat Horn

Description: 
This is a unique opportunity to acquire a magnificent & rare original antique Lithograph by one of the most famous Botanists of the 19th century, Joseph Dalton Hooker. This original antique print, illustrated by the equally famous botanical artist Walter Hood Fitch, of the Decaisnea insignis or by its Chinese name Mao Er Shi (Transcribed Chinese) cat faeces or goat horns - that grows in China & SE Asia - was published as part of Hookers 1855 publication of the Illustrations of Himalayan plants. This publication contained 24 coloured plates all superbly engraved and hand coloured.

Decaisnea insignis Mao Er Shi (Transcribed Chinese - Cat faeces or Goat Horns - is a genus of flowering plant in the family Lardizabalaceae, native to eastern Asia, from China west to Nepal and south to Myanmar.
The genus comprises one or two species, depending on taxonomic opinion. Decaisnea insignis (Griffith) Hook.f. & Thomson was described from Nepal, and is sometimes restricted to the plants occurring in the Himalaya, with Chinese plants distinguished asDecaisnea fargesii Franchet. The only cited distinction (e.g. Bean 1973, Rushforth 1999) between the plants from the two regions is the fruit colour, yellow-green in D. insignis and bluish in D. fargesii. This is of little significance and the two are now combined under the older name D. insignis by some authors (e.g. Flora of China).

Sir Joseph Dalton Hooker (1817 – 1911) was one of the greatest British botanists and explorers of the 19th century. Hooker was one of the founders of geographical botany, and Charles Darwin's closest friend. He was Director of the Royal Botanical Gardens, Kew, for twenty years, in succession to his father, William Jackson Hooker, and was awarded the highest honours of British science.
On 11 November 1847 Hooker left England for his three year long Himalayan expedition; he would be the first European to collect plants in the Himalaya.
By his travels and his publications, Hooker built up a high scientific reputation at home. In 1855 he was appointed Assistant-Director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and in 1865 he succeeded his father as full Director, holding the post for twenty years. Under the directorship of father and son Hooker, the Royal Botanical gardens of Kew rose to world renown. At the age of thirty, Hooker was elected a fellow of the Royal Society, and in 1873 he was chosen its President (till 1877). He received three of its medals: the Royal Medal in 1854, the Copley in 1887 and the Darwin Medal in 1892. He continued to intersperse work at Kew with foreign exploration and collecting. His journeys to Palestine, Morocco and the United States all produced valuable information and specimens for Kew.
He started the series Flora Indica in 1855, together with Thomas Thompson. Their botanical observations and the publication of the Rhododendrons of Sikkim-Himalaya (1849–51), formed the basis of elaborate works on the rhododendrons of the Sikkim Himalaya and on the flora of India. His works were illustrated with lithographs by Walter Hood Fitch.

Walter Hood Fitch (1817 - 1892) was a botanist and botanical artist. He was born in Glasgow, Scotland.
Fitch was involved in fabric printing from the age of 17 and took to botanical art after being discovered by William Jackson Hooker, the editor of Curtis's Botanical Magazine. Hooker was a Professor of Botany at the University of Glasgow, and a competent botanical artist in his own right.
Fitch's important works are his illustrations for W. J. Hooker's A Century of Orchidaceous Plants (1851), and for James Bateman's A Monograph of Odontoglossum (1864-74). He also created around 500 plates for Hooker's Icones Plantarum (1836-76). Some of his most notable work was for George Bentham and W.J. Hooker's Handbook of the British Flora (1865). When Joseph Dalton Hooker returned from his travels in India, Fitch prepared lithographs from Hooker's sketches for his Rhododendrons of Sikkim Himalaya (1849-51) and, from the drawings of Indian artists, for his Illustrations of Himalayan Plants (1855).
A dispute over pay with Joseph Dalton Hooker ended Fitch's service to both the Botanical Magazine and Kew although he was much sought after and remained active as a botanical artist until 1888. Works during this period included Henry John Elwes's Monograph of the Genus Lilium (1877-80). (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Red, pink, green, brown
General color appearance: - Authentic   
Paper size: - 20in x 15in (510mm x 380mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling top left & bottom of margin
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$850.00 USD
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1724 Kip Large Folio Antique Print a View of Carlisle Church in Cumbria, England

1724 Kip Large Folio Antique Print a View of Carlisle Church in Cumbria, England

Description: 
Carlisle Cathedral bears the scars of 900 years spent in this most tumultuous of regions. The scarred exterior and tower, has the effect of making the cathedral look more like a Border castle than a church! The cathedral suffered badly in the Civil War, when Parliamentary troops under General Leslie almost destroyed the nave, leaving only two bays standing.

The original nave was built by secular canons in 1092 as a collegiate church. That early church was built, but by 1123 the Augustinian order had taken over. The choir aisles are late 13th century, but the body of the choir was not completed until a century later.

The transepts and tower date from the 15th century. The glories of Carlisle are the east window, one of the best examples of decorated tracery anywhere, and the delicately carved capitals in the choir, depicting the seasons. The east window is believed to be the work of Ivo de Ragheton, who was also responsible for the west front of York Minster.

The barrel-vaulted choir ceiling is painted in vivid blue with gold trim. Medieval paintings in the north and south aisles and the choir represent the lives of the Apostles and saints Anthony and Cuthbert. The choir stalls and misericords are decorated with wonderful carvings dating from the early 15th century.

This is a finely engraved print being testimony to the beautiful and detailed work produced by Kip whose eye for detail was one of the most acknowledged of his day.

Condition Report
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - Early
Colours used: - Yellow, brown, green, red
General colour appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 
24 1/2in x 19 1/2in (610mm x 495mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 18in (585mm x 470mm)
Margins: - min 1/4in (6mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: -  None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1724 Kip Large Antique Folio Print of Gloucester Cathedral, England

1724 Kip Large Antique Folio Print of Gloucester Cathedral, England

  • TitleThe South Prospect of The Cathedral of St Peters Glocester
  • Date : 1724
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  40415
  • Size: 26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)

Description: 
This finely engraved original large folio antique Cathedral print by Johnnes Kip (1653-1722) and engraved by James Collins was published in the 1724 by Joseph Smith monumental work Nouveau Theatre de la Grande Bretagne. This print also appeared in Britannia Illustrata by D. Mortier (brother of Pierre).
This is a finely engraved print being testimony to the beautiful and detailed work produced by Kip whose eye for detail was one of the most acknowledged of his day.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - 
Colours used: - 
General colour appearance: - 
Paper size: - 
26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 18in (585mm x 460mm)
Margins: - min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: -  None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1724 Kip Large Folio Antique Print of Worcester Cathedral, England

1724 Kip Large Folio Antique Print of Worcester Cathedral, England

Description: 
This finely engraved original large folio antique Cathedral print by Johnnes Kip (1653-1722) and engraved by James Collins was published in the 1724 by Joseph Smith monumental work Nouveau Theatre de la Grande Bretagne. This print also appeared in Britannia Illustrata by D. Mortier (brother of Pierre).
This is a finely engraved print being testimony to the beautiful and detailed work produced by Kip whose eye for detail was one of the most acknowledged of his day.

Background:
The history of Worcester goes back a long way. In 672, a council of the English Church was held, Worcester became the centre of five new dioceses formed. In the ninth century invasions from the Danes brought fighting to England, but Worcester being on the edge of the conflict escaped without much damage. In 983, Oswald founded a monastery at Worcester under the Benedictine rule, dedicated to St. Mary the Virgin. Wulfstan, in 1040 became a monk at Worcester and made such an impression, he became Bishop of Worcester in 1062. Wulfstan was the only Anglo-Saxon bishop to remain at his post after the Norman Conquest of 1066. In 1084, Wulfstan began rebuilding Worcester Cathedral, starting with the crypt, some of which still survives. He was canonised in 1203. Building work continued for some time, including rebuilding the two western bays of the nave in 1170 and around 1202 the central tower collapsed and there was a serious fire. In 1216, King John was buried at Worcester and he seems to have a devotion to St. Wulfstan. In 1224, Bishop William de Blois built the Lady Chapel, where he was buried when he died in 1236. In the fourteenth century the nave was completely rebuilt apart from the western bays. The central tower and the cloisters were completed built by 1374.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - 
Colours used: - 
General colour appearance: - 
Paper size: - 
26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 18in (585mm x 460mm)
Margins: - min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: -  None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1724 Kip Large Antique Folio Print of Peterborough Cathedral, England

1724 Kip Large Antique Folio Print of Peterborough Cathedral, England

Description: 
This finely engraved original large folio antique Cathedral print by Johnnes Kip (1653-1722) and engraved by James Collins was published in the 1724 by Joseph Smith monumental work Nouveau Theatre de la Grande Bretagne. This print also appeared in Britannia Illustrata by D. Mortier (brother of Pierre).
This is a finely engraved print being testimony to the beautiful and detailed work produced by Kip whose eye for detail was one of the most acknowledged of his day.

Background:
An abbey was founded on the site around 655 by either Saxulf or Peada, the first Christian king of Mercia. The abbey was conconsecrated by the Archbishop of Canterbury in 655. at the end of the 9th century, the Danes invaded and raised the abbey to the ground. The abbey lay in ruins until the Bishop of Winchester, Aethelwold with help from King Edgar rebuilt the abbey and consecrated it in 972, in the presence of Archbishops Dunstan of Canterbury and Oswald of York. The second abbey was run under the rule of the Benedictines. The abbey dedicated to St. Peter had a wall built around it for defense and the name changed to Burgh St. Peter, where Burgh means fortified. In 1066, the abbot of Peterborough, Leofric, stood at Harold's side at Hastings but was wounded and died. His successor Brando mistakenly supported Edgar the Atheling instead of William and when William enforced his rule, Brando had to pay William a fine. A Norman abbot was installed at Peterborough when Brando died in 1069. In 1116 fire struck the abbey and the building was badly damaged. Building work begun in 1118. Building work took 120 years to complete. The building was consecrated in 1238 by the Bishop of Lincoln, Grosseteste. The abbey became a Cathedral in 1541 after the abbeys were dissolved in 1539. Notable people buried here are Catherine of Aragon, divorced from Henry VIII, and Mary, Queen of Scots was buried here first before being moved to Westminster Abbey.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - 
Colours used: - 
General colour appearance: - 
Paper size: - 
26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 18in (585mm x 460mm)
Margins: - min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: -  None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1724 Kip Large Antique Folio Print of St Marys Church The Strand London England

1724 Kip Large Antique Folio Print of St Marys Church The Strand London England

  • TitleAdmodum Reverendis Amplissimis...Templi St Maria in Vico dicto The Strand
  • Date : 1724
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  40399
  • Size: 26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)

Description: 
This finely engraved original large folio antique Cathedral print by Johnnes Kip (1653-1722) and engraved by James Collins was published in the 1724 by Joseph Smith monumental work Nouveau Theatre de la Grande Bretagne. This print also appeared in Britannia Illustrata by D. Mortier (brother of Pierre).
This is a finely engraved print being testimony to the beautiful and detailed work produced by Kip whose eye for detail was one of the most acknowledged of his day.

Background:
The parish of St Mary le Strand may lay a good claim to being one of the oldest parishes in London. It stands dominating a roadway which since prehistory has been the main artery to the west from the City of London. In early Saxon times the Strand area was the very heart of London, for it seems that the City was effectively abandoned by the newly-arrived settlers. The Saxons predominantly inhabited "Lundenwic", an area stretching from Fleet Street to Whitehall and from the Thames to Covent Garden from the sixth to the ninth centuries. Christianity came to this settlement with St Mellitus and his followers in 604, and, despite their brief expulsion in the 620s, became firmly established. We do not know if any of the existing churches in the area date back that far but some, such as St Clement Danes, are known to have existed in later Saxon times. 

There is no record of when St Mary le Strand was founded, but the first church, which was dedicated to the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, stood just south of the present church on a site now covered by Somerset House. Throughout the Middle Ages, the Bishops of Worcester were the Patrons of the parish and had their London residence on an adjoining site. For throughout the period from the Norman Conquest to the Reformation, the Strand was mainly the home of bishops and princes. Within the parish were the "inns" - large town houses with chapels, stables and accommodation for a large retinue - of the Bishops of Worcester, Llandaff, Coventry and Lichfield. A large part of the parish was absorbed by the building of a great house, the Palace of the Savoy, by Count Peter of Savoy, the uncle of Henry III, in the 1240s. A century later this became the home of John of Gaunt, Earl of Lancaster, and the palace became a centre of culture; among its residents was Geoffrey Chaucer, who was married in the palace chapel. Gaunt's unpopularity, as the king's chief minister, caused the palace to be burned in the Peasant's Revolt. Despite its long absence, the fame of the palace has lasted in the area and was recreated in the nineteenth century by the Savoy Hotel and Theatre. 
The site where the present church stands was occupied in medieval times by Strand Cross. The origins of this are unclear. It was not a cross erected in memory of Queen Eleanor - as was Charing Cross - but seems to have dated back at least to Norman times. Perhaps it began as a market cross; by the early fourteenth century it had been rebuilt in a lavish manner, almost certainly following the design of the Eleanor Crosses. Strand Cross was a famous site and it is recorded that in the thirteenth century the local magistrates held their assizes in front of it.
Until the sixteenth century, the Strand was no more than a line of Bishops' palaces on the south side of the roadway stretching all the way to Whitehall. On the north side stood a wall which bounded the Convent - later Covent - Garden, while the churches further away, St Martin's and St Giles, stood "in-the-fields". All this was to change with the Reformation. The bishops' inns around the church were seized by Edward Lord Protector who set about building himself a renaissance palace in what was then the most fashionable part of town. Even with the extensive site that he had now obtained, further space was needed and towards the end of 1548 the Lord Protector's workmen fell upon St Mary's church and demolished it to provide stone for the new palace. Further stone was provided by the demolition of a cloister at St Paul's Cathedral known as Pardon Churchyard and the greater part of the Priory of St John at Clerkenwell. Even by the standards of the time, the demolition of so much sacred property was an outrage. Somerset was never to enjoy living in his new palace; just as it was nearing completion he was overthrown by his political enemies and executed at Tower Hill in 1551.
It is said that Somerset had intended to build a new parish church. If so, all thought of it passed away with his fall. Initially, the parishioners scattered but within a short time we find them gathered in the chapel of St John the Baptist in the Savoy. Here they would remain for the next 175 years. Now known at "St Mary le Savoy", the parishioners chose and paid for their own ministers. The most famous of these was Thomas Fuller, the church historian, who was appointed in 1642, fled during the Civil War and was restored to his living in 1660. 
Following the execution of Somerset, his palace had passed to the possession of the Crown. Elizabeth I occasionally lodged there and it was from Somerset House that she set off to give thanks after the defeat of the Armada. Under the Stuarts, extensive improvements were made to the palace, the most impressive being the lavish Roman Catholic chapel built by Charles I's queen, Henrietta Maria.
The roadway in front of Somerset House, where Strand Cross had stood and where the present church was later to stand, was occupied in the early seventeenth century by a windmill used to pump water. In 1634 the first Hackney Carriage stand in England was established here by one Captain Bailey. Here also a maypole was erected which became the most famous maypole in London. Demolished by the Puritans, a new maypole was erected in 1661. Parts of this maypole remained until 1717, when they were removed and presented to Sir Isaac Newton as the base for a telescope.
In 1711, an Act of Parliament was passed for building 50 New Churches in the fast expanding suburbs of London. These were the so-called "Queen Ann Churches"; among them are Hawksmoor's Chris
t Church Spitalfields, St Anne's Limehouse, and St George's-in-the-East, Archer's St Paul's Depftord and James' St George's, Hanover Square. St Mary le Strand was quick to apply for a church to replace their demolished one and, as the site on the Strand was so prominent, the Commissioners for building the New Churches decided to make the Strand church the most lavish of the churches. Initially, it was intended that there should not be a spire but that a column celebrating the building of the New Churches should stand directly in front of the church.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - 
Colours used: - 
General colour appearance: - 
Paper size: - 
26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 18in (585mm x 460mm)
Margins: - min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: -  None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1724 Kip Large Antique Print of Chester Cathedral Church, Cheshire, England

1724 Kip Large Antique Print of Chester Cathedral Church, Cheshire, England

Description: 
This finely engraved original large folio antique Cathedral print by Johnnes Kip (1653-1722) and engraved by James Collins was published in the 1724 by Joseph Smith monumental work Nouveau Theatre de la Grande Bretagne. This print also appeared in Britannia Illustrata by D. Mortier (brother of Pierre).
This is a finely engraved print being testimony to the beautiful and detailed work produced by Kip whose eye for detail was one of the most acknowledged of his day.

Background:
Standing on the site of a 10th century Saxon church, the present cathedral at Chester dates from the mid 13th century. Dedicated to St Werburgh, this Christian church was transformed into a Benedictine Abbey in 1092, colonised by a small group of monks from Normandy. Building of the new abbey church began immediately and took the best part of 150 years to complete but little evidence of the first church remains. The traditional sturdy Norman architecture was eventually replaced over the next two centuries by a more elegant Gothic style. Henry VIII dissolved the monastery in 1540 just as the monks of St Werburgh's Abbey were beginning to enjoy their new surroundings. A year later the abbey was given back as a cathedral, the last abbot of St Werburgh's becoming the first Dean of Chester Cathedral. 

Over the next two hundred years the cathedral slipped into a bad state of disrepair but was eventually saved from total collapse by the efforts of Sir George Gilbert Scott. His 19th century restoration of Chester Cathedral, both externally and internally, not only put in place essential repairs but also enhanced the appearance of the great church immensely. Most of the stained glass comes from this period and highlights the abbey's dedication to St Werburgh, as well as the long history of the cathedral. On the northern aisle of the nave, at the side of one of the large windows, sits the 'Chester Imp'. A charming little figure in chains, carved by one of the medieval monks, to protect the church from evil spirits.
Most medieval cathedrals have beautifully carved stalls in the quire but the quality of oak carving at Chester Cathedral is quite exceptional. Each stall is topped with an elaborately carved canopy set above a row of small corbels, and below each seat a magnificently carved misericord. This area of the church is so richly carved with such a diverse array of religious artefacts, animals, birds and grotesque figures that it is quite overwhelming.
Apart from the main church many of the monastic buildings from the ancient Benedictine Abbey have been remarkably preserved. The original cloisters, although largely rebuilt during the first half of the 16th century and subsequently restored at the beginning of the 20th century, are a constant reminder of the important part they played in monastic life. All the bays of the undercroft, containing some wonderful vaulting, have been utilised to provide an exhibition centre, gift shop and workshop. The monks' dining room or refectory is still used regularly, as is the superb Chapter House. .

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - 
Colours used: - 
General colour appearance: - 
Paper size: - 
26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 18in (585mm x 460mm)
Margins: - min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: -  None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1720 Kip Large Folio Antique Print of Bath Cathedral, Somerset, England

1720 Kip Large Folio Antique Print of Bath Cathedral, Somerset, England

Description: 
This finely engraved original large folio antique Cathedral print by Johnnes Kip (1653-1722) and engraved by James Collins was published in the 1724 by Joseph Smith monumental work Nouveau Theatre de la Grande Bretagne. This print also appeared in Britannia Illustrata by D. Mortier (brother of Pierre).
This is a finely engraved print being testimony to the beautiful and detailed work produced by Kip whose eye for detail was one of the most acknowledged of his day.

Background:
Bath Abbey stands at the heart of the city of Bath; during the past twelve and a half centuries, three different churches have occupied this site:
An Anglo-Saxon Abbey Church dating from 757, pulled down by the Norman conquerors of England soon after 1066.
A massive Norman cathedral begun about 1090. It was larger than the monastery could afford to maintain and by the end of the 15th century was in ruins.
The present Abbey church founded in 1499, ruined after the dissolution of the monasteries in 1539 by order of Henry VIII.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - 
Colours used: - 
General colour appearance: - 
Paper size: - 
26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 18in (585mm x 460mm)
Margins: - min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: -  None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1725 Kip Large Antique Print of the Holy Trinity Cathedral, Chichester, England

1725 Kip Large Antique Print of the Holy Trinity Cathedral, Chichester, England

  • TitleThe Cathedral Church of the Holy Trinity in Chichester
  • Date : 1724
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  40411
  • Size: 26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)

Description: 
This finely engraved original large folio antique Cathedral print by Johnnes Kip (1653-1722) and engraved by James Collins was published in the 1724 by Joseph Smith monumental work Nouveau Theatre de la Grande Bretagne. This print also appeared in Britannia Illustrata by D. Mortier (brother of Pierre).
This is a finely engraved print being testimony to the beautiful and detailed work produced by Kip whose eye for detail was one of the most acknowledged of his day.

Background:
The cathedral of the Holy Trinity at Chichester was founded in 1075, after the seat of the bishop was transferred to the town from nearby Selsey. It was consecrated in 1108, but a subsequent fire created a need for substantial rebuilding, which was not completed until 1184. The cathedral was reconsecrated in 1199. This was not the last stage in its development, by a long way. Richard de la Wyche, (Saint Richard of Chichester in the Anglican Communion), who was bishop from 1245 to 1253, was buried in the cathedral, where his shrine was a place of pilgrimage, until it was ordered destroyed in 1538, during the first stages of the English Reformation. Further damage to the cathedral had been done by fire after the second consecration, and much rebuilding was carried out in the Early English style. The original wooden ceiling had burnt out, and the sublimely simple present vaulting replaced it. The spire, which was originally built in the 14th century, was of poor-quality local stone, and collapsed suddenly in 1861, miraculously without loss of life. It was immediately rebuilt, by Sir Gilbert Scott, a noted scholarly architect.

The cathedral has many other unique features. Under the floor of the nave are the remains of a Roman mosaic pavement, which can be viewed through a glass window. Also in the interior are the grave of the composer Gustav Holst and the Gothic "Arundel tomb" referred to in a famous poem by Philip Larkin.
Despite its age, the cathedral contains several modern works of art, including tapestries by John Piper and Ursula Benker-Schirmer, a window by Marc Chagall, and a sculpture by Graham Sutherland.  

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - 
Colours used: - 
General colour appearance: - 
Paper size: - 
26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 18in (585mm x 460mm)
Margins: - min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: -  None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1724 Kip Large Antique Folio Print of St Marys Church, The Strand, London

1724 Kip Large Antique Folio Print of St Marys Church, The Strand, London

  • TitleThe South West Prospect of St Mary's Church in ye Strand
  • Date : 1724
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  40400
  • Size: 26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)

Description: 
This finely engraved original large folio antique Cathedral print by Johnnes Kip (1653-1722) and engraved by James Collins was published in the 1724 by Joseph Smith monumental work Nouveau Theatre de la Grande Bretagne. This print also appeared in Britannia Illustrata by D. Mortier (brother of Pierre).
This is a finely engraved print being testimony to the beautiful and detailed work produced by Kip whose eye for detail was one of the most acknowledged of his day.

Background:
The parish of St Mary le Strand may lay a good claim to being one of the oldest parishes in London. It stands dominating a roadway which since prehistory has been the main artery to the west from the City of London. In early Saxon times the Strand area was the very heart of London, for it seems that the City was effectively abandoned by the newly-arrived settlers. The Saxons predominantly inhabited "Lundenwic", an area stretching from Fleet Street to Whitehall and from the Thames to Covent Garden from the sixth to the ninth centuries. Christianity came to this settlement with St Mellitus and his followers in 604, and, despite their brief expulsion in the 620s, became firmly established. We do not know if any of the existing churches in the area date back that far but some, such as St Clement Danes, are known to have existed in later Saxon times. 

There is no record of when St Mary le Strand was founded, but the first church, which was dedicated to the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, stood just south of the present church on a site now covered by Somerset House. Throughout the Middle Ages, the Bishops of Worcester were the Patrons of the parish and had their London residence on an adjoining site. For throughout the period from the Norman Conquest to the Reformation, the Strand was mainly the home of bishops and princes. Within the parish were the "inns" - large town houses with chapels, stables and accommodation for a large retinue - of the Bishops of Worcester, Llandaff, Coventry and Lichfield. A large part of the parish was absorbed by the building of a great house, the Palace of the Savoy, by Count Peter of Savoy, the uncle of Henry III, in the 1240s. A century later this became the home of John of Gaunt, Earl of Lancaster, and the palace became a centre of culture; among its residents was Geoffrey Chaucer, who was married in the palace chapel. Gaunt's unpopularity, as the king's chief minister, caused the palace to be burned in the Peasant's Revolt. Despite its long absence, the fame of the palace has lasted in the area and was recreated in the nineteenth century by the Savoy Hotel and Theatre. 
The site where the present church stands was occupied in medieval times by Strand Cross. The origins of this are unclear. It was not a cross erected in memory of Queen Eleanor - as was Charing Cross - but seems to have dated back at least to Norman times. Perhaps it began as a market cross; by the early fourteenth century it had been rebuilt in a lavish manner, almost certainly following the design of the Eleanor Crosses. Strand Cross was a famous site and it is recorded that in the thirteenth century the local magistrates held their assizes in front of it.
Until the sixteenth century, the Strand was no more than a line of Bishops' palaces on the south side of the roadway stretching all the way to Whitehall. On the north side stood a wall which bounded the Convent - later Covent - Garden, while the churches further away, St Martin's and St Giles, stood "in-the-fields". All this was to change with the Reformation. The bishops' inns around the church were seized by Edward Lord Protector who set about building himself a renaissance palace in what was then the most fashionable part of town. Even with the extensive site that he had now obtained, further space was needed and towards the end of 1548 the Lord Protector's workmen fell upon St Mary's church and demolished it to provide stone for the new palace. Further stone was provided by the demolition of a cloister at St Paul's Cathedral known as Pardon Churchyard and the greater part of the Priory of St John at Clerkenwell. Even by the standards of the time, the demolition of so much sacred property was an outrage. Somerset was never to enjoy living in his new palace; just as it was nearing completion he was overthrown by his political enemies and executed at Tower Hill in 1551.
It is said that Somerset had intended to build a new parish church. If so, all thought of it passed away with his fall. Initially, the parishioners scattered but within a short time we find them gathered in the chapel of St John the Baptist in the Savoy. Here they would remain for the next 175 years. Now known at "St Mary le Savoy", the parishioners chose and paid for their own ministers. The most famous of these was Thomas Fuller, the church historian, who was appointed in 1642, fled during the Civil War and was restored to his living in 1660. 
Following the execution of Somerset, his palace had passed to the possession of the Crown. Elizabeth I occasionally lodged there and it was from Somerset House that she set off to give thanks after the defeat of the Armada. Under the Stuarts, extensive improvements were made to the palace, the most impressive being the lavish Roman Catholic chapel built by Charles I's queen, Henrietta Maria.
The roadway in front of Somerset House, where Strand Cross had stood and where the present church was later to stand, was occupied in the early seventeenth century by a windmill used to pump water. In 1634 the first Hackney Carriage stand in England was established here by one Captain Bailey. Here also a maypole was erected which became the most famous maypole in London. Demolished by the Puritans, a new maypole was erected in 1661. Parts of this maypole remained until 1717, when they were removed and presented to Sir Isaac Newton as the base for a telescope.
In 1711, an Act of Parliament was passed for building 50 New Churches in the fast expanding suburbs of London. These were the so-called "Queen Ann Churches"; among them are Hawksmoor's Chris
t Church Spitalfields, St Anne's Limehouse, and St George's-in-the-East, Archer's St Paul's Depftord and James' St George's, Hanover Square. St Mary le Strand was quick to apply for a church to replace their demolished one and, as the site on the Strand was so prominent, the Commissioners for building the New Churches decided to make the Strand church the most lavish of the churches. Initially, it was intended that there should not be a spire but that a column celebrating the building of the New Churches should stand directly in front of the church.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - 
Colours used: - 
General colour appearance: - 
Paper size: - 
26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 18in (585mm x 460mm)
Margins: - min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: -  None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
More Info
1720 Kip Large Folio Antique Print of Durham Cathedral, England

1720 Kip Large Folio Antique Print of Durham Cathedral, England

Description: 
This finely engraved original large folio antique Cathedral print by Johnnes Kip (1653-1722) and engraved by James Collins was published in the 1724 by Joseph Smith monumental work Nouveau Theatre de la Grande Bretagne. This print also appeared in Britannia Illustrata by D. Mortier (brother of Pierre).
This is a finely engraved print being testimony to the beautiful and detailed work produced by Kip whose eye for detail was one of the most acknowledged of his day.

Background:
Durham Cathedral was first built as a shrine to house the uncorrupted body of St. Cuthbert, brought to rest here by his brother monks in the late eleventh century, after their wanderings around the north east. The famous seventh century saint of Lindisfarne had been celebrated by Bede in his writings and it is fitting that this wonderful writer is also buried and commemorated here at Durham, in the dramatic Galilee Chapel. 

On the main entrance door of the cathedral hangs a replica of the elaborately cast Sanctuary Knocker, where those seeking escape from the law would come to grasp the handle, gaining time to sort out their affairs. As you enter the dark nave, the shocking boldness of design almost a thousand years old arrests your attention. The nave pillars are deeply carved with geometric grooves, their circumference equal to their height, producing a feel of solidity and permanence. The emphasis at Durham is of mass and weight, a sharp contrast to the later gothic naves of cathedrals such as Winchester or Canterbury, where light and space are the key. Around 1093, the present cathedral was started by Bishop William of St. Carileph and the Benedictine monks. The shrine of St. Cuthbert attracted many pilgrims and a suitably grand structure was required.
In the early twelfth century, the Chapter house and the Galilee Chapel were built. The Galilee Chapel is one of my favourite architectural spaces, with its abundance of crisp zigzag carving arched over slim stone pillars. Bede is simply and suitably commemorated by a dark marble grave slab and the mixture of ancient and modern sculpture, stained glass and wall painting crosses and unites centuries of Christian belief and artistic devotion. 
Back in the nave, there is ample evidence also of the continuum of belief, interrupted and partly destroyed at times, but still very much alive today. Here is the earliest example in Europe of rib vaulting, there is a memorial to the local minors, reflecting poignantly the double-edged sword of industry and its losses. 
In the south transept is a huge clock, installed at the end of the fifteenth century, when the cathedral was still a priory, whose monks prayed through their daily round of services. At the Reformation, Durham was fortunate to become of the new cathedrals, saved from Henry VIII's destructive power. Between the two transepts, the tower over the crossing dates from around 1490, a replacement for the previous tower which had been destroyed by lightening and fire sixty years before. Despite the discrepancy in age between the main body of the cathedral and the tower, the design is harmonious. 
Beyond the high alter lies the raised site of the shrine of St. Cuthbert, still a place of quiet power and reverence for this unassuming, gentle man. Separating it from the high altar is the Neville Screen, built between 1372 and 1380 by the influential Neville family. Once adorned with 107 statues, supposedly removed before the iconoclasts of the Reformation could deface them, this structure stands out at Durham for its light, vertical, decorated gothic design. Around a hundred years before, the Chapel of the Nine Altars which encompasses the east end of the cathedral displays an earlier and more restrained gothic. Here the pillars are edged with local black 'Frosterley Marble', filled with fossils.    
During the seventeenth and nineteenth centuries, Durham underwent several 'beautification' schemes, best seen in the organ and choir screen areas. The geometric marble inlaid floor is particularly beautiful.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - 
Colours used: - 
General colour appearance: - 
Paper size: - 
26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 18in (585mm x 460mm)
Margins: - min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: -  None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
More Info
1724 Kip Large Antique Folio Print of Rochester Cathedral, Kent, England

1724 Kip Large Antique Folio Print of Rochester Cathedral, Kent, England

  • TitleThe North Prospect of the Cathedral Church of Rochester
  • Date : 1724
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  40405
  • Size: 26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)

Description: 
This finely engraved original large folio antique Cathedral print by Johnnes Kip (1653-1722) and engraved by James Collins was published in the 1724 by Joseph Smith monumental work Nouveau Theatre de la Grande Bretagne. This print also appeared in Britannia Illustrata by D. Mortier (brother of Pierre).
This is a finely engraved print being testimony to the beautiful and detailed work produced by Kip whose eye for detail was one of the most acknowledged of his day.

Background:
Being the second oldest cathedral foundation in England, Rochester Cathedrals history goes back to AD604 when Augustine sent Bishop Justus to establish the house founded by King Ethelbert of Kent. Following several invasions by the Danes, the church was in a state of devastation by the time Bishop Gundulf was consecrated in 1077 but immediately he began a major building operation, and introduced a community of Benedictine monks in 1080.
The church suffered misfortune again in the mid 12th century with two serious fires, resulting in a further rebuilding programme. Since that time there has been continuous remodelling, refurbishments and restorations, mainly due to other historical events when the cathedral sustained damage. As a consequence of its very chequered history, Rochester Cathedral displays the varied building styles of each period, from the functional austerity of Gundulf's original structure, through the Romanesque, Gothic and Early English architectural periods, and continuing with renovation and restoration well into the 20th century following war damage.
The sturdy, squat Norman nave contrasts dramatically with the tall, narrow Gothic arches of the crossing. A superbly carved stone archway of the Decorated period (c1345), now enhanced with a solid oak door, leads to the chapter room and is a magnificent feat of craftsmanship. Quite unusually, the Lady Chapel is sited between the nave and the south transept as monastic outbuildings occupied the traditional location at the eastern end of the church when the chapel was added in the late 15th century. Beneath the quire transept is a beautifully preserved and vaulted crypt, with two bays surviving from the original Norman construction. There are also many fragments of medieval ceiling paintings to be found in this lower level sanctuary.
Though one of the smaller Norman cathedrals, Rochester was an important centre for pilgrimage during the 13th century, and even today attracts many visitors who are keen to learn more about its fascinating history. From a photographic perspective, a wonderful view of Rochester cathedral can be seen from the top of Rochester Castle, immediately opposite. We have visited both the Rochester Cathedral and Castle on many occasions, and still manage to uncover more information, or something interesting that we had previously overlooked. Earlier this year, we ventured for the first time into the cloister garth, discovering a substantial section of the ruined Chapter House. On the south side, the entrance arch to the monk's refectory survives and, looking behind it, the 13th century lavatorium and towel recess is still visible.

Johannes Kip was a draughtsman and engraver, who worked first in his native Amsterdam before moving to London at the end of the seventeenth century. He did portraits, views, and book illustrations. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - 
Colours used: - 
General colour appearance: - 
Paper size: - 
26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 18in (585mm x 460mm)
Margins: - min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: -  None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
More Info
1849 Fairbairn Large Folio Antique Print of Old Tombs High Church Yard, Glasgow

1849 Fairbairn Large Folio Antique Print of Old Tombs High Church Yard, Glasgow

Description: 
This beautifully coloured large folio original antique lithograph print, views of old Glasgow now long gone, by the Scottish artist Thomas Fairbairn (1821 - 1885) was published by Miller & Buchanan in the 1849 edition of Relic of Ancient Architecture and other Picturesque Scenes in Glasgow.

Subject Background:
The subjects of this picture are representations of the memorials raised to departed worth by the affection or gratitude of our forefathers. We append a brief notice of each, but the only one of the four deserving of special allusion is that erected to the memory of Dr Peter Low, and now the property of the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons in Glasgow. Dr. Low, who was some-time chirurgeon-in-ordinary to the French King, and also to King James VI., and his son the Prince, procured from the latter monarch a charter of erection in favour of the Faculty of Glasgow. The original charter is extant A fine old portrait of Dr. Low is preserved in the Faculty Hall, St.Enoch Square.

No. I.- The first on the left of the Plate.

Erected in 1630, by the Rev. John Dickson, who was married to Janet, daughter of the "Lord Bedlay." Afterwards it appears to have become the property of "Roberton of Bedlay," and latterly of Miss Lennox of Woodhead, who in 1818 disponed it to George Brown of Capelrigg, whose representatives are the present proprietors.

No. II.

"Here lyes ane Treu faithfull Brother, William Robertson, Merchand Burges of Glasgow. Decesit ye 24 June, 1617."

"W.R. AB."

This tomb appears afterwards to have belonged to Morehead of Bredisholm, although there is no entry in the Register to that effect. The present proprietor is not known.

No. III.

Monument to Dr PETER Low, Founder of the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons, Glasgow.

INSCRIPTION.

Stay, Passenger, and view this Stone,

For under it lys such an one,

Who cur'd many while he liv'd,

So gracious he no man griev'd;

Yea, when his Physick's force oft fail'd,

His pleasant Purpose then prevail'd;

For of his God he got the Grace,

To live in Mirth and die in Peace.

Heaven has his soul, his corpse this Stone:

Sigh, passenger, and then be gone.

Ah! me. I gravel am and dust,

And to the grave deshend I must;

O! painted piece of liveing clay,

Man be not proud of thy short day.

This Burial Place was purchased by and is now the property of the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons.

No. IV.

"Erected by Archd. Mure, Merchant, 1616, and descended to his daughter, Margaret Mure, who was married to James Hamilton. Afterwards it became the property of Provost John Gibson, in right of his wife, Christian Anderson, grand-child of the above James Hamilton and Margaret Mure. It afterwards became the property of William Anderson, merchant, in right of his wife, Christian Gibson, daughter of Provost John Gibson; and their only child, Christian Anderson, was the next successor. She dying unmarried, was succeeded by her cousin, Margaret Mather, relict of Archibald Anderson, brewer in Glasgow, who upon the 13th May, 1797, disponed this property to Thomas Buchanan, merchant in Glasgow; and upon the 13th March, 1806, it was conveyed by Jane Buchanan, his daughter, to James Buchanan,* merchant, Glasgow." - (From Register of Burial Grounds.)

* Late of Dowanhill, whose representatives are the present proprietors.

Relic of Ancient Architecture and other Picturesque Scenes in Glasgow, was published large folio size in 1849, containing 19 large folio coloured lithograph prints and has long since been out of print. A praiseworthy motive induced Mr. James Bogle, at one time Lord Dean of Guild, and a member of an old and highly-respected Glasgow family, to engage Mr. Thomas Fairbairn to reproduce them, before they passed into oblivion, some "Relics of Ancient Architecture and Picturesque Scenes in Glasgow." The immediate cause of Mr. Bogle's resolve was the fall of a sugar-house in Alston Street, by which some six or seven lives were lost, and a resolution on the part of the Dean of Guild Court to make a general survey of the City with a view to the removal of old houses which, from age or other causes, were considered to be unfit for habitation. Mr. Bogle naturally thought that this was the proper time to reproduce in permanent form a fair presentment of many of the noted houses of old Glasgow.
Along with Mr. Fairbairn, the artist, Mr. Bogle made a tour of the City, and selected subjects for the drawings, nearly all of which are now gone, and those few that remain are so altered as to be almost irrecognisable.
A general wish having been expressed for a reproduction of the work, the publishers some time ago engaged Mr. Fairbairn (now alas! gone) to reproduce the original sketches, and also add a number of others of interest before the rapid growth of the City extinguishes or entirely defaces their subjects.
The drawings are now thirty in number, and have been reproduced by Messrs. Annan's new process of photo-engraving, which it will be observed, gives the effect of finely finished mezzo-tints.
The letterpress descriptions of the original edition are from the pen of the late Mr. James Pagan, Editor of the Glasgow Herald, and the descriptions of the new scenes have been supplied by his successor, the present Editor of that journal.
It ought to be stated that the descriptive portions, written by Mr. Pagan more than thirty years ago, have not been touched; so that readers should understand that they refer to the Glasgow of a former generation, and are all indicated in the Contents by an asterisk.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Red, green, blue, brown  
General color appearance: - Authentic   
Paper size: - 22in x 16in (560mm x 405mm)
Margins: - Min 4in (100mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
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1849 Fairbairn Large Folio Antqiue Print of Houses Saltmarket St Gorbals Glasgow

1849 Fairbairn Large Folio Antqiue Print of Houses Saltmarket St Gorbals Glasgow

Description: 
This beautifully coloured large folio original antique lithograph print, views of old Glasgow now long gone, by the Scottish artist Thomas Fairbairn (1821 - 1885) was published by Miller & Buchanan in the 1849 edition of Relic of Ancient Architecture and other Picturesque Scenes in Glasgow.

Subject Background:

The artist has here represented a style of dwelling-house architecture which is fast passing away, and will soon altogether cease to exist. Houses of this kind seem to have been originally erected from the cheapness of the materials, and for the purpose of economizing building-ground space. To attain the latter object, beams, as shown in the print, were projected from the first storey, and an out-shot and additional structure raised upon them, thus offering a great obstruction to ventilation, and affording an inconvenient, cold, and comfortless dwelling. When situated in a close, houses of this kind were generally occupied by working people, or by those who rented a small shop or bothy in the front street, and lodged themselves and families in one of these fragile-looking tenements behind. In some rare cases these wooden houses were tenanted by persons of a more substantial character, and we may mention, as the most prominent instance of which we have heard, that so recently as the close of last century the firm of Francis Reid & Sons, watchmakers, occupied a large wooden structure in the close opposite 77, both as their dwelling-house, work-shop, and sale-shop. These gentlemen were the first to give a stimulus to the watchmaking and jewellery business in Glasgow; and however humble their premises may have been, they did a large and lucrative business, and off-shoots from their concern branched into some of the principal establishments at present existing in Glasgow. We have no story to tell regarding the houses represented in the print; in their better days they were occupied by decent native tradesmen, but for a long succession of years they have been in the possession of the Irish, whose annals would furnish nothing attractive. Two hundred years ago wooden houses of this kind formed the majority of the Saltmarket closes ; but a great fire having broken out on 3rd November, 1677, the upper part of the street on both sides was destroyed as far as the Tron Church on the west, and two or three tenements in the Gallowgate on the east. From the rapidity with which these timber structures were mowed down by the flames on that occasion, the wisdom of replacing them with stone erections became apparent, and since then very few timber houses have been put down in the city, excepting in obscure back lanes, and on a very humble scale. As we have said, they will speedily disappear altogether, for the Dean of Guild Court will not permit a renewal of buildings in this style, when the present houses fall or are pulled down from natural decay. A stone inserted in the door-way of a one-storey house at the bottom of this close hears the inscription, "H. Br., J. H., 1727.".

Relic of Ancient Architecture and other Picturesque Scenes in Glasgow, was published large folio size in 1849, containing 19 large folio coloured lithograph prints and has long since been out of print. A praiseworthy motive induced Mr. James Bogle, at one time Lord Dean of Guild, and a member of an old and highly-respected Glasgow family, to engage Mr. Thomas Fairbairn to reproduce them, before they passed into oblivion, some "Relics of Ancient Architecture and Picturesque Scenes in Glasgow." The immediate cause of Mr. Bogle's resolve was the fall of a sugar-house in Alston Street, by which some six or seven lives were lost, and a resolution on the part of the Dean of Guild Court to make a general survey of the City with a view to the removal of old houses which, from age or other causes, were considered to be unfit for habitation. Mr. Bogle naturally thought that this was the proper time to reproduce in permanent form a fair presentment of many of the noted houses of old Glasgow.
Along with Mr. Fairbairn, the artist, Mr. Bogle made a tour of the City, and selected subjects for the drawings, nearly all of which are now gone, and those few that remain are so altered as to be almost irrecognisable.
A general wish having been expressed for a reproduction of the work, the publishers some time ago engaged Mr. Fairbairn (now alas! gone) to reproduce the original sketches, and also add a number of others of interest before the rapid growth of the City extinguishes or entirely defaces their subjects.
The drawings are now thirty in number, and have been reproduced by Messrs. Annan's new process of photo-engraving, which it will be observed, gives the effect of finely finished mezzo-tints.
The letterpress descriptions of the original edition are from the pen of the late Mr. James Pagan, Editor of the Glasgow Herald, and the descriptions of the new scenes have been supplied by his successor, the present Editor of that journal.
It ought to be stated that the descriptive portions, written by Mr. Pagan more than thirty years ago, have not been touched; so that readers should understand that they refer to the Glasgow of a former generation, and are all indicated in the Contents by an asterisk.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Red, green, blue, brown  
General color appearance: - Authentic   
Paper size: - 22in x 16in (560mm x 405mm)
Margins: - Min 4in (100mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
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1849 Fairbairn Large Folio Antique Print Baronial Tower ,Main St Gorbals Glasgow

1849 Fairbairn Large Folio Antique Print Baronial Tower ,Main St Gorbals Glasgow

Description: 
This beautifully coloured large folio original antique lithograph print, views of old Glasgow now long gone, by the Scottish artist Thomas Fairbairn (1821 - 1885) was published by Miller & Buchanan in the 1849 edition of Relic of Ancient Architecture and other Picturesque Scenes in Glasgow.

Subject Background:
This venerable pile, so long identified with the Barony of Gorbals, was erected between the years 1600 and 1608, by Sir George Elphinston, the son of a merchant in Glasgow, who had acquired the lands on the south side of the river known as "St. Ninian's Croft," from Boyd, the Protestant Archbishop of the See. With the view of forming a suitable residence, Sir George enclosed part of the croft for an orchard and garden, and built thereon the erections which so long formed the most prominent objects on the east side of the Main Street of Gorbals. Tradition informs us that he also erected a small Chapel adjoining, part of which still exists at the corner of Main Street and Rutherglen Loan. It was in this baronet's favour that the village of "Gorbels" was erected into a Burgh of Barony and Regality. Although this gentleman enjoyed great distinction in his lifetime, and rose to the rank of Lord Justice Clerk in the reign of Charles I., he afterwards became reduced in circumstances, and died miserably and in poverty about 1634. According to McUre, he was privately interred "in his own chapel, adjoining to his house." The property was then sold by the creditors of the deceased to Robert Douglas, Viscount Belhaven. This nobleman extended the mansion in Gorbals, and built a square Tower or "Fortulice," which is now almost the only part of the venerable buildings existing. Until within a few years ago, the Tower in question exhibited four turrets, which of course gave an imposing appearance to the structure. On the building adjoining the Tower may still be seen the family arms of Viscount Belhaven, pretty well cut in stone, the whole surmounted by the letters S. G. E., which are apparently meant for the initials of Sir George Elphinston. It is not at all improbable that this was not the original position of the arms referred to, but that at some period when alterations were made on the Tower, they had been removed from it, and placed so as to face the Main Street of the Barony. The Viscount, at his death, was succeeded by his nephew, Sir Robert Douglas of Blackerston, who sold the Gorbals Mansion House and lands in cumulo, some time prior to 1661, to the town of Glasgow, the Trades' House, and the Trustees for Hutchesons' Hospital. They were retained as a sort of co-partnery possession till 1790, when a division was made, and the central portion, containing the old buildings, fell to the lot of the city. The most important event connected with the Baronial Hall structure is found in the fact that at one time it formed the residence of Sir James Turner, Commander-in-Chief of the Forces in Scotland in the reign of Charles II., and who is understood to be the personage who supplied Sir Walter Scott with the portrait of Dugald Dalgetty. The terms on which Sir James obtained possession of the house are somewhat singular; for it appears by the minutes that on the 18th July, 1670, the Bailies and Council "ordains ane tack to be wrytten and subscryvit in favors of Sir James Turnor, of the toune's houss and tour in Gorballs, quhilk he presentlie possesses, and that dureing his lifetyme, for payment yearlie of three punds Scots, if the samyne be requyred." Sir James accordingly died in possession of the subjects; and from the records kept in the College, it would appear that at the sale of his effects, a part of his scanty library was purchased by the University of Glasgow. Amongst his books were several works upon the art of war; but the soldier of fortune had not overlooked productions of a more elevating and humanising kind, for Milton's "Paradise Lost" and various kindred tomes are found in his catalogue. Who were the successors of Sir James Turner, in the "toune's houss and tour," we have no way of knowing. At all events, as the locality was never an attractive one for the Glasgow merchants, the occupants must have gradually descended in the scale of quality. Before the close of the last century, and for some time afterwards, the principal room in the Tower, which was of a spacious kind, was used as a place of meeting by the magistrates, heritors and feuars of the parish of Gorbals; and here also the inhabitants mustered previous to performing the dutes of watching and warding, in days when a police force did not exist. Latterly, part of the old building was fitted up as a police-office, with adjoining cells. But it lost all its importance, excepting such as it retained from olden associations, when the official staff was removed to the present extensive police establishment in Portland Street. t was then given over to very humble uses - the ground floors to the street being let as whisky shops, and the upper flats having been split up into dwelling-houses for the lowest class of the people. The greater part of the structure built by Sir George Elphinston was taken down early in 1849 by order of the Dean of Guild Court, from its having exhibited symptoms of insecurity. It was then a fine remnant and wreck of the Scottish urban Manor House style, with its oriel windows, ornamental ceilings, and stout oaken staircases. The Tower, which remains, though sadly dilapidated externally and internally, still exhibits evidences of the aristocratic aspect it wore in the days of other years

Relic of Ancient Architecture and other Picturesque Scenes in Glasgow, was published large folio size in 1849, containing 19 large folio coloured lithograph prints and has long since been out of print. A praiseworthy motive induced Mr. James Bogle, at one time Lord Dean of Guild, and a member of an old and highly-respected Glasgow family, to engage Mr. Thomas Fairbairn to reproduce them, before they passed into oblivion, some "Relics of Ancient Architecture and Picturesque Scenes in Glasgow." The immediate cause of Mr. Bogle's resolve was the fall of a sugar-house in Alston Street, by which some six or seven lives were lost, and a resolution on the part of the Dean of Guild Court to make a general survey of the City with a view to the removal of old houses which, from age or other causes, were considered to be unfit for habitation. Mr. Bogle naturally thought that this was the proper time to reproduce in permanent form a fair presentment of many of the noted houses of old Glasgow.
Along with Mr. Fairbairn, the artist, Mr. Bogle made a tour of the City, and selected subjects for the drawings, nearly all of which are now gone, and those few that remain are so altered as to be almost irrecognisable.
A general wish having been expressed for a reproduction of the work, the publishers some time ago engaged Mr. Fairbairn (now alas! gone) to reproduce the original sketches, and also add a number of others of interest before the rapid growth of the City extinguishes or entirely defaces their subjects.
The drawings are now thirty in number, and have been reproduced by Messrs. Annan's new process of photo-engraving, which it will be observed, gives the effect of finely finished mezzo-tints.
The letterpress descriptions of the original edition are from the pen of the late Mr. James Pagan, Editor of the Glasgow Herald, and the descriptions of the new scenes have been supplied by his successor, the present Editor of that journal.
It ought to be stated that the descriptive portions, written by Mr. Pagan more than thirty years ago, have not been touched; so that readers should understand that they refer to the Glasgow of a former generation, and are all indicated in the Contents by an asterisk.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Red, green, blue, brown  
General color appearance: - Authentic   
Paper size: - 22in x 16in (560mm x 405mm)
Margins: - Min 4in (100mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
More Info
1849 Fairnbiarn Large Antique Print The Old Baronial Hall in the Gorbals Glasgow

1849 Fairnbiarn Large Antique Print The Old Baronial Hall in the Gorbals Glasgow

Description: 
This beautifully coloured large folio original antique lithograph print, views of old Glasgow now long gone, by the Scottish artist Thomas Fairbairn (1821 - 1885) was published by Miller & Buchanan in the 1849 edition of Relic of Ancient Architecture and other Picturesque Scenes in Glasgow.

Subject Background

The Old Baronial Hall was built by Sir George Elphinstone and his wife Dame Agnes Boyd in 1601. Following his death in 1634 the building passed down through several owners including Robert Douglas, Viscount Belhaven (who added a distinctive square tower), Gorbals Town Council and Sir James Turner. By 1858 a part of The Old Barional Hall (with the neighbouring chapel) had been converted into a public house, the Old Gorbals Wine and Spirit Vaults. However, the ornate ceiling and cornicing and the statuettes on the walls are reminders of the building's former glories, as the home of one of Glasgow's most prominent men of affairs. The initials S G E and D A B on the ceiling were part of the original decoration and stood for Sir George Elphinstone and his wife Dame Agnes Boyd. It was demolished in the early 1870s.

The Gorbals is an area on the south bank of the River Clyde in the city of Glasgow, Scotland. By the late 19th century, it had become over-populated and adversely affected by local industrialisation. Many people lived here because their jobs provided this home and they could not afford their own. It became widely known as a dangerous slum and was subject to efforts at
redevelopment, which contributed to more problems such as homeless people and diseases spreading. In recent decades, some buildings have been demolished for a mixture of market and social housing; others are being refurbished and restored to a higher standard.

Relic of Ancient Architecture and other Picturesque Scenes in Glasgow, was published large folio size in 1849, containing 19 large folio coloured lithograph prints and has long since been out of print. A praiseworthy motive induced Mr. James Bogle, at one time Lord Dean of Guild, and a member of an old and highly-respected Glasgow family, to engage Mr. Thomas Fairbairn to reproduce them, before they passed into oblivion, some "Relics of Ancient Architecture and Picturesque Scenes in Glasgow." The immediate cause of Mr. Bogle's resolve was the fall of a sugar-house in Alston Street, by which some six or seven lives were lost, and a resolution on the part of the Dean of Guild Court to make a general survey of the City with a view to the removal of old houses which, from age or other causes, were considered to be unfit for habitation. Mr. Bogle naturally thought that this was the proper time to reproduce in permanent form a fair presentment of many of the noted houses of old Glasgow

Along with Mr. Fairbairn, the artist, Mr. Bogle made a tour of the City, and selected subjects for the drawings, nearly all of which are now gone, and those few that remain are so altered as to be almost irrecognisable.

A general wish having been expressed for a reproduction of the work, the publishers some time ago engaged Mr. Fairbairn (now alas! gone) to reproduce the original sketches, and also add a number of others of interest before the rapid growth of the City extinguishes or entirely defaces their subjects.

The drawings are now thirty in number, and have been reproduced by Messrs. Annan's new process of photo-engraving, which it will be observed, gives the effect of finely finished mezzo-tints.

The letterpress descriptions of the original edition are from the pen of the late Mr. James Pagan, Editor of the Glasgow Herald, and the descriptions of the new scenes have been supplied by his successor, the present Editor of that journal.

It ought to be stated that the descriptive portions, written by Mr. Pagan more than thirty years ago, have not been touched; so that readers should understand that they refer to the Glasgow of a former generation, and are all indicated in the Contents by an asterisk.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Red, green, blue, brown  
General color appearance: - Authentic   
Paper size: - 22in x 16in (560mm x 405mm)
Margins: - Min 4in (100mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
More Info
1849 Fairnbiarn Large Antique Print of Mansion Stockwell Street Glasgow Scotland

1849 Fairnbiarn Large Antique Print of Mansion Stockwell Street Glasgow Scotland

Description: 
This beautifully coloured large folio original antique lithograph print of views of old Glasgow now long gone by the Scottish artist Thomas Fairbairn (1821 - 1885) was published by Miller & Buchanan in the 1849 edition of Relic of Ancient Architecture and other Picturesque Scenes in Glasgow.

Subject Background
This is one of the finest specimens extant of the dwelling-houses which the Glasgow citizens of the seventeenth century delighted to rear for the accommodation of themselves and families. No story of any peculiar interest attaches to the fabric in question. It simply illustrates a once favourite style of architecture which has now almost disappeared from amongst us. In a document, dated in 1639, this site is described as having been occupied by three small tenements which were then in rather a ruinous condition. They were surrounded by a "yaird," and considered quite in the suburbs. The subjects must have remained in a dilapidated condition for a long time. They were purchased in 1668 by John Caldwell, merchant in Glasgow, who immediately afterwards built the present tenement or tenements. It had a garden to the back, surrounded with a wall, and adorned with a summer-house. The subjects passed into the hands of Andrew Caldwell, son of the former, who sold them in 1698 to John Gray and William Knox, merchants in Glasgow, but apparently only in security for a debt. This was not paid, however, and a commission was granted to these gentlemen to dispose of the property absolutely, when it was acquired by Daniel Campbell, John Graham of Dugaldston, William Cross, William Wodropp, James Muir, and Matthew Campbell, merchants in Glasgow. This transaction took place on 3rd October, 1700. These gentlemen belonged to the mercantile aristocracy of the time; but the purpose for which they became joint-stock owners of this property is not now apparent. These parties sold their respective shares to Graham of Dugaldston in 1705, who in turn disposed of it, in 1709, to Andrew Cathcart, merchant in Glasgow. In a document, dated 13th January of that year, the subjects are thus described:-

"All and haill, the foresaid northmost of the saids two tenements of land, high and laigh, back and forwd, with the closs yaird at the back thereof, and stone dyke about the same, and summer-house within the same yaird, office-house, and haill pertinents of the samen, with the equal half of the said well Lyand betwixt the said two tenements, with free ish and entree yrto, and haill liberties and privileges yrof. And whilk northmost tenement, closs, yaird, office-houss, and pertinents erected and rebuilded by umqll John Cauldwell, merchant, father to the said Andrew, pertained of old to umqll Peter Johnston Tayloor, and consisted of three small tenements, yaird, and pertinents, and were acquired by the said umqll John Cauldwell from Kathrine Johnstoune and John Montgomerie, her husband, and were then bounded betwixt the lands of Adam Hish, being now the southmost of the saids two tenements. The lands of umqll Patrick Crawford and oyrs, and of the representatives of the said umqll Mitchell on the north. The lands of umqll William Thomson, John Andersone, elder, and Mr Archibald Denniston on the east, and the High Street on the west parts."

The purchaser above-named having held the property during a very lengthened period, including the time of the two great rebellions, it descended in 1754 to his grandson, William Cathcart, then merchant in Kingston, Jamaica. The representatives of this gentleman sold the property in 1771 to James Campbell, saddler in Glasgow, for the sum of £820. Campbell seems to have been unfortunate, for in the same year the Trustees for his creditors sold the subjects to George Anderson, merchant. About this time the house was much damaged by fire, but as it was insured in the Sun Fire Office, the Trustees retained the insurance money, and sold the property as it stood for the reduced price of £535. Anderson held it till his death, and the greater part was disposed of by his Trustees in 1827 to Mr Ritchie, Stockwell Street, whose family still hold the house. The price then paid was £1800. It has long ceased to be a dwelling-house, the lower portions or ground floors having been occupied as spirit vaults for an uninterrupted space of more than 80 years. They are used for this purpose still. A tradition has long prevailed that this house was occupied by some of Cromwell's officers when the Protector was in Glasgow. This, of course, could not have been the case, for the house was not built till eight years after the Restoration. The three small houses, however, which previously occupied the same site may, in all likelihood, have afforded accommodation to some of Cromwell's train.

Relic of Ancient Architecture and other Picturesque Scenes in Glasgow, was published large folio size in 1849, containing 19 large folio coloured lithograph prints and has long since been out of print. A praiseworthy motive induced Mr. James Bogle, at one time Lord Dean of Guild, and a member of an old and highly-respected Glasgow family, to engage Mr. Thomas Fairbairn to reproduce them, before they passed into oblivion, some "Relics of Ancient Architecture and Picturesque Scenes in Glasgow." The immediate cause of Mr. Bogle's resolve was the fall of a sugar-house in Alston Street, by which some six or seven lives were lost, and a resolution on the part of the Dean of Guild Court to make a general survey of the City with a view to the removal of old houses which, from age or other causes, were considered to be unfit for habitation. Mr. Bogle naturally thought that this was the proper time to reproduce in permanent form a fair presentment of many of the noted houses of old Glasgow

Along with Mr. Fairbairn, the artist, Mr. Bogle made a tour of the City, and selected subjects for the drawings, nearly all of which are now gone, and those few that remain are so altered as to be almost irrecognisable.

A general wish having been expressed for a reproduction of the work, the publishers some time ago engaged Mr. Fairbairn (now alas! gone) to reproduce the original sketches, and also add a number of others of interest before the rapid growth of the City extinguishes or entirely defaces their subjects.

The drawings are now thirty in number, and have been reproduced by Messrs. Annan's new process of photo-engraving, which it will be observed, gives the effect of finely finished mezzo-tints.

The letterpress descriptions of the original edition are from the pen of the late Mr. James Pagan, Editor of the Glasgow Herald, and the descriptions of the new scenes have been supplied by his successor, the present Editor of that journal.

It ought to be stated that the descriptive portions, written by Mr. Pagan more than thirty years ago, have not been touched; so that readers should understand that they refer to the Glasgow of a former generation, and are all indicated in the Contents by an asterisk.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Red, green, blue, brown  
General color appearance: - Authentic   
Paper size: - 22in x 16in (560mm x 405mm)
Margins: - Min 4in (100mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
More Info
1849 Fairnbiarn Large Antique Print of a Mansion House Gorbals, Glasgow Scotland

1849 Fairnbiarn Large Antique Print of a Mansion House Gorbals, Glasgow Scotland

  • TitleCourt of an old Manson House, Main St. Gorbals
  • Date : 1849
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  40246
  • Size: 22in x 16in (560mm x 405mm)

Description: 
This beautifully coloured large folio original antique lithograph print of views of old Glasgow now long gone by the Scottish artist Thomas Fairbairn (1821 - 1885) was published by Miller & Buchanan in the 1849 edition of Relic of Ancient Architecture and other Picturesque Scenes in Glasgow.

Subject Background
This is a fine old urban manor-house on the east side of Main Street, Gorbals, opposite Malta Street, and we are enabled to set down a little of its quiet domestic annals from the courteous correspondence of the Rev. Dr. Thom, of Liverpool, one of the joint proprietors, himself a native Glasgow, and brother of the late lamented Robert Thom, Esq., British Consul at Ningpo. The front building, or at least a portion of it, was built in 1687 by George Swan, a Quaker, who came originally from Perth, and whose initials "G. S.," with the date, are still plainly readable above one of the upper windows. There are also on the same stone the initials "I. R.," which we take to represent the name and surname of the Quaker's spouse. A part of the house was damaged by the great Gorbals fire of 1749, and some additions took place soon after that period. Mr. John Campbell, smith and farrier, became the occupant of the premises somewhere between 1730 and 1740, and finally purchased the "old house" from Mr. Swan's representatives in 1749, and it remains the possession of his descendants till this day. Mr. Campbell carried on his business in the little court, which still exists. He was a highly respectable man, and his name is still inscribed on the Gorbals tablets as a great benefactor to the village poor. His first wife was a Miss Maxwell of Williamfield, and his second wife a Miss Margaret Corse, of Paisley, whom he married in 1739, and by the only daughter of this lady, who was born in this house in 1744, and who subsequently married Mr. William Falconer, of Hamilton, the property has been transmitted to the present proprietors, her descendants. This Mr Falconer was descended from Mr. William Falconer, whose fine for the affair of Bothwell Bridge is noticed in Wodrow. Many eminent Glasgow families claim kindred with him; but it is unnecessary to pursue this genealogical disquisition further. After the family ceased to use the house as a place of residence, the front portion became an inn or public house, in which capacity it was tenanted for more than half a century. The tenants are to this day humbly respectable, but they do not, of course, occupy the position in society which their predecessors did.

Relic of Ancient Architecture and other Picturesque Scenes in Glasgow, was published large folio size in 1849, containing 19 large folio coloured lithograph prints and has long since been out of print. A praiseworthy motive induced Mr. James Bogle, at one time Lord Dean of Guild, and a member of an old and highly-respected Glasgow family, to engage Mr. Thomas Fairbairn to reproduce them, before they passed into oblivion, some "Relics of Ancient Architecture and Picturesque Scenes in Glasgow." The immediate cause of Mr. Bogle's resolve was the fall of a sugar-house in Alston Street, by which some six or seven lives were lost, and a resolution on the part of the Dean of Guild Court to make a general survey of the City with a view to the removal of old houses which, from age or other causes, were considered to be unfit for habitation. Mr. Bogle naturally thought that this was the proper time to reproduce in permanent form a fair presentment of many of the noted houses of old Glasgow

Along with Mr. Fairbairn, the artist, Mr. Bogle made a tour of the City, and selected subjects for the drawings, nearly all of which are now gone, and those few that remain are so altered as to be almost irrecognisable.

A general wish having been expressed for a reproduction of the work, the publishers some time ago engaged Mr. Fairbairn (now alas! gone) to reproduce the original sketches, and also add a number of others of interest before the rapid growth of the City extinguishes or entirely defaces their subjects.

The drawings are now thirty in number, and have been reproduced by Messrs. Annan's new process of photo-engraving, which it will be observed, gives the effect of finely finished mezzo-tints.

The letterpress descriptions of the original edition are from the pen of the late Mr. James Pagan, Editor of the Glasgow Herald, and the descriptions of the new scenes have been supplied by his successor, the present Editor of that journal.

It ought to be stated that the descriptive portions, written by Mr. Pagan more than thirty years ago, have not been touched; so that readers should understand that they refer to the Glasgow of a former generation, and are all indicated in the Contents by an asterisk.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Red, green, blue, brown  
General color appearance: - Authentic   
Paper size: - 22in x 16in (560mm x 405mm)
Margins: - Min 4in (100mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling, small repair to margin edges
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
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1888 Large Antique Print Views of Melbourne, Australia

1888 Large Antique Print Views of Melbourne, Australia

Description: 
This fine original antique lithograph print four views Melbourne, The City, Harbour, Gov. House & Collins St, was published in ca 1888. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 14 1/2in x 11in (370mm x 280mm)
Plate size: - 14 1/2in x 11in (370mm x 280mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (10mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$75.00 USD
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1888 Large Antique Print Views of Sydney Australia

1888 Large Antique Print Views of Sydney Australia

Description: 
This fine original antique lithograph print three views Sydney - The Zig Zag Railway, Sydney Harbour & the Sydney Town Hall - was published in ca 1888. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 14 1/2in x 11in (370mm x 280mm)
Plate size: - 14 1/2in x 11in (370mm x 280mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (10mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$75.00 USD
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1750 Large Antique Print of a Roman God or Emperor heavy Laid 18th century Paper

1750 Large Antique Print of a Roman God or Emperor heavy Laid 18th century Paper

Description: 
This large fine copper-plate engraved original antique print of a Roman God or Emperor - on heavy laid 18th century rag paper - was published in the mid 18th century. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 19in x 12in (485mm x 305mm)
Paper size: - 16in x 10 1/2in (410mm x 270mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling and spotting to margins
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$99.00 USD
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1889 Ernst Wasmuth Antique Print Lithograph of Neo-classical European Decoration

1889 Ernst Wasmuth Antique Print Lithograph of Neo-classical European Decoration

Description: 
This finely engraved coloured original antique lithograph print of neo-classical European decoration was published by Ernst Wasmuth in the 1889 edition of Farbige Decorationen, Berlin.

Farbige Decorationen, was published in two volumes between 1889 & 1896 . the volumes contained 121 coloured plates lithographed by Ernst Wasmuth, illustrating contemporary architectural and decoration.

Ernst Wasmuth - a very influential publisher who is famous for a book on the architect Frank Lloyd Wright entitled Studies and Executed Buildings of Frank Lloyd Wright, published in Germany in 1910. This two-volume work, which contains more than 100 lithographs of Wright’s designs, is commonly known as the Wasmuth Portfolio.(Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Brown 
General color appearance: - Authentic  
Paper size: - 19in x 12 1/2in (485mm x 320mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25m)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
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1888 Paul Planat Lithograph Antique Hotel Architectural Print, France

1888 Paul Planat Lithograph Antique Hotel Architectural Print, France

Description: 

This finely engraved original antique print of a French Hotel was published by Paul Planat (1839 - 1911) in the 1888 edition of Encyclopédie de l'architecture et de la construction.

Published between 1888 - 1892 this monumental 13 volume work on Architecture and construction by Planat was a leap forward in both the understanding and representation of architecture at the end of the 19th century. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: -  Green, yellow, blue, brown
General color appearance: -  Authentic
Paper size: - 18in x 13 1/2in (460mm x 345mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
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1732 Baldaeus Antique Print a View of Machilipatnam Andhra Pradesh, India

1732 Baldaeus Antique Print a View of Machilipatnam Andhra Pradesh, India

Description: 
This fine beautifully hand coloured original antique print a view of the city of Masulipatam (Machilipatnam) on the Malibar Coast in India was published in the 1732 second English edition of Philip Baldaeus "A True and Exact Description of the Most Celebrated East-India Coasts of Malabar and Coromandel; and also of the Isle of Ceylon… London: Awnsham and John Churchill, 1732.

Machilipatnam is a city and the district headquarters of Krishna district, located in Coastal Andhra region of Andhra Pradesh, India. During British rule, the city was their first trading settlement on the Bay of Bengal coast, when it was also known as Masulipatnam or Masula, and as Bandar in folklore, located 72 km to the east of the state capital Vijayawada.

Second edition in English of Baldaeus’ account of his 17th-century travels in south India and Ceylon—one of the first Europeans to publish at length about the region published with 37 copper-engraved views and maps. Father Philippus Baldaeus, Baelde or Philip Balde (October 1632, Delft – 1672, Geervliet) was a Dutch minister. He went to Jaffna, Ceylon with an invading Dutch force during 17th Century. As the first European he documented the life, language and culture of Tamil people, living in the north of the island. It is a great historical record, similar to Mahawamsa, and it was immediately published in Dutch and German (with several beautiful pictures).

Baldaeus had a Flemish origin. His ancestors had left Ypres in 1584. Baldaeus lost both his parents, when he was four years old. His uncle Robertus Junius was a missionary on Dutch Formosa. After studying Oriental languages in Groningen (1649) and theology in Leiden (1650), and discussions with Arnoldus Montanus, he preached from 1655 at Batavia, Dutch East Indies, Jaffanapatnam and Point de Galle, either in Dutch or Portuguese (language). From 1657 he served under Rijklof van Goens, occupying the Coromandel and Negapatnam in 1658. Cornelis Speelman became its first governor. By 1660 the Dutch controlled the whole island except the kingdom of Kandy. When the Dutch occupied the coast of Malabar in 1661, Baldaeus took part. Around 1662 he returned to Ceylon and Baldaeus learned Sanskrit and studied Hinduism.

In 1666 he returned to the Dutch Republic and preached in Geervliet from 1669 until his death at the age of 39 or 40. He left behind a full and faithful account of the civil, religious, and domestic condition of the countries through which he travelled. In this, he introduced also an interesting account of the Hindu mythology, and some specimens of the Tamil language, including the translation of the Lord's Prayer: defective enough it is true, but remarkable as the first treatise, printed in Europe, on any Indian language. The title of the whole work is Description of the East Indian Countries of Malabar, Coromandel, Ceylon, etc. (in Dutch, 1671) The book is dedicated to the bailiff Cornelis de Witt. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Blue, green,
General color appearance: - Fresh
Paper size: - 15in x 10in (380mm x 255mm)
Plate size: - 14in x 9 1/2in (360mm x 240mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Folds as issued
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
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1841 D'Urville Antique Print People of Nuku Hiva Marquesas Is. French Polynesia

1841 D'Urville Antique Print People of Nuku Hiva Marquesas Is. French Polynesia

Description: 
This large fine original antique print of the peoples and costumes of war on Nuku Hiva the largest of the Marquesas Islands of French Polynesia was published in the 1841 edition of Dumont d'Urville Voyage au Pole Sud during his second circumnavigation of the globe

Voyage au Pole Sud et dan l'Océanie sur les corvettes - In 1836, the French King Louis-Philippe, enthusiastic for Southern Hemisphere exploration, supported J. Dumont d'Urville's plan for a circumnavigation focusing on the South Seas. D'Urville (1790–1842) had already distinguished himself on two Pacific expeditions and was eager to rival the achievements of James Cook. Between 1837 and 1840, the ships Astrolabe and Zélée explored the waters of the Antarctic area and Oceania in extremely harsh conditions: almost forty crew members died or deserted. However, d'Urville discovered a new portion of the Antarctic coast, shed light on the ethnography of several Pacific islands and brought back multitudes of botanical specimens. His impressive contributions to the fields of geography, natural history and ethnography were gathered in this ten-volume work, published between 1841 and 1846. In Volume 10, published in 1846, which includes extracts from his correspondence, as well as a biography, d'Urville shares his immense relief as he returns to France. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 21in x 15 1/2in (535mm x 395mm)
Margins: - Min 2in (50mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Browning to margins
Plate area: - None
Verso: - Browning

$125.00 USD
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1842 Dumont d'Urville Folio Antique Print Men of Magareva Isle. French Polynesia

1842 Dumont d'Urville Folio Antique Print Men of Magareva Isle. French Polynesia

Description: 
This large finely engraved original antique lithograph print of two inhabitants of the island of Magareva - Mangaréva - of French Polynesia by Thierry, was published in the 1841 edition of Dumont d'Urville Voyage au Pole Sud

Voyage au Pole Sud et dan l'Océanie sur les corvettes - In 1836, the French King Louis-Philippe, enthusiastic for Southern Hemisphere exploration, supported J. Dumont d'Urville's plan for a circumnavigation focusing on the South Seas. D'Urville (1790–1842) had already distinguished himself on two Pacific expeditions and was eager to rival the achievements of James Cook. Between 1837 and 1840, the ships Astrolabe and Zélée explored the waters of the Antarctic area and Oceania in extremely harsh conditions: almost forty crew members died or deserted. However, d'Urville discovered a new portion of the Antarctic coast, shed light on the ethnography of several Pacific islands and brought back multitudes of botanical specimens. His impressive contributions to the fields of geography, natural history and ethnography were gathered in this ten-volume work, published between 1841 and 1846. In Volume 10, published in 1846, which includes extracts from his correspondence, as well as a biography, d'Urville shares his immense relief as he returns to France. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 21in x 15 1/2in (535mm x 395mm)
Margins: - Min 2in (50mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Browning to margins
Plate area: - None
Verso: - Browning to margins

$125.00 USD
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1842 d' Urville Antique Folio Print of Men of Mauga, Savai'i Island, Somoa

1842 d' Urville Antique Folio Print of Men of Mauga, Savai'i Island, Somoa

Description: 
This large fine original antique folio print of 2 x men of Mauga, Savai'i Island, Somoa was published in the 1841 edition of Dumont d'Urville Voyage au Pole Sud during his second circumnavigation of the globe in 1837-40.

Voyage au Pole Sud et dan l'Océanie sur les corvettes - In 1836, the French King Louis-Philippe, enthusiastic for Southern Hemisphere exploration, supported J. Dumont d'Urville's plan for a circumnavigation focusing on the South Seas. D'Urville (1790–1842) had already distinguished himself on two Pacific expeditions and was eager to rival the achievements of James Cook. Between 1837 and 1840, the ships Astrolabe and Zélée explored the waters of the Antarctic area and Oceania in extremely harsh conditions: almost forty crew members died or deserted. However, d'Urville discovered a new portion of the Antarctic coast, shed light on the ethnography of several Pacific islands and brought back multitudes of botanical specimens. His impressive contributions to the fields of geography, natural history and ethnography were gathered in this ten-volume work, published between 1841 and 1846. In Volume 10, published in 1846, which includes extracts from his correspondence, as well as a biography, d'Urville shares his immense relief as he returns to France. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 22in x 14in (560mm x 355mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Two repairs to margins, browning to margins
Plate area: - None
Verso: - Browning to margins

$125.00 USD
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1842 d'Urville Original Antique Folio Print of Peha Chief of Uplou Islands, Samoa

1842 d'Urville Original Antique Folio Print of Peha Chief of Uplou Islands, Samoa

Description: 
This large finely engraved original antique folio print of Peha the Chief of the Opoloo - Upolu - island's of Samoa was published in the 1842 edition of Dumont d'Urville Voyage au pole sud et dans l'Oceanie

Voyage au pole sud et dans l'Oceanie... reported on the geography, geology, anthropology and natural history of Oceania and the South Pacific, which d'Urville had explored. He enlisted scientific collaborators to write and illustrate each section. The zoology section contained about 110 plates, including 29 of mammals.

Jules Sebastien Cesar Dumont d'Urville was a French navigator who surveyed and explored the Falklands, Oceania and the South Pacific on two voyages between 1822 and 1829. During his second circumnavigation of the world between 1837 and 1840, on the Astrolabe and the Zélée, he penetrated the ice pack south of New Zealand and discovered the Adélie Coast region of Antarctica, which he named for his wife. Earlier in his career, D'Urville encountered the newly-discovered Venus de Milo while surveying the Mediterranean, and brought it to the attention of the Louvre, where it remains a featured part of the collection.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy
Paper color: - Brown
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 21in x 15in (535mm x 380mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Age toning
Plate area: - Age toning
Verso: - Age toning

$125.00 USD
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1862 Morel & Lemercier Large Antique French Lithograph Decoration Print

1862 Morel & Lemercier Large Antique French Lithograph Decoration Print

  • Title : Paris A Morel & Co. Editeurs...Imp. Lemercier r de Seine 57 Paris
  • Date : 1862
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  70548
  • Size: 16 1/2in x 13 1/2in (460mm x 345mm)

Description: 

This fine large original antique chromolithograph print of interior French decoration from the mid 19th century was published in the 1862 edition of Manuel de Peintures by A Morel & Co. Editeurs , Paris with the Chromolithograph by the famous French firm of Lemercier, Paris

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original 
Colors used: - Red, Green 
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 16 1/2in x 13 1/2in (460mm x 345mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
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1862 Morel & Lemercier Large Antique French Lithograph Decoration Print

1862 Morel & Lemercier Large Antique French Lithograph Decoration Print

  • Title : Paris A Morel & Co. Editeurs...Imp. Petit et Bisiaux Lemercier r de Seine 57 Paris
  • Date : 1862
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  70549
  • Size: 16 1/2in x 13 1/2in (460mm x 345mm)

Description: 

This fine large original antique chromolithograph print of interior French decoration from the mid 19th century was published in the 1862 edition of Manuel de Peintures by A Morel & Co. Editeurs , Paris with the Chromolithograph by the famous French firm of Lemercier, Paris

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original 
Colors used: - Red, Green 
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 16 1/2in x 13 1/2in (460mm x 345mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light spotting in bottom margin
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
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1862 Morel & Lemercier Large Antique French Lithograph Decoration Print

1862 Morel & Lemercier Large Antique French Lithograph Decoration Print

  • Title : Paris A Morel & Co. Editeurs...Imp. Lemercier r de Seine 57 Paris
  • Date : 1862
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  70540
  • Size: 16 1/2in x 13 1/2in (460mm x 345mm)

Description: 

This fine large original antique chromolithograph print of interior French decoration from the mid 19th century was published in the 1862 edition of Manuel de Peintures by A Morel & Co. Editeurs , Paris with the Chromolithograph by the famous French firm of Lemercier, Paris

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original 
Colors used: - Red, Green 
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 16 1/2in x 13 1/2in (460mm x 345mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
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1870 Murillo Durand Antique Print Self Portrait of Bartolomé Esteban Murillo

1870 Murillo Durand Antique Print Self Portrait of Bartolomé Esteban Murillo

  • Title : Bart Murillo seipsum depin gens. pro filorum votis acprecibus explendis
  • Date : 1870
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  22446
  • Size: 14in x 9 1/2in (350mm x 240mm)

Description: 
This fine original antique wood-cut print of the Spanish artist Bartolomé Esteban Murillo was produced from a reworked 17th century wood-block by Amand Durand in 1870. As a way of clarification this print was printed in 1870 by Durand by means of a wood-block  from the original 17th century wood-block. Please see below for further detail.

The Latin inscription on the cartouche at the centre of the ledge explains that the self-portrait was made at the request of Murillo's children: 'Bart (olo) mé Murillo portraying himself to fulfil the wishes and prayers of his children - or sons'. Despite the unlined appearance of the face the painting is probably relatively late in date, of the early 1670s, when Murillo's children would have been of an age to take pride in their father's achievements. The composition is based on a formula that had been developed for portrait engravings used on the frontispiece of books. The sitter is shown in an oval frame and on the ledge below are the instruments of his profession, a palette and brushes on the right and a drawing and pencil on the left.

Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (born late December 1617, died April 3, 1682) was a Spanish Baroque painter. Although he is best known for his religious works, Murillo also produced a considerable number of paintings of contemporary women and children. These lively, realist portraits of flower girls, street urchins, and beggars constitute an extensive and appealing record of the everyday life of his times.

Amand Durand, born in Paris France, 1831, became a master engraver early in his career. He deeply admired the 15th, 16th, and 17th century Old Masters’ engravings and saw how they lost quality and faded from the ravages of time. This realization, combined with in-depth research throughout public and private collections of these masters, inspired Durands dedication to recreate their images and preserve the original quality for future generations. In 1895 Theo Van Gogh, brother and manager of the infamous Vincent Van Gogh stumbled across the works of this artist in one of his travels. He was so impressed that he sought the artist out and spent an evening with him in his home. Afterward he quickly took to pen and paper to write Vincent to express his enthusiasm for his artistic talents and intellect. The Van Gogh brothers were just two of the many that recognized Amand Durand's talents. However, it would take years to unravel a story book mystery that makes his works and talents even more famed today. Amand Durand was a great admirer of Rembrandt. He desired to study the plates and techniques of this genius. Unfortunately at the time there only remained about 100 known plates, which were available to produce fine quality impressions. For 100 years the bulk of Rembrandt's plates were shrouded in mystery. As time moved on some of Rembrandt’s plates began to surface. By this time Rembrandt’s plates were miserably worn and dull. Amand Durand, who by now had made the ranks of a noted engraver, decided to remedy this with his own gifted talents. He researched and intensely studied pieces that were available only in collections. From here on he spent the major part of his life exactly duplicating Rembrandt’s images onto copper plates. These recreations were called Amand Durand’s after Rembrandt. Their unbelievable clarity and exactness were achieved because Amand Durand used as his guide, not the worn and dull plates, but the first and second state etchings of the master’s original works. By this time Durand’s talent were known to experts of the 19th and 20th centuries. In 1855, Conservator of the Cabinet de Estampes, George Duplessis so appreciated the genius of this man that he had his work published in books which belong to the Bibliotheque Nationale in France. Amand-Durand was used as master etcher in an anthology of European engravings, which became so valuable that they were kept under locked scrutiny in most libraries. What we have is a noted master duplicating a master some 200 years later. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: -  General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 14in x 9 1/2in (350mm x 240mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

 Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1886 Picturesque Atlas Large Antique Print a View of Perth & Swan River, WA

1886 Picturesque Atlas Large Antique Print a View of Perth & Swan River, WA

Description: 
This large steel-plate engraved original antique print - an early view of Perth and the Swan River, Western Australia from Kings Park - was published in The Picturesque Atlas of Australasia.1886-88.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - Off white
Age of map color: -  
Colors used: -  
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 17in x 13in (435mm x 335mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light foxing and soiling
Plate area: - Light foxing
Verso: - Light foxing

$125.00 USD
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1809 Wilkinson Large Antique Print of London, Somerset to Whitehall, Westminster

1809 Wilkinson Large Antique Print of London, Somerset to Whitehall, Westminster

  • Title : Somerset House in its Original State With the Various Buildings on the Banks of the River Thames as far as Westminster...October 1809...Rob Wilkinson
  • Date : 1809
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  92599
  • Size: 18in x 12 1/2in (460mm x 320mm)

Description: 

This large finely engraved beautifully hand coloured original antique print of Somerset House - and the Thames as far as Westminster - as it was before the alterations by Indigo Jones was published by Robert Wilkinson 11th of October 1809, the date is engraved at the foot of the print.

Text below the title goes into some detail of the view quote ..."Buildings in the distance are Whitehall and Westminster Abbey opposite to which are Lambeth Church and Palace". (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

Condition Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Blue, green, brown, yellow
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 18in x 12 1/2in (460mm x 320mm)
Plate size: - 17in x 12in (435mm x 305mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Plate-mark re-enforced with archival tape left margin
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1802 Lechevalier Antique Print of Bronze Figure & Vases from Achilles Tomb Troad

1802 Lechevalier Antique Print of Bronze Figure & Vases from Achilles Tomb Troad

  • Title : Figure de bronze et vases cineraires, trouves dans le tombeau d Achille
  • Date : 1802
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  70228
  • Size: 14in x 10in (355mm x 255mm)

Description: 
This fine original antique print of a Bronze Figure and a pair of Vases found in the Tomb of Achilles - to be found in the town of Achilleion an ancient Greek city in the south-west of the Troad region of Anatolia Turkey - was published in the Atlas of Charts & Views that accompanied the 1802 edition of Jean-Baptiste Lechevalier's (1752 - 1836) Voyage de la Troade, fait dans les années 1785 et 1786.

Jean-Baptiste Lechevalier was the secretary of the Ambassador of France in Constantinople. In the year 1788 he visited the plain of Troy, and was enthusiastically in favour of the theory that the site of Homer's Troy was to be found at the village of Bunarbashi. His title, "Voyage de la Troade" was first published in 1799.

The Troad, also known as Troas, is the historical name of the Biga peninsula (Biga Yarımadası, Τρωάς) in the northwestern part of Anatolia, Turkey. This region now is part of the Çanakkale province of Turkey. Bounded by the Dardanelles to the northwest, by the Aegean Sea to the west and separated from the rest of Anatolia by the massif that forms Mount Ida, the Troad is drained by two main rivers, the Scamander (Karamenderes) and the Simois, which join at the area containing the ruins of Troy. Grenikos, Kebren, Simoeis, Rhesos, Rhodios, Heptaporos and Aisepos were seven rivers of the Troad and the names of the river gods that inhabited each river.(Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 14in x 10in (355mm x 255mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - Light age toning
Verso: Light age toning

$75.00 USD
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1802 Lechevalier Antique Print of Ancient Greek & Troy Coins - Apollo, Ganymede.

1802 Lechevalier Antique Print of Ancient Greek & Troy Coins - Apollo, Ganymede.

Description: 
This fine original antique print of two plates (34 & 35) each with three coins was published in the Atlas of Charts & Views that accompanied the 1802 edition of Jean-Baptiste Lechevalier's (1752 - 1836) Voyage de la Troade, fait dans les années 1785 et 1786. 

The coins on plate 34 to the left are; Julia Domna (170-217) Roman Empress; the second is a cockrel & a warrior on a horse; the third is Ganymede a Trojan prince of Greek Mythology.  On plate 35 the coins are; a sitting woman; Medusa; head of Apollo with a laurel.

Jean-Baptiste Lechevalier was the secretary of the Ambassador of France in Constantinople. In the year 1788 he visited the plain of Troy, and was enthusiastically in favour of the theory that the site of Homer's Troy was to be found at the village of Bunarbashi. His title, "Voyage de la Troade" was first published in 1799.

The Troad, also known as Troas, is the historical name of the Biga peninsula (Biga Yarımadası, Τρωάς) in the northwestern part of Anatolia, Turkey. This region now is part of the Çanakkale province of Turkey. Bounded by the Dardanelles to the northwest, by the Aegean Sea to the west and separated from the rest of Anatolia by the massif that forms Mount Ida, the Troad is drained by two main rivers, the Scamander (Karamenderes) and the Simois, which join at the area containing the ruins of Troy. Grenikos, Kebren, Simoeis, Rhesos, Rhodios, Heptaporos and Aisepos were seven rivers of the Troad and the names of the river gods that inhabited each river.(Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 14in x 10in (355mm x 255mm)
Plate size: - 10in x 9in (255mm x 230mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - Light age toning
Verso: Light age toning

$75.00 USD
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1802 Lechevalier Antique Print Ancient Greek & Trojan Coins - Jupiter, Ulysses

1802 Lechevalier Antique Print Ancient Greek & Trojan Coins - Jupiter, Ulysses

Description: 
This fine original antique print of two plates (24 & 25) each with three coins was published in the Atlas of Charts & Views that accompanied the 1802 edition of Jean-Baptiste Lechevalier's (1752 - 1836) Voyage de la Troade, fait dans les années 1785 et 1786. 

The coins on plate 24 to the left are; Jupiter; a sitting figure & trident; Ulysses.  On plate 25 the coins are; Apollo; Diane; Womans Head.

Jean-Baptiste Lechevalier was the secretary of the Ambassador of France in Constantinople. In the year 1788 he visited the plain of Troy, and was enthusiastically in favour of the theory that the site of Homer's Troy was to be found at the village of Bunarbashi. His title, "Voyage de la Troade" was first published in 1799.

The Troad, also known as Troas, is the historical name of the Biga peninsula (Biga Yarımadası, Τρωάς) in the northwestern part of Anatolia, Turkey. This region now is part of the Çanakkale province of Turkey. Bounded by the Dardanelles to the northwest, by the Aegean Sea to the west and separated from the rest of Anatolia by the massif that forms Mount Ida, the Troad is drained by two main rivers, the Scamander (Karamenderes) and the Simois, which join at the area containing the ruins of Troy. Grenikos, Kebren, Simoeis, Rhesos, Rhodios, Heptaporos and Aisepos were seven rivers of the Troad and the names of the river gods that inhabited each river.(Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 14in x 10in (355mm x 255mm)
Plate size: - 10in x 9in (255mm x 230mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - Light age toning
Verso: Light age toning

$75.00 USD
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1802 Lechevalier Antique Print Ancient Greek & Trojan Coins - Minerva, Pallas...

1802 Lechevalier Antique Print Ancient Greek & Trojan Coins - Minerva, Pallas...

Description: 
This fine original antique print of two plates (26 & 27) each with three coins was published in the Atlas of Charts & Views that accompanied the 1802 edition of Jean-Baptiste Lechevalier's (1752 - 1836) Voyage de la Troade, fait dans les années 1785 et 1786. 

The coins on plate 26 to the left are; Minerva; Minerva (again); Pittacus of Lesbos.  On plate 27 the coins are; Dual headed coin; Pallas; Pallas (again).

Jean-Baptiste Lechevalier was the secretary of the Ambassador of France in Constantinople. In the year 1788 he visited the plain of Troy, and was enthusiastically in favour of the theory that the site of Homer's Troy was to be found at the village of Bunarbashi. His title, "Voyage de la Troade" was first published in 1799.

The Troad, also known as Troas, is the historical name of the Biga peninsula (Biga Yarımadası, Τρωάς) in the northwestern part of Anatolia, Turkey. This region now is part of the Çanakkale province of Turkey. Bounded by the Dardanelles to the northwest, by the Aegean Sea to the west and separated from the rest of Anatolia by the massif that forms Mount Ida, the Troad is drained by two main rivers, the Scamander (Karamenderes) and the Simois, which join at the area containing the ruins of Troy. Grenikos, Kebren, Simoeis, Rhesos, Rhodios, Heptaporos and Aisepos were seven rivers of the Troad and the names of the river gods that inhabited each river.(Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 14in x 10in (355mm x 255mm)
Plate size: - 10in x 9in (255mm x 230mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - Light age toning
Verso: Light age toning

$75.00 USD
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1802 Lechevalier Antique Print Ancient Greek & Trojan Coins Mark Antony Commudus

1802 Lechevalier Antique Print Ancient Greek & Trojan Coins Mark Antony Commudus

Description: This fine original antique print of two plates (28 & 29) each with three coins was published in the Atlas of Charts & Views that accompanied the 1802 edition of Jean-Baptiste Lechevalier's (1752 - 1836) Voyage de la Troade, fait dans les années 1785 et 1786. 

The coins on plate 28 to the left are; Roman Emperor Geta; Head of Gallien; Roman Emperor Commudus. On plate 29 the coins are; Mark Antony; Womans Head; Apollo.

Jean-Baptiste Lechevalier was the secretary of the Ambassador of France in Constantinople. In the year 1788 he visited the plain of Troy, and was enthusiastically in favour of the theory that the site of Homer's Troy was to be found at the village of Bunarbashi. His title, "Voyage de la Troade" was first published in 1799.

The Troad, also known as Troas, is the historical name of the Biga peninsula (Biga Yarımadası, Τρωάς) in the northwestern part of Anatolia, Turkey. This region now is part of the Çanakkale province of Turkey. Bounded by the Dardanelles to the northwest, by the Aegean Sea to the west and separated from the rest of Anatolia by the massif that forms Mount Ida, the Troad is drained by two main rivers, the Scamander (Karamenderes) and the Simois, which join at the area containing the ruins of Troy. Grenikos, Kebren, Simoeis, Rhesos, Rhodios, Heptaporos and Aisepos were seven rivers of the Troad and the names of the river gods that inhabited each river.(Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 14in x 10in (355mm x 255mm)
Plate size: - 10in x 9in (255mm x 230mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - Light age toning
Verso: Light age toning

$75.00 USD
More Info
1802 Lechevalier Antique Print Ancient Greek & Trojan Coins Mark Antony, Hadrian

1802 Lechevalier Antique Print Ancient Greek & Trojan Coins Mark Antony, Hadrian

Description: 
This fine original antique print of two plates (30 & 31) each with three coins was published in the Atlas of Charts & Views that accompanied the 1802 edition of Jean-Baptiste Lechevalier's (1752 - 1836) Voyage de la Troade, fait dans les années 1785 et 1786. 

The coins on plate 30 to the left are; Hadrian; Emperor Maximinus; Head of Maxime
On plate 31 the coins are; Mark Antony; Woman of Troad; Mark Antony (again)

Jean-Baptiste Lechevalier was the secretary of the Ambassador of France in Constantinople. In the year 1788 he visited the plain of Troy, and was enthusiastically in favour of the theory that the site of Homer's Troy was to be found at the village of Bunarbashi. His title, "Voyage de la Troade" was first published in 1799.

The Troad, also known as Troas, is the historical name of the Biga peninsula (Biga Yarımadası, Τρωάς) in the northwestern part of Anatolia, Turkey. This region now is part of the Çanakkale province of Turkey. Bounded by the Dardanelles to the northwest, by the Aegean Sea to the west and separated from the rest of Anatolia by the massif that forms Mount Ida, the Troad is drained by two main rivers, the Scamander (Karamenderes) and the Simois, which join at the area containing the ruins of Troy. Grenikos, Kebren, Simoeis, Rhesos, Rhodios, Heptaporos and Aisepos were seven rivers of the Troad and the names of the river gods that inhabited each river.(Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 14in x 10in (355mm x 255mm)
Plate size: - 10in x 9in (255mm x 230mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - Light age toning
Verso: Light age toning

$75.00 USD
More Info
1802 Lechevalier Antique Print Ancient Greek & Trojan Coins - Marcus Aralias

1802 Lechevalier Antique Print Ancient Greek & Trojan Coins - Marcus Aralias

Description: This fine original antique print of two plates (32 & 33) each with three coins was published in the Atlas of Charts & Views that accompanied the 1802 edition of Jean-Baptiste Lechevalier's (1752 - 1836) Voyage de la Troade, fait dans les années 1785 et 1786. 

The coins on plate 32 to the left are; Alexander The Great; Winged Horse; Marcus Aralias
On plate 33 the coins are; Minerva; Minerva 9again); Minerva (again)

Jean-Baptiste Lechevalier was the secretary of the Ambassador of France in Constantinople. In the year 1788 he visited the plain of Troy, and was enthusiastically in favour of the theory that the site of Homer's Troy was to be found at the village of Bunarbashi. His title, "Voyage de la Troade" was first published in 1799.

The Troad, also known as Troas, is the historical name of the Biga peninsula (Biga Yarımadası, Τρωάς) in the northwestern part of Anatolia, Turkey. This region now is part of the Çanakkale province of Turkey. Bounded by the Dardanelles to the northwest, by the Aegean Sea to the west and separated from the rest of Anatolia by the massif that forms Mount Ida, the Troad is drained by two main rivers, the Scamander (Karamenderes) and the Simois, which join at the area containing the ruins of Troy. Grenikos, Kebren, Simoeis, Rhesos, Rhodios, Heptaporos and Aisepos were seven rivers of the Troad and the names of the river gods that inhabited each river.(Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 14in x 10in (355mm x 255mm)
Plate size: - 10in x 9in (255mm x 230mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - Light age toning
ht age toning

$75.00 USD
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1802 Lechevalier Large Antique Print of The Sarcophagus of Homer, Greek Hero

1802 Lechevalier Large Antique Print of The Sarcophagus of Homer, Greek Hero

Description: This fine large original antique print of the Sarcophagus of the Greece Hero Homer - the tomb was reputed to be on the Greek Island of Ios - was published in the Atlas of Charts & Views that accompanied the 1802 edition of Jean-Baptiste Lechevalier's (1752 - 1836) Voyage de la Troade, fait dans les années 1785 et 1786.

Jean-Baptiste Lechevalier was the secretary of the Ambassador of France in Constantinople. In the year 1788 he visited the plain of Troy, and was enthusiastically in favour of the theory that the site of Homer's Troy was to be found at the village of Bunarbashi. His title, "Voyage de la Troade" was first published in 1799.

The Troad, also known as Troas, is the historical name of the Biga peninsula (Biga Yarımadası, Τρωάς) in the northwestern part of Anatolia, Turkey. This region now is part of the Çanakkale province of Turkey. Bounded by the Dardanelles to the northwest, by the Aegean Sea to the west and separated from the rest of Anatolia by the massif that forms Mount Ida, the Troad is drained by two main rivers, the Scamander (Karamenderes) and the Simois, which join at the area containing the ruins of Troy. Grenikos, Kebren, Simoeis, Rhesos, Rhodios, Heptaporos and Aisepos were seven rivers of the Troad and the names of the river gods that inhabited each river.(Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 19 1/4in x 14in (495mm x 355mm)
Plate size: - 15in x 9 1/2in (380mm x 240mm)
Margins: - Min 2in (50mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - Light age toning, offsetting
ht age toning

$125.00 USD
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1802 Lechevalier Large Antique Print of Poseidon's Temple on Cape Sounion Greece

1802 Lechevalier Large Antique Print of Poseidon's Temple on Cape Sounion Greece

Description: 
This fine large original antique print a view of the Temple of Poseidon on the cliff overlooking Cape Sounion, Attica Greece, south of Athens, was published in the Atlas of Charts & Views that accompanied the 1802 edition of Jean-Baptiste Lechevalier's (1752 - 1836) Voyage de la Troade, fait dans les années 1785 et 1786. Although this print dedicate the Temple to Minerva it was actually dedicated to the god Athena which is of course today dedicated to the Sea God Poseidon.

Cape Sounion is a promontory located 69 kilometres (43 mi) SSE of Athens, at the southernmost tip of the Attica peninsula in Greece. Cape Sounion is noted as the site of ruins of an ancient Greek temple of Poseidon, the god of the sea in classical mythology. The remains are perched on the headland, surrounded on three sides by the sea. The ruins bear the deeply engraved name of English Romantic poet Lord Byron (1788–1824). The original, Archaic Period temple of Poseidon on the site, which was built of tufa, was probably destroyed in 480 BC by Persian troops during shahanshah Xerxes I's invasion of Greece (the second Greco-Persian War). Although there is no direct evidence for Sounion, Xerxes certainly had the temple of Athena, and everything else, on the Acropolis of Athens razed as punishment for the Athenians' defiance. After they defeated Xerxes in the naval Battle of Salamis, the Athenians placed an entire enemy trireme (warship with three banks of oars) at Sounion as a trophy dedicated to Poseidon

Jean-Baptiste Lechevalier was the secretary of the Ambassador of France in Constantinople. In the year 1788 he visited the plain of Troy, and was enthusiastically in favour of the theory that the site of Homer's Troy was to be found at the village of Bunarbashi. His title, "Voyage de la Troade" was first published in 1799.

The Troad, also known as Troas, is the historical name of the Biga peninsula (Biga Yarımadası, Τρωάς) in the northwestern part of Anatolia, Turkey. This region now is part of the Çanakkale province of Turkey. Bounded by the Dardanelles to the northwest, by the Aegean Sea to the west and separated from the rest of Anatolia by the massif that forms Mount Ida, the Troad is drained by two main rivers, the Scamander (Karamenderes) and the Simois, which join at the area containing the ruins of Troy. Grenikos, Kebren, Simoeis, Rhesos, Rhodios, Heptaporos and Aisepos were seven rivers of the Troad and the names of the river gods that inhabited each river.(Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 19 1/4in x 14in (495mm x 355mm)
Plate size: - 15in x 9 1/2in (380mm x 240mm)
Margins: - Min 2in (50mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - Light age toning
Verso: - Light age toning

$125.00 USD
More Info