Africa (29)

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1815 Horsburgh Large Antique Map of St Helena Island HMS Northumberland Napoleon

1815 Horsburgh Large Antique Map of St Helena Island HMS Northumberland Napoleon

  • TitleA Survey of The Bank of Soundings and Dangers around The Island St. Helena by Mr. George Thoms. on His Majesty Ship Northumberland Rear Admiral Sir George Cockburn, in 1815
  • Date : 1815
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  35002
  • Size: 27in x 26in (685mm x 660mm)

Description: 
This large extremely rare original antique map of St Helena Island is special. Special not just because of its rarity but also because the survey of the Island to construct this map, were undertaken by George Thomas onboard HMS Northumberland in 1815. 

The Northumberland, under the command of Rear Admiral Sir George Cockburn, was responsible for transporting Napoleon to the Island after his defeat at the battle of Waterloo. And so the surveys would have been carried out by Thomas, after delivering Napoleon to the Island and would have been used by the Royal Navy as intelligence in case of a rescue or kidnap attempt on Napoleon. 
I have been able to locate only one other copy of the map in the Bibliothèque nationale de France.
The map has extensive depth soundings as well as coastal navigation points with text on both the Barn & Sperry Ledge and remarks on sunken rocks off Mundens Point and James Town.
The map was published by John Horsburgh Hydrographer to the East India Company on January 1st 1817.

Admiral of the Fleet Sir George Cockburn, 10th Baronet (22 April 1772 – 19 August 1853) was a Royal Navy officer. As a captain he was present at the battle of Cape St Vincent in February 1797 during the French Revolutionary Wars and commanded the naval support at the reduction of Martinique in February 1809 during the Napoleonic Wars. He also directed the capture and burning of Washington on 24 August 1814 as an advisor to Major General Robert Ross during the War of 1812. He went on to be First Naval Lord and in that capacity sought to improve the standards of gunnery in the fleet, forming a gunnery school at Portsmouth; later he ensured that the Navy had latest steam and screw technology and put emphasis of the ability to manage seamen without the need to resort to physical punishment.
In August 1815 Cockburn was given the job of conveying Napoleon Bonaparte in the third-rate HMS Northumberland to Saint Helena: Cockburn remained there for some months as governor of the island and Commander-in-Chief of the Cape of Good Hope Station. He was advanced to Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Bath on 20 February 1818, and having been promoted to vice-admiral on 12 August  1819, he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society on 21 December 1820

HMS Northumberland was a 74-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, built at the yards of Barnard, Deptford and launched on 2 February 1798.
Northumberland
 participated in the Battle of San Domingo, where she was damaged, and suffered 21 killed and 74 wounded, the highest casualties of any British ship in the battle.
On November 22, 1810, Northumberland, while in the company of HMS Armada, a 74-gun third rate, captured the 14-gun French privateerketch La Glaneuse.
She received a measure of fame when she transported Napoleon I into captivity on the Island of Saint Helena. Napoleon had surrendered to Captain Frederick Maitland of HMS Bellerophon, on 15 July 1815 and was then transported to Plymouth. Napoleon was transferred from the Bellerophon to the Northumberland for his final voyage to St. Helena because concerns were expressed about the suitability of the ageing ship. HMS Northumberland was therefore selected instead. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: -  
Colors used: -   
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 27in x 26in (685mm x 660mm)
Plate size: - 25 1/2in x 25in (650mm x 635mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$1,775.00 USD
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1674 A H Jaillot Large Old Antique 1st edition Map of Africa

1674 A H Jaillot Large Old Antique 1st edition Map of Africa

  • Title : L 'Afrique Divisee Suivant l'Estendue de ses Principales Parties...Alexis Hubert Jaillot...1674
  • Ref #:  50667
  • Size: 36in x 24 1/2in (915mm x 620mm)
  • Date : 1674
  • Condition: (A) Very Good Condition

Description:
This large, exquisitely hand coloured, original antique 1st edition map of Africa by Alexis Hubert Jaillot - after Nicolas Sanson - was engraved in 1674 - the date is engraved in the scale cartouche.
This is a beautifully presented map, fantastic colour on sturdy & heavy paper with a deep clear impression, signifying a very early pressing.
This 1st edition map is not to be confused with the later smaller more common version of the map published by A.H. Jaillot. There are 5 editions of this map published in 1674, 1685, 1690, 1692 & 1695.

Background: Being part of the Mediterranean world, the northern coasts of the African continent as far as the Straits of Gibraltar and even round to the area of the Fortunate Isles (the Canaries) were reasonably well known and quite accurately mapped from ancient times. In particular, Egypt and the Nile Valley were well defined and the Nile itself was, of course, one of the rivers separating the continents in medieval T-O maps. Through Arab traders the shape of the east coast, down the Red Sea as far as the equator, was also known but detail shown in the interior faded into deserts with occasional mountain ranges and mythical rivers. The southern part of the continent, in the Ptolemaic tradition, was assumed to curve to the east to form a land-locked Indian Ocean. The voyages of the Portuguese, organized by Henry the Navigator in the fifteenth century, completely changed the picture and by the end of the century Vasco da Gama had rounded the Cape enabling cartographers to draw a quite presentable coastal outline of the whole continent, even if the interior was to remain largely unknown for the next two or three centuries.

After Nicolas Sanson, Hubert Jaillot and Pierre Duval were the most important French cartographers of the seventeenth centuries. Jaillot, originally a sculptor, became interested in geography after his marriage to the daughter of Nicolas Berey (1606-65), a famous map colourist, and went into partnership in Paris with Sanson's sons. There, from about 1669, he undertook the re-engraving, enlarging and re-publishing of the Sanson maps in sheet form and in atlases, sparing no effort to fill the gap in the map trade left by the destruction of Blaeu's printing establishment in Amsterdam in 1672. Many of his maps were printed in Amsterdam (by Pierre Mortier) as well as in Paris. One of his most important works was a magnificent sea atlas, Le Neptune François, published in 1693 and compiled in co-operation with J D Cassini. This was re-published shortly afterwards by Pierre Mortier in Amsterdam with French, Dutch and English texts, the charts having been re-engraved. Eventually, after half a century, most of the plates were used again as the basis for a revised issue published by J N Bellin in 1753.(Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, green, red, orange.
General color appearance: - Authentic and fresh
Paper size: - 36in x 24 1/2in (915mm x 620mm)
Plate size: - 35in x 23in (890mm x 585mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning in margins, bottom margin corners cropped
Plate area: - Light age toning & creasing along centerfold
Verso: - Light age toning & creasing along centerfold

$1,750.00 USD
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1730 Seutter Large Antique Map of Africa

1730 Seutter Large Antique Map of Africa

Description: 
This large beautifully engraved hand coloured original map of Africa was published by Georg Mattraus Seutter in 1730. 

Background: A very graphic map of the African continent with a large pictorial title cartouche containing native figures, animals, the pyramids and a dragon. 
The cartography of the central and southern regions is mostly fictitious and filled with erroneous detail. The Nile is shown originating considerably south of Zaire Lacus, and the Abyssinian province of Amhara is shown in the kingdom of Monomotapa. (Ref: Norwich; M&B; Tooley)

Condition Report
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original & later
Colors used: - Yellow, pink, green, orange, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 25 ½in x 21 ½in (650mm x 545mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 20in (585mm x 510mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Two repairs to bottom margin, no loss
Plate area: - Two small professional repairs to center of image
Verso: - None

$875.00 USD
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1641 Blaeu Large Old, Antique Map of Southern Africa - Aethopia, The Cape

1641 Blaeu Large Old, Antique Map of Southern Africa - Aethopia, The Cape

Description: 
This beautifully hand coloured original antique map of South Africa was published in the 1641 German edition of Joan Blaeus Atlas Novus. 

This handsome map formed the standard for the depiction of South Africa throughout the 17th century, covering the region from Congo-Zanzibar to the Cape. Both Blaeu & Jansson based this map on Portuguese exploration and most detail is confined to the coastlines. There are two large lakes in the interior, one unnamed and the other called Zachef, which is the lake out of which the Zambere (Zambesi River) flows, probably based on reports of Lake Ngami, which was not conclusively discovered until the mid 19th century. The interior shows the mythical Mountains of the Moon or Lunae Montes. Indigenous animals including elephants and monkeys are illustrated, while large galleons sail the sea. The dramatic title cartouche is drawn on an ox hide held up by natives, with monkeys and turtles at their feet. French text on verso.

Background:
The first separately printed map of Africa (as with the other known continents) appeared in Munster's Geographia from 1540 onwards and the first atlas devoted to Africa only was published in 1588 in Venice by Livio Sanuto, but the finest individual map of the century was that engraved on 8 sheets by Gastaldi, published in Venice in 1564. Apart from maps in sixteenth-century atlases generally there were also magnificent marine maps of 1596 by Jan van Linschoten (engraved by van Langrens) of the southern half of the continent with highly imaginative and decorative detail in the interior. In the next century there were many attractive maps including those of Mercator/Hondius (1606), Speed (1627), Blaeu (1 630), Visscher (1636), de Wit (c. 1670), all embellished with vignettes of harbours and principal towns and bordered with elaborate and colourful figures of their inhabitants, but the interior remained uncharted with the exception of that part of the continent known as Ethiopia, the name which was applied to a wide area including present-day Abyssinia. Here the legends of Prester John lingered on and, as so often happened in other remote parts of the world, the only certain knowledge of the region was provided by Jesuit missionaries. Among these was Father Geronimo Lobo (1595-1678), whose work A Voyage to Abyssinia was used as the basis for a remarkably accurate map published by a German scholar, Hiob Ludolf in 1683. Despite the formidable problems which faced them, the French cartographers G. Delisle (c. 1700-22), J. B. B. d'Anville (1727-49) and N. Bellin (1754) greatly improved the standards of mapping of the continent, improvements which were usually, although not always, maintained by Homann, Seutter, de Ia Rochette, Bowen, Faden and many others in the later years of the century. (Ref: Norwich; Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Yellow, pink, red, blue, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 22in x 18in (560mm x 460mm)
Plate size: - 20in x 15 1/2in (510mm x 395mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Small repair to left bottom margin, light soiling in margins
Plate area: - Bottom centerfold re-joined, no loss light soiling
Verso: - Light soiling

$850.00 USD
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1693 Coronelli Antique Globe Gore of South Africa

1693 Coronelli Antique Globe Gore of South Africa

  • Title: Ae Se De Cafri; Cafreri; Mare Delli
  • Date: 1693
  • Ref: 31955
  • Size: 17in x 10 1/4in (415mm x 265mm)

Description:
This is a rare opportunity to acquire an original antique Globe Gores, a full half, of South Africa published by Vincenzo Maria Coronelli (1650 - 1718) in the 1693 Venice edition of Atlante Veneto, Libro dei Globi. The Gore is printed on heavy clean cabled paper, with 17th century water-mark, acquired by us in a large collection some years ago.
I have included an image of the Western Hemisphere Gores from Rodney Shirley's reference book "The Mapping of the World" to give you a perspective of the gore.

In 1693 Coronelli published all his gores - from the 2in to the 42 in - in an atlas, Libero dei Globi, part of the great series of atlases, Atlante Veneto. Libero dei Globi was published by Coronelli to ensure his work was available to a wider audience, as very few could afford travel to Venice, Rome or Paris to view his completed globes... Background: In the early 1680’s Vincenzo Coronelli constructed two vast 15ft diameter terrestrial & celestial globes for Louis XIV of France. These were meticulously hand drawn & engraved. Such was the admiration of these Globes that in 1688 Coronelli began the engraving & publication of Globe Gores for the construction of two 110cm (42in) terrestrial & celestial globes.
Coronellis claim to have produced the best globes of any age was exemplified by the high demand and purchase of the globes by various institutions & cities within Europe. Yet many scholars still did not have the opportunity to visit Paris, London, Rome or Venice to view them and so Coronelli devised his famous atlas Libero dei Globi the first atlas of globe gores ever produced. The Libro formed part of a great series of atlases by Coronelli, the Atlante Veneto, in which Coronelli was able to combine the two cartographic art forms in which he excelled, maps & globes.
The engraving of the gores was of the highest standard with neat contrasting lettering and five large cartouches of a singular grace and elegance. One cartouche situated below Australia carries a portrait of the author and Pope Alexander VI.
Some of the more interesting features contained within the Gores are the recording of recent French explorations in North America, such as La Salles journey to the mouth of the Mississippi in 1681-87 & the French possessions within North America. Elsewhere the Caspian Sea is drawn closer to its modern shape, the Nile in Africa is shown without its fictitious source and the Blue Nile is shown correctly from a large lake in Ethiopia. The tracks of Le Maire crossing of the Pacific in 1616 are marked, as is the voyage of Chaumont to Siam in 1685-6. There are an unusual number of legends, all explanatory and informative along with many vignettes of ships and fishing scenes throughout the globe.

Coronelli was one of the finest engravers & cartographers of any era, producing some of the most stunning work ever seen. These Globe Gores are no exception. Coronelli was a master craftsman with an eye for detail. You can feel the uncompromising accuracy & passion in his work when you study his maps & globes.
These globe gores are scarce, with only a few sales records from the last 25 years. Similarly there is very little choice currently on the market. This scarcity ensures ongoing value and future appreciation.

Libero dei Globi - discrepancies: Over the years there has been confusion as to why there are differences of cartographic information to some gores published in Libero dei Globi. The answer I believe is simple.
Each of the original 1688 copper-plates measured approximately 25 1/2in (650mm) in length from polar calotte to equator. The total length of the paper for Libero dei Globi was 19 1/2in (495mm). So rather than go through the expensive exercise of re-engraving the copper-plates to a reduced size Coronelli masked about 6 1/2 - 7in in (165 - 175mm) of each copper-plate so it would fit onto the atlas page.
It is not known why, either by fate or design, but in different editions of Libero dei Globi the plates were masked at the top of the plate and others the plate was masked at the bottom. This meant that either cartographic data was lost from the equatorial regions or from the Polar regions. The masking also meant that a plate-mark is only evident on three sides of the the gores, a unique way of establishing originality. I tend to believe that the change in masking was deliberate for obvious reasons.
To illustrate the point examine the two gores below. Both are from the same copper-plate The one on the right is masked at the pole with no plate-mark at the top and the other masked at equator again with no plate-mark at the bottom. You therefore have the complete original 1688 globe gore in two.


This has led to much confusion in the past, as we have very little background information on Coronelli's printing methods in regards to the gores.
(Ref: Shirley 538; Tooley; Dr. Helen Wallis The Map Collector Dec 1980; Armao, Ermanno. Vincenzo Coronelli Cenni sull'uomo e la sua Vita Catalogo... Bibliopolis, Florence pp.130-134)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - white
Age of map color: -
Colors used: -
General color appearance: -
Paper size: - 17in x 10 1/4in (415mm x 265mm)
Margins: - min. 1/4in (10mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Several very small worm holes repaired
Verso: - None

If you wish to discuss this or any other item
please email or call - good luck, Simon.
Classical Images
61 (0) 409 551910 Tel
simon@classicalimages.com

Condition : (A) Very Good Condition

 

 

$750.00 USD
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1696 Coronelli Antique Map Globe Gore Section of SE Africa & Madagascar

1696 Coronelli Antique Map Globe Gore Section of SE Africa & Madagascar

Description:
This is a rare opportunity to acquire one of the hand coloured original antique Globe Gores of Madagascar & SE Africa by Vincenzo Coronelli published in 1696. 

The copper-plates for these gores were originally engraved in 1688 by Coronelli for the construction of the large 42in (110cm) terrestrial globe. 
In 1696 Coronelli published all his gores - from the 2in to the 42 in - in an atlas,  Libero dei Globi, part of the great series of atlases,Atlante Veneto. Libero dei Globi was published by Coronelli to ensure his work was available to a wider audience, as very few could afford travel to Venice, Rome or Paris to view his completed globes.

Background: 
In the early 1680’s Vincenzo Coronelli constructed two vast 15ft diameter terrestrial & celestial globes for Louis XIV of France. These were meticulously hand drawn & engraved. Such was the admiration of these Globes that in 1688 Coronelli began the engraving & publication of Globe Gores for the construction of two 110cm (42in) terrestrial & celestial globes. 
Coronellis claim to have produced the best globes of any age was exemplified by the high demand and purchase of the globes by various institutions & cities within Europe. Yet many scholars still did not have the opportunity to visit Paris, London, Rome or Venice to view them and so Coronelli devised his famous atlas Libero dei Globi the first atlas of globe gores ever produced. The Libroformed part of a great series of atlases by Coronelli, the Atlante Veneto, in which Coronelli was able to combine the two cartographic art forms in which he excelled, maps & globes. 
The engraving of the gores was of the highest standard with neat contrasting lettering and five large cartouches of a singular grace and elegance. One cartouche situated below Australia carries a portrait of the author and Pope Alexander VI. 
Some of the more interesting features contained within the Gores are the recording of recent French explorations in North America, such as La Salles journey to the mouth of the Mississippi in 1681-87 & the French possessions within North America. Elsewhere the Caspian Sea is drawn closer to its modern shape, the Nile in Africa is shown without its fictitious source and the Blue Nile is shown correctly from a large lake in Ethiopia. The tracks of Le Maire crossing of the Pacific in 1616 are marked, as is the voyage of Chaumont to Siam in 1685-6. There are an unusual number of legends, all explanatory and informative along with many vignettes of ships and fishing scenes throughout the globe. 

Coronelli was one of the finest engravers & cartographers of any era, producing some of the most stunning work ever seen. These Globe Gores are no exception. Coronelli was a master craftsman with an eye for detail. You can feel the uncompromising accuracy & passion in his work when you study his maps & globes. 
These globe gores are scarce, with only a few sales records from the last 25 years. Similarly there is very little choice currently on the market. This scarcity ensures ongoing value and future appreciation. (Ref: Shirley 538; Tooley; Dr. Helen Wallis The Map Collector Dec 1980;Armao, Ermanno. Vincenzo Coronelli Cenni sull'uomo e la sua Vita Catalogo... Bibliopolis, Florence pp.130-134)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Yellow, green, blue  
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 19 1/2in x 14in (495mm x 355mm)
Plate size: - 19in x 11 1/2in (485mm x 290mm)  
Margins: - min. 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$750.00 USD
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1588 Munster Antique Map of Africa

1588 Munster Antique Map of Africa

Description:

This beautifully hand coloured original antique map of Africa was published in the 1588 edition of Sebastian MunstersCosmographia published by Sebastian Petri, Basle.

The first separately printed map of Africa (as with the other known continents) appeared in Munster's Geographia from 1540 onwards and the first atlas devoted to Africa only was published in 1588 in Venice by Livio Sanuto, but the finest individual map of the century was that engraved on 8 sheets by Gastaldi, published in Venice in 1564. Apart from maps in sixteenth-century atlases generally there were also magnificent marine maps of 1596 by Jan van Linschoten (engraved by van Langrens) of the southern half of the continent with highly imaginative and decorative detail in the interior. In the next century there were many attractive maps including those of Mercator/Hondius (1606), Speed (1627), Blaeu (1 630), Visscher (1636), de Wit (c. 1670), all embellished with vignettes of harbours and principal towns and bordered with elaborate and colourful figures of their inhabitants, but the interior remained uncharted with the exception of that part of the continent known as Ethiopia, the name which was applied to a wide area including present-day Abyssinia. Here the legends of Prester John lingered on and, as so often happened in other remote parts of the world, the only certain knowledge of the region was provided by Jesuit missionaries. Among these was Father Geronimo Lobo (1595-1678), whose work A Voyage to Abyssinia was used as the basis for a remarkably accurate map published by a German scholar, Hiob Ludolf in 1683. Despite the formidable problems which faced them, the French cartographers G. Delisle (c. 1700-22), J. B. B. d'Anville (1727-49) and N. Bellin (1754) greatly improved the standards of mapping of the continent, improvements which were usually, although not always, maintained by Homann, Seutter, de Ia Rochette, Bowen, Faden and many others in the later years of the century.

Sebastian Petri re-release of Cosomgraphia in 1588 produced some fine woodcut maps in the "copperplate style". The maps in this release were more sophisticated than with earlier publications of Cosomgraphia and were based on the 1570 release of Abraham Ortelius monumental work Theatrum Orbis Terrarum.

For a variety of reasons town plans were comparatively latecomers in the long history of cartography. Few cities in Europe in the middle ages had more than 20,00 inhabitants and even London in the late Elizabethan period had only 100-150,000 people which in itself was probably 10 times that of any other English city. The Nuremberg Chronicle in 1493 included one of the first town views of Jerusalem, thereafter, for most of the sixteenth century, German cartographers led the way in producing town plans in a modern sense. In 1544 Sebastian Munster issued in Basle his Cosmographia containing roughly sixty-six plans and views, some in the plan form, but many in the old panorama or birds eye view. (Ref: M&B;Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Later
Colors used: - Blue, yellow, green, pink
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 15in x 13in (380mm x 330mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Small repair to bottom right & top left corner margin
Plate area: - None
Verso: - Re-enforced along centerfold

$750.00 USD
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1760 Lotter Large Antique Map of Southern Africa

1760 Lotter Large Antique Map of Southern Africa

  • Title  : Africae Pars Meridionalis cum Promontorio Bonae Spei Accuratissime Delineato
  • Date : 1760
  • Ref # : 43185
  • Size :  24 1/2in x 19 3/4in (620mm x 505mm)

Description:
This large scarce, beautifully hand coloured original antique map of Southern Africa was published by Tobias Conrad Lotter in 1760.

Background: A map of Southern Africa with an coastline carrying inaccurate inaccurate information, Hottentot tribes are illustrated throughout the mainland, with three detailed insets of the Cape Fort (castle), Saldanha Bay and the Cape of Good Hope, all with a legend. An elaborate cartouche dedication to Domino Wilhelmo - Friedrich Wilhelm, Elector of Brandenburg. (Ref: Tooley, M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Pink, green, yellow
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 24 1/2in x 19 3/4in (620mm x 505mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 19 3/4in (585mm x 505mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Two small worm holes professionally repaired
Plate area: - Small worm holes professionally repaired along centerfold
Verso: - None

Overall Quality (in Bold):
Perfect/Fine/Very Good/Good/Fair/Poor

$650.00 USD
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1638 Jan Jansson Large, Old Antique Map of Africa Morocco, Gibraltar & NW Africa

1638 Jan Jansson Large, Old Antique Map of Africa Morocco, Gibraltar & NW Africa

  • TitleFezzae et Marocchi Regna Africae Celeberrima
  • Date : 1638
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  92950
  • Size: 23 1/2in x 19 1/2in (600mm x 495mm)

Description: 
This fine large beautifully hand coloured original antique map of Morocco & the Straits of Gibraltar into the Mediterranean was published by Jan Jansson in the 1638 Latin edition of Atlas Novus. 

Background: Being part of the Mediterranean world, the northern coasts of the African continent as far as the Straits of Gibraltar and even round to the area of the Fortunate Isles (the Canaries) were reasonably well known and quite accurately mapped from ancient times. In particular, Egypt and the Nile Valley were well defined and the Nile itself was, of course, one of the rivers separating the continents in medieval T-O maps. Through Arab traders the shape of the east coast, down the Red Sea as far as the equator, was also known but detail shown in the interior faded into deserts with occasional mountain ranges and mythical rivers. The southern part of the continent, in the Ptolemaic tradition, was assumed to curve to the east to form a land-locked Indian Ocean. The voyages of the Portuguese, organized by Henry the Navigator in the fifteenth century, completely changed the picture and by the end of the century Vasco da Gama had rounded the Cape enabling cartographers to draw a quite presentable coastal outline of the whole continent, even if the interior was to remain largely unknown for the next two or three centuries.

The first separately printed map of Africa (as with the other known continents) appeared in Munster's Geographia from 1540 onwards and the first atlas devoted to Africa only was published in 1588 in Venice by Livio Sanuto, but the finest individual map of the century was that engraved on 8 sheets by Gastaldi, published in Venice in 1564. Apart from maps in sixteenth-century atlases generally there were also magnificent marine maps of 1596 by Jan van Linschoten (engraved by van Langrens) of the southern half of the continent with highly imaginative and decorative detail in the interior. In the next century there were many attractive maps including those of Mercator/Hondius (1606), Speed (1627), Blaeu (1 630), Visscher (1636), de Wit (c. 1670), all embellished with vignettes of harbours and principal towns and bordered with elaborate and colourful figures of their inhabitants, but the interior remained uncharted with the exception of that part of the continent known as Ethiopia, the name which was applied to a wide area including present-day Abyssinia. Here the legends of Prester John lingered on and, as so often happened in other remote parts of the world, the only certain knowledge of the region was provided by Jesuit missionaries. Among these was Father Geronimo Lobo (1595-1678), whose work A Voyage to Abyssinia was used as the basis for a remarkably accurate map published by a German scholar, Hiob Ludolf in 1683. Despite the formidable problems which faced them, the French cartographers G. Delisle (c. 1700-22), J. B. B. d'Anville (1727-49) and N. Bellin (1754) greatly improved the standards of mapping of the continent, improvements which were usually, although not always, maintained by Homann, Seutter, de Ia Rochette, Bowen, Faden and many others in the later years of the century. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

 General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original & later
Colors used: - Green, red, orange, yellow, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic  
Paper size: - 23 1/2in x 19 1/2in (600mm x 495mm)
Plate size: - 20in x 15 1/2in (510mm x 395mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling in left margin, reapir to top and bottom margin not affecting the image
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$475.00 USD
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1754 Bellin Large Old, Antique Map of Southern Africa, inset view of Cape Town

1754 Bellin Large Old, Antique Map of Southern Africa, inset view of Cape Town

  • Title : Carte Reduite D Une Partie Des Costes Occidentalies et Meridionales De L Afrique...MDCCLIV
  • Ref #:  50656
  • Size: 35 1/2in x 25in (900mm x 510mm)
  • Date : 1754
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This very large finely engraved beautifully hand coloured original antique map, sea chart, of SW Coast of Africa - with an inset view of Cape Town - by Jacques Nicolas Bellin in 1754 - dated in the title cartouche.

Background: This is a scarce and attractive nautical chart depicting the southwest coast of Africa from Cape Fria in Namibia to Cape Agulhas (Cape of the Needles) and the Bay of St. Blaise, including the Cape of Good Hope.
It shows incredible detail along the coast with capes, bays and topographical features including mountains, rivers as well as coastal features noted. Elevation is beautifully rendered in profile.
The map includes three profile views in the top right quadrant. These are ‘Vue Du Cap de Bonne Esperance’ (Cape of Good Hope), ‘Vue Du Cap Falso, Du Cap Des Eguilles et des Terres Qui sont Entre deux’ and ‘Autre Vue Du Cap Falso et Du Cap Des Eguilles’. Cape Town, Constance (Constantia), Stellenbosch and Hangklip are accurately identified

Being part of the Mediterranean world, the northern coasts of the African continent as far as the Straits of Gibraltar and even round to the area of the Fortunate Isles (the Canaries) were reasonably well known and quite accurately mapped from ancient times. In particular, Egypt and the Nile Valley were well defined and the Nile itself was, of course, one of the rivers separating the continents in medieval T-O maps. Through Arab traders the shape of the east coast, down the Red Sea as far as the equator, was also known but detail shown in the interior faded into deserts with occasional mountain ranges and mythical rivers. The southern part of the continent, in the Ptolemaic tradition, was assumed to curve to the east to form a land-locked Indian Ocean. The voyages of the Portuguese, organized by Henry the Navigator in the fifteenth century, completely changed the picture and by the end of the century Vasco da Gama had rounded the Cape enabling cartographers to draw a quite presentable coastal outline of the whole continent, even if the interior was to remain largely unknown for the next two or three centuries.
The first separately printed map of Africa (as with the other known continents) appeared in Munster's Geographia from 1540 onwards and the first atlas devoted to Africa only was published in 1588 in Venice by Livio Sanuto, but the finest individual map of the century was that engraved on 8 sheets by Gastaldi, published in Venice in 1564. Apart from maps in sixteenth-century atlases generally there were also magnificent marine maps of 1596 by Jan van Linschoten (engraved by van Langrens) of the southern half of the continent with highly imaginative and decorative detail in the interior. In the next century there were many attractive maps including those of Mercator/Hondius (1606), Speed (1627), Blaeu (1 630), Visscher (1636), de Wit (c. 1670), all embellished with vignettes of harbours and principal towns and bordered with elaborate and colourful figures of their inhabitants, but the interior remained uncharted with the exception of that part of the continent known as Ethiopia, the name which was applied to a wide area including present-day Abyssinia. Here the legends of Prester John lingered on and, as so often happened in other remote parts of the world, the only certain knowledge of the region was provided by Jesuit missionaries. Among these was Father Geronimo Lobo (1595-1678), whose workA Voyage to Abyssinia was used as the basis for a remarkably accurate map published by a German scholar, Hiob Ludolf in 1683. Despite the formidable problems which faced them, the French cartographers G. Delisle (c. 1700-22), J. B. B. d'Anville (1727-49) and N. Bellin (1754) greatly improved the standards of mapping of the continent, improvements which were usually, although not always, maintained by Homann, Seutter, de Ia Rochette, Bowen, Faden and many others in the later years of the century. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - Blue
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Yellow, green pink, blue 
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 35 1/2in x 25in (900mm x 510mm)
Plate size: - 35in x 23in (890mm x 595mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Creasing along centerfold
Verso: - None

$475.00 USD
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1719 Chatelain Large Old, Antique Map of Africa

1719 Chatelain Large Old, Antique Map of Africa

  • TitleCarte De L Afrique Selon Les Auteurs Anciens Enrichie de Remarques Historiques
  • Date : 1719
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  50628
  • Size: 20 3/4in x 17 1/2in (530m x 445m)

Description: 
This large beautifully hand coloured original antique map of antique map of Africa was published by Henri Abraham Chatelain in 1719, in his famous Atlas Historique.

Atlas Historique: First published in Amsterdam from 1705 to 1720, the various volumes were updated at various times up to 1739 when the fourth edition of vol.I appeared, stated as the "dernière edition, corrigée & augmentée."
The first four volumes seem to have undergone four printings with the later printings being the most desirable as they contain the maximum number of corrections and additions. The remaining three final volumes were first issued between 1719-1720 and revised in 1732.
An ambitious and beautifully-presented work, the Atlas Historique was intended for the general public, fascinated in the early eighteenth century by the recently conquered colonies and the new discoveries. Distant countries, such as the Americas, Africa, the Middle East, Mongolia, China, Japan, Indonesia, etc., take an important place in this work.
In addition to the maps, many of which are based on Guillaume De L'Isle, the plates are after the best travel accounts of the period, such as those of Dapper, Chardin, de Bruyn, Le Hay and other.
Other sections deal with the history of the european countries, and covers a wide range of subjects including genealogy, history, cosmography, topography, heraldry and chronology, costume of the world, all illustrated with numerous engraved maps, plates of local inhabitants and heraldic charts of the lineages of the ruling families of the time. The maps, prints and tables required to make up a complete set are listed in detail in each volume.
The accompanying text is in French and often is printed in two columns on the page with maps and other illustrations interspersed. Each map and table is numbered consecutively within its volume and all maps bear the privileges of the States of Holland and West-Friesland.
The encyclopaedic nature of the work as a whole is reflected in this six frontispiece. The pages are the work of the celerated mr. Romeijn de Hooghe. and are engraved by J.Goeree, T.Schynyoet and P.Sluyter.
New scholarship has suggested the compiler of the atlas, who is identified on the title as "Mr. C***" not to be Henri Abraham Châtelain, but Zacharie Châtelain. (See Van Waning's article in the Journal of the International Map Collectors' Society for persuasive evidence of the latter's authorship.) (Ref: M&B; Tooley)   

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Later
Colors used: - Pink, green, yellow, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic 
Paper size: - 20 3/4in x 17 1/2in (530m x 445m)
Plate size: - 11in x 11in (280m x 280mm)
Margins: - min. 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$375.00 USD
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1735 Homann Large Antique Map of Oran, Algeria, North Africa

1735 Homann Large Antique Map of Oran, Algeria, North Africa

  • TitleTopographica Repræsentatio Barbarici Portus et Urbis Munitæ Oran... Nuremberg, 1732 
  • Ref #:  43187
  • Size: 24 1/2in x 21 1/4in (620mm x 540mm)
  • Date : 1735
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This large fine beautifully hand coloured original antique map and view of the City of Oran & Environs in the North African country of Algeria, as it was being captured by the Spanish in 1732, was published by Homann Heirs in ca 1735.

Background: Chart of the environs of Oran in Algeria, with a panorama of the city and environs, decorated with several sailing battle ships. In 1509 Spain captured Oran from the Moors, but in 1708, with Spain disadvantaged by the War of the Spanish Succession, they were driven out by the Turkish Bey, Mustapha Ben Youssef. In 1732 José Carrillo de Albornoz, 1st Duke of Montemar (1671-1747), recaptured Oran, causing this map to be published, after which the Spanish held the city until 1792. When the Spanish saw no point in keeping it, when it was handed over to the Bey of Algiers(Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, green, blue, pink
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 24 1/2in x 21 1/4in (620mm x 540mm) 
Plate size: - 22 1/2in x 19 1/2in (570mm x 500mm) 
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$375.00 USD
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1670 Dapper & Ogilby Large Old, Antique Print View of Cairo, Egypt

1670 Dapper & Ogilby Large Old, Antique Print View of Cairo, Egypt

Description: 
This finely engraved original antique print a view of the Egyptian city of Cairo was published by John Ogilby in the 1670 edition of An Accurate Description and Complete History of America and Africa based on De Nieuwe en Onbekende Wereld by Olfert Dapper.

Background: A fine bird's-eye view of the ancient city of Cairo, originally featured in Dapper's 'Description of Africa', and heavily based upon the 1549 view of Cairo by Venetian printmaker Matteo Pagono. This striking view of Cairo places the dense city in the centre, surrounded by open landscape. Set to the right of the city, past the River Nile, are depictions of the Pyramids and the Sphinx. In the immediate foreground, several travellers can be seen upon a hilltop that overlooks the city. With them are various animals, including cattle and camels. Two lettered keys are featured, one in Dutch in the upper left corner, and the other, an English translation in the upper right. 
The view was featured in John Ogilby's English edition of Olfert Dapper's 'Description of Africa'.
Olfert Dapper's 'Description of Africa' was an ethnographic book which offered a detailed description of the parts of Africa known to Europeans in the mid-seventeenth century. Despite the work being regarded as one of the most important and detailed seventeenth-century publications on Africa, Dapper himself never actually visited the continent. Instead, he relied on the reports of Jesuit missionaries and Dutch explorers.
Dapper's 'Description of Africa' was first published in 1668 by Jacob van Meurs in Amsterdam, with a second Dutch edition appearing in 1676. In 1670, a German translation of the publication was issued, and in the same year, an English translation, which is generally attributed to John Ogilby. A French edition was published in 1676, although it was not as true to the original as the other translations. 
Olfert Dapper (1636 - 1689) was a Dutch physician and writer. Despite never travelling outside of the Netherlands, Dapper was a writer of world history and geography.
John Ogilby (1600-1676) was a Scottish cartographer and publisher. Ogilby is perhaps best known for his series of road-maps entitled the "Britannia", which was the first road-atlas of any country, published in 1675. (Ref: Tooley, M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 17 1/2in x 14in (445mm x 355mm)
Plate size: - 13 1/2in x 9 1/2in (345mm x 245mm)
Margins: - Min 2in (50mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Slight separation to bottom margin centrefold, not affecting the image
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$375.00 USD
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1751 D Anville Very Large Antique Map The West Coast of Africa, Gambia & Senegal

1751 D Anville Very Large Antique Map The West Coast of Africa, Gambia & Senegal

  • Title : Carte Particuliere De La Cote Occidentale De L'Afrique Depusi le Cap Blanc jusqu'au Cap De Verga et du Cours Des Rivieres De Senega et de Gambie . .MDCCLI
  • Ref #:  22009
  • Size: 42in x 33in (1.07m x 840mm)
  • Date : 1751
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This very large finely engraved, highly detailed original antique map of of the west coast of Africa covering Gambia and Senegal was engraved in 1751 - dated in the tile cartouche - and was published in Jean-Baptiste Bourguinon D'Anville's large elephant folio atlas Atlas Generale.

Description: D' Anville's maps have a clarity and a directness that is very 'modern'. He incorporated as much known information into his maps as he could. Map extent is from Cap Blanc in the north to Cap de Verga in the south.

Being part of the Mediterranean world, the northern coasts of the African continent as far as the Straits of Gibraltar and even round to the area of the Fortunate Isles (the Canaries) were reasonably well known and quite accurately mapped from ancient times. In particular, Egypt and the Nile Valley were well defined and the Nile itself was, of course, one of the rivers separating the continents in medieval T-O maps. Through Arab traders the shape of the east coast, down the Red Sea as far as the equator, was also known but detail shown in the interior faded into deserts with occasional mountain ranges and mythical rivers. The southern part of the continent, in the Ptolemaic tradition, was assumed to curve to the east to form a land-locked Indian Ocean. The voyages of the Portuguese, organized by Henry the Navigator in the fifteenth century, completely changed the picture and by the end of the century Vasco da Gama had rounded the Cape enabling cartographers to draw a quite presentable coastal outline of the whole continent, even if the interior was to remain largely unknown for the next two or three centuries.
The first separately printed map of Africa (as with the other known continents) appeared in Munster's Geographia from 1540 onwards and the first atlas devoted to Africa only was published in 1588 in Venice by Livio Sanuto, but the finest individual map of the century was that engraved on 8 sheets by Gastaldi, published in Venice in 1564. Apart from maps in sixteenth-century atlases generally there were also magnificent marine maps of 1596 by Jan van Linschoten (engraved by van Langrens) of the southern half of the continent with highly imaginative and decorative detail in the interior. In the next century there were many attractive maps including those of Mercator/Hondius (1606), Speed (1627), Blaeu (1 630), Visscher (1636), de Wit (c. 1670), all embellished with vignettes of harbours and principal towns and bordered with elaborate and colourful figures of their inhabitants, but the interior remained uncharted with the exception of that part of the continent known as Ethiopia, the name which was applied to a wide area including present-day Abyssinia. Here the legends of Prester John lingered on and, as so often happened in other remote parts of the world, the only certain knowledge of the region was provided by Jesuit missionaries. Among these was Father Geronimo Lobo (1595-1678), whose work A Voyage to Abyssinia was used as the basis for a remarkably accurate map published by a German scholar, Hiob Ludolf in 1683. Despite the formidable problems which faced them, the French cartographers G. Delisle (c. 1700-22), J. B. B. d'Anville (1727-49) and N. Bellin (1754) greatly improved the standards of mapping of the continent, improvements which were usually, although not always, maintained by Homann, Seutter, de Ia Rochette, Bowen, Faden and many others in the later years of the century. (Ref: Tooley, M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 42in x 33in (1.07m x 840mm)
Plate size: - 40 1/2in x 28in (1.02m x 710mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Light text offsetting
Verso: - None

$299.00 USD
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1719 Chatelain Large Antique Print North Africa City Views Algiers, Jijel, Tripoli & Tunis

1719 Chatelain Large Antique Print North Africa City Views Algiers, Jijel, Tripoli & Tunis

  • Title : Vue de Tunis d'Alger & de Gigeri avec quelques particularitez curieuses touchant les moeurs de leur habitans & de quelques autres peuples de Barbarie
  • Ref #:  50646
  • Size: 20in x 17 1/2in (510mm x 445mm)
  • Date : 1719
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This large finely engraved original antique print views of cities of The Barbary Coast of North Africa including Algiers and Jijel, both in Algeria, Tripoli in Libya and Tunis in Tunisia - as well as peoples & animals of the Barbary coast - was published by Henri Abraham Chatelain in 1719, in his famous Atlas Historique.

Henri Abraham Chatelain (1684 - 1743)
was a Huguenot pastor of Parisian origins. He lived consecutively in Paris, St. Martins, London (c. 1710), the Hague (c. 1721) and Amsterdam (c. 1728).
Chatelain was a skilled artist and knew combining a wealth of historical and geographical information with delicate engraving and an uncomplicated composition. Groundbreaking for its time, this work included studies of geography, history, ethnology, heraldry, and cosmography. His maps with his elegant engraving are a superb example from the golden age of French mapmaking.The publishing firm of Chatelain, Chatelain Frères and Chatelain & Fils is recorded in Amsterdam, from around 1700-1770, with Zacharias living "op den Dam" in 1730.
Henri Abraham Chatelain, his father Zacharie Chatelain (d.1723) and Zacharie Junior (1690-1754), worked as a partnership publishing the Atlas Historique, Ou Nouvelle Introduction à L'Histoire under several different Chatelain imprints, depending on the Chatelain family partnerships at the time of publication. The atlas was published in seven volumes between 1705 and 1720, with a second edition appearing in 1732. The volumes I-IV with a Third edition and volume I with a final edition in 1739.
Henri Abraham Chatelain, whose "Atlas Historique" was one of the most expansive Dutch encyclopedias of the age. First published in 1705, Chatelain's Atlas Historique was part of an immense seven-volume encyclopedia. Although the main focus of the text was geography, the work also included a wealth of historical, political, and genealogical information. The text was compiled by Nicholas Gueudeville and Garillon with a supplement by H.P. de Limiers and the maps were engraved by Chatelain, primarily after charts by De L'Isle. The atlas was published in Amsterdam between 1705 and 1721 and was later reissued by Zacharie Chatelain between 1732 and 1739.

Atlas Historique: First published in Amsterdam from 1705 to 1720, the various volumes were updated at various times up to 1739 when the fourth edition of vol.I appeared, stated as the "dernière edition, corrigée & augmentée."
The first four volumes seem to have undergone four printings with the later printings being the most desirable as they contain the maximum number of corrections and additions. The remaining three final volumes were first issued between 1719-1720 and revised in 1732.
An ambitious and beautifully-presented work, the Atlas Historique was intended for the general public, fascinated in the early eighteenth century by the recently conquered colonies and the new discoveries. Distant countries, such as the Americas, Africa, the Middle East, Mongolia, China, Japan, Indonesia, etc., take an important place in this work.
In addition to the maps, many of which are based on Guillaume De L'Isle, the plates are after the best travel accounts of the period, such as those of Dapper, Chardin, de Bruyn, Le Hay and other.
Other sections deal with the history of the european countries, and covers a wide range of subjects including genealogy, history, cosmography, topography, heraldry and chronology, costume of the world, all illustrated with numerous engraved maps, plates of local inhabitants and heraldic charts of the lineages of the ruling families of the time. The maps, prints and tables required to make up a complete set are listed in detail in each volume.
The accompanying text is in French and often is printed in two columns on the page with maps and other illustrations interspersed. Each map and table is numbered consecutively within its volume and all maps bear the privileges of the States of Holland and West-Friesland.
The encyclopaedic nature of the work as a whole is reflected in this six frontispiece. The pages are the work of the celerated mr. Romeijn de Hooghe. and are engraved by J.Goeree, T.Schynyoet and P.Sluyter.
New scholarship has suggested the compiler of the atlas, who is identified on the title as "Mr. C***" not to be Henri Abraham Châtelain, but Zacharie Châtelain. (See Van Waning's article in the Journal of the International Map Collectors' Society for persuasive evidence of the latter's authorship.) (Ref: M&B; Tooley)   

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 20in x 17 1/2in (510mm x 445mm)
Plate size: - 17 1/2in x 15in (445mm x 380mm)
Margins: - min. 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$299.00 USD
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1755 Seale & Postlethweyt Large Antique Map Trade Routes & Forts of West Africa

1755 Seale & Postlethweyt Large Antique Map Trade Routes & Forts of West Africa

  • Title : A New and Correct Map of the Coast of Africa from Cape Blance to the Coast of Angola with Explanatory Notes of all the Forts and settlements belonging to the several European Powers
  • Ref #:  92347
  • Size: 20 1/2in x 17in (520mm x 430mm)
  • Date : 1755
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This large finely engraved, highly detailed original antique map of the west coast of Africa from Senegal To Angola - with a separate inset map of the Gold Coast was engraved by William Seale - after Jean-Baptiste Bourguinon D'Anville - and was published in Malachy Postlethweyt's monumental 2 Volume Dictionary of Trade & Commerce published between 1751 & 1774.
Incredibly detailed map with an in-depth explanation of the different commercial interests of the European countries from Senegal referred to as the Gum Coast, Sierra Leone & Liberia known as the grain coast, Ivory coast, Ghana & Benin known as the Gold Coast all the way down to Angola.
The extensive text, bottom left, gives a detailed explanation to the different trades undertaken in which areas on the West Coast of Africa. This also included the unfortunate Slaves Trade, Ivory, Gold and Grain as well as local & European settlements and forts.
A truly fascinating insight into a vast region of Africa that was so crucial to the commerce and wealth of Western Europe.

Malachy Postlethweyt's Dictionary of Trade & Commerce:
A monumental dictionary of trade and commerce. It is based in part on the Dictionnaire universel de Commerce (Paris: 1723-30) of Jacques Savary de Bruslon, under whose name it is often catalogued, but has been adapted by Postlethwayt for a British audience, with substantial enlargements and improvements, and entirely new material relating to England and her colonies. Postlethwayt devoted twenty years to the preparation of the dictionary, which was first published in 1751-55 &  includes a description of British affairs in North America since the peace of 1763.
As with his other works, the dictionary demonstrates Postlethway’s deep commitment to the expansion and strengthening of English trade. Included are entries for geographical locations (Africa, Antilles, Canada, Japan, Louisiana, &c.), products (brandy, cardamom, codfish, diamonds, sugar, &c.), trading companies (Dutch East India Company, English African Company, &c.), treaties of commerce, and a vast range of other information of value to merchants (bankruptcy, currency, bills of exchange, brokerage, exportation, landed interest, privateering, &c.). The Dictionary is also important for containing almost the whole substance of Richard Cantillon’s Essay on Commerce, its first appearance in print.

Background: Being part of the Mediterranean world, the northern coasts of the African continent as far as the Straits of Gibraltar and even round to the area of the Fortunate Isles (the Canaries) were reasonably well known and quite accurately mapped from ancient times. In particular, Egypt and the Nile Valley were well defined and the Nile itself was, of course, one of the rivers separating the continents in medieval T-O maps. Through Arab traders the shape of the east coast, down the Red Sea as far as the equator, was also known but detail shown in the interior faded into deserts with occasional mountain ranges and mythical rivers. The southern part of the continent, in the Ptolemaic tradition, was assumed to curve to the east to form a land-locked Indian Ocean. The voyages of the Portuguese, organized by Henry the Navigator in the fifteenth century, completely changed the picture and by the end of the century Vasco da Gama had rounded the Cape enabling cartographers to draw a quite presentable coastal outline of the whole continent, even if the interior was to remain largely unknown for the next two or three centuries.
The first separately printed map of Africa (as with the other known continents) appeared in Munster's Geographia from 1540 onwards and the first atlas devoted to Africa only was published in 1588 in Venice by Livio Sanuto, but the finest individual map of the century was that engraved on 8 sheets by Gastaldi, published in Venice in 1564. Apart from maps in sixteenth-century atlases generally there were also magnificent marine maps of 1596 by Jan van Linschoten (engraved by van Langrens) of the southern half of the continent with highly imaginative and decorative detail in the interior. In the next century there were many attractive maps including those of Mercator/Hondius (1606), Speed (1627), Blaeu (1 630), Visscher (1636), de Wit (c. 1670), all embellished with vignettes of harbours and principal towns and bordered with elaborate and colourful figures of their inhabitants, but the interior remained uncharted with the exception of that part of the continent known as Ethiopia, the name which was applied to a wide area including present-day Abyssinia. Here the legends of Prester John lingered on and, as so often happened in other remote parts of the world, the only certain knowledge of the region was provided by Jesuit missionaries. Among these was Father Geronimo Lobo (1595-1678), whose work A Voyage to Abyssinia was used as the basis for a remarkably accurate map published by a German scholar, Hiob Ludolf in 1683. Despite the formidable problems which faced them, the French cartographers G. Delisle (c. 1700-22), J. B. B. d'Anville (1727-49) and N. Bellin (1754) greatly improved the standards of mapping of the continent, improvements which were usually, although not always, maintained by Homann, Seutter, de Ia Rochette, Bowen, Faden and many others in the later years of the century. (Ref: Tooley, M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 20 1/2in x 17in (520mm x 430mm)
Plate size: - 19 1/2in x 15 1/2in (495mm x 395mm)
Margins: - Min 1/4in (5mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Bottom left margin cropped to plate-mark
Plate area: - Folds as issued
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1719 Chatelain Large Antique Print Views of Cairo, Egypt - Nile

1719 Chatelain Large Antique Print Views of Cairo, Egypt - Nile

  • Title : Vue de la Ville Du Grand Caire et de ses Environs
  • Ref #:  50650
  • Size: 20in x 17 1/2in (510mm x 445mm)
  • Date : 1719
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This large finely engraved original antique print of various views of Cairo and Environs was published by Henri Abraham Chatelain in 1719, in his famous Atlas Historique.

Henri Abraham Chatelain (1684 - 1743)
was a Huguenot pastor of Parisian origins. He lived consecutively in Paris, St. Martins, London (c. 1710), the Hague (c. 1721) and Amsterdam (c. 1728). 
Chatelain was a skilled artist and knew combining a wealth of historical and geographical information with delicate engraving and an uncomplicated composition. Groundbreaking for its time, this work included studies of geography, history, ethnology, heraldry, and cosmography. His maps with his elegant engraving are a superb example from the golden age of French mapmaking.The publishing firm of Chatelain, Chatelain Frères and Chatelain & Fils is recorded in Amsterdam, from around 1700-1770, with Zacharias living "op den Dam" in 1730.
Henri Abraham Chatelain, his father Zacharie Chatelain (d.1723) and Zacharie Junior (1690-1754), worked as a partnership publishing the Atlas Historique, Ou Nouvelle Introduction à L'Histoire under several different Chatelain imprints, depending on the Chatelain family partnerships at the time of publication. The atlas was published in seven volumes between 1705 and 1720, with a second edition appearing in 1732. The volumes I-IV with a Third edition and volume I with a final edition in 1739.
Henri Abraham Chatelain, whose "Atlas Historique" was one of the most expansive Dutch encyclopedias of the age. First published in 1705, Chatelain's Atlas Historique was part of an immense seven-volume encyclopedia. Although the main focus of the text was geography, the work also included a wealth of historical, political, and genealogical information. The text was compiled by Nicholas Gueudeville and Garillon with a supplement by H.P. de Limiers and the maps were engraved by Chatelain, primarily after charts by De L'Isle. The atlas was published in Amsterdam between 1705 and 1721 and was later reissued by Zacharie Chatelain between 1732 and 1739.

Atlas Historique: First published in Amsterdam from 1705 to 1720, the various volumes were updated at various times up to 1739 when the fourth edition of vol.I appeared, stated as the "dernière edition, corrigée & augmentée." 
The first four volumes seem to have undergone four printings with the later printings being the most desirable as they contain the maximum number of corrections and additions. The remaining three final volumes were first issued between 1719-1720 and revised in 1732. 
An ambitious and beautifully-presented work, the Atlas Historique was intended for the general public, fascinated in the early eighteenth century by the recently conquered colonies and the new discoveries. Distant countries, such as the Americas, Africa, the Middle East, Mongolia, China, Japan, Indonesia, etc., take an important place in this work. 
In addition to the maps, many of which are based on Guillaume De L'Isle, the plates are after the best travel accounts of the period, such as those of Dapper, Chardin, de Bruyn, Le Hay and other.
Other sections deal with the history of the european countries, and covers a wide range of subjects including genealogy, history, cosmography, topography, heraldry and chronology, costume of the world, all illustrated with numerous engraved maps, plates of local inhabitants and heraldic charts of the lineages of the ruling families of the time. The maps, prints and tables required to make up a complete set are listed in detail in each volume. 
The accompanying text is in French and often is printed in two columns on the page with maps and other illustrations interspersed. Each map and table is numbered consecutively within its volume and all maps bear the privileges of the States of Holland and West-Friesland. 
The encyclopaedic nature of the work as a whole is reflected in this six frontispiece. The pages are the work of the celerated mr. Romeijn de Hooghe. and are engraved by J.Goeree, T.Schynyoet and P.Sluyter. 
New scholarship has suggested the compiler of the atlas, who is identified on the title as "Mr. C***" not to be Henri Abraham Châtelain, but Zacharie Châtelain. (See Van Waning's article in the Journal of the International Map Collectors' Society for persuasive evidence of the latter's authorship.) (Ref: M&B; Tooley)   

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: -  
Colors used: -  
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 20in x 17 1/2in (510mm x 445mm)
Plate size: - 17 1/2in x 15in (445mm x 380mm)
Margins: - min. 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1775 D Anville Very Large Antique Map of Western Africa - Guinee & Nigeria

1775 D Anville Very Large Antique Map of Western Africa - Guinee & Nigeria

  • Title : Guinee Entre Serre-Lione....Sr D Anville...MDCCLXXV (1775)
  • Date : 1775
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  22010
  • Size: 34in x 22 1/2in (865m x 570mm)

Description: 
This very large beautifully engraved original antique map of Western Africa was engraved by Jean-Baptiste Bourguinon D'Anville in 1775 - the date is engraved in the title - and was published in the large elephant folio atlas Atlas Generale.

These maps are hard to find in such good condition and make fantastic historical reference tools due to the size and high level of detail as with all D'Anvilles work. (Ref: Tooley, M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, pink, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 34in x 22 1/2in (865m x 570mm)
Plate size: - 27in x 13in (685mm x 330mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$175.00 USD
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1775 D Anville Very Large Antique Map of Western Africa - Guinee & Nigeria

1775 D Anville Very Large Antique Map of Western Africa - Guinee & Nigeria

  • Title : Guinee Entre Serre-Lione....Sr D Anville...MDCCLXXV (1775)
  • Date : 1775
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  92325
  • Size: 31in x 21 1/2in (790mm x 550mm)

Description: 
This very large beautifully engraved original antique map of Western Africa was engraved by Jean-Baptiste Bourguinon D'Anville in 1775 - the date is engraved in the title - and was published in the large elephant folio atlas Atlas Generale.

These maps are hard to find in such good condition and make fantastic historical reference tools due to the size and high level of detail as with all D'Anvilles work. (Ref: Tooley, M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 31in x 21 1/2in (790mm x 550mm)
Plate size: - 21in x 19 1/2in (670mm x 320mm)
Margins: - Min 2in (50mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling, small worm holes
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$175.00 USD
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1747 Bellin Antique Map of the Benguela province of Angola, Africa

1747 Bellin Antique Map of the Benguela province of Angola, Africa

  • Title: Carte de la Rade de Benguella et Riviere de Cantonbelle
  • Date: 1747
  • Condition : (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref: 25550
  • Size: 11 1/2in x 11in (295mm x 280mm)

Description: 

This finely engraved hand coloured original antique map of the Benguela province of Angola, Africa was published in ca 1747 for Antoine-François Prevost's monumental 20 volume edition of L`Histoire Generale des Voyages published by Pierre de Hondt, The Hague between 1747 & 1780. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early 
Colors used: - Red, green, yellow 
General color appearance: - Authentic 
Paper size: - 14in x 10in (355mm x 255mm)
Plate size: - 12in x 9in (305mm x 230mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$149.00 USD
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1747 Bellin Antique Map of The Empire of Mutapa or Monomotapa SE Africa Zimbabwe

1747 Bellin Antique Map of The Empire of Mutapa or Monomotapa SE Africa Zimbabwe

  • Title: Empire Du Monomotapa et Etats Voisins....
  • Date: 1747
  • Condition : (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref: 60914
  • Size: 13 1/2in x 10in (345mm x 255mm)

Description: 

This beautiful hand coloured original antique map of the ancient East African country of Mutapa or Monomotapa  - stretching from Zimbabwe, South Africa, Lesotho, Swaziland, Mozambique and parts of Namibia and Botswana - by Jacques Nicolas Bellin was published for Antoine-François Prevosts 20 volume edition of L`Histoire Generale des Voyages published by Pierre de Hondt, The Hague between 1747 & 1785.

The Kingdom of Mutapa - sometimes referred to as the Mutapa Empire or more commonly and modern Monomotapa was a Shona kingdom which stretched from the Zambezi through the Limpopo rivers to the Indian Ocean in southern Africa, in what are the modern states of Zimbabwe, South Africa, Lesotho, Swaziland, Mozambique and parts of Namibia and Botswana; stretching well into modern Zambia. Its founders are descendants of the builders who constructed Great Zimbabwe. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description: Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early 
Colors used: - Red, green, yellow 
General color appearance: - Authentic 
Paper size: - 13 1/2in x 10in (345mm x 255mm)
Plate size: - 11n x 9in (280mm x 250mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections: Margins: - None
Plate area: - Folds as issued
Verso: - None

Condition : (A+) Fine Condition

$125.00 USD
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1760 Bellin Antique Map The Entrance to the Sierra Leone River, Africa

1760 Bellin Antique Map The Entrance to the Sierra Leone River, Africa

  • Title: Carte De L Entrée De La Riviere De Sierra Leona...
  • Date: 1760
  • Condition : (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref: 25836
  • Size: 10in x 7 1/2in (255mm x 190mm) 

Description: 

This beautifully hand coloured original antique map of the Sierra Leone River estuary by J N Bellin in 1760 was published in Antoine-François Prevosts 20 volume edition of L`Histoire Generale des Voyages published by Pierre de Hondt, The Hague between 1747 & 1785.

The Sierra Leone River is a river estuary on the Atlantic Ocean in Western Sierra Leone. It is formed by the Port Loko Creek and Rokel River and is between 4 and 10 miles wide (6–16 km) and 25 miles (40 km) long. It is the largest natural harbour in the African continent. Several islands, including Tasso Island (the largest), Tombo Island, and the historically important Bunce Island, are located in the estuary. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description: Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Green, yellow, red
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 10in x 7 1/2in (255mm x 190mm)
Plate size: - 9in x 7in (230mm x 180mm)
Margins: - min. 1/4in (10mm)

Imperfections: Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

Condition : (A+) Fine Condition

$125.00 USD
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1739 Bellin Antique Map of The SE Coast of Africa, Angola to The Cape

1739 Bellin Antique Map of The SE Coast of Africa, Angola to The Cape

  • Title: Carte Occidentale D Afrique...1739
  • Date: 1739
  • Condition : (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref: 92507
  • Size: 11 1/2in x 11in (295mm x 280mm)

Description: 

This beautiful hand coloured original antique map of central and south eastern coastline of Africa - from the Cape to Northern Angola was engraved in 1739 - the date is engraved in the title by Jacques Nicolas Bellin for Antoine-François Prevosts 20 volume edition of L`Histoire Generale des Voyages published by Pierre de Hondt, The Hague between 1747 & 1785. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early 
Colors used: - Red, green, yellow 
General color appearance: - Authentic 
Paper size: - 11 1/2in x 11in (295mm x 280mm)
Plate size: - 11in x 9in (280mm x 250mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Folds as issued
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
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1747 Bellin Antique Map Plan Cape Coast Castle in Ghana West Africa - Slavery

1747 Bellin Antique Map Plan Cape Coast Castle in Ghana West Africa - Slavery

  • Title: Plan Du Fort Anglois et de la Ville du Cap De Corse
  • Date: 1747
  • Condition : (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref: 25657
  • Size: 11 1/2in x 11in (295mm x 280mm)

Description: 

This beautifully hand coloured original antique map a plan of the Cape Coast Castle - the notorious Slave Castle - situated in the West African country of  Ghana was published in 1747 by Jacques Nicolas Bellin for Antoine-François Prevosts 20 volume edition of L`Histoire Generale des Voyages published by Pierre de Hondt, The Hague between 1747 & 1785.

Background: Cape Coast Castle is one of a number of "slave castles", fortifications in Ghana built by Swedish traders, originally for trade in timber and gold, later used in the trans-Atlantic slave trade. Other Ghanaian slave castles include the Portuguese foundation of Elmina Castle (later Dutch) and Fort Christiansborg. They were used to hold slaves before they were loaded onto ships and traded in the Americas and the Caribbean. This “gate of no return” was the last stop before crossing the great Atlantic Ocean (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early 
Colors used: - Red, green, yellow 
General color appearance: - Authentic 
Paper size: - 14in x 10in (380mm x 255mm)
Plate size: - 9in x 6 1/2in (230mm x 165mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
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1739 Bellin Antique map of West Africa - Senegal to Cameroon

1739 Bellin Antique map of West Africa - Senegal to Cameroon

  • Title  : Carte De La Coste Occidentale D Afrique..Comte De Maurepas en 1739
  • Date  : 1739
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref # : 92510
  • Size  : 14in x 9 1/2in (355mm x 245mm)   

Description:

This beautifully hand coloured original antique map of the West Coast of Africa - from Senegal to Cameroon - was engraved in 1739 - dated in title cartouche - and was published in 1747 by Jacques Nicolas Bellin for Antoine-François Prevosts 20 volume edition of L`Histoire Generale des Voyages published by Pierre de Hondt, The Hague between 1747 & 1785. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Yellow, red, blue, green
General color appearance: - Authentic  
Paper size: - 14in x 9 1/2in (355mm x 245mm)  
Plate size: - 10 1/2in x 8in (265mm x 205mm)  
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
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1788 Bowen Large Antique Map The West Coast of Africa

1788 Bowen Large Antique Map The West Coast of Africa

  • Title : An Accurate Copy of D Anvilles Map of the Coast of Guinea Between Sierra Leona and the crossing of the line...J Harrison Feb 11 1788
  • Ref #:  31418
  • Size: 19in x 12 1/2in (485mm x 320mm)
  • Date : 1788
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This large beautifully hand coloured original antique map of the West Coast of Africa was engraved by Emmanual Bowen - after D'Anville - in 1788 - the date is engraved in the title - and was published by John Harrison. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Yellow, green, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic 
Paper size: - 19in x 12 1/2in (485mm x 320mm)
Plate size: - 18 1/2in x 9 1/2in (470mm x 240mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light creasing
Plate area: - Light creasing
Verso: - Light creasing

$125.00 USD
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1760 Bowen, D Anville Map Entrance of River Sanaga, St Louis Senegal West Africa

1760 Bowen, D Anville Map Entrance of River Sanaga, St Louis Senegal West Africa

  • Title : A General Map of The River Sanaga or Senegal; Map of ye Entrance of the Sanga or Senegal; Island of Sanaga Senegal or St Louis.
  • Date : 1760
  • Condition: (A) Very Good Condition
  • Ref:  31879
  • Size: 16in x 10in (405mm x 255mm)

Description: 
This large beautifully hand coloured original antique map of three view of the River, River Mouth & Island of St Louis of the Sangha River in Senegal West Africa by Thomas Bowen - after D anville - was published in 1760. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Yellow, green, pink, blue  
General color appearance: - Authentic  
Paper size: - 16in x 10in (405mm x 255mm)
Plate size: - 16in x 10in (405mm x 255mm)
Margins: - min. 1/4in (6mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Folds as issued
Plate area: - Folds as issued, light creasing along folds
Verso: - Folds as issued, light creasing along folds

$125.00 USD
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1747 Bellin Antique Map of The Island & Bay of Arguin, Mauritania, West Africa

1747 Bellin Antique Map of The Island & Bay of Arguin, Mauritania, West Africa

  • Title: Plan De La Baye Et Isle D'Arguim
  • Date: 1747
  • Condition : (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref: 25793
  • Size: 11 1/2in x 11in (295mm x 280mm)

Description: 

This beautiful hand coloured original antique map of Arguin an island off the western coast of Mauritania in the Bay of Arguin, West Africa by Jacques Nicolas Bellin was published for Antoine-François Prevosts 20 volume edition of L`Histoire Generale des Voyages published by Pierre de Hondt, The Hague between 1747 & 1785. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early 
Colors used: - Red, green, yellow 
General color appearance: - Authentic 
Paper size: - 10in x 7in (255mm x 180mm)
Plate size: - 9in x 6 1/2in (250mm x 165mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$100.00 USD
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1750 Bellin Antique Map of East Coast, Horn of Africa

1750 Bellin Antique Map of East Coast, Horn of Africa

  • Title: Carte de la Coste Orientale D ' Afrique...1740
  • Date: 1750
  • Condition : (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref: 15987
  • Size: 10in x 10in (255mm x 255mm) 

Description: 

This beautifully hand coloured original antique map of the east coast of Africa from the Horn south to Tanzania by Jacques Nicolas Bellin was engraved in 1740 - the date is in the title - and was published in 1750 for Antoine-François Prevost's monumental 20 volume edition of L`Histoire Generale des Voyages published by Pierre de Hondt, in The Hague between 1747 & 1780. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early 
Colors used: - Red, green, yellow 
General color appearance: - Authentic 
Paper size: - 10in x 10in (255mm x 255mm)
Plate size: - 10in x 8in (255mm x 205mm)
Margins: - Min 1/4in (6mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Folds as issued
Verso: - None

$99.00 USD
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