Prints (251)

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1780 Cook Benard Large Antique Print View of Prince William Sound Gulf of Alaska

1780 Cook Benard Large Antique Print View of Prince William Sound Gulf of Alaska

Description:
This fine large original antique print of  Prince William Sound Gulf of Alaska - as seen by Captain Cook and his men during their visit to the Islands - was engraved by the Frenchman Robert Benard and was published in the first French edition of Hawkesworth's Voyages in 1780.

This print is from the 1st edition of the French publication of Cooks voyages and are beautifully engraved on heavy stable paper and should not be confused with the later re-engravings of the next 30 years which were of a more inferior quality.

Cook's First Voyage (1768-1771)
The first voyage under Captain James Cook's command was primarily of a scientific nature. The expedition on the Endeavour initially sailed to Tahiti to observe the transit of the planet Venus in order to calculate the earth's distance from the sun. Cook landed on the South Pacific island in April of 1769 and in June of that year the astronomical observations were successfully completed. In addition to these labors, very good relations with the Tahitians were maintained and the naturalists Joseph Banks and Daniel C. Solander conducted extensive ethnological and botanical research.

Another purpose of the voyage was to explore the South Seas to determine if an inhabitable continent existed in the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Upon leaving Tahiti, Cook named and charted the Society Islands and then continued southwest to New Zealand. His circumnavigation and exploration of that country also resulted in a detailed survey. Cook proceeded to Australia, where he charted the eastern coast for 2,000 miles, naming the area New South Wales. As a result of these surveys, both Australia and New Zealand were annexed by Great Britain. In addition to these explorations, the Endeavour returned to England without a single death from scurvy among its men, an historic feat at the time. The combination of these accomplishments brought Cook prominence, promotion, and the opportunity to lead further expeditions.

Cook's Second Voyage (1772-1775)
Based on the success of his first voyage, Cook was appointed by the Admiralty to lead a second expedition. Two ships were employed with Cook commanding the Resolution and Captain Tobias Furneaux in charge of theAdventure. The purpose was to circumnavigate the globe as far south as possible to confirm the location of a southern continent. Cook proved that there was no "Terra Australis," which supposedly was located between New Zealand and South America. Cook was convinced, however, that there was land beyond the southern ice fields. In his pursuit of this idea, this expedition was the first European voyage to cross the Antarctic Circle. In addition, in two great sweeps through the Southern latitudes, Cook made an incredible number of landfalls including New Zealand, Easter Island, the Marquesas, Tahiti and the Society Islands, the Tonga Islands, the New Hebrides, New Caledonia, and a number of smaller islands.

In addition to these navigational accomplishments and the accompanying expansion of geographical knowledge, the expedition also recorded a vast amount of information regarding the Pacific islands and peoples, proved the value of the chronometer as an instrument for calculating longitude, and improved techniques for preventing scurvy.

Cook's Third Voyage (1776-1779)
In the course of his first two voyages, Cook circumnavigated the globe twice, sailed extensively into the Antarctic, and charted coastlines from Newfoundland to New Zealand. Following these achievements, Cook's third voyage was organized to seek an efficient route from England to southern and eastern Asia that would not entail rounding the Cape of Good Hope. The search for such a Northwest (or Northeast) Passage had been on the agenda of northern European mariners and merchants since the beginning of European expansion in the late fifteenth century. England's growing economic and colonial interests in India in the later eighteenth century provided the stimulus for the latest exploration for this route.

Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 14 1/4in x 9 3/4in (365mm x 245mm)
Plate size: - 14 1/4in x 9 3/4in (365mm x 245mm)
Margins: - 1/8in (2mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - L&R margins cropped to border
Plate area: - None
Verso: - Light soiling

$149.00 USD
More Info
1780 Cook Benard Large Antique Print of Weapons & Braid New Caledonia Islands

1780 Cook Benard Large Antique Print of Weapons & Braid New Caledonia Islands

Description:
This fine large original antique print of  weapons & ceremonial hats and braids of war of the New Caledonia Islands - as seen by Captain Cook and his men during their visit to the Islands - was engraved by the Frenchman Robert Benard and was published in the first French edition of Hawkesworth's Voyages in 1780.

This print is from the 1st edition of the French publication of Cooks voyages and are beautifully engraved on heavy stable paper and should not be confused with the later re-engravings of the next 30 years which were of a more inferior quality.

Cook's First Voyage (1768-1771)
The first voyage under Captain James Cook's command was primarily of a scientific nature. The expedition on the Endeavour initially sailed to Tahiti to observe the transit of the planet Venus in order to calculate the earth's distance from the sun. Cook landed on the South Pacific island in April of 1769 and in June of that year the astronomical observations were successfully completed. In addition to these labors, very good relations with the Tahitians were maintained and the naturalists Joseph Banks and Daniel C. Solander conducted extensive ethnological and botanical research.

Another purpose of the voyage was to explore the South Seas to determine if an inhabitable continent existed in the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Upon leaving Tahiti, Cook named and charted the Society Islands and then continued southwest to New Zealand. His circumnavigation and exploration of that country also resulted in a detailed survey. Cook proceeded to Australia, where he charted the eastern coast for 2,000 miles, naming the area New South Wales. As a result of these surveys, both Australia and New Zealand were annexed by Great Britain. In addition to these explorations, the Endeavour returned to England without a single death from scurvy among its men, an historic feat at the time. The combination of these accomplishments brought Cook prominence, promotion, and the opportunity to lead further expeditions.

Cook's Second Voyage (1772-1775)
Based on the success of his first voyage, Cook was appointed by the Admiralty to lead a second expedition. Two ships were employed with Cook commanding the Resolution and Captain Tobias Furneaux in charge of theAdventure. The purpose was to circumnavigate the globe as far south as possible to confirm the location of a southern continent. Cook proved that there was no "Terra Australis," which supposedly was located between New Zealand and South America. Cook was convinced, however, that there was land beyond the southern ice fields. In his pursuit of this idea, this expedition was the first European voyage to cross the Antarctic Circle. In addition, in two great sweeps through the Southern latitudes, Cook made an incredible number of landfalls including New Zealand, Easter Island, the Marquesas, Tahiti and the Society Islands, the Tonga Islands, the New Hebrides, New Caledonia, and a number of smaller islands.

In addition to these navigational accomplishments and the accompanying expansion of geographical knowledge, the expedition also recorded a vast amount of information regarding the Pacific islands and peoples, proved the value of the chronometer as an instrument for calculating longitude, and improved techniques for preventing scurvy.

Cook's Third Voyage (1776-1779)
In the course of his first two voyages, Cook circumnavigated the globe twice, sailed extensively into the Antarctic, and charted coastlines from Newfoundland to New Zealand. Following these achievements, Cook's third voyage was organized to seek an efficient route from England to southern and eastern Asia that would not entail rounding the Cape of Good Hope. The search for such a Northwest (or Northeast) Passage had been on the agenda of northern European mariners and merchants since the beginning of European expansion in the late fifteenth century. England's growing economic and colonial interests in India in the later eighteenth century provided the stimulus for the latest exploration for this route.

Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 15 1/2in x 11in (395mm x 280mm)
Plate size: - 15in x 9 1/2in (380mm x 245mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - light soiling in margins
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
More Info
1780 Cook Benard Large Antique Print Dancing & Fashion Raiatea, French Polynesia

1780 Cook Benard Large Antique Print Dancing & Fashion Raiatea, French Polynesia

  • TitleVue d L Interieur d une Maison dans i Isle d Ulietea. Representation d une danse a la mode du pays
  • Ref #:  16087
  • Size: 15 1/2in x 11in (395mm x 280mm)
  • Date : 1780
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This fine large original antique print of a the interior of a house with people of the island dancing and showing the dress fashion on the Island of Raiatea in French Polynesia - as seen by Captain Cook and his men during their visit to the Islands - was engraved by the Frenchman Robert Benard and was published in the first French edition of Hawkesworth's Voyages in 1780.

This print is from the 1st edition of the French publication of Cooks voyages and are beautifully engraved on heavy stable paper and should not be confused with the later re-engravings of the next 30 years which were of a more inferior quality.

Cook's First Voyage (1768-1771)
The first voyage under Captain James Cook's command was primarily of a scientific nature. The expedition on the Endeavour initially sailed to Tahiti to observe the transit of the planet Venus in order to calculate the earth's distance from the sun. Cook landed on the South Pacific island in April of 1769 and in June of that year the astronomical observations were successfully completed. In addition to these labors, very good relations with the Tahitians were maintained and the naturalists Joseph Banks and Daniel C. Solander conducted extensive ethnological and botanical research.

Another purpose of the voyage was to explore the South Seas to determine if an inhabitable continent existed in the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Upon leaving Tahiti, Cook named and charted the Society Islands and then continued southwest to New Zealand. His circumnavigation and exploration of that country also resulted in a detailed survey. Cook proceeded to Australia, where he charted the eastern coast for 2,000 miles, naming the area New South Wales. As a result of these surveys, both Australia and New Zealand were annexed by Great Britain. In addition to these explorations, the Endeavour returned to England without a single death from scurvy among its men, an historic feat at the time. The combination of these accomplishments brought Cook prominence, promotion, and the opportunity to lead further expeditions.

Cook's Second Voyage (1772-1775)
Based on the success of his first voyage, Cook was appointed by the Admiralty to lead a second expedition. Two ships were employed with Cook commanding the Resolution and Captain Tobias Furneaux in charge of theAdventure. The purpose was to circumnavigate the globe as far south as possible to confirm the location of a southern continent. Cook proved that there was no "Terra Australis," which supposedly was located between New Zealand and South America. Cook was convinced, however, that there was land beyond the southern ice fields. In his pursuit of this idea, this expedition was the first European voyage to cross the Antarctic Circle. In addition, in two great sweeps through the Southern latitudes, Cook made an incredible number of landfalls including New Zealand, Easter Island, the Marquesas, Tahiti and the Society Islands, the Tonga Islands, the New Hebrides, New Caledonia, and a number of smaller islands.

In addition to these navigational accomplishments and the accompanying expansion of geographical knowledge, the expedition also recorded a vast amount of information regarding the Pacific islands and peoples, proved the value of the chronometer as an instrument for calculating longitude, and improved techniques for preventing scurvy.

Cook's Third Voyage (1776-1779)
In the course of his first two voyages, Cook circumnavigated the globe twice, sailed extensively into the Antarctic, and charted coastlines from Newfoundland to New Zealand. Following these achievements, Cook's third voyage was organized to seek an efficient route from England to southern and eastern Asia that would not entail rounding the Cape of Good Hope. The search for such a Northwest (or Northeast) Passage had been on the agenda of northern European mariners and merchants since the beginning of European expansion in the late fifteenth century. England's growing economic and colonial interests in India in the later eighteenth century provided the stimulus for the latest exploration for this route.

Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 15 1/2in x 11in (395mm x 280mm)
Plate size: - 15in x 9 1/2in (380mm x 245mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - light soiling in margins
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
More Info
1780 Cook Benard Large Antique Print View of Raiatea Island in French Polynesia

1780 Cook Benard Large Antique Print View of Raiatea Island in French Polynesia

  • TitleVue De Isle d Ulietea avec une double Pirogue et un hanger ou les Insulaires retirent leurs Batiments de mer
  • Ref #:  21616
  • Size: 15 1/2in x 11in (395mm x 280mm)
  • Date : 1780
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This fine large original antique print of a double canoe and a boathouse on the Island of Raiatea in French Polynesia - as seen by Captain Cook and his men during their visit to the Islands - was engraved by the Frenchman Robert Benard and was published in the first French edition of Hawkesworth's Voyages in 1780.

This print is from the 1st edition of the French publication of Cooks voyages and are beautifully engraved on heavy stable paper and should not be confused with the later re-engravings of the next 30 years which were of a more inferior quality.

Cook's First Voyage (1768-1771)
The first voyage under Captain James Cook's command was primarily of a scientific nature. The expedition on the Endeavour initially sailed to Tahiti to observe the transit of the planet Venus in order to calculate the earth's distance from the sun. Cook landed on the South Pacific island in April of 1769 and in June of that year the astronomical observations were successfully completed. In addition to these labors, very good relations with the Tahitians were maintained and the naturalists Joseph Banks and Daniel C. Solander conducted extensive ethnological and botanical research.

Another purpose of the voyage was to explore the South Seas to determine if an inhabitable continent existed in the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Upon leaving Tahiti, Cook named and charted the Society Islands and then continued southwest to New Zealand. His circumnavigation and exploration of that country also resulted in a detailed survey. Cook proceeded to Australia, where he charted the eastern coast for 2,000 miles, naming the area New South Wales. As a result of these surveys, both Australia and New Zealand were annexed by Great Britain. In addition to these explorations, the Endeavour returned to England without a single death from scurvy among its men, an historic feat at the time. The combination of these accomplishments brought Cook prominence, promotion, and the opportunity to lead further expeditions.

Cook's Second Voyage (1772-1775)
Based on the success of his first voyage, Cook was appointed by the Admiralty to lead a second expedition. Two ships were employed with Cook commanding the Resolution and Captain Tobias Furneaux in charge of theAdventure. The purpose was to circumnavigate the globe as far south as possible to confirm the location of a southern continent. Cook proved that there was no "Terra Australis," which supposedly was located between New Zealand and South America. Cook was convinced, however, that there was land beyond the southern ice fields. In his pursuit of this idea, this expedition was the first European voyage to cross the Antarctic Circle. In addition, in two great sweeps through the Southern latitudes, Cook made an incredible number of landfalls including New Zealand, Easter Island, the Marquesas, Tahiti and the Society Islands, the Tonga Islands, the New Hebrides, New Caledonia, and a number of smaller islands.

In addition to these navigational accomplishments and the accompanying expansion of geographical knowledge, the expedition also recorded a vast amount of information regarding the Pacific islands and peoples, proved the value of the chronometer as an instrument for calculating longitude, and improved techniques for preventing scurvy.

Cook's Third Voyage (1776-1779)
In the course of his first two voyages, Cook circumnavigated the globe twice, sailed extensively into the Antarctic, and charted coastlines from Newfoundland to New Zealand. Following these achievements, Cook's third voyage was organized to seek an efficient route from England to southern and eastern Asia that would not entail rounding the Cape of Good Hope. The search for such a Northwest (or Northeast) Passage had been on the agenda of northern European mariners and merchants since the beginning of European expansion in the late fifteenth century. England's growing economic and colonial interests in India in the later eighteenth century provided the stimulus for the latest exploration for this route.

Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 15 1/2in x 11in (395mm x 280mm)
Plate size: - 15in x 9 1/2in (380mm x 245mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - light soiling in margins
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
More Info
1780 Cook Benard Large Antique Print View of Resolution Bay, Marquesas Islands

1780 Cook Benard Large Antique Print View of Resolution Bay, Marquesas Islands

  • TitleVue De La Baye De La Resolution Dans L Isle Des Marquises
  • Ref #:  21464
  • Size: 15 1/2in x 11in (395mm x 280mm)
  • Date : 1780
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This fine large original antique print a view of Resolution Bay on the Marquesas Islands - named after Capt. Cooks ship Resolution during his second voyage to the south seas - was engraved by the Frenchman Robert Benard and was published in the first French edition of Hawkesworth's Voyages in 1780.

This print is from the 1st edition of the French publication of Cooks voyages and are beautifully engraved on heavy stable paper and should not be confused with the later re-engravings of the next 30 years which were of a more inferior quality.

Cook's First Voyage (1768-1771)
The first voyage under Captain James Cook's command was primarily of a scientific nature. The expedition on the Endeavour initially sailed to Tahiti to observe the transit of the planet Venus in order to calculate the earth's distance from the sun. Cook landed on the South Pacific island in April of 1769 and in June of that year the astronomical observations were successfully completed. In addition to these labors, very good relations with the Tahitians were maintained and the naturalists Joseph Banks and Daniel C. Solander conducted extensive ethnological and botanical research.

Another purpose of the voyage was to explore the South Seas to determine if an inhabitable continent existed in the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Upon leaving Tahiti, Cook named and charted the Society Islands and then continued southwest to New Zealand. His circumnavigation and exploration of that country also resulted in a detailed survey. Cook proceeded to Australia, where he charted the eastern coast for 2,000 miles, naming the area New South Wales. As a result of these surveys, both Australia and New Zealand were annexed by Great Britain. In addition to these explorations, the Endeavour returned to England without a single death from scurvy among its men, an historic feat at the time. The combination of these accomplishments brought Cook prominence, promotion, and the opportunity to lead further expeditions.

Cook's Second Voyage (1772-1775)
Based on the success of his first voyage, Cook was appointed by the Admiralty to lead a second expedition. Two ships were employed with Cook commanding the Resolution and Captain Tobias Furneaux in charge of theAdventure. The purpose was to circumnavigate the globe as far south as possible to confirm the location of a southern continent. Cook proved that there was no "Terra Australis," which supposedly was located between New Zealand and South America. Cook was convinced, however, that there was land beyond the southern ice fields. In his pursuit of this idea, this expedition was the first European voyage to cross the Antarctic Circle. In addition, in two great sweeps through the Southern latitudes, Cook made an incredible number of landfalls including New Zealand, Easter Island, the Marquesas, Tahiti and the Society Islands, the Tonga Islands, the New Hebrides, New Caledonia, and a number of smaller islands.

In addition to these navigational accomplishments and the accompanying expansion of geographical knowledge, the expedition also recorded a vast amount of information regarding the Pacific islands and peoples, proved the value of the chronometer as an instrument for calculating longitude, and improved techniques for preventing scurvy.

Cook's Third Voyage (1776-1779)
In the course of his first two voyages, Cook circumnavigated the globe twice, sailed extensively into the Antarctic, and charted coastlines from Newfoundland to New Zealand. Following these achievements, Cook's third voyage was organized to seek an efficient route from England to southern and eastern Asia that would not entail rounding the Cape of Good Hope. The search for such a Northwest (or Northeast) Passage had been on the agenda of northern European mariners and merchants since the beginning of European expansion in the late fifteenth century. England's growing economic and colonial interests in India in the later eighteenth century provided the stimulus for the latest exploration for this route.

Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 15 1/2in x 11in (395mm x 280mm)
Plate size: - 15in x 9 1/2in (380mm x 245mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - light soiling in margins
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
More Info
1780 Cook Benard Large Antique Print of Many Various Ships & Boats in Tahiti

1780 Cook Benard Large Antique Print of Many Various Ships & Boats in Tahiti

Description:
This fine large original antique print of many different types of sailing vessels in Tahiti - witnessed by Cook and his men during their time on the island - was engraved by the Frenchman Robert Benard after John Webber and was published in the first French edition of Hawkesworth's Voyages in 1780.

This print is from the 1st edition of the French publication of Cooks voyages and are beautifully engraved on heavy stable paper and should not be confused with the later re-engravings of the next 30 years which were of a more inferior quality.

Cook's First Voyage (1768-1771)
The first voyage under Captain James Cook's command was primarily of a scientific nature. The expedition on the Endeavour initially sailed to Tahiti to observe the transit of the planet Venus in order to calculate the earth's distance from the sun. Cook landed on the South Pacific island in April of 1769 and in June of that year the astronomical observations were successfully completed. In addition to these labors, very good relations with the Tahitians were maintained and the naturalists Joseph Banks and Daniel C. Solander conducted extensive ethnological and botanical research.

Another purpose of the voyage was to explore the South Seas to determine if an inhabitable continent existed in the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Upon leaving Tahiti, Cook named and charted the Society Islands and then continued southwest to New Zealand. His circumnavigation and exploration of that country also resulted in a detailed survey. Cook proceeded to Australia, where he charted the eastern coast for 2,000 miles, naming the area New South Wales. As a result of these surveys, both Australia and New Zealand were annexed by Great Britain. In addition to these explorations, the Endeavour returned to England without a single death from scurvy among its men, an historic feat at the time. The combination of these accomplishments brought Cook prominence, promotion, and the opportunity to lead further expeditions.

Cook's Second Voyage (1772-1775)
Based on the success of his first voyage, Cook was appointed by the Admiralty to lead a second expedition. Two ships were employed with Cook commanding the Resolution and Captain Tobias Furneaux in charge of theAdventure. The purpose was to circumnavigate the globe as far south as possible to confirm the location of a southern continent. Cook proved that there was no "Terra Australis," which supposedly was located between New Zealand and South America. Cook was convinced, however, that there was land beyond the southern ice fields. In his pursuit of this idea, this expedition was the first European voyage to cross the Antarctic Circle. In addition, in two great sweeps through the Southern latitudes, Cook made an incredible number of landfalls including New Zealand, Easter Island, the Marquesas, Tahiti and the Society Islands, the Tonga Islands, the New Hebrides, New Caledonia, and a number of smaller islands.

In addition to these navigational accomplishments and the accompanying expansion of geographical knowledge, the expedition also recorded a vast amount of information regarding the Pacific islands and peoples, proved the value of the chronometer as an instrument for calculating longitude, and improved techniques for preventing scurvy.

Cook's Third Voyage (1776-1779)
In the course of his first two voyages, Cook circumnavigated the globe twice, sailed extensively into the Antarctic, and charted coastlines from Newfoundland to New Zealand. Following these achievements, Cook's third voyage was organized to seek an efficient route from England to southern and eastern Asia that would not entail rounding the Cape of Good Hope. The search for such a Northwest (or Northeast) Passage had been on the agenda of northern European mariners and merchants since the beginning of European expansion in the late fifteenth century. England's growing economic and colonial interests in India in the later eighteenth century provided the stimulus for the latest exploration for this route.

Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: -  
Colors used: -  
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 21in x 10in (535mm x 265mm)
Plate size: - 19in x 9 1/2in (490mm x 245mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling in margins
Plate area: - Folds as issued
Verso: - Light soiling

$125.00 USD
More Info
1780 Cook Benard Large Antique Print of Various Sailing Vessels of Tahiti

1780 Cook Benard Large Antique Print of Various Sailing Vessels of Tahiti

  • TitleVue de Isle d Otahiti et de plusieurs Pirogues
  • Ref #:  16085
  • Size: 16in x 10 1/2in (410mm x 270mm)
  • Date : 1780
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This fine large original antique print of different types of sailing vessels in Tahiti - witnessed by Cook and his men during their time on the island - was engraved by the Frenchman Robert Benard after John Webber and was published in the first French edition of Hawkesworth's Voyages in 1780.

This print is from the 1st edition of the French publication of Cooks voyages and are beautifully engraved on heavy stable paper and should not be confused with the later re-engravings of the next 30 years which were of a more inferior quality.

Cook's First Voyage (1768-1771)
The first voyage under Captain James Cook's command was primarily of a scientific nature. The expedition on the Endeavour initially sailed to Tahiti to observe the transit of the planet Venus in order to calculate the earth's distance from the sun. Cook landed on the South Pacific island in April of 1769 and in June of that year the astronomical observations were successfully completed. In addition to these labors, very good relations with the Tahitians were maintained and the naturalists Joseph Banks and Daniel C. Solander conducted extensive ethnological and botanical research.

Another purpose of the voyage was to explore the South Seas to determine if an inhabitable continent existed in the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Upon leaving Tahiti, Cook named and charted the Society Islands and then continued southwest to New Zealand. His circumnavigation and exploration of that country also resulted in a detailed survey. Cook proceeded to Australia, where he charted the eastern coast for 2,000 miles, naming the area New South Wales. As a result of these surveys, both Australia and New Zealand were annexed by Great Britain. In addition to these explorations, the Endeavour returned to England without a single death from scurvy among its men, an historic feat at the time. The combination of these accomplishments brought Cook prominence, promotion, and the opportunity to lead further expeditions.

Cook's Second Voyage (1772-1775)
Based on the success of his first voyage, Cook was appointed by the Admiralty to lead a second expedition. Two ships were employed with Cook commanding the Resolution and Captain Tobias Furneaux in charge of theAdventure. The purpose was to circumnavigate the globe as far south as possible to confirm the location of a southern continent. Cook proved that there was no "Terra Australis," which supposedly was located between New Zealand and South America. Cook was convinced, however, that there was land beyond the southern ice fields. In his pursuit of this idea, this expedition was the first European voyage to cross the Antarctic Circle. In addition, in two great sweeps through the Southern latitudes, Cook made an incredible number of landfalls including New Zealand, Easter Island, the Marquesas, Tahiti and the Society Islands, the Tonga Islands, the New Hebrides, New Caledonia, and a number of smaller islands.

In addition to these navigational accomplishments and the accompanying expansion of geographical knowledge, the expedition also recorded a vast amount of information regarding the Pacific islands and peoples, proved the value of the chronometer as an instrument for calculating longitude, and improved techniques for preventing scurvy.

Cook's Third Voyage (1776-1779)
In the course of his first two voyages, Cook circumnavigated the globe twice, sailed extensively into the Antarctic, and charted coastlines from Newfoundland to New Zealand. Following these achievements, Cook's third voyage was organized to seek an efficient route from England to southern and eastern Asia that would not entail rounding the Cape of Good Hope. The search for such a Northwest (or Northeast) Passage had been on the agenda of northern European mariners and merchants since the beginning of European expansion in the late fifteenth century. England's growing economic and colonial interests in India in the later eighteenth century provided the stimulus for the latest exploration for this route.

Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 16in x 10 1/2in (410mm x 270mm)
Plate size: - 14 1/2in x 9 1/2in (470mm x 245mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling in margins
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
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1780 Cook Benard Large Antique Print of Burial Ceremony of The Dead in Tahiti

1780 Cook Benard Large Antique Print of Burial Ceremony of The Dead in Tahiti

  • TitleUn Toupapow, avec un Cadavre Dessus avec le principal personnage du deuil en habit de ceremonie
  • Ref #:  21652
  • Size: 16in x 10 1/2in (410mm x 270mm)
  • Date : 1780
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This fine large original antique print of a burial ceremony of the dead in Tahiti - witnessed by Cook and his men during thier time on the island - was engraved by the Frenchman Robert Benard after John Webber and was published in the first French edition of Hawkesworth's Voyages in 1780.

This print is from the 1st edition of the French publication of Cooks voyages and are beautifully engraved on heavy stable paper and should not be confused with the later re-engravings of the next 30 years which were of a more inferior quality.

Cook's First Voyage (1768-1771)
The first voyage under Captain James Cook's command was primarily of a scientific nature. The expedition on the Endeavour initially sailed to Tahiti to observe the transit of the planet Venus in order to calculate the earth's distance from the sun. Cook landed on the South Pacific island in April of 1769 and in June of that year the astronomical observations were successfully completed. In addition to these labors, very good relations with the Tahitians were maintained and the naturalists Joseph Banks and Daniel C. Solander conducted extensive ethnological and botanical research.

Another purpose of the voyage was to explore the South Seas to determine if an inhabitable continent existed in the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Upon leaving Tahiti, Cook named and charted the Society Islands and then continued southwest to New Zealand. His circumnavigation and exploration of that country also resulted in a detailed survey. Cook proceeded to Australia, where he charted the eastern coast for 2,000 miles, naming the area New South Wales. As a result of these surveys, both Australia and New Zealand were annexed by Great Britain. In addition to these explorations, the Endeavour returned to England without a single death from scurvy among its men, an historic feat at the time. The combination of these accomplishments brought Cook prominence, promotion, and the opportunity to lead further expeditions.

Cook's Second Voyage (1772-1775)
Based on the success of his first voyage, Cook was appointed by the Admiralty to lead a second expedition. Two ships were employed with Cook commanding the Resolution and Captain Tobias Furneaux in charge of theAdventure. The purpose was to circumnavigate the globe as far south as possible to confirm the location of a southern continent. Cook proved that there was no "Terra Australis," which supposedly was located between New Zealand and South America. Cook was convinced, however, that there was land beyond the southern ice fields. In his pursuit of this idea, this expedition was the first European voyage to cross the Antarctic Circle. In addition, in two great sweeps through the Southern latitudes, Cook made an incredible number of landfalls including New Zealand, Easter Island, the Marquesas, Tahiti and the Society Islands, the Tonga Islands, the New Hebrides, New Caledonia, and a number of smaller islands.

In addition to these navigational accomplishments and the accompanying expansion of geographical knowledge, the expedition also recorded a vast amount of information regarding the Pacific islands and peoples, proved the value of the chronometer as an instrument for calculating longitude, and improved techniques for preventing scurvy.

Cook's Third Voyage (1776-1779)
In the course of his first two voyages, Cook circumnavigated the globe twice, sailed extensively into the Antarctic, and charted coastlines from Newfoundland to New Zealand. Following these achievements, Cook's third voyage was organized to seek an efficient route from England to southern and eastern Asia that would not entail rounding the Cape of Good Hope. The search for such a Northwest (or Northeast) Passage had been on the agenda of northern European mariners and merchants since the beginning of European expansion in the late fifteenth century. England's growing economic and colonial interests in India in the later eighteenth century provided the stimulus for the latest exploration for this route.

Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 16in x 10 1/2in (410mm x 270mm)
Plate size: - 14 1/2in x 9 1/2in (470mm x 245mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling in margins
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
More Info
1780 Cook Benard Large Antique Print of Dancing Women & Men of Tahiti

1780 Cook Benard Large Antique Print of Dancing Women & Men of Tahiti

Description: 
This fine large original antique print of dancing Women & men of Tahiti was engraved by the Frenchman Robert Benard after John Webber and was published in the first French edition of Hawkesworth's Voyages in 1780.

This print is from the 1st edition of the French publication of Cooks voyages and are beautifully engraved on heavy stable paper and should not be confused with the later re-engravings of the next 30 years which were of a more inferior quality.

Cook's First Voyage (1768-1771)
The first voyage under Captain James Cook's command was primarily of a scientific nature. The expedition on the Endeavour initially sailed to Tahiti to observe the transit of the planet Venus in order to calculate the earth's distance from the sun. Cook landed on the South Pacific island in April of 1769 and in June of that year the astronomical observations were successfully completed. In addition to these labors, very good relations with the Tahitians were maintained and the naturalists Joseph Banks and Daniel C. Solander conducted extensive ethnological and botanical research.

Another purpose of the voyage was to explore the South Seas to determine if an inhabitable continent existed in the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Upon leaving Tahiti, Cook named and charted the Society Islands and then continued southwest to New Zealand. His circumnavigation and exploration of that country also resulted in a detailed survey. Cook proceeded to Australia, where he charted the eastern coast for 2,000 miles, naming the area New South Wales. As a result of these surveys, both Australia and New Zealand were annexed by Great Britain. In addition to these explorations, the Endeavour returned to England without a single death from scurvy among its men, an historic feat at the time. The combination of these accomplishments brought Cook prominence, promotion, and the opportunity to lead further expeditions.

Cook's Second Voyage (1772-1775)
Based on the success of his first voyage, Cook was appointed by the Admiralty to lead a second expedition. Two ships were employed with Cook commanding the Resolution and Captain Tobias Furneaux in charge of theAdventure. The purpose was to circumnavigate the globe as far south as possible to confirm the location of a southern continent. Cook proved that there was no "Terra Australis," which supposedly was located between New Zealand and South America. Cook was convinced, however, that there was land beyond the southern ice fields. In his pursuit of this idea, this expedition was the first European voyage to cross the Antarctic Circle. In addition, in two great sweeps through the Southern latitudes, Cook made an incredible number of landfalls including New Zealand, Easter Island, the Marquesas, Tahiti and the Society Islands, the Tonga Islands, the New Hebrides, New Caledonia, and a number of smaller islands.

In addition to these navigational accomplishments and the accompanying expansion of geographical knowledge, the expedition also recorded a vast amount of information regarding the Pacific islands and peoples, proved the value of the chronometer as an instrument for calculating longitude, and improved techniques for preventing scurvy.

Cook's Third Voyage (1776-1779)
In the course of his first two voyages, Cook circumnavigated the globe twice, sailed extensively into the Antarctic, and charted coastlines from Newfoundland to New Zealand. Following these achievements, Cook's third voyage was organized to seek an efficient route from England to southern and eastern Asia that would not entail rounding the Cape of Good Hope. The search for such a Northwest (or Northeast) Passage had been on the agenda of northern European mariners and merchants since the beginning of European expansion in the late fifteenth century. England's growing economic and colonial interests in India in the later eighteenth century provided the stimulus for the latest exploration for this route.

Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 16in x 10 1/2in (410mm x 270mm)
Plate size: - 14 1/2in x 9 1/2in (470mm x 245mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
More Info
1780 Cook Benard Large Antique Print of Dead Tahitian Chief Laying in State

1780 Cook Benard Large Antique Print of Dead Tahitian Chief Laying in State

  • TitleLe Corps De Thee, Chef De O-Taiti, Tel Qu'on Le Conservoit Apres Sa Mort
  • Ref #:  31834
  • Size: 15in x 9 3/4in (510mm x 270mm)
  • Date : 1780
  • Condition: (A) Very Good Condition

Description:
This fine large original antique print of the dead Tahitian Chief laid in State was engraved by the Frenchman Robert Benard after John Webber and was published in the first French edition of Hawkesworth's Voyages in 1780.

Cook's First Voyage (1768-1771)
The first voyage under Captain James Cook's command was primarily of a scientific nature. The expedition on theEndeavour initially sailed to Tahiti to observe the transit of the planet Venus in order to calculate the earth's distance from the sun. Cook landed on the South Pacific island in April of 1769 and in June of that year the astronomical observations were successfully completed. In addition to these labors, very good relations with the Tahitians were maintained and the naturalists Joseph Banks and Daniel C. Solander conducted extensive ethnological and botanical research.

Another purpose of the voyage was to explore the South Seas to determine if an inhabitable continent existed in the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Upon leaving Tahiti, Cook named and charted the Society Islands and then continued southwest to New Zealand. His circumnavigation and exploration of that country also resulted in a detailed survey. Cook proceeded to Australia, where he charted the eastern coast for 2,000 miles, naming the area New South Wales. As a result of these surveys, both Australia and New Zealand were annexed by Great Britain. In addition to these explorations, the Endeavour returned to England without a single death from scurvy among its men, an historic feat at the time. The combination of these accomplishments brought Cook prominence, promotion, and the opportunity to lead further expeditions.

Cook's Second Voyage (1772-1775)
Based on the success of his first voyage, Cook was appointed by the Admiralty to lead a second expedition. Two ships were employed with Cook commanding the Resolution and Captain Tobias Furneaux in charge of theAdventure. The purpose was to circumnavigate the globe as far south as possible to confirm the location of a southern continent. Cook proved that there was no "Terra Australis," which supposedly was located between New Zealand and South America. Cook was convinced, however, that there was land beyond the southern ice fields. In his pursuit of this idea, this expedition was the first European voyage to cross the Antarctic Circle. In addition, in two great sweeps through the Southern latitudes, Cook made an incredible number of landfalls including New Zealand, Easter Island, the Marquesas, Tahiti and the Society Islands, the Tonga Islands, the New Hebrides, New Caledonia, and a number of smaller islands.

In addition to these navigational accomplishments and the accompanying expansion of geographical knowledge, the expedition also recorded a vast amount of information regarding the Pacific islands and peoples, proved the value of the chronometer as an instrument for calculating longitude, and improved techniques for preventing scurvy.

Cook's Third Voyage (1776-1779)
In the course of his first two voyages, Cook circumnavigated the globe twice, sailed extensively into the Antarctic, and charted coastlines from Newfoundland to New Zealand. Following these achievements, Cook's third voyage was organized to seek an efficient route from England to southern and eastern Asia that would not entail rounding the Cape of Good Hope. The search for such a Northwest (or Northeast) Passage had been on the agenda of northern European mariners and merchants since the beginning of European expansion in the late fifteenth century. England's growing economic and colonial interests in India in the later eighteenth century provided the stimulus for the latest exploration for this route.

Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 15in x 9 3/4in (510mm x 270mm)
Plate size: - 14 1/2in x 9 1/2in (470mm x 245mm)
Margins: - 1/8in (3mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Margin cropped to plate-mark
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$99.00 USD
More Info
1780 Cook Benard Large Antique Print of the Dead in Elevated Platforms in Tahiti

1780 Cook Benard Large Antique Print of the Dead in Elevated Platforms in Tahiti

Description:
This fine large original antique print of the way the Tahitians left and honoured their dead in elevated platforms was engraved by the Frenchman Robert Benard after John Webber and was published in the first French edition of Hawkesworth's Voyages in 1780.

This print is from the 1st edition of the French publication of Cooks voyages and are beautifully engraved on heavy stable paper and should not be confused with the later re-engravings of the next 30 years which were of a more inferior quality.

Cook's First Voyage (1768-1771)
The first voyage under Captain James Cook's command was primarily of a scientific nature. The expedition on theEndeavour initially sailed to Tahiti to observe the transit of the planet Venus in order to calculate the earth's distance from the sun. Cook landed on the South Pacific island in April of 1769 and in June of that year the astronomical observations were successfully completed. In addition to these labors, very good relations with the Tahitians were maintained and the naturalists Joseph Banks and Daniel C. Solander conducted extensive ethnological and botanical research.

Another purpose of the voyage was to explore the South Seas to determine if an inhabitable continent existed in the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Upon leaving Tahiti, Cook named and charted the Society Islands and then continued southwest to New Zealand. His circumnavigation and exploration of that country also resulted in a detailed survey. Cook proceeded to Australia, where he charted the eastern coast for 2,000 miles, naming the area New South Wales. As a result of these surveys, both Australia and New Zealand were annexed by Great Britain. In addition to these explorations, the Endeavour returned to England without a single death from scurvy among its men, an historic feat at the time. The combination of these accomplishments brought Cook prominence, promotion, and the opportunity to lead further expeditions.

Cook's Second Voyage (1772-1775)
Based on the success of his first voyage, Cook was appointed by the Admiralty to lead a second expedition. Two ships were employed with Cook commanding the Resolution and Captain Tobias Furneaux in charge of theAdventure. The purpose was to circumnavigate the globe as far south as possible to confirm the location of a southern continent. Cook proved that there was no "Terra Australis," which supposedly was located between New Zealand and South America. Cook was convinced, however, that there was land beyond the southern ice fields. In his pursuit of this idea, this expedition was the first European voyage to cross the Antarctic Circle. In addition, in two great sweeps through the Southern latitudes, Cook made an incredible number of landfalls including New Zealand, Easter Island, the Marquesas, Tahiti and the Society Islands, the Tonga Islands, the New Hebrides, New Caledonia, and a number of smaller islands.

In addition to these navigational accomplishments and the accompanying expansion of geographical knowledge, the expedition also recorded a vast amount of information regarding the Pacific islands and peoples, proved the value of the chronometer as an instrument for calculating longitude, and improved techniques for preventing scurvy.

Cook's Third Voyage (1776-1779)
In the course of his first two voyages, Cook circumnavigated the globe twice, sailed extensively into the Antarctic, and charted coastlines from Newfoundland to New Zealand. Following these achievements, Cook's third voyage was organized to seek an efficient route from England to southern and eastern Asia that would not entail rounding the Cape of Good Hope. The search for such a Northwest (or Northeast) Passage had been on the agenda of northern European mariners and merchants since the beginning of European expansion in the late fifteenth century. England's growing economic and colonial interests in India in the later eighteenth century provided the stimulus for the latest exploration for this route.

Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 15 1/2in x 10in (510mm x 270mm)
Plate size: - 14 1/2in x 9 1/2in (470mm x 245mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
More Info
1780 Cook Benard Large Antique Print of the Dead in Elevated Platforms in Tahiti

1780 Cook Benard Large Antique Print of the Dead in Elevated Platforms in Tahiti

Description:
This fine large original antique print of the way the Tahitians left and honoured their dead in elevated platforms was engraved by the Frenchman Robert Benard after John Webber and was published in the first French edition of Hawkesworth's Voyages in 1780.

This print is from the 1st edition of the French publication of Cooks voyages and are beautifully engraved on heavy stable paper and should not be confused with the later re-engravings of the next 30 years which were of a more inferior quality.

Cook's First Voyage (1768-1771)
The first voyage under Captain James Cook's command was primarily of a scientific nature. The expedition on theEndeavour initially sailed to Tahiti to observe the transit of the planet Venus in order to calculate the earth's distance from the sun. Cook landed on the South Pacific island in April of 1769 and in June of that year the astronomical observations were successfully completed. In addition to these labors, very good relations with the Tahitians were maintained and the naturalists Joseph Banks and Daniel C. Solander conducted extensive ethnological and botanical research.

Another purpose of the voyage was to explore the South Seas to determine if an inhabitable continent existed in the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Upon leaving Tahiti, Cook named and charted the Society Islands and then continued southwest to New Zealand. His circumnavigation and exploration of that country also resulted in a detailed survey. Cook proceeded to Australia, where he charted the eastern coast for 2,000 miles, naming the area New South Wales. As a result of these surveys, both Australia and New Zealand were annexed by Great Britain. In addition to these explorations, the Endeavour returned to England without a single death from scurvy among its men, an historic feat at the time. The combination of these accomplishments brought Cook prominence, promotion, and the opportunity to lead further expeditions.

Cook's Second Voyage (1772-1775)
Based on the success of his first voyage, Cook was appointed by the Admiralty to lead a second expedition. Two ships were employed with Cook commanding the Resolution and Captain Tobias Furneaux in charge of theAdventure. The purpose was to circumnavigate the globe as far south as possible to confirm the location of a southern continent. Cook proved that there was no "Terra Australis," which supposedly was located between New Zealand and South America. Cook was convinced, however, that there was land beyond the southern ice fields. In his pursuit of this idea, this expedition was the first European voyage to cross the Antarctic Circle. In addition, in two great sweeps through the Southern latitudes, Cook made an incredible number of landfalls including New Zealand, Easter Island, the Marquesas, Tahiti and the Society Islands, the Tonga Islands, the New Hebrides, New Caledonia, and a number of smaller islands.

In addition to these navigational accomplishments and the accompanying expansion of geographical knowledge, the expedition also recorded a vast amount of information regarding the Pacific islands and peoples, proved the value of the chronometer as an instrument for calculating longitude, and improved techniques for preventing scurvy.

Cook's Third Voyage (1776-1779)
In the course of his first two voyages, Cook circumnavigated the globe twice, sailed extensively into the Antarctic, and charted coastlines from Newfoundland to New Zealand. Following these achievements, Cook's third voyage was organized to seek an efficient route from England to southern and eastern Asia that would not entail rounding the Cape of Good Hope. The search for such a Northwest (or Northeast) Passage had been on the agenda of northern European mariners and merchants since the beginning of European expansion in the late fifteenth century. England's growing economic and colonial interests in India in the later eighteenth century provided the stimulus for the latest exploration for this route.

Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 15 1/2in x 10in (510mm x 270mm)
Plate size: - 14 1/2in x 9 1/2in (470mm x 245mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
More Info
1780 Cook Benard Large Antique Print of Capt. Wallis Meeting Queen Purea, Tahiti

1780 Cook Benard Large Antique Print of Capt. Wallis Meeting Queen Purea, Tahiti

  • TitleCesoion de Osle d Otahiti au Capitaine Wallis par la Reine Oberea
  • Ref #:  21671
  • Size: 14 1/2in x 10in (370mm x 255mm)
  • Date : 1780
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This beautifully engraved original antique print of Captain Samuel Wallis meeting the Queen of Tahiti, Queen Purea or Oberea in 1767 was engraved by Robert Benard in the first French edition of Hawkesworth's Voyages published in 1780.

Purea also called Oborea was a queen from the Landward Teva tribe and a self-proclaimed ruler of all Tahiti. Queen Purea is known from the first famous European expeditions to Tahiti. She ruled as chieftainess of her tribe area in 1767-1768, when she was encountered by the expedition of Samuel Wallis.

Samuel Wallis (1728 –1795) was a Cornish navigator who circumnavigated the world.
Wallis was born near Camelford, Cornwall. In 1766 he was given the command of HMS Dolphin to circumnavigate the world, accompanied by the Swallow under the command of Philip Carteret. The two ships were parted shortly after sailing through the Strait of Magellan, Wallis continuing to Tahiti, which he named "King George the Third's Island" in honour of the King (June 1767).
Wallis himself was ill and remained in his cabin: lieutenant Tobias Furneaux was the first to set foot, hoisting a pennant and turning a turf, taking possession in the name of His Majesty. He continued to Batavia, where many of the crew died from dysentery, then via the Cape of Good Hope to England, arriving in May 1768. He was able to pass on useful information to James Cook who was due to depart shortly for the Pacific, and some of the crew from the Dolphin sailed with Cook.
In 1780 Wallis was appointed Commissioner of the Admiralty.
The Polynesian island of Wallis is named after Samuel Wallis. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 14 1/2in x 10in (370mm x 255mm)
Plate size: - 13 1/2in x 9in (340mm x 230mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: -  None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
More Info
1780 Cook Benard Large Antique Print of Capt. Wallis Meeting Queen Purea, Tahiti

1780 Cook Benard Large Antique Print of Capt. Wallis Meeting Queen Purea, Tahiti

  • TitleCesoion de Osle d Otahiti au Capitaine Wallis par la Reine Oberea
  • Ref #:  16089
  • Size: 14 1/2in x 10in (370mm x 255mm)
  • Date : 1780
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This beautifully engraved original antique print of Captain Samuel Wallis meeting the Queen of Tahiti, Queen Purea or Oberea in 1767 was engraved by Robert Benard in the first French edition of Hawkesworth's Voyages published in 1780.

This print is from the 1st edition of the French publication of Cooks voyages and are beautifully engraved on heavy stable paper and should not be confused with the later re-engravings of the next 30 years which were of a more inferior quality.

Purea also called Oborea was a queen from the Landward Teva tribe and a self-proclaimed ruler of all Tahiti. Queen Purea is known from the first famous European expeditions to Tahiti. She ruled as chieftainess of her tribe area in 1767-1768, when she was encountered by the expedition of Samuel Wallis.

Samuel Wallis (1728 –1795) was a Cornish navigator who circumnavigated the world.
Wallis was born near Camelford, Cornwall. In 1766 he was given the command of HMS Dolphin to circumnavigate the world, accompanied by the Swallow under the command of Philip Carteret. The two ships were parted shortly after sailing through the Strait of Magellan, Wallis continuing to Tahiti, which he named "King George the Third's Island" in honour of the King (June 1767).
Wallis himself was ill and remained in his cabin: lieutenant Tobias Furneaux was the first to set foot, hoisting a pennant and turning a turf, taking possession in the name of His Majesty. He continued to Batavia, where many of the crew died from dysentery, then via the Cape of Good Hope to England, arriving in May 1768. He was able to pass on useful information to James Cook who was due to depart shortly for the Pacific, and some of the crew from the Dolphin sailed with Cook.
In 1780 Wallis was appointed Commissioner of the Admiralty.
The Polynesian island of Wallis is named after Samuel Wallis. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 14 1/2in x 10in (370mm x 255mm)
Plate size: - 13 1/2in x 9in (340mm x 230mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: -  None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
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1780 Cook Benard Large Antique Print of Capt. Wallis under attack in Tahiti

1780 Cook Benard Large Antique Print of Capt. Wallis under attack in Tahiti

  • TitleLe Capitaine Wallis est attaque dans L Dauphin par les Otahitiens
  • Ref #:  25928
  • Size: 14 1/2in x 10in (370mm x 255mm)
  • Date : 1780
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This beautifully engraved original antique print of Captain Samuel Wallis and his ship the Dolphin under attack by locals in Tahiti in 1767 was engraved by Robert Benard in the first French edition of Hawkesworth's Voyages published in 1780.

Samuel Wallis (1728 –1795) was a Cornish navigator who circumnavigated the world.
Wallis was born near Camelford, Cornwall. In 1766 he was given the command of HMS Dolphin to circumnavigate the world, accompanied by the Swallow under the command of Philip Carteret. The two ships were parted shortly after sailing through the Strait of Magellan, Wallis continuing to Tahiti, which he named "King George the Third's Island" in honour of the King (June 1767).
Wallis himself was ill and remained in his cabin: lieutenant Tobias Furneaux was the first to set foot, hoisting a pennant and turning a turf, taking possession in the name of His Majesty. He continued to Batavia, where many of the crew died from dysentery, then via the Cape of Good Hope to England, arriving in May 1768. He was able to pass on useful information to James Cook who was due to depart shortly for the Pacific, and some of the crew from the Dolphin sailed with Cook.
In 1780 Wallis was appointed Commissioner of the Admiralty.
The Polynesian island of Wallis is named after Samuel Wallis. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 14 1/2in x 10in (370mm x 255mm)
Plate size: - 13 1/2in x 9in (340mm x 230mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: -  Folds as issued
Verso: - None

$149.00 USD
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1802 Lechevalier Antique Print View of The Tomb of Hector, Karamenders Turkey

1802 Lechevalier Antique Print View of The Tomb of Hector, Karamenders Turkey

Description: 
This fine large original antique print of The Burial Tomb of Hector of Troy in the vale of Karamenders (anc. Scamander) river, western Turkey.was published in the Atlas of Charts & Views that accompanied the 1802 edition of Jean-Baptiste Lechevalier's (1752 - 1836) Voyage de la Troade, fait dans les années 1785 et 1786.

Jean-Baptiste Lechevalier was the secretary of the Ambassador of France in Constantinople. In the year 1788 he visited the plain of Troy, and was enthusiastically in favour of the theory that the site of Homer's Troy was to be found at the village of Bunarbashi. His title, Voyage de la Troade was first published in 1799.

In Greek mythology, Hector was a Trojan prince and the greatest fighter for Troy in the Trojan War. As the first-born son of King Priam and Queen Hecuba, who was a descendant ofDardanus and Tros, the founder of Troy, he was a prince of the royal house and the heir apparent to his father's throne. He was married to Andromache, with whom he had an infant son, Scamandrius (whom the people of Troy called Astyanax). He acted as leader of the Trojans and their allies in the defense of Troy, "killing 31,000 Greek fighters", offers Hyginus. During the European Middle Ages, Hector figures as one of the Nine Worthies noted by Jacques de Longuyon, known not only for his courage but also for his noble and courtly nature. Indeed, Homer places Hector as peace-loving, thoughtful as well as bold, a good son, husband and father, and without darker motives. James Redfield writes of Hector as a "martyr to loyalties, a witness to the things of this world, a hero ready to die for the precious imperfections of ordinary life.

Troy was a city, both factual and legendary, located in northwest Anatolia in what is now Turkey, southeast of the Dardanelles and beside Mount Ida. It is best known for being the setting of the Trojan War described in the Greek Epic Cycle and especially in the Iliad, one of the two epic poems attributed to Homer. Metrical evidence from the Iliad and the Odyssey seems to show that the name λιον (Ilion) formerly began with a digamma: ίλιον (Wilion). This was later supported by the Hittite form Wilusa.
A new city called Ilium was founded on the site in the reign of the Roman Emperor Augustus. It flourished until the establishment of Constantinople and declined gradually during the Byzantine era.
In 1865, English archaeologist Frank Calvert excavated trial trenches in a field he had bought from a local farmer at Hisarlık, and in 1868, Heinrich Schliemann, wealthy German businessman and archaeologist, also began excavating in the area after a chance meeting with Calvert in Çanakkale. These excavations revealed several cities built in succession. Schliemann was at first skeptical about the identification of Hissarlik with Troy, but was persuaded by Calvert and took over Calvert's excavations on the eastern half of the Hissarlik site, which was on Calvert's property. Troy VII has been identified with the Hittite Wilusa, the probable origin of the Greek Ἴλιον, and is generally (but not conclusively) identified with Homeric Troy.
Today, the hill at Hisarlik has given its name to a small village near the ruins, supporting the tourist trade visiting the Troia archaeological site. It lies within the province of Çanakkale, some 30 km south-west of the provincial capital, also called Çanakkale.

The Troad, also known as Troas, is the historical name of the Biga peninsula (Biga Yarımadası, Τρωάς) in the northwestern part of Anatolia, Turkey. This region now is part of the Çanakkale province of Turkey. Bounded by the Dardanelles to the northwest, by the Aegean Sea to the west and separated from the rest of Anatolia by the massif that forms Mount Ida, the Troad is drained by two main rivers, the Scamander (Karamenderes) and the Simois, which join at the area containing the ruins of Troy. Grenikos, Kebren, Simoeis, Rhesos, Rhodios, Heptaporos and Aisepos were seven rivers of the Troad and the names of the river gods that inhabited each river.(Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 19 1/2in x 13 1/2in (495mm x 345mm)
Plate size: - 17 1/2in x 10 3/4in (445mm x 275mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling
Plate area: - Light browning along cenerfold
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
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1846 D Urville Large Antique Print of Hut & Church Matureivavao French Polynesia

1846 D Urville Large Antique Print of Hut & Church Matureivavao French Polynesia

  • Title Interieur D Un Temple; Habitation D Un Chef (Isle Vavao)
  • Ref  :  31750
  • Size:  21in x 15 1/2in (535mm x 395mm)
  • Date : 1841
  • Condition: (A) Very Good Condition

Description:
This large finely engraved original lithograph by L Le Breton & de Thierry was published in the 1841 edition of Dumont d'Urville Voyage au Pole Sud

Jules Sébastien César Dumont d'Urville(1790–1842) - was born in Condé-sur-Noireau, a village in Normandy, France. His father was Gabriel François Dumont, sieur of Urville and an hereditary Judge; his mother, née Jeanne de Croisilles, was of a noble French family. 
The d'Urvilles, because of their aristocratic connections, took refuge after the French Revolution in a secluded part of Normandy. Here, after the death of his father, Jules was educated by his mother's brother, a churchman of wide learning. Later he attended the Lycée Malherbe at Caen. In 1807 he entered the Navy. A student by talent and inclination, he devoted himself to learning, both in the humanities and natural sciences. In 1815 he married. In 1820, while on a visit in a French naval vessel to the eastern Mediterranean, he was instrumental in procuring for France a Greek statue which had been found on Melos – the Venus de Milo.

In 1822–25, while serving on the Coquille, he surveyed the Falklands, Tahiti and other Pacific islands, and New Holland (W Australia). In 1826–29 he commanded the Astrolabe in a voyage around the world; searching for the ill-fated La Pérouse expedition, he explored Fiji and many other islands of Oceania, the New Zealand coast, and the Moluccas. With the Astrolabe and the Zelée he made a second circumnavigation in 1837–40, and in 1840 he penetrated the ice pack south of New Zealand and discovered the Adélie Coast region in Antarctica. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: -  
Colors used: -  
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 21in x 15 1/2in (535mm x 395mm)
Margins: - Min 2in (50mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Browning to margins
Plate area: - None
Verso: - Browning

$90.00 USD
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1841 D Urville Large Antique Print Portraits Study The People of Solomon Islands

1841 D Urville Large Antique Print Portraits Study The People of Solomon Islands

Description:
This large finely engraved original lithograph by L Le Breton & de Thierry was published in the 1841 edition of Dumont d'Urville Voyage au Pole Sud

Jules Sébastien César Dumont d'Urville(1790–1842) - was born in Condé-sur-Noireau, a village in Normandy, France. His father was Gabriel François Dumont, sieur of Urville and an hereditary Judge; his mother, née Jeanne de Croisilles, was of a noble French family. 
The d'Urvilles, because of their aristocratic connections, took refuge after the French Revolution in a secluded part of Normandy. Here, after the death of his father, Jules was educated by his mother's brother, a churchman of wide learning. Later he attended the Lycée Malherbe at Caen. In 1807 he entered the Navy. A student by talent and inclination, he devoted himself to learning, both in the humanities and natural sciences. In 1815 he married. In 1820, while on a visit in a French naval vessel to the eastern Mediterranean, he was instrumental in procuring for France a Greek statue which had been found on Melos – the Venus de Milo.

In 1822–25, while serving on the Coquille, he surveyed the Falklands, Tahiti and other Pacific islands, and New Holland (W Australia). In 1826–29 he commanded the Astrolabe in a voyage around the world; searching for the ill-fated La Pérouse expedition, he explored Fiji and many other islands of Oceania, the New Zealand coast, and the Moluccas. With the Astrolabe and the Zelée he made a second circumnavigation in 1837–40, and in 1840 he penetrated the ice pack south of New Zealand and discovered the Adélie Coast region in Antarctica. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: -  
Colors used: -  
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 21in x 15 1/2in (535mm x 395mm)
Margins: - Min 2in (50mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Browning to margins
Plate area: - None
Verso: - Browning

$90.00 USD
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1841 D Urville Large Antique Print Hair Styles People of Vanikoro Solomon Island

1841 D Urville Large Antique Print Hair Styles People of Vanikoro Solomon Island

Description:
This large finely engraved original lithograph by Jacques Tastu & de Lemercier was published in the 1841 edition of Dumont d'Urville Voyage au Pole Sud

Jules Sébastien César Dumont d'Urville(1790–1842) - was born in Condé-sur-Noireau, a village in Normandy, France. His father was Gabriel François Dumont, sieur of Urville and an hereditary Judge; his mother, née Jeanne de Croisilles, was of a noble French family. 
The d'Urvilles, because of their aristocratic connections, took refuge after the French Revolution in a secluded part of Normandy. Here, after the death of his father, Jules was educated by his mother's brother, a churchman of wide learning. Later he attended the Lycée Malherbe at Caen. In 1807 he entered the Navy. A student by talent and inclination, he devoted himself to learning, both in the humanities and natural sciences. In 1815 he married. In 1820, while on a visit in a French naval vessel to the eastern Mediterranean, he was instrumental in procuring for France a Greek statue which had been found on Melos – the Venus de Milo.

In 1822–25, while serving on the Coquille, he surveyed the Falklands, Tahiti and other Pacific islands, and New Holland (W Australia). In 1826–29 he commanded the Astrolabe in a voyage around the world; searching for the ill-fated La Pérouse expedition, he explored Fiji and many other islands of Oceania, the New Zealand coast, and the Moluccas. With the Astrolabe and the Zelée he made a second circumnavigation in 1837–40, and in 1840 he penetrated the ice pack south of New Zealand and discovered the Adélie Coast region in Antarctica. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy 
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: -  
Colors used: -  
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 20 1/2in x 13 1/2in (520mm x 340mm)
Margins: - Min 2in (50mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light spotting and soiling in margins
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$90.00 USD
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1719 Chatelain Large Antique Print The Costumes of Jews & Arabs in Cairo, Egypt

1719 Chatelain Large Antique Print The Costumes of Jews & Arabs in Cairo, Egypt

  • Title Description des Piramides D Egypte Tant au Dedans qu'au Dehors...
  • Ref  :  50647
  • Size: 20in x 17 1/2in (510m x 440m)
  • Date : 1719
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This large original antique print including detailed French Text on the subject was published by Henri Abraham Chatelain in 1719, in his famous Atlas Historique.

Atlas Historique: First published in Amsterdam from 1705 to 1720, the various volumes were updated at various times up to 1739 when the fourth edition of vol.I appeared, stated as the "dernière edition, corrigée & augmentée."
The first four volumes seem to have undergone four printings with the later printings being the most desirable as they contain the maximum number of corrections and additions. The remaining three final volumes were first issued between 1719-1720 and revised in 1732.
An ambitious and beautifully-presented work, the Atlas Historique was intended for the general public, fascinated in the early eighteenth century by the recently conquered colonies and the new discoveries. Distant countries, such as the Americas, Africa, the Middle East, Mongolia, China, Japan, Indonesia, etc., take an important place in this work.
In addition to the maps, many of which are based on Guillaume De L'Isle, the plates are after the best travel accounts of the period, such as those of Dapper, Chardin, de Bruyn, Le Hay and other.
Other sections deal with the history of the european countries, and covers a wide range of subjects including genealogy, history, cosmography, topography, heraldry and chronology, costume of the world, all illustrated with numerous engraved maps, plates of local inhabitants and heraldic charts of the lineages of the ruling families of the time. The maps, prints and tables required to make up a complete set are listed in detail in each volume.
The accompanying text is in French and often is printed in two columns on the page with maps and other illustrations interspersed. Each map and table is numbered consecutively within its volume and all maps bear the privileges of the States of Holland and West-Friesland.
The encyclopaedic nature of the work as a whole is reflected in this six frontispiece. The pages are the work of the celerated mr. Romeijn de Hooghe. and are engraved by J.Goeree, T.Schynyoet and P.Sluyter.
New scholarship has suggested the compiler of the atlas, who is identified on the title as "Mr. C***" not to be Henri Abraham Châtelain, but Zacharie Châtelain. (See Van Waning's article in the Journal of the International Map Collectors' Society for persuasive evidence of the latter's authorship.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: -  
Colors used: -  
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 20in x 17 1/2in (510m x 440m)
Plate size: - 17 1/2in x 15in (440m x 380mm)
Margins: - min. 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
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1820 Fischer Large Antique Print View of the City & Harbour of Liverpool England

1820 Fischer Large Antique Print View of the City & Harbour of Liverpool England

  • Title View of The Town and Harbour of Liverpool, from Seacombe....1820
  • Ref  :  92895
  • Size: 16 1/2in x 10 1/2in (420mm x 270mm)
  • Date : 1820
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This large fine original antique print a view of the very important and busy town and port of Liverpool in Northern England at the turn of the 19th century was engraved in 1820 - dated at the foot of the print - and published by Henry Fisher & co.. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: -  
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 16 1/2in x 10 1/2in (420mm x 270mm)
Plate size: - 16 1/2in x 10 1/2in (420mm x 270mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (10mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Folds as issued
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
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1886 Pic. Australasia Large Antique Print View of Circular Quay Sydney Australia

1886 Pic. Australasia Large Antique Print View of Circular Quay Sydney Australia

Description: 
This fine large original antique lithograph print was published in the extremely significant Australian & New Zealand publication The Picturesque Atlas of Australasia between 1886-88.

The Picturesque Atlas of Australasia was published in Sydney between 1886-88. Many of its over 700 wood-engraved illustrations were specially commissioned works by leading Australian artists. It was released in 42 separate editions usually bound into three large volumes and sold a remarkable 50,000 copies. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original 
Colors used: - Pink, green, yellow, orange    
General color appearance: - Authentic  
Paper size: - 17in x 13in (430mm x 330mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (10mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$75.00 USD
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1886 Pic. Australasia Large Antique Print of Melbourne & Yarra River, Australia

1886 Pic. Australasia Large Antique Print of Melbourne & Yarra River, Australia

Description: 
This fine large original antique lithograph print was published in the extremely significant Australian & New Zealand publication The Picturesque Atlas of Australasia between 1886-88.

The Picturesque Atlas of Australasia was published in Sydney between 1886-88. Many of its over 700 wood-engraved illustrations were specially commissioned works by leading Australian artists. It was released in 42 separate editions usually bound into three large volumes and sold a remarkable 50,000 copies. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original 
Colors used: - Pink, green, yellow, orange    
General color appearance: - Authentic  
Paper size: - 17in x 13in (430mm x 330mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (10mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$75.00 USD
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1886 Pic. Australasia Large Antique Print View of Wellington, New Zealand

1886 Pic. Australasia Large Antique Print View of Wellington, New Zealand

Description: 
This fine large original antique lithograph print was published in the extremely significant Australian & New Zealand publication The Picturesque Atlas of Australasia between 1886-88.

The Picturesque Atlas of Australasia was published in Sydney between 1886-88. Many of its over 700 wood-engraved illustrations were specially commissioned works by leading Australian artists. It was released in 42 separate editions usually bound into three large volumes and sold a remarkable 50,000 copies. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original 
Colors used: - Pink, green, yellow, orange    
General color appearance: - Authentic  
Paper size: - 17in x 13in (430mm x 330mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (10mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$75.00 USD
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1886 Pic. Australasia Large Antique Print of Parliament House Melbourne Victoria

1886 Pic. Australasia Large Antique Print of Parliament House Melbourne Victoria

Description: 
This fine large original antique lithograph print was published in the extremely significant Australian & New Zealand publication The Picturesque Atlas of Australasia between 1886-88.

The Picturesque Atlas of Australasia was published in Sydney between 1886-88. Many of its over 700 wood-engraved illustrations were specially commissioned works by leading Australian artists. It was released in 42 separate editions usually bound into three large volumes and sold a remarkable 50,000 copies. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original 
Colors used: - Pink, green, yellow, orange    
General color appearance: - Authentic  
Paper size: - 17in x 13in (430mm x 330mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (10mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$75.00 USD
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1886 Pic. Australasia Large Antique Print View of Ballarat, Victoria, Australia

1886 Pic. Australasia Large Antique Print View of Ballarat, Victoria, Australia

Description: 
This fine large original antique lithograph print was published in the extremely significant Australian & New Zealand publication The Picturesque Atlas of Australasia between 1886-88.

The Picturesque Atlas of Australasia was published in Sydney between 1886-88. Many of its over 700 wood-engraved illustrations were specially commissioned works by leading Australian artists. It was released in 42 separate editions usually bound into three large volumes and sold a remarkable 50,000 copies. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original 
Colors used: - Pink, green, yellow, orange    
General color appearance: - Authentic  
Paper size: - 17in x 13in (430mm x 330mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (10mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$75.00 USD
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1886 Picturesque Australasia Large Antique Print View of Hobart, Tasmania

1886 Picturesque Australasia Large Antique Print View of Hobart, Tasmania

Description: 
This fine large original antique lithograph print was published in the extremely significant Australian & New Zealand publication The Picturesque Atlas of Australasia between 1886-88.

The Picturesque Atlas of Australasia was published in Sydney between 1886-88. Many of its over 700 wood-engraved illustrations were specially commissioned works by leading Australian artists. It was released in 42 separate editions usually bound into three large volumes and sold a remarkable 50,000 copies. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original 
Colors used: - Pink, green, yellow, orange    
General color appearance: - Authentic  
Paper size: - 17in x 13in (430mm x 330mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (10mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$75.00 USD
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1886 Picturesque Atlas of Australasia Large Antique Print of The Melbourne Cup

1886 Picturesque Atlas of Australasia Large Antique Print of The Melbourne Cup

  • TitleMelbourne Cup - Race Course From Members Stand
  • Ref #:  92164
  • Size:  17 1/2in x 13 1/2in (440mm x 340mm)
  • Date : 1886
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This fine large original antique lithograph print was published in the extremely significant Australian & New Zealand publication The Picturesque Atlas of Australasia between 1886-88.

The Picturesque Atlas of Australasia was published in Sydney between 1886-88. Many of its over 700 wood-engraved illustrations were specially commissioned works by leading Australian artists. It was released in 42 separate editions usually bound into three large volumes and sold a remarkable 50,000 copies. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original 
Colors used: - Pink, green, yellow, orange    
General color appearance: - Authentic  
Paper size: - 17 1/2in x 13 1/2in (440mm x 340mm)
Margins: - Min 2in (50mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
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1822 Louis Freycinet Large Antique Bird Print The Wood Shrike, Papua New Guinea

1822 Louis Freycinet Large Antique Bird Print The Wood Shrike, Papua New Guinea

Description: 
This large beautifully hand coloured original antique print of The Yellow Bellied Wood Shrike of New Guinea was engraved by Jean Louis Denis Coutant in 1822 from the voyages of the ship the Uranie and published by Louis de Freycinet in Voyage autour du monde sur les corvettes Uranie et la Physicienne.

Louis Claude Desaulces de Freycinet (1779-1842) was a French marine officer and explorer, who participated in several significant early 19th-century expeditions to relatively unknown areas in the southern hemisphere. In 1800, he joined one of the most important early explorations of Australia, which was commissioned by the French government and commanded by Nicholas Baudin (1754-1803). On this voyage, which included stops in Mauritius and Tasmania, Freycinet served as a surveyor and was responsible for conducting a thorough cartographic survey of the Australian coast. Upon returning to France years later, he completed a detailed account of the journey begun by the naturalist Françis Péron that was published asVoyage de decouvertes aux Terres Australes between 1807 and 1816.

In 1817, Freycinet embarked on the Uranie on a major scientific expedition around the world to record information regarding the geography, meteorology, terrestrial magnetism, ethnology, and indigenous flora and fauna of various locations in the southern hemisphere. Accompanied by the talented artist Jacques Arago, he explored the Sandwich Islands, the Hawaii Islands as well as Rio de Janeiro, the Cape of Good Hope, Tonga, Gibraltar, Tenerife, Mauritius, Timor, Tierra del Fuego, Montevideo, Mauritius, New South Wales, and the Caroline Islands. After being shipwrecked near the Falklands, Freycinet eventually returned to Paris on the Physicienne in 1820, where he published a comprehensive illustrated account of the expedition in a colossal thirteen-volume work entitled Voyage Autor de Monde. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Pink, yellow, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 18in x 12in (460mm x 305mm)
Plate size: - 13in x 9 ½in (330mm x 240mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light spotting, age toning
Plate area: - Light spotting, age toning
Verso: - Light spotting, age toning

$275.00 USD
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1822 Louis Freycinet Large Antique Bird Print of The Wood Kingfisher, New Guinea

1822 Louis Freycinet Large Antique Bird Print of The Wood Kingfisher, New Guinea

Description: 
This beautifully hand coloured original antique print of the Wood Kingfisherdacélonidés of New Guinea was engraved by Coutant and published in the 1822 edition ofVoyage autour du monde sur les corvettes Uranie et la Physicienne by Louis de Freycinetaboard the ship Uranie and its voyage of discovery. Also accompanying Freycinet on this expedition was Louis lsidore Duperry instrumental in the surveying and mapping of many of the regions explored by the Uranie

Louis Claude Desaulces de Freycinet (1779-1842) was a French marine officer and explorer, who participated in several significant early 19th-century expeditions to relatively unknown areas in the southern hemisphere. In 1800, he joined one of the most important early explorations of Australia, which was commissioned by the French government and commanded by Nicholas Baudin (1754-1803). On this voyage, which included stops in Mauritius and Tasmania, Freycinet served as a surveyor and was responsible for conducting a thorough cartographic survey of the Australian coast. Upon returning to France years later, he completed a detailed account of the journey begun by the naturalist Françis Péron that was published as Voyage de decouvertes aux Terres Australes between 1807 and 1816.

In 1817, Freycinet embarked on the Uranie on a major scientific expedition around the world to record information regarding the geography, meteorology, terrestrial magnetism, ethnology, and indigenous flora and fauna of various locations in the southern hemisphere. Accompanied by the talented artist Jacques Arago, he explored the Sandwich Islands, the Hawaii Islands as well as Rio de Janeiro, the Cape of Good Hope, Tonga, Gibraltar, Tenerife, Mauritius, Timor, Tierra del Fuego, Montevideo, Mauritius, New South Wales, and the Caroline Islands. After being shipwrecked near the Falklands, Freycinet eventually returned to Paris on the Physicienne in 1820, where he published a comprehensive illustrated account of the expedition in a colossal thirteen-volume work entitled Voyage Autor de Monde.

Louis lsidore Duperry a French naval officer was born in Paris, 21 October 1786 and died there on the 10th of September 1865. 
He entered the French navy in 1802, was promoted 2nd lieutenant, and sailed in 1817 for a voyage round the world in the corvette " Uranie," under the command of Louis Claude Desaules De Freycinet, which was wrecked on the Malouine islands. Duperrey was picked up by a passing American vessel, returned to France, and was promoted to 1st lieutenant. 
In 1822 he received his commission as captain, and, in command of the corvette "La Coquille," sailed on a scientific expedition to the South American coasts and the Pacific Ocean, from which he returned on 24 March 1825. During that time he  repeatedly visited the coasts of Chili and Peru from where he sent to the navy department interesting reports upon the geology and institutions of those countries, and brought home many thousand zoological and botanical specimens. 
The observations of many Pendulum Measurements taken during this voyage at many different points proved the flattening of the earth at the poles, Duperrey also determined the position of the magnetic poles and the figure of the magnetic equator. 
He designed charts of the coast of South America that are valued, especially one showing the bifurcation of the current at the mouth of the Plate. Duperrey in 1836 was appointed officer of the Legion of Honor, and in 1842 a member of the French academy. He published Voyage autour du Monde....pendant les annes 1822 - 25 in Paris between 1826 & 1830. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Blue, yellow, red
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 18in x 12in (460mm x 305mm)
Plate size: - 12 1/2in x 9 1/2in (315mm x 240mm)
Margins: - Min 2in (50mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Spotting and light soiling
Plate area: - Light soiling, spotting & offsetting
Verso: - Light soiling, spotting 

$275.00 USD
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1693 Slezer Antique Print View of the Town of Alloa on Firth of Forth Scotland

1693 Slezer Antique Print View of the Town of Alloa on Firth of Forth Scotland

  • Title The Prospect of the House & of the Town of Alloua
  • Ref  :  24947
  • Size:  18 ½in x 14 ½in (470mm x 370mm)
  • Date : 1693
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This finely engraved original important antique print a view of the town of Alloa in Clackmannanshire in eastern Scotland on the Firth of Forth, was published in the first edition of John Slezer's 'Theatrum Scotiae', 1693. 
This is an important and rare print as Slezer s Theatrum Scotiae is one of the earliest records of early Scottish towns. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: -  
Colors used: -  
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 18 ½in x 14 ½in (470mm x 370mm)
Plate size: - 16 ½in x 11 in (420mm x 280mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1693 Slezer Antique Print Fortrose View of Ross-shire, Scotland

1693 Slezer Antique Print Fortrose View of Ross-shire, Scotland

Description: 
This fine beautifully hand coloured original antique print a view of Fortrose - in the Shire of Ross, Northern Scotland - was published in the 1718 edition of John Slezer's 'Theatrum Scotiae', published in 1693.

Fortrose in Ross-shire sits on the edge of the Moray Firth. In Slezer's view you see the ruins of the town's cathedral, which fell into decline after the Reformation in 1560.
Fortrose consists of two towns, Chanonry (or as Slezer writes, 'Channery') and Rosemarkie, which were formally united in 1592 under the name Fortrose. From the 12th century, Rosemarkie was the seat of the Bishopric of Ross, but the cathedral and former bishop's residence were largely removed by Cromwell in the 1650s.
In front of the town are run-rigs unenclosed strips of separately cultivated ground. These were typical in the Scottish landscape of the 17th and early 18th centuries.

This is an important and rare print as Slezer s Theatrum Scotiae is one of the earliest records of early Scottish towns. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Green, yellow, orange, blue  
General color appearance: - Authentic  
Paper size: - 16 ½in x 10 ½in (420mm x 270mm)
Plate size: - 16 ½in x 10 ½in (420mm x 270mm)
Margins: - Min 1/4in (7mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Cropped to plate-mark
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1880 Blackie & Son Antique Print Central Asian Peoples Caucasus Georgia, Armenia

1880 Blackie & Son Antique Print Central Asian Peoples Caucasus Georgia, Armenia

Description:
This beautifully coloured large original antique lithograph print was published by Blackie & Son of Glasgow in the 1880 edition of Geographical Atlas. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - Original
Colours used: - Brown, blue, green
General colour appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 15in x 11in (380mm x 280mm)
Margins: - min 12in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$75.00 USD
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1880 Blackie & Son Antique Print South American Indians

1880 Blackie & Son Antique Print South American Indians

Description:
This beautifully coloured large original antique lithograph print was published by Blackie & Son of Glasgow in the 1880 edition of Geographical Atlas. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - Original
Colours used: - Brown, blue, green
General colour appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 15in x 11in (380mm x 280mm)
Margins: - min 12in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$75.00 USD
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1880 Blackie & Son Antique Print the Japanese Peoples

1880 Blackie & Son Antique Print the Japanese Peoples

Description:
This beautifully coloured large original antique lithograph print was published by Blackie & Son of Glasgow in the 1880 edition of Geographical Atlas. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - Original
Colours used: - Brown, blue, green
General colour appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 15in x 11in (380mm x 280mm)
Margins: - min 12in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$75.00 USD
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1575 Braun & Hogenberg Large Antique Print a View of Mechelen, Belgium

1575 Braun & Hogenberg Large Antique Print a View of Mechelen, Belgium

  • TitleMechelen - Nitidissimae Civitatis Mechlineensis in meditullio Brabantiae sitae, exactis: delineatio
  • Ref #:  16247
  • Size: 21in x 16in (535mm x 410mm)
  • Date : 1575
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This fine beautifully hand coloured original antique map a birds-eye view of the city of Mechelen in the Antwerp province of Flanders, Belgium was published by Georg Braun & Frans Hogenberg for the 1575 atlas of town plans Civiates Orbis Terrarum Vol II (1572-1612) intended as a companion to Abraham Ortelius's master Atlas Theatrum Orbis Terrarum published in 1570.

Franz Hogenberg's birthplace is illustrated twice. In the view presented in Volume I the cityscape is dominated by the massive tower belonging to the cathedral of Sint-Rombout, which measures almost 100 m in height. Behind the cathedral to the right lies the Onze-Lieve-Vrouwe church built in the Brabantine late Gothic style. In the present plate Mechelen is seen in a bird's-eye view from the northwest. Clearly apparent is the almost circular shape of the inner city, which has already spread beyond the bounds of the canal ringing the old city wall. In the Middle Ages staple rights and the cloth trade brought Mechelen great prosperity. In 1336 the city passed to the Duchy of Brabant, later to Burgundy, and developed into a highly regarded centre of commerce. The collapse of the cloth industry prompted the development of new areas of manufacturing, such as cannon and bell founding. In 1477 Mechelen passed to the Habsburgs and from 1507 to 1530, under the regency of Margaret of Austria, was capital of the Habsburg Netherlands. In 1559 Mechelen became an archbishopric and over the course of the Wars of Religion grew into a centre of the Counter-Reformation. For some time it was also the seat of the highest tribunal of the Habsburg Netherlands. (Taschen)

Background of Civitates Orbis Terrarum
The first volume of the Civitates Orbis Terrarum was published in Cologne in 1572. The sixth and the final volume appeared in 1617. 
This great city atlas, edited by Georg Braun and largely engraved by Franz Hogenberg, eventually contained 546 prospects, bird-eye views and map views of cities from all over the world. Braun (1541-1622), a cleric of Cologne, was the principal editor of the work, and was greatly assisted in his project by the close, and continued interest of Abraham Ortelius, whose Theatrum Orbis Terrarum of 1570 was, as a systematic and comprehensive collection of maps of uniform style, the first true atlas.

For a variety of reasons town plans were comparatively latecomers in the long history of cartography. Few cities in Europe in the middle ages had more than 20,00 inhabitants and even London in the late Elizabethan period had only 100-150,000 people which in itself was probably 10 times that of any other English city. The Nuremberg Chronicle in 1493 included one of the first town views of Jerusalem, thereafter, for most of the sixteenth century, German cartographers led the way in producing town plans in a modern sense. In 1544 Sebastian Munster issued in Basle his Cosmographia containing roughly sixty-six plans and views, some in the plan form, but many in the old panorama or birds eye view. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

Condition Report:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Green, blue, red, yellow
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 21in x 16in (535mm x 410mm)
Plate size: - 18 1/2in x 13 1/2in (470mm x 345mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling in margins
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$425.00 USD
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1574 Munster Large Antique Print View of The City of Wormbs, Germany

1574 Munster Large Antique Print View of The City of Wormbs, Germany

Description:
This large folding original antique print a View of the important German city ofWormbs, south of Hamburg was published in the 1574 release of Sebastian MunstersCosmographia published by Sebastian Petri, Basle.
(This is a reasonably scarce map as the large fold out maps in Cosmographia were easily damaged and lost)

Background: For a variety of reasons town plans were comparatively latecomers in the long history of cartography. Few cities in Europe in the middle ages had more than 20,00 inhabitants and even London in the late Elizabethan period had only 100-150,000 people which in itself was probably 10 times that of any other English city. The Nuremberg Chronicle in 1493 included one of the first town views of Jerusalem, thereafter, for most of the sixteenth century, German cartographers led the way in producing town plans in a modern sense. In 1544 Sebastian Munster issued in Basle his Cosmographia containing roughly sixty-six plans and views, some in the plan form, but many in the old panorama or birds eye view. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Later
Colors used: - Green, blue, yellow, pink
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 27in x 13in (685mm x 330mm)
Plate size: - 25in x 10in (635 x 255m)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling
Plate area: -Folds re-joined small loss, light soiling, light creasing
Verso: - Light soiling, colour show through, half the map backed in archival material

$475.00 USD
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1575 Braun & Hogenberg Antique Print Sneek Dokkum Ylst Frisia Sloten Netherlands

1575 Braun & Hogenberg Antique Print Sneek Dokkum Ylst Frisia Sloten Netherlands

  • TitleSneecha, vulgo Sneeck Frisiae Occidentalis Oppidum. - Doccum - Sloten - Ylsta
  • Ref #:  30261
  • Size: 21in x 16in (535mm x 410mm)
  • Date : 1575
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This fine beautifully hand coloured original antique map a birds-eye view of the towns of Sneek, Dokkum, Ylst and Sloten in Frisia, the Netherlands was published by Georg Braun & Frans Hogenberg for the 1575 atlas of town plans Civiates Orbis Terrarum Vol II (1572-1612) intended as a companion to Abraham Ortelius's master Atlas Theatrum Orbis Terrarum published in 1570.

Background of Civitates Orbis Terrarum
The first volume of the Civitates Orbis Terrarum was published in Cologne in 1572. The sixth and the final volume appeared in 1617. 
This great city atlas, edited by Georg Braun and largely engraved by Franz Hogenberg, eventually contained 546 prospects, bird-eye views and map views of cities from all over the world. Braun (1541-1622), a cleric of Cologne, was the principal editor of the work, and was greatly assisted in his project by the close, and continued interest of Abraham Ortelius, whose Theatrum Orbis Terrarum of 1570 was, as a systematic and comprehensive collection of maps of uniform style, the first true atlas.

For a variety of reasons town plans were comparatively latecomers in the long history of cartography. Few cities in Europe in the middle ages had more than 20,00 inhabitants and even London in the late Elizabethan period had only 100-150,000 people which in itself was probably 10 times that of any other English city. The Nuremberg Chronicle in 1493 included one of the first town views of Jerusalem, thereafter, for most of the sixteenth century, German cartographers led the way in producing town plans in a modern sense. In 1544 Sebastian Munster issued in Basle his Cosmographia containing roughly sixty-six plans and views, some in the plan form, but many in the old panorama or birds eye view. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

Condition Report:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Green, blue, red, yellow
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 21in x 16in (535mm x 410mm)
Plate size: - 16 1/2in x 14in (420mm x 355mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling in margins
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$425.00 USD
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1575 Braun & Hogenberg Antique Map City Plan of Tournai or Doornik, Belgium

1575 Braun & Hogenberg Antique Map City Plan of Tournai or Doornik, Belgium

Description:
This fine beautifully hand coloured original antique map a birds-eye view of the town ofTournai or Doornik, a Walloon city located 85 kilometres west-southwest of Brussels, on the river Scheldt, in the province of Hainaut in Belgium was published by Georg Braun & Frans Hogenberg for the 1575 atlas of town plans Civiates Orbis Terrarum Vol II (1572-1612) intended as a companion to Abraham Ortelius's master Atlas Theatrum Orbis Terrarum published in 1570.

Background: 
Bird's-eye view of the city from the south seen fortified with a Renaissance-style moat and wall with projecting bastions. The Old Town wall, dating from 1290, can be seen inside the city. The 12th-century Gothic cathedral of Notre-Dame (5) stands out in the centre , the most important and influential church building in Belgium. 
Tournai is one of Belgium's oldest cities. A formidable stronghold as early as the 4th century AD, it was the main centre of the Salian Franks until the mid-5th century. Tournai became an Episcopal See at the beginning of the 6th century and belonged then to the Count of Flanders from 1188 to France. 
In the 15th century the city flourished economically and culturally as a result of its tapestry industry (Rogier van der Weyden, among others). In the Treaties of Madrid and Cambrai (1526/29), France had to cede Tournai to Charles V and it thus became part of the Spanish Netherlands.  

Verso Text: "Tornacum or Turnacum is a city in Gallia Belgica, situated on the Schelde in the territory of the Nervii, called Tournai by its French inhabitants, but Dorneck by the Germans. Tournai has always been a large and powerful city, with an abundance of goods and commercial activities and wonderfully resourceful craftsmen, who invent new articles every day, and although some of these go out of use they constantly conceive of other new things, both useful and delightful, so that they have at all times something that provides work and a means of livelihood for the poor." 

Civitates Orbis Terrarum

The first volume of the Civitates Orbis Terrarum was published in Cologne in 1572. The sixth and the final volume appeared in 1617. 
This great city atlas, edited by Georg Braun and largely engraved by Franz Hogenberg, eventually contained 546 prospects, bird-eye views and map views of cities from all over the world. Braun (1541-1622), a cleric of Cologne, was the principal editor of the work, and was greatly assisted in his project by the close, and continued interest of Abraham Ortelius, whose Theatrum Orbis Terrarum of 1570 was, as a systematic and comprehensive collection of maps of uniform style, the first true atlas.

For a variety of reasons town plans were comparatively latecomers in the long history of cartography. Few cities in Europe in the middle ages had more than 20,00 inhabitants and even London in the late Elizabethan period had only 100-150,000 people which in itself was probably 10 times that of any other English city. The Nuremberg Chronicle in 1493 included one of the first town views of Jerusalem, thereafter, for most of the sixteenth century, German cartographers led the way in producing town plans in a modern sense. In 1544 Sebastian Munster issued in Basle his Cosmographia containing roughly sixty-six plans and views, some in the plan form, but many in the old panorama or birds eye view. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

Condition Report:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Green, blue, red, yellow
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 21 1/2in x 16in (550mm x 400mm)
Plate size: - 16 3/4in x 14 1/4in (440mm x 365mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light chipping to margin edges
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$475.00 USD
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1632 Henricus David Large Antique Portrait of Cartographer Giovanni A Magini

1632 Henricus David Large Antique Portrait of Cartographer Giovanni A Magini

  • TitleIo. Antonius Maginus Pat. Mathemat. In Bonon. Gymn. Profess
  • Date : 1632
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  92835
  • Size: 17 1/2in x 11in (445mm x 280mm)

Description: 
This fine beautifully hand coloured original antique portrait of the Italian Cartographer Giovanni Antonio Magini was engraved by Henricus David in 1632 - date is engraved below portrait.

Giovanni Antonio Magini (1555-1617) was an Italian mathematician, cartographer and Professor of Astronomy in Bologna. He is responsible for publishing an edition ofPtolemy's Geographia in 1596 that contained 27 maps of the ancient world drawn from the text of Claude Ptolemy, along with 27 contemporary or modern maps. His maps were used by Blaeu in 1640. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, green, red, brown.
General color appearance: - Fresh
Paper size: - 17 1/2in x 11in (445mm x 280mm)
Plate size: - 12n x 8 1/2in (305mm x 215mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light dis-colouration in top margin
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$375.00 USD
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1712 Winter Antique Large Print Portrait of Johann Baptiste Homann

1712 Winter Antique Large Print Portrait of Johann Baptiste Homann

Description:
This finely engraved original antique print, a portrait of the early 18th century German Cartographer Johann Baptiste Homann after a painting by Joannes Krenckel was engraved by Wilhelm Winter and published in 1716 for Homann's Grosser Atlas.

Stunning full portrait of the Imperial Geographer of the Holy Roman Empire, Johann Baptist Homann (1664-1724) who was born in the Bavarian town of Kammlach.
Educated at a Jesuit school, he eventually became a member of the Prussian Academy of Sciences. As an Imperial Geographer he had special printing privileges, which were not only the best reference for customers but also gave him exclusive rights in his various endeavours as an engraver, publisher, cartographer, and a scientist. Homann died in Nuremberg, with the company, under his heirs, lasting until 1848.
After a painting by Joannes Krenckel (1688–1722), engraved by Wilhelm Winter (1696–1765). (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - Off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 21in x 11 3/4in (560mm x 295mm)
Plate size: - 15 1/4in x 11in (390mm x 280mm)
Margins: - Min 1/4in (7mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling bottom right corner
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$325.00 USD
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1575 Braun & Hogenberg Large Antique Map of the City of Arras, France

1575 Braun & Hogenberg Large Antique Map of the City of Arras, France

Description:
This fine beautifully hand coloured original antique map a birds-eye view of the French City of Arras - the capital of the Pas de Calais region - was published by Georg Braun & Frans Hogenberg for the 1575 atlas of town plans Civiates Orbis Terrarum Vol II (1572-1612) intended as a companion to Abraham Ortelius's master Atlas Theatrum Orbis Terrarum published in 1570.

Background of Civitates Orbis Terrarum
The first volume of the Civitates Orbis Terrarum was published in Cologne in 1572. The sixth and the final volume appeared in 1617. 
This great city atlas, edited by Georg Braun and largely engraved by Franz Hogenberg, eventually contained 546 prospects, bird-eye views and map views of cities from all over the world. Braun (1541-1622), a cleric of Cologne, was the principal editor of the work, and was greatly assisted in his project by the close, and continued interest of Abraham Ortelius, whose Theatrum Orbis Terrarum of 1570 was, as a systematic and comprehensive collection of maps of uniform style, the first true atlas.

For a variety of reasons town plans were comparatively latecomers in the long history of cartography. Few cities in Europe in the middle ages had more than 20,00 inhabitants and even London in the late Elizabethan period had only 100-150,000 people which in itself was probably 10 times that of any other English city. The Nuremberg Chronicle in 1493 included one of the first town views of Jerusalem, thereafter, for most of the sixteenth century, German cartographers led the way in producing town plans in a modern sense. In 1544 Sebastian Munster issued in Basle his Cosmographia containing roughly sixty-six plans and views, some in the plan form, but many in the old panorama or birds eye view. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

Condition Report:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Green, blue, red, yellow
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 21in x 16in (535mm x 410mm)
Plate size: - 19in x 14in (485mm x 355mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$425.00 USD
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1765 De Buffon Large Antique Folio Bird Print - Piebald Leucistic Common Grackle

1765 De Buffon Large Antique Folio Bird Print - Piebald Leucistic Common Grackle

Description:
This fine, beautifully hand coloured original antique large ornithological folio print of the North American Piebald Leucistic Common Grackle was engraved by Francois Nicolas Martinet and published in the Histoire Naturelle de Oiseaux by Georges-Louis Leclerc or Count de Buffon & Edme Louis Daubenton between 1765-80.
These prints are in extraordinary condition with superb original colour on clean heavy chain laid paper. 

Histoire Naturelle Des Oiseaux, is a collection of 1,008 hand colored bird prints edited by Georges-Louis Marie Leclerc, the Count of Buffon. This was one of two major Buffon works, collectively the most comprehensive French natural history sets of their time. Histoire Naturelle Des Oiseauxwas published in 42 volumes from 1765 to 1780 by Edme Louis Daubenton in collaboration with Buffon, illustrated with engravings by Francois Nicolas Martinet.

Georges-Louis Leclerc or Count de Buffon (1707 - 1788) was a French aristocrat of formidable intellect and achievements, including books on mathematics and natural history. Although his father initially steered him toward law school, Buffon persisted in pursuing his interest in math. At the age of 20, he discovered the binomial theorem and later introduced differential and integral calculus into probability theory. He soon became fascinated with biological science, and his father relented and let him enroll in the faculty of medicine to study botany and zoology. As a young man in Paris, he befriended Voltaire and other intellectuals, and gained admission to the prestigious Academy of Science at age 27. Decades before Darwin introduced his theory of evolution, Buffon dared to challenge religious thought with empirical observations, suggesting that the earth was older than 6,000 years and that the physical resemblance between humans and apes might be explained by their having a common ancestry. While the theories he proposed to explain these phenomena were by and large incorrect, he correctly grasped that a new paradigm was needed.
De Buffon also published a different 44-volume natural history work with various studies, including birds, titled Histoire Naturelle Generale Et Particuliere (Natural History, General and Particular) (Paris, 1749-1804), which included works by various artists including Jacques Eustache de Sève. This work was his major achievement and an ambitious project characteristic of the 18th-century Enlightenment: a 44-volume encyclopedia attempting to include everything known about the natural world and widely disseminate scientific knowledge. It was the first complete natural history survey presented in a popular form, and also broke ground in attempting to separate science from theological dogma.

Francois Nicolas Martinet was a French engraver and draughtsman. In 1756, he was working for the court of France as Graveur du Cabinet du Roi, under the auspices of the Menus Plaisirs du Roi, making engravings after drawings by others of such subjects as the May Ball at Versailles during the Carnival of 1763. In the same period, Martinet produced illustrations for plays or comic operas by such contemporaries as Marmontel, Voltaire and Philidor. Some of these he engraved himself, while others were drawn by him but engraved by his sister Thérèse Martinet (born c. 1731). He is best known for his engravings of birds for Comte de Buffon's, Histoire Naturelle Des Oiseaux published in Paris from 1770-86. In 1768, a comprehensive group of natural history studies drafted by Martinet, and engraved by Robert Bénard were included in the natural history volume of Diderot and Alembert’sEncyclopédie. Martinet also drew and engraved portraits, landscapes and genre scenes. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Green, blue, yellow
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 12in x 9in (305mm x 230mm)
Plate size: - 10in x 8in (255mm x 205mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (15mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$325.00 USD
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1765 Buffon Antique Large Folio Bird Print - American Long Billed Curlew

1765 Buffon Antique Large Folio Bird Print - American Long Billed Curlew

Description:
This fine, beautifully hand coloured original antique large ornithological folio print of the American Long Billed Curlew was engraved by Francois Nicolas Martinet and published in the Histoire Naturelle de Oiseaux by Georges-Louis Leclerc or Count de Buffon & Edme Louis Daubenton between 1765-80.
These prints are in extraordinary condition with superb original colour on clean heavy chain laid paper. 

Histoire Naturelle Des Oiseaux, is a collection of 1,008 hand colored bird prints edited by Georges-Louis Marie Leclerc, the Count of Buffon. This was one of two major Buffon works, collectively the most comprehensive French natural history sets of their time. Histoire Naturelle Des Oiseauxwas published in 42 volumes from 1765 to 1780 by Edme Louis Daubenton in collaboration with Buffon, illustrated with engravings by Francois Nicolas Martinet.

Georges-Louis Leclerc or Count de Buffon (1707 - 1788) was a French aristocrat of formidable intellect and achievements, including books on mathematics and natural history. Although his father initially steered him toward law school, Buffon persisted in pursuing his interest in math. At the age of 20, he discovered the binomial theorem and later introduced differential and integral calculus into probability theory. He soon became fascinated with biological science, and his father relented and let him enroll in the faculty of medicine to study botany and zoology. As a young man in Paris, he befriended Voltaire and other intellectuals, and gained admission to the prestigious Academy of Science at age 27. Decades before Darwin introduced his theory of evolution, Buffon dared to challenge religious thought with empirical observations, suggesting that the earth was older than 6,000 years and that the physical resemblance between humans and apes might be explained by their having a common ancestry. While the theories he proposed to explain these phenomena were by and large incorrect, he correctly grasped that a new paradigm was needed.
De Buffon also published a different 44-volume natural history work with various studies, including birds, titled Histoire Naturelle Generale Et Particuliere (Natural History, General and Particular) (Paris, 1749-1804), which included works by various artists including Jacques Eustache de Sève. This work was his major achievement and an ambitious project characteristic of the 18th-century Enlightenment: a 44-volume encyclopedia attempting to include everything known about the natural world and widely disseminate scientific knowledge. It was the first complete natural history survey presented in a popular form, and also broke ground in attempting to separate science from theological dogma.

Francois Nicolas Martinet was a French engraver and draughtsman. In 1756, he was working for the court of France as Graveur du Cabinet du Roi, under the auspices of the Menus Plaisirs du Roi, making engravings after drawings by others of such subjects as the May Ball at Versailles during the Carnival of 1763. In the same period, Martinet produced illustrations for plays or comic operas by such contemporaries as Marmontel, Voltaire and Philidor. Some of these he engraved himself, while others were drawn by him but engraved by his sister Thérèse Martinet (born c. 1731). He is best known for his engravings of birds for Comte de Buffon's, Histoire Naturelle Des Oiseaux published in Paris from 1770-86. In 1768, a comprehensive group of natural history studies drafted by Martinet, and engraved by Robert Bénard were included in the natural history volume of Diderot and Alembert’sEncyclopédie. Martinet also drew and engraved portraits, landscapes and genre scenes. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Green, blue, yellow
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 12in x 9in (305mm x 230mm)
Plate size: - 10in x 8in (255mm x 205mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (15mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$325.00 USD
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1765 De Buffon Large Folio Antique Bird Print - The American Jabiru Stork

1765 De Buffon Large Folio Antique Bird Print - The American Jabiru Stork

Description:
This fine, beautifully hand coloured original antique large ornithological folio print of the Jabiru Stork of South & Central America was engraved by Francois Nicolas Martinet and published in the Histoire Naturelle de Oiseaux by Georges-Louis Leclerc or Count de Buffon & Edme Louis Daubenton between 1765-80.
These prints are in extraordinary condition with superb original colour on clean heavy chain laid paper. 

Histoire Naturelle Des Oiseaux, is a collection of 1,008 hand colored bird prints edited by Georges-Louis Marie Leclerc, the Count of Buffon. This was one of two major Buffon works, collectively the most comprehensive French natural history sets of their time. Histoire Naturelle Des Oiseauxwas published in 42 volumes from 1765 to 1780 by Edme Louis Daubenton in collaboration with Buffon, illustrated with engravings by Francois Nicolas Martinet.

Georges-Louis Leclerc or Count de Buffon (1707 - 1788) was a French aristocrat of formidable intellect and achievements, including books on mathematics and natural history. Although his father initially steered him toward law school, Buffon persisted in pursuing his interest in math. At the age of 20, he discovered the binomial theorem and later introduced differential and integral calculus into probability theory. He soon became fascinated with biological science, and his father relented and let him enroll in the faculty of medicine to study botany and zoology. As a young man in Paris, he befriended Voltaire and other intellectuals, and gained admission to the prestigious Academy of Science at age 27. Decades before Darwin introduced his theory of evolution, Buffon dared to challenge religious thought with empirical observations, suggesting that the earth was older than 6,000 years and that the physical resemblance between humans and apes might be explained by their having a common ancestry. While the theories he proposed to explain these phenomena were by and large incorrect, he correctly grasped that a new paradigm was needed.
De Buffon also published a different 44-volume natural history work with various studies, including birds, titled Histoire Naturelle Generale Et Particuliere (Natural History, General and Particular) (Paris, 1749-1804), which included works by various artists including Jacques Eustache de Sève. This work was his major achievement and an ambitious project characteristic of the 18th-century Enlightenment: a 44-volume encyclopedia attempting to include everything known about the natural world and widely disseminate scientific knowledge. It was the first complete natural history survey presented in a popular form, and also broke ground in attempting to separate science from theological dogma.

Francois Nicolas Martinet was a French engraver and draughtsman. In 1756, he was working for the court of France as Graveur du Cabinet du Roi, under the auspices of the Menus Plaisirs du Roi, making engravings after drawings by others of such subjects as the May Ball at Versailles during the Carnival of 1763. In the same period, Martinet produced illustrations for plays or comic operas by such contemporaries as Marmontel, Voltaire and Philidor. Some of these he engraved himself, while others were drawn by him but engraved by his sister Thérèse Martinet (born c. 1731). He is best known for his engravings of birds for Comte de Buffon's, Histoire Naturelle Des Oiseaux published in Paris from 1770-86. In 1768, a comprehensive group of natural history studies drafted by Martinet, and engraved by Robert Bénard were included in the natural history volume of Diderot and Alembert’sEncyclopédie. Martinet also drew and engraved portraits, landscapes and genre scenes. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Green, blue, yellow
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 12in x 9in (305mm x 230mm)
Plate size: - 10in x 8in (255mm x 205mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (15mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$375.00 USD
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1841 McKenny Hall Large Folio Antique Print Chippeway Indian Native American

1841 McKenny Hall Large Folio Antique Print Chippeway Indian Native American

Description:
This beautifully hand coloured original antique folio lithograph print of KA-TA-WA-BE-DA (Katawabeda) “Old Tooth” of the Chippeway Tribe was engraved and hand coloured in 1841 - the date is engraved at the foot of the print - by J.T. Bowen and was published in the folio edition of McKenny-Hall`s History of the Indian Tribes of North America published between 1837 and 1844

McKenney and Hall's Indian Tribes of North America has long been renowned for its faithful portraits of Native Americans. The portrait plates are based on paintings by the artist Charles Bird King, who was employed by the War Department to paint the Indian delegates visiting Washington D.C., forming the basis of the War Department's Indian Gallery. Most of King's original paintings were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian, and their appearance in McKenney and Hall's magnificent work is thus our only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century. Numbered among King's sitters were Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. 

As first director, McKenney was to improve the administration of Indian programs in various government offices. His first trip was during the summer of 1826 to the Lake Superior area for a treaty with the Chippewa, opening mineral rights on their land. In 1827, he journeyed west again for a treaty with the Chippewa, Menominee , and Winebago in the present state of Michigan. His journeys provided an unparalleled opportunity to become acquainted with Native American tribes. When President Jackson dismissed him from his government post in 1839, McKenney was able to turn more of his attention to his publishing project. Within a few years, he was joined by James Hall, a lawyer who had written extensively about the west.

Both authors, not unlike George Catlin, whom they tried to enlist in their publishing enterprise, saw their book as a way of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. (Gilreath). McKenney provided the biographies, many based on personal interviews, and Hall wrote the general history of the North American Indian. This was the most elaborate plate book produced in the United States to date, and its publication involved a number of different printers and lithographers. The publication of volume I (in 1836) was initially undertaken by Edward C.Biddle, Biddle's firm was taken over by Frederick W. Greenough, who re-issued vol.I and published the first issue of vol.II in 1842. Later, Greenough's firm was replaced by the printing firm of Rice and Clark who reissued vol. I and vol.II and published the first issue of vol.III in 1844. The printing of the plates was chiefly carried out by Peter Duval of Lehman and Duval and James T. Bowen. 
(Ref: BAL 6934; Bennett p.79; Field 992; Howes M129; Lipperhiede Mc4; Reese, American Color Plate Books 24; Sabin 43410a).

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - Off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Blue, grey, red, brown.
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 18in x 13in (495mm x 344mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning, light spotting
Plate area: - Small repair not affecting the image, light offsetting
Verso: - Light age toning & spotting

$650.00 USD
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1774 Cook Webber Antique Print of a New Zealand Maori Chief

1774 Cook Webber Antique Print of a New Zealand Maori Chief

Description:
This fine original antique print of a Maori Man was engraved by John James Barralet, after the original drawings by Sydney Parkinson in 1769, and was published in the 1773 1st edition of John Hawkesworth's An Account of the Voyages Undertaken by the Order of His Present Majesty for Making Discoveries in the Southern Hemisphere and Successively Performed by Commodore Byron, Captain Wallis, Captain Carteret, and Captain Cook, in the Dolphin, the Swallow, and the Endeavor, Drawn Up from the Journals Which Were Kept by the Several Commanders, and from the Papers of Joseph Banks, Esq. 3 vols. 1st ed. London, 1773. Volumes 2 and 3 are devoted to Cook’s first voyage.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: -  
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 11 1/2in x 8 1/2in (290mm x 230mm)
Plate size: - 9in x 7 1/2in (225mm x 190mm)
Margins: - 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

Below is an excerpt from Hawkesworth regarding this and other Maori prints by Parkinson.
The bodies of both sexes are marked with black stains called Amoco, by the same method that is used at Otaheite, and called Tattowing; but the men are more marked, and the women less. . . . [T]he men, on the contrary, seem to add something every year to the ornaments of the last, so that some of them, who appeared to be of an advanced age, were almost covered from head to foot. Besides the Amoco, the have marks impressed by a method unknown to us, of a very extraordinary kind: they are furrows of about a line deep, and a line broad, such as appear on the bark of a tree which has been cut through . . . and being perfectly black, they make a most frightful appearance. . . . [W]e could not but admire the dexterity and art with which they were impressed. The marks upon the face in general are spirals, which are drawn with great nicety, and even elegance, those on one side exactly corresponding with those on the other. . . . [N]o two were, upon a close examination, found to be alike. [vol. 3, pp. 452–53]

Background: 
Sydney Parkinson 1745 – 71 was draughtsman to the botanist Sir Joseph Banks on James Cook’s first voyage to the Pacific in 1768. He died of dysentery in 1771, on the homeward voyage.
Parkinson was the first European artist to create drawings of Indigenous Australian, Maori & South Sea peoples, as well as landscapes, from direct observation. Hundreds of his original drawings survive in the British Museum. He is particularly remembered for his plant illustrations which were later used to create the lavish plates for Joseph Banks’ Florilegium. 
When the Endeavour returned to England in 1772, a dispute arose between Joseph Banks and Sydney’s brother, Stanfield Parkinson. As his employer, Banks claimed rights to Sydney’s drawings, papers and collections made on the voyage. Stanfield claimed that Sydney had willed them to his family. Banks lent the Parkinson family Sydney’s journal and drawings with instructions that they were not to be published, however Stanfield disregarded this and arranged for A Journal of a voyage to the South Seas to be printed from Sydney’s account of the voyage. 
Banks managed to suppress Stanfield’s publication until the official account of the voyage, edited by John Hawkesworth, appeared. In return for Parkinson’s papers, Banks paid Stanfield Parkinson 500 pounds for balance of wages due to Sydney, but the dispute did not end there. Stanfield further accused Banks of retaining items collected by Sydney which were intended for his relatives. Stanfield Parkinson was declared insane soon after the publication of Sydney Parkinson’s Journal and died in an asylum.

John Hawkesworth An English writer and journalist, Hawkesworth was commissioned by the British Admiralty to edit for publication the narratives of its officers’ circumnavigations. He was given full access to the journals of the commanders and the freedom to adapt and re-tell them in the first person. Cook was already on his way back from his second Pacific voyage, temporarily docked at Cape Town (South Africa), when he first saw the published volumes: he was mortified and furious to find that Hawkesworth claimed in the introduction that Cook had seen and blessed (with slight corrections) the resulting manuscript. (In his defense, Hawkesworth also had been a victim of misunderstanding.) Cook had trouble recognizing himself. Moreover, the work was full of errors and commentary introduced by Hawkesworth and, in Cook’s view, too full of Banks, who had promoted himself and the publication. Still, the work was popular; the first edition sold out in several months.

John James Barralet 1747 - 1815 was an Irish artist who spent the later part of his career in the United States. Of French descent, Barralet was born in Dublin, Ireland. In early life he was a drawing-master in Dublin, but he later went to London and practised water-colour painting. He exhibited three landscapes at the Royal Academy in 1770, and occasionally exhibited in succeeding years. He was employed in illustrating books on Irish Antiquities. In 1795 he emigrated to America, settling in Philadelphia, where he died in 1815. His brother, J. Melchior Barralet, was a teacher in the Royal Academy School, and occasionally, between the years 1775 and 1789, sent tinted drawings to the Academy Exhibitions

Cook's First Voyage (1768-1771)
The first voyage under Captain James Cook's command was primarily of a scientific nature. The expedition on the Endeavour initially sailed to Tahiti to observe the transit of the planet Venus in order to calculate the earth's distance from the sun. Cook landed on the South Pacific island in April of 1769 and in June of that year the astronomical observations were successfully completed. In addition to these labors, very good relations with the Tahitians were maintained and the naturalists Joseph Banks and Daniel C. Solander conducted extensive ethnological and botanical research.
Another purpose of the voyage was to explore the South Seas to determine if an inhabitable continent existed in the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Upon leaving Tahiti, Cook named and charted the Society Islands and then continued southwest to New Zealand. His circumnavigation and exploration of that country also resulted in a detailed survey. Cook proceeded to Australia, where he charted the eastern coast for 2,000 miles, naming the area New South Wales. As a result of these surveys, both Australia and New Zealand were annexed by Great Britain. In addition to these explorations, the Endeavour returned to England without a single death from scurvy among its men, an historic feat at the time. The combination of these accomplishments brought Cook prominence, promotion, and the opportunity to lead further expeditions.

 

$1,250.00 USD
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1575 Braun & Hogenberg Map of Pozzuoli Bay Naples Italy

1575 Braun & Hogenberg Map of Pozzuoli Bay Naples Italy

Description:
This finely engraved beautifully hand coloured original antique 2 x birds-eye view of the Bay of Pozzuoli -in the Gulf of Naples - with The city of Pozzuoli & the Port Of Baia visible was published by Georg Braun & Frans Hogenberg for the 1575 atlas of town plans Civiates Orbis Terrarum Vol II intended as a companion to Abraham Ortelius's master Atlas Theatrum Orbis Terrarum published in 1570.

The Gulf of Naples is a 10-mile wide gulf located in the south western coast of Italy, (province of Naples, Campania region). It opens to the west into the Mediterranean Sea & is bordered on the north by the cities of Naples and Pozzuoli. To the east is Mount Vesuvius, and on the south by the Sorrentine Peninsula and its main town Sorrento; the Peninsula separates it from the Gulf of Salerno.

Pozzuoli began as the Greek colony of Dicaearchia. The Roman colony was established in 194 BC, and took the Latin name Puteoli 'little wells', referring to the many hot springs in the area, most notably Solfatara. This is because Pozzuoli lies in the center of the Campi Flegrei, a caldera.
Puteoli was the great emporium for the Alexandrian grain ships, and other ships from all over the Roman world. It also was the main hub for goods exported from Campania, including blown glass, mosaics, wrought iron, and marble. The Roman naval base at nearby Misenum housed the largest naval fleet in the ancient world. It was also the site of the Roman Dictator Sulla's country villa and the place where he died in 78 BC.
The local volcanic sand, pozzolana formed the basis for the first effective concrete, as it reacted chemically with water. Instead of just evaporating slowly off, the water would turn this sand/lime mix into a mortar strong enough to bind lumps of aggregate into a load-bearing unit. This made possible the cupola of the Pantheon, the first real dome.

Background of Civitates Orbis Terrarum

The first volume of the Civitates Orbis Terrarum was published in Cologne in 1572. The sixth and the final volume appeared in 1617. 
This great city atlas, edited by Georg Braun and largely engraved by Franz Hogenberg, eventually contained 546 prospects, bird-eye views and map views of cities from all over the world. Braun (1541-1622), a cleric of Cologne, was the principal editor of the work, and was greatly assisted in his project by the close, and continued interest of Abraham Ortelius, whose Theatrum Orbis Terrarum of 1570 was, as a systematic and comprehensive collection of maps of uniform style, the first true atlas.

For a variety of reasons town plans were comparatively latecomers in the long history of cartography. Few cities in Europe in the middle ages had more than 20,00 inhabitants and even London in the late Elizabethan period had only 100-150,000 people which in itself was probably 10 times that of any other English city. The Nuremberg Chronicle in 1493 included one of the first town views of Jerusalem, thereafter, for most of the sixteenth century, German cartographers led the way in producing town plans in a modern sense. In 1544 Sebastian Munster issued in Basle his Cosmographia containing roughly sixty-six plans and views, some in the plan form, but many in the old panorama or birds eye view. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

Condition Report:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Green, blue, red, yellow
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 21in x 16in (535mm x 410mm)
Plate size: - 19in x 12in (485mm x 310mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Professional repair to top centre margin
Plate area: - Small professional repairs & light age toning to centrefold
Verso: - None

$475.00 USD
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