Prints (9)

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1760 Vue D Optic Large Antique Print View of Cheapside, London St Mary le Bow

1760 Vue D Optic Large Antique Print View of Cheapside, London St Mary le Bow

  • Title : Prospectus majoris viae, et Ecclesiae Sanctae Mariae in Londino; 25c Vue D Optique Representatnt; Le Grande Rue, et L Englise St Marie de Londres
  • Ref  :  43197
  • Size: 18in x 13in (460mm x 330mm)
  • Date : 1756
  • Condition: (A) Very Good Condition

Description:
This hand coloured original antique print, a view of Cheapside and St Marys Le Bow, London was published as part of the Vues d’Optique in 1760.

St Mary-le-Bow is an historic church rebuilt after the Great Fire of 1666 by Sir Christopher Wren in the City of London on the main east–west thoroughfare, Cheapside. According to tradition a true Cockney must be born within earshot of the sound of Bow Bells (which refers to this church's bells rather than St Mary and Holy Trinity, Bow Road, in Bow, an outlying village until the 19th century.

Vues d'Optique or Perspective Views: Perspective views, or "vues d'optique," are a special type of popular print published in Europe during the 18th century. These prints provided a form of entertainment when viewed through a device called an "optical machine" or an "optique." The most characteristic feature of the perspective views is their emphasized linear perspective, done to further intensify the enhanced appearance of depth and illusionistic space in the prints when viewed through an optique. When displayed in the optique, the prints might transport the viewer into a far away place---an unknown city, or perhaps into the midst of a dramatic bit of contemporary history. Another attribute of these prints is their bright, often heavy hand coloring, applied boldly so as to show the tints when viewed through the lens. 
A number of perspective prints depicted American scenes at the time of the Revolution for a European audience hungry for news of the events in the British colonies. As documents of American history and European printmaking, these are unusual and appealing eighteenth-century prints. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Blue, yellow, green, red
General color appearance: - Authentic & bright
Paper size: - 18in x 13in (460mm x 330mm)
Plate size: - 16 1/2in x 10in (420mm x 255mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Repair to top margin, no loss
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$175.00 USD
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1760 Vue D Optic Large Antique Print View of Old Somerset House, Thames London

1760 Vue D Optic Large Antique Print View of Old Somerset House, Thames London

  • Title : Vue du Palias Royal Somerset du cote de la Thamise
  • Ref  :  26261
  • Size: 16in x 9 1/2in (405mm x 240mm)
  • Date : 1756
  • Condition: (B) Good Condition

Description:
This hand coloured original antique print, a view of the old Somerset House, prior to the late 18th century refurbishment, on the River Thames, London was published as part of the Vues d’Optique in 1760.

Somerset House is a large Neoclassical building situated on the south side of the Strand in central London, overlooking the River Thames, just east of Waterloo Bridge. The building, originally the site of a Tudor Palace was designed by Sir William Chambers in 1776, and further extended with Victorian wings to the east and west in 1831 and 1856 respectively. The East Wing forms part of the adjacent Strand campus of King's College London

Vues d'Optique or Perspective Views: Perspective views, or "vues d'optique," are a special type of popular print published in Europe during the 18th century. These prints provided a form of entertainment when viewed through a device called an "optical machine" or an "optique." The most characteristic feature of the perspective views is their emphasized linear perspective, done to further intensify the enhanced appearance of depth and illusionistic space in the prints when viewed through an optique. When displayed in the optique, the prints might transport the viewer into a far away place---an unknown city, or perhaps into the midst of a dramatic bit of contemporary history. Another attribute of these prints is their bright, often heavy hand coloring, applied boldly so as to show the tints when viewed through the lens. 
A number of perspective prints depicted American scenes at the time of the Revolution for a European audience hungry for news of the events in the British colonies. As documents of American history and European printmaking, these are unusual and appealing eighteenth-century prints. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Blue, yellow, green, red
General color appearance: - Authentic & bright
Paper size: - 16in x 9 1/2in (405mm x 240mm)
Plate size: - 16in x 9 1/2in (405mm x 240mm)
Margins: - Min 0in (0mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Left margin cropped to image edge
Plate area: - Soiling and creasing the bottom left edge
Verso: - Soiling

$99.00 USD
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1756 Maitland Large Antique Print of Temple Church London, Knights Templars

1756 Maitland Large Antique Print of Temple Church London, Knights Templars

Description: 
This fine hand coloured original antique print of SE view of Temple Church, London was engraved by Benjamin Cole and published in the 1756 edition of The History of London from its Foundation to the Present Time...', by William Maitland, Osborne & Shipton and Hodges, London.

The Temple Church is a late 12th-century church in the City of London located between Fleet Street and the River Thames, built by the Knights Templar as their English headquarters. During the reign of King John (1199–1216) it served as the royal treasury, supported by the role of the Knights Templars as proto-international bankers. It is jointly owned by the Inner Temple and Middle Temple Inns of Court, bases of the English legal profession. It is famous for being a round church, a common design feature for Knights Templar churches, and for its 13th and 14th century stone effigies. It was heavily damaged by German bombing during World War II and has since been greatly restored and rebuilt. The area around the Temple Church is known as the Temple and nearby formerly in the middle of Fleet Street stood the Temple Bar, an ornamental processional gateway. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early 
Colors used: - Red, yellow, green
General color appearance: -  Authentic
Paper size: - 15in x 9 1/2in (380mm x 245mm)
Plate size: -  13 3/4in x 8 1/4in (350mm x 210mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)
 
Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$99.00 USD
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1756 Maitland Large Antique Print of Bridewell Palace, Prison London, England

1756 Maitland Large Antique Print of Bridewell Palace, Prison London, England

Description:
This fine hand coloured original antique print of Bridewell Palace as it was as a prison in the 18th century was engraved by Benjamin Cole and published in the 1756 edition of The History of London from its Foundation to the Present Time...', by William Maitland, Osborne & Shipton and Hodges, London.

Bridewell Palace in London was built as a residence of King Henry VIII and was one of his homes early in his reign for eight years. Given to the City of London Corporation by his son King Edward VI for use as an orphanage and place of correction for wayward women, Bridewell later became the first prison/poorhouse to have an appointed doctor.
It was built on the banks of the Fleet River in the City of London between Fleet Street and the River Thames in an area today known as 'Bridewell Court' off New Bridge Street. By 1556 part of it had become a jail known as Bridewell Prison. It was reinvented with lodgings and was closed in 1855 and the buildings demolished in 1863–1864. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early 
Colors used: - Red, yellow, green
General color appearance: -  Authentic
Paper size: - 15in x 9 1/2in (380mm x 245mm)
Plate size: -  13 3/4in x 8 1/4in (350mm x 210mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)
 
Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$99.00 USD
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1725 Campbell Antique Architectural Print of Greenhouse at Wanstead Manor Essex

1725 Campbell Antique Architectural Print of Greenhouse at Wanstead Manor Essex

  • Title : The Greenhouse at Wanstead in Essex the Seat of Sir Richard Child Bart
  • Ref #:  70547
  • Size: 17in x 10 1/2in (430mm x 270mm)
  • Date : 1725
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This large original antique architectural print of the Greenhouse of the Great Manor House at Wanstead in Essex the home of Sir Richard Child by Colen Campbell and was published in the 1725 edition of Vitruvius Britannicus or The British Architect.

Background: In 1715 Sir Richard Child commissioned the Scottish architect Colen Campbell to design a grand mansion in the then emerging Palladian style, to replace the former house, and to rival contemporary mansions such as Blenheim Palace. When completed it covered an area of 260 ft (79 m). by 70 ft (21 m), the facade having a portico with six Corinthian columns, the earliest in England.
The grounds were landscaped and planted with formal avenues of trees by George London, one of the leading garden designers of his day. Child was created 1st Viscount Castlemaine 3 years later in 1718, the house being completed in 1722. Child had married in 1703 Dorothy Glynne, whose mother was of the Tylney family of Tylney Hall in Rotherwick, Hampshire.
On the death of Ann Tylney, her cousin, in 1730, Dorothy and her husband Viscount Castlemain inherited the Tylney estates. Castlemain was created 1st Earl Tylney the following year (1731) and in 1734 obtained an Act of Parliament to change the name of his family, including his heirs, from the patronymic to Tylney, probably to meet a condition of his wife's inheritance.
On the death of the Earl in 1750 he was succeeded by his 38-year-old son John Tylney, 2nd Earl Tylney, who continued the plantings, but in the then fashionable natural and non-formal style. The 2nd. Earl had no male issue and his estates passed on his death in 1784 to his elder sister Emma's sonSir James Long, 7th Baronet, who being then in possession of the vast estates of the Longs, the Childs and the Tylneys, assumed the surname Tylney-Long for himself and his descendants, again probably in accordance with a requirement of the inheritance.
On the death of the 7th Baronet in 1794 the combined estate passed to his one-year-old infant son Sir James Tylney-Long, 8th Baronet, who died in 1805 aged just 11. The estate then passed to his young sister, eldest of three, Catherine Tylney-Long, who thereby became the richest heiress in England.Like many other settlements, Wanstead first emerged into the light of history in the eleventh century, with the Domesday Survey, compiled on the orders of William I in 1086.

Vitruvius Britannicus or The British Architect is from one of the finest works on architecture ever produced.  Colen Campbell published the work in London in 1725.  The engravings from this work feature illustrations, plans, and cross sections of English country houses and parks.
Campbell was the chief architect to the Prince of Wales.  His work served as a design book that led to the construction of many of Britain’s great houses.  Vitruvius Britannicus established Palladian architecture as the dominant style England in the 18th century.
Vitruvius Britannicus documented the buildings of some of the greatest architects of the times including Indigo Jones, Sir Christopher Wren, and Colen Campbell himself.  The work is essential to the study of 17th and 18th century design and architecture in England.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - Off white
Age of map color: -  
Colors used: -  
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 17in x 10 1/2in (430mm x 270mm)
Plate size: - 15in x 10in (380mm x 255mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Uniform age toning
Plate area: - Uniform age toning
Verso: - Uniform age toning

$125.00 USD
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1773 Grose Large Antique Print View of The London Charter House

1773 Grose Large Antique Print View of The London Charter House

Description:

This large original antique print of the London Charter House situated in Smithfield London - accompanied with text page - was published by Francis Grose on the 1773 edition of The Antiquities of England and Wales.

The London Charterhouse is a historic complex of buildings in Smithfield, London dating back to the 14th century. It occupies land to the north of Charterhouse Square. The Charterhouse began as (and takes its name from) a Carthusian priory, founded in 1371 and dissolved in 1537. 
Substantial fragments remain from this monastic period, but the site was largely rebuilt after 1545 as a large courtyard house. Thus, today it "conveys a vivid impression of the type of large rambling 16th century mansion that once existed all round London". The Charterhouse was further altered and extended after 1611, when it became an almshouseand school, endowed by Thomas Sutton. The almshouse (a home for gentlemen pensioners) still occupies the site today under the name the Charterhouse.

Francis Grose (1731 –1791) was an English antiquary, draughtsman, and lexicographer. He was born at his father's house in Broad Street, St-Peter-le-Poer, London. 
Grose had early on shown a keen interest in drawing, having attempted sketches of medieval buildings as far back as 1749, and having taken formal instruction at a drawing school in the mid-1750s. He was not a particularly gifted draughtsman but he mixed in the London artistic milieu and began to exhibit, first at the Society of Artists in 1767–8 and then at the Royal Academy. His interest was in the field of medieval remains, which were beginning to exercise an increasing grip on the public imagination. 
In 1772, he published the first part of The Antiquities of England and Wales, a work which he unashamedly aimed at the popular market. Essentially, it targeted those who wanted to know about antiquities but had neither time nor means to visit them in person, and contained small panoramas of medieval ruins, together with an informative text on a separate page. Sometimes the text was taken from books already published, or from information supplied by other antiquaries (both acknowledged); sometimes Grose collated material himself from which he could work up an article. From 1772 onwards, he also toured the country to visit and draw sites for inclusion in The Antiquities. The fourth and last volume came out in June 1776, and Grose almost immediately began work on a supplement.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - Off white
Age of map color: -  
Colors used: -  
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 15in x 9 1/2in (385mm x 235mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$75.00 USD
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1760 Vue D Optic Antique Print View of Hampton Court Palace, Richmond London

1760 Vue D Optic Antique Print View of Hampton Court Palace, Richmond London

  • Title : Vue du Palias Royal de Hampton Court a 15 Milles de Londres
  • Date : 1760
  • Condition: (A) Very Good Condition
  • Ref:  92704
  • Size: 19in x 12 3/4in (480mm x 325mm) 

Description: 
This hand coloured original antique print, a view of Hampton Court Palace was published as part of the Vues d’Optique in 1760.

Hampton Court Palace: is a royal palace in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames, Greater London, in the historic county of Middlesex, and within the postal town East Molesey, Surrey. It has not been inhabited by the British Royal Family since the 18th century. The palace is 11.7 miles (18.8 kilometres) south west of Charing Cross and upstream of central London on the River Thames. It was originally built in 1514 for Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, a favourite of King Henry VIII. In 1529, as Wolsey fell from favour, the King seized the palace for himself and later enlarged it. Along with St. James's Palace, it is one of only two surviving palaces out of the many owned by King Henry VIII.

In the following century, King William III's massive rebuilding and expansion project was intended to rival Versailles. Work ceased in 1694, leaving the palace in two distinct contrasting architectural styles, domestic Tudor and Baroque. While the palace's styles are an accident of fate, a unity exists due to the use of pink bricks and a symmetrical, if vague, balancing of successive low wings.

Vues d' Optique or Perspective Views: Perspective views, or "vues d'optique," are a special type of popular print published in Europe during the 18th century. These prints provided a form of entertainment when viewed through a device called an "optical machine" or an "optique." The most characteristic feature of the perspective views is their emphasized linear perspective, done to further intensify the enhanced appearance of depth and illusionistic space in the prints when viewed through an optique. When displayed in the optique, the prints might transport the viewer into a far away place---an unknown city, or perhaps into the midst of a dramatic bit of contemporary history. Another attribute of these prints is their bright, often heavy hand coloring, applied boldly so as to show the tints when viewed through the lens.

A number of perspective prints depicted American scenes at the time of the Revolution for a European audience hungry for news of the events in the British colonies. As documents of American history and European printmaking, these are unusual and appealing eighteenth-century prints.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - Off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Blue, yellow, green, red
General color appearance: - Authentic & bright
Paper size: - 19in x 12 3/4in (480mm x 325mm)
Plate size: - 14 1/2in x 9 1/2in (370mm x 240mm)
Margins: - Min 2in (50mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling
Plate area: - Small smudge & toning to sky
Verso: - Small repair, no loss

$175.00 USD
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1780 Vue d' Optic Antique Print of Westminster, River Thames, Tower of London

1780 Vue d' Optic Antique Print of Westminster, River Thames, Tower of London

  • Title : Vue Du Pont De Westminster Du Cote Du Nord
  • Date : 1780
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  92718
  • Size: 21in x 14 1/2in (535mm x 370mm) 

Description: 

This large beautifully engraved hand coloured original antique print, a view of Westminster in London -including London Bridge, Tower Hill, Westminster Abbey and the old Parliament buildings - was engraved by Balthazar Frederic Leizelt and was published in 1780 in the unusual publication Vues d’Optique.

Vues d' Optique or Perspective Views: Perspective views, or "vues d'optique," are a special type of popular print published in Europe during the 18th century. These prints provided a form of entertainment when viewed through a device called an "optical machine" or an "optique." The most characteristic feature of the perspective views is their emphasized linear perspective, done to further intensify the enhanced appearance of depth and illusionistic space in the prints when viewed through an optique. When displayed in the optique, the prints might transport the viewer into a far away place---an unknown city, or perhaps into the midst of a dramatic bit of contemporary history. Another attribute of these prints is their bright, often heavy hand coloring, applied boldly so as to show the tints when viewed through the lens.

A number of perspective prints depicted American scenes at the time of the Revolution for a European audience hungry for news of the events in the British colonies. As documents of American history and European printmaking, these are unusual and appealing eighteenth-century prints.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Blue, yellow, green, red
General color appearance: - Authentic & bright
Paper size: - 21in x 14 1/2in (535mm x 370mm)
Plate size: - 15 1/2in x 10in (395mm x 255mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - Light soiling

$325.00 USD
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1656 Daniell King Antique Print of Old St Pauls Cathedral London - Pre 1666

1656 Daniell King Antique Print of Old St Pauls Cathedral London - Pre 1666

  • Title  : Ecclesiae Cathedralis Sti Pauli facies Aquilonaris / The North Prospect of ye Cathedral Church of St Paul in London
  • Date  : 1656
  • Condition: (A+) Fine
  • Ref # :  16365
  • Size   : 15 1/2in x 13 1/2in (395mm x 340mm) 

Description:

This fine original antique print of the Old St Pauls Cathedral in London by Daniel King was published just prior to the Great Fire of London in the 1656 edition of his Cathedral and Conventual Churches of England and Wales.

Old St Paul's Cathedral was the medieval cathedral of the City of London that, until 1666, stood on the site of the present St Paul's Cathedral. Built in 1087–1314 and dedicated to Saint Paul, the cathedral was the fourth church on the site at Ludgate Hill. Work began during the reign of William the Conqueror after a fire in 1087 that destroyed much of the city. Work took more than 200 years, and construction was delayed by another fire in 1135. The church was consecrated in 1240 and enlarged again in 1256 and the early 14th century. At its completion in the middle of the 14th century, the cathedral was one of the longest churches in the world and had one of the tallest spires and some of the finest stained glass. The presence of the shrine of Saint Erkenwald made the cathedral a pilgrimage site during the Medieval period. In addition to serving as the seat of the Diocese of London, the building developed a reputation as a hub of the City of London, with the nave aisle, "Paul's walk", known as a centre for business and the London grapevine. After the Reformation, the open-air pulpit in the churchyard, St Paul's Cross, became the stage for radical evangelical preaching and Protestant bookselling. The cathedral was already severely in decline by the 17th century. Restoration work by Inigo Jones in the 1620s was halted by the English Civil War. Sir Christopher Wren was attempting another restoration in 1666 when the cathedral was destroyed in the Great Fire of London. After demolition of the old structure, the present, domed cathedral was erected on the site, with an English Baroque design by Wren

Daniel King: 1616 - 1661 Topographical etcher, born and based in Chester, England. King was the son of a baker, and was apprenticed in Chester in 1630. He was admitted to the Chester Painter's Company in 1639, and continued working there until about 1643. He then moved away from the town, but sporadically re-appears in the Company lists until 1661 when he is recorded as dead. His etchings all belong to the 1650s, and all emerge from his association with the famous 17th century antiquarian Sir William Dugdale. Anthony Wood recorded that he had been robbed by his wife, and died heart-broken near York House in the Strand. Dugdale later fell out with King, calling him 'a most ignorant silly fellow' and 'an arrant knave'. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 15 1/2in x 13 1/2in (395mm x 340mm)
Plate size: - 14 1/2in x 9in (370mm x 230mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (10mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Small repair to bottom of margin, no loss
Plate area: - Folds as issued
Verso: - None

$425.00 USD
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