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1745 Tindal Large Antique Map Plan The Battle of Prado del Rey, Andalusia Spain

1745 Tindal Large Antique Map Plan The Battle of Prado del Rey, Andalusia Spain

  • TitlePlan of the Incampment of the Allies at Prats Del Rey...
  • Ref:  16430
  • Size:  20in x 17in (510mm x 430mm)
  • Date : 1745
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This beautifully hand coloured original antique map a plan of the battle encampment atPrado del Rey located in the province of Cadiz, Andalucia Spain, during the The War of the Spanish Succession was published in 1745 by Nicholas Tindal in the continuation of Paul Rapin de Thoiras History of England.

This map is a Bird's Eye view of both armies  encampments under the command of Count Staremberg and the enemy under the Duke of Vendosme.

The War of the Spanish Succession, also known as Marlborough's Wars (1702-13), fought in Europe and on the Mediterranean, were the last and the bloodiest of the Wars between England and France under Louis XIV, and the first in which Britain played a major military role in European military affairs. 

Charles II, the Hapsburg king of Spain, was childless, and negotiations over his eventual successor began long before his death. The chief claimants were Philip, son of Louis XIV of France; Archduke Charles (later Holy Roman Emperor Charles VI), son of Emperor Leopold I; and Joseph Ferdinand, electoral prince of Bavaria. England and Holland, opposed to the extension of either French Bourbon or Austrian Hapsburg power into Spain, favoured Joseph Ferdinand. In 1698 all the powers agreed to the complicated First Partition Treaty. By its terms, Joseph Ferdinand was to get the crown; in return, Spanish territories were to go to Austria and France. Joseph Ferdinand died before Charles, however, and the treaty went into jeopardy. In 1700 the duke of Anjou, grandson of Louis, named by the dying Charles as his successor, ascended the throne as Philip V. England, Holland, Austria, and most of the German states then went to war against France. Bavaria sided with France, as did Portugal and Savoy until 1703, when they switched sides. In 1700 Louis had further antagonised the English by the prohibition of English imports and recognition of the claim to the English throne put forward by James, the "Old Pretender," who was the son of the deposed James II and the leader of the Jacobites. England's Grand Alliance with Holland, the Hapsburg Empire, Hanover, and Prussia, intended to prevent French dominance over all of Europe, was opposed by France, Spain, Bavaria, and Savoy.   After the death of William III in 1702, Queen Anne, James's daughter, appointed John Churchill, the Earl of Marlborough, as commander of the English and Dutch armies. A brilliant soldier--brave, handsome, skilful--Marlborough was also opportunistic, crafty, deceptive, and tight-fisted. Military operations began in the Low Countries and became general in 1703.

During the War Marlborough waged ten successful campaigns, besieged over thirty towns, and never lost a battle or a skirmish. After his successes in the Netherlands, the Bavarians and the French threatened Vienna and the Austrians, and Marlborough, a master of tactics and strategy, marched 250 miles across Germany and confronted the French army at Blenheim in 1704, destroying two thirds of it and capturing Marshall Tallard, its commander. Thereafter, however, the war dragged on on different fronts--in the Netherlands, Italy, and Spain--but by 1710 the situation was largely stalemated, though the war as a whole had brought Britain into much greater prominence as a European power. The great allied commanders, the English Duke of Marlborough and the imperial general Prince Eugene of Savoy, won such major victories as Blenheim and Gibraltar (1704), Ramillies (1706), Oudenarde (1708), and Malplaquet (1709). The campaigns in Spain were indecisive, however, and in 1711 England quit the war. Charles VI had become emperor, and he represented as great a threat to the English as did the Bourbons.

Meanwhile, the cost of the war, a dominant theme in English politics and society during the reign of Queen Anne, had generated considerable political opposition at home, particularly amongst the Tory gentry who were taxed to pay for it: though a common soldier in the British Army earned only sixpence a day, it cost £1,000,000 a year to maintain the army in Europe, and total cost of the war for Britain was close to £9,000,000 per year. The conduct of the war became a political football between the Whigs and the Tories, with the queen in the middle. Marlborough's wife Sarah, long one of Anne's favourites, eventually fell out of favour, and after the Tories came back into power in 1710 Marlborough himself, accused of corruption, was stripped of his offices and went abroad.  

Britain had withdrawn from the war for all practical purposes by 1712, and England, Holland, and France signed the Peace of Utrecht, negotiated by the Tory government, which was approved by parliament in 1713--though the Whigs (who represented the mercantile interests which had profited by the war, and who made larger profits by financing it, though in doing so they had created a National Debt which had to be financed by further taxation) regarded it as a betrayal of Britain's allies. By the terms of the treaty France agreed never to unite the crowns of France and Spain, while Britain acquired Hudson's Bay, Arcadia, and Newfoundland from the French, Gibraltar and Minorca from Spain, new trading privileges with Spain, and a monopoly of the slave trade with the Spanish Empire. 

In 1713 England, Holland, and France signed the Peace of Utrecht. Charles continued the war until 1714. Although Philip remained on the Spanish throne, the principle of balance of power had been established in European dynastic affairs.

Marlborough returned to England after Anne's death in 1714 and was restored to some of his former influence under George I.

Paul Rapin de Thoiras was a Frenchman responsible for publishing ten elaborate volumes on the History of England Histoire D’ Angleterre published between 1724-27. In 1745 his work was translated and updated by Nicholas Tindal and called “Tindal’s Continuation of Mr. Rapin’s History of England”. Included with the English edition of Rapins work was an atlas containing 45 maps, battle plans and town plans of the Spanish War of Succession (1701-13) engraved by Richard William Seale and John Basire.
Richard William Seale was an engraver and publisher from London responsible for publishing a number of fine and detailed maps of the continents between 1744-47. (Ref Tooley M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: -  Early
Colors used: -  Green, yellow, blue, orange
General color appearance: -  Authentic
Paper size: - 20in x 17in (510mm x 430mm)
Plate size: - 19in x 15in (482mm x 380mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Folds as issued
Verso: - Small pieces of old tape

$125.00 USD
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1780 Cook Benard Large Antique Print of Capt. Wallis under attack in Tahiti

1780 Cook Benard Large Antique Print of Capt. Wallis under attack in Tahiti

  • TitleLe Capitaine Wallis est attaque dans L Dauphin par les Otahitiens
  • Ref #:  25928
  • Size: 14 1/2in x 10in (370mm x 255mm)
  • Date : 1780
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This beautifully engraved original antique print of Captain Samuel Wallis and his ship the Dolphin under attack by locals in Tahiti in 1767 was engraved by Robert Benard in the first French edition of Hawkesworth's Voyages published in 1780.

Samuel Wallis (1728 –1795) was a Cornish navigator who circumnavigated the world.
Wallis was born near Camelford, Cornwall. In 1766 he was given the command of HMS Dolphin to circumnavigate the world, accompanied by the Swallow under the command of Philip Carteret. The two ships were parted shortly after sailing through the Strait of Magellan, Wallis continuing to Tahiti, which he named "King George the Third's Island" in honour of the King (June 1767).
Wallis himself was ill and remained in his cabin: lieutenant Tobias Furneaux was the first to set foot, hoisting a pennant and turning a turf, taking possession in the name of His Majesty. He continued to Batavia, where many of the crew died from dysentery, then via the Cape of Good Hope to England, arriving in May 1768. He was able to pass on useful information to James Cook who was due to depart shortly for the Pacific, and some of the crew from the Dolphin sailed with Cook.
In 1780 Wallis was appointed Commissioner of the Admiralty.
The Polynesian island of Wallis is named after Samuel Wallis. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 14 1/2in x 10in (370mm x 255mm)
Plate size: - 13 1/2in x 9in (340mm x 230mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: -  Folds as issued
Verso: - None

$149.00 USD
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1780 Cook Benard Large Antique Print of Weapons & Braid New Caledonia Islands

1780 Cook Benard Large Antique Print of Weapons & Braid New Caledonia Islands

Description:
This fine large original antique print of  weapons & ceremonial hats and braids of war of the New Caledonia Islands - as seen by Captain Cook and his men during their visit to the Islands - was engraved by the Frenchman Robert Benard and was published in the first French edition of Hawkesworth's Voyages in 1780.

This print is from the 1st edition of the French publication of Cooks voyages and are beautifully engraved on heavy stable paper and should not be confused with the later re-engravings of the next 30 years which were of a more inferior quality.

Cook's First Voyage (1768-1771)
The first voyage under Captain James Cook's command was primarily of a scientific nature. The expedition on the Endeavour initially sailed to Tahiti to observe the transit of the planet Venus in order to calculate the earth's distance from the sun. Cook landed on the South Pacific island in April of 1769 and in June of that year the astronomical observations were successfully completed. In addition to these labors, very good relations with the Tahitians were maintained and the naturalists Joseph Banks and Daniel C. Solander conducted extensive ethnological and botanical research.

Another purpose of the voyage was to explore the South Seas to determine if an inhabitable continent existed in the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Upon leaving Tahiti, Cook named and charted the Society Islands and then continued southwest to New Zealand. His circumnavigation and exploration of that country also resulted in a detailed survey. Cook proceeded to Australia, where he charted the eastern coast for 2,000 miles, naming the area New South Wales. As a result of these surveys, both Australia and New Zealand were annexed by Great Britain. In addition to these explorations, the Endeavour returned to England without a single death from scurvy among its men, an historic feat at the time. The combination of these accomplishments brought Cook prominence, promotion, and the opportunity to lead further expeditions.

Cook's Second Voyage (1772-1775)
Based on the success of his first voyage, Cook was appointed by the Admiralty to lead a second expedition. Two ships were employed with Cook commanding the Resolution and Captain Tobias Furneaux in charge of theAdventure. The purpose was to circumnavigate the globe as far south as possible to confirm the location of a southern continent. Cook proved that there was no "Terra Australis," which supposedly was located between New Zealand and South America. Cook was convinced, however, that there was land beyond the southern ice fields. In his pursuit of this idea, this expedition was the first European voyage to cross the Antarctic Circle. In addition, in two great sweeps through the Southern latitudes, Cook made an incredible number of landfalls including New Zealand, Easter Island, the Marquesas, Tahiti and the Society Islands, the Tonga Islands, the New Hebrides, New Caledonia, and a number of smaller islands.

In addition to these navigational accomplishments and the accompanying expansion of geographical knowledge, the expedition also recorded a vast amount of information regarding the Pacific islands and peoples, proved the value of the chronometer as an instrument for calculating longitude, and improved techniques for preventing scurvy.

Cook's Third Voyage (1776-1779)
In the course of his first two voyages, Cook circumnavigated the globe twice, sailed extensively into the Antarctic, and charted coastlines from Newfoundland to New Zealand. Following these achievements, Cook's third voyage was organized to seek an efficient route from England to southern and eastern Asia that would not entail rounding the Cape of Good Hope. The search for such a Northwest (or Northeast) Passage had been on the agenda of northern European mariners and merchants since the beginning of European expansion in the late fifteenth century. England's growing economic and colonial interests in India in the later eighteenth century provided the stimulus for the latest exploration for this route.

Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 15 1/2in x 11in (395mm x 280mm)
Plate size: - 15in x 9 1/2in (380mm x 245mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - light soiling in margins
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
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1863 Dangerfield Rare Antique Map of Gettysburg, American Civil War, 1 July 1863

1863 Dangerfield Rare Antique Map of Gettysburg, American Civil War, 1 July 1863

  • Title : Sketch to show the advance of Ewell into Pennsylvania (marked thus_._._._.) also the simultaneous concentration of the armies of Lee and MEADE on Gettysburg on the 1st of July 1863...F Dangerfield Lith. 22 Bedford St Covent Garden
  • Date : 1863
  • Size: 8 1/2in x 5 1/2in (215mm x 140mm)
  • Ref #:  61002
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This rare original antique military map of the intersection of Pennsylvania, Maryland & Virginia centering on Chambersburg & Gettysburg on the 1st of July 1863 was published by Frederick Dangerfield in late 1863.
The map illustrating possibly the most famous battle of the American Civil War also contains a legend showing the position of both the Federal & Confederate Armies on that day.

The Battle of Gettysburg was fought July 1–3, 1863, in and around the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, by Union and Confederate forces during the American Civil War. The battle involved the largest number of casualties of the entire war and is often described as the war's turning point.  Union Maj. Gen. George Meade's Army of the Potomac defeated attacks by Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia, ending Lee's attempt to invade the North.
After his success at Chancellorsville in Virginia in May 1863, Lee led his army through the Shenandoah Valley to begin his second invasion of the North—the Gettysburg Campaign. With his army in high spirits, Lee intended to shift the focus of the summer campaign from war-ravaged northern Virginia and hoped to influence Northern politicians to give up their prosecution of the war by penetrating as far as Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, or even Philadelphia. Prodded by President Abraham Lincoln, Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker moved his army in pursuit, but was relieved of command just three days before the battle and replaced by Meade.
Elements of the two armies initially collided at Gettysburg on July 1, 1863, as Lee urgently concentrated his forces there, his objective being to engage the Union army and destroy it. Low ridges to the northwest of town were defended initially by a Union cavalry division under Brig. Gen. John Buford, and soon reinforced with two corps of Union infantry. However, two large Confederate corps assaulted them from the northwest and north, collapsing the hastily developed Union lines, sending the defenders retreating through the streets of the town to the hills just to the south.
On the second day of battle, most of both armies had assembled. The Union line was laid out in a defensive formation resembling a fishhook. In the late afternoon of July 2, Lee launched a heavy assault on the Union left flank, and fierce fighting raged at Little Round Top, the Wheatfield, Devil's Den, and the Peach Orchard. On the Union right, Confederate demonstrations escalated into full-scale assaults on Culp's Hill and Cemetery Hill. All across the battlefield, despite significant losses, the Union defenders held their lines.
On the third day of battle, fighting resumed on Culp's Hill, and cavalry battles raged to the east and south, but the main event was a dramatic infantry assault by 12,500 Confederates against the center of the Union line on Cemetery Ridge, known as Pickett's Charge. The charge was repulsed by Union rifle and artillery fire, at great loss to the Confederate army.
Lee led his army on a torturous retreat back to Virginia. Between 46,000 and 51,000 soldiers from both armies were casualties in the three-day battle, the most costly in US history.
On November 19, President Lincoln used the dedication ceremony for the Gettysburg National Cemetery to honor the fallen Union soldiers and redefine the purpose of the war in his historic Gettysburg Address. (Ref Tooley M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: -  
Colors used: -  
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 8 1/2in x 5 1/2in (215mm x 140mm)
Plate size: - 8 1/2in x 5 1/2in (215mm x 140mm)
Margins: - Min 1/4in (5mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age top margin cropped closed to title
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$325.00 USD
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1945 Original US Army Airforce Map Defenses of Hiroshima & Naval Base at Kure Ko, Japan

1945 Original US Army Airforce Map Defenses of Hiroshima & Naval Base at Kure Ko, Japan

  • Title : Anti-Aircraft Defenses Kure Naval Base Based on Photo Coverage, POW Reports and other Sources
  • Date : 1945
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  80504
  • Size: 12 1/2in x 12 1/2in (320mm x 320mm)

Description: 
This incredibly rare original United States Army Air Force map of the defences of the Japanese City of Hiroshima & its surrounds - including the important Naval Base at Kure Ko - in 1945 is an incredible find. It is possible that this map has a direct link with the first of 2 A-Bomb attack on Japan in August 1945 as Hiroshima was generally left alone by the United States Army Air Force whilst other cities within Japan were being bombed daily in mid 1945. I have been unable to find another like it.

This is an original map folded covered in an early laminate and seems to me given the protection and folds this would have more than likely used by a United States Army Air Force navigation crew to identify Hiroshima. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Green, red
General color appearance: - Authentic 
Paper size: - 12 1/2in x 12 1/2in (320mm x 320mm)
Margins: - Min 0in (0mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$650.00 USD
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1945 Original US Army Airforce Map of Hiroshima Japan Kure Submarine Naval Base, Atomic Bomb

1945 Original US Army Airforce Map of Hiroshima Japan Kure Submarine Naval Base, Atomic Bomb

Description: 
This is an incredibly rare, extremely detailed & original United States Army Air Force map of the defenses, moorings, submarine bays and depth soundings of the Japanese Kure naval base near Hiroshima produced by the United States Army Air Force in 1945 & is an incredible find. Kure Naval Base was established in 1889, and the Kure Naval Dockyard began operating in 1903. This was the best naval port in the Far East, and is most famous as the site where the battleship Yamato was built. Additionally, Kure was the biggest arsenal town in Japan.

It is possible that this map has a direct link with the first of 2 A-Bomb attack on Japan in August 1945 as Hiroshima was generally left alone by the United States Army Air Force whilst other cities within Japan were being bombed daily in mid 1945. I have been unable to find another like it. This is an original map folded covered in a type of early laminate and seems to me given the plastic protection and folds this would have more than likely used by a United States Army Air Force navigation crew to identify Hiroshima.  (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Red
General color appearance: - Authentic 
Paper size: - 17 1/2in x 12 1/2in (445mm x 320mm)
Margins: - Min 0in (0mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$650.00 USD
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