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1780 Bonne Antique Map of Tahiti

1780 Bonne Antique Map of Tahiti

Description: 
This finely engraved original antique map of NW America from Alaska to Canada and the NE coast of Siberia showing the tracks of Cooks ship, with an inset map of Nootka, by Rigobert Bonne was published in the 1780 edition of Atlas des toutes les parties connues du globe terrestre by Guillaume Raynal. (Ref Tooley M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: -.Pink, green, yellow, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic and fresh
Paper size: - 16 ½in x 11 ½in; (420mm x 295mm)
Plate size: - 14 ½in x 10in; (370mm x 250mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Two very small worm holes adjacent to centerfold
Verso: - None

$225.00 USD
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1780 Cook Benard Antique Map of Manus Island, Queen Charlottes, New Guinea

1780 Cook Benard Antique Map of Manus Island, Queen Charlottes, New Guinea

  • Title  : Cote septentrional de la plus grande des isles de la Reine Charlotte; Baye Swallow; Havre Byroni
  • Date  : 1780
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref # : 21589
  • Size  : 13in x 9in (330mm x 230mm) 

Description:

This finely engraved hand coloured original antique map & view of the north side of Manus Island (Queen Charlottes) New Guinea with an inset of the islands Swallow Bay & Byron Harbour was engraved by Robert Benard after Webber for the French edition of Cooks voyages published in 1780.

Cook's Third Voyage (1776-1779) In the course of his first two voyages, Cook circumnavigated the globe twice, sailed extensively into the Antarctic, and charted coastlines from Newfoundland to New Zealand. Following these achievements, Cook's third voyage was organized to seek an efficient route from England to southern and eastern Asia that would not entail rounding the Cape of Good Hope. The search for such a Northwest (or Northeast) Passage had been on the agenda of northern European mariners and merchants since the beginning of European expansion in the late fifteenth century. England's growing economic and colonial interests in India in the later eighteenth century provided the stimulus for the latest exploration for this route.

Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: -  Early
Colors used: - Yellow, brown, blue 
General color appearance: -  Authentic
Paper size: - 13in x 9in (330mm x 230mm)  
Plate size: - 12in x 7 1/2in (305mm x 190mm)  
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Folds as issued
Verso: - None

$149.00 USD
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1780 Cook Benard Antique Map of the Tongan Islands, South Pacific

1780 Cook Benard Antique Map of the Tongan Islands, South Pacific

  • Title  : Varte Des Isles Des Amis
  • Date  : 1780
  • Condition (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref # : 32166
  • Size  : 14in x 9in (355mm x 230mm) 

Description:

This fine beautifully hand coloured original antique map of the South Pacific Island group of Tonga was engraved by Robert Benard - after Captain James Cooks 1st voyage to the South Seas - and was published in the 1st French edition of Cooks voyages in 1780.

Cook's First Voyage (1768-1771)
The first voyage under Captain James Cook's command was primarily of a scientific nature. The expedition on the Endeavour initially sailed to Tahiti to observe the transit of the planet Venus in order to calculate the earth's distance from the sun. Cook landed on the South Pacific island in April of 1769 and in June of that year the astronomical observations were successfully completed. In addition to these labors, very good relations with the Tahitians were maintained and the naturalists Joseph Banks and Daniel C. Solander conducted extensive ethnological and botanical research. Another purpose of the voyage was to explore the South Seas to determine if an inhabitable continent existed in the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Upon leaving Tahiti, Cook named and charted the Society Islands and then continued southwest to New Zealand. His circumnavigation and exploration of that country also resulted in a detailed survey. Cook proceeded to Australia, where he charted the eastern coast for 2,000 miles, naming the area New South Wales. As a result of these surveys, both Australia and New Zealand were annexed by Great Britain. In addition to these explorations, the Endeavour returned to England without a single death from scurvy among its men, an historic feat at the time. The combination of these accomplishments brought Cook prominence, promotion, and the opportunity to lead further expeditions.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: -  Early
Colors used: - Green, yellow, red,  
General color appearance: -  Authentic
Paper size: - 14in x 9in (355mm x 230mm)
Plate size: - 13 1/2in x 8in (340mm x 205mm)
Margins: - 1/4in (6mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Professional repair to top margin & border
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$225.00 USD
More Info
1780 Cook Benard Antique Map of the Tongan Islands, South Pacific

1780 Cook Benard Antique Map of the Tongan Islands, South Pacific

Description: 
This fine original antique map of the Friendly Islands - Tonga Islands - with the routes of Cooks ships Resolution in 1774 & Adventure 1773 - was engraved by Robert Benard after Webber for the French edition of Cooks voyages published in 1780.

This print is from the 1st edition of the French publication of Cooks voyages and are beautifully engraved on heavy stable paper and should not be confused with the later re-engravings of the next 30 years which were of a more inferior quality.

The first printed account of the first voyage under Cook's command was surreptitiously edited and printed by Thomas Becket only two months after the expedition returned to England, it was published almost two years before the official account by John Hawkesworth appeared. As described on the title page, the book related "various occurrences of the voyage, with descriptions of several new discovered countries in the southern hemisphere." The work also provided much information about the native inhabitants encountered on the voyage, including "a concise vocabulary of the language of Otahitee" [Tahiti]. The text was quickly disseminated with a second English edition published in Dublin as well as translations into German and French the following year. French editions were printed in 1773, 1777, 1782, and 1793.

Cook's First Voyage (1768-1771)
The first voyage under Captain James Cook's command was primarily of a scientific nature. The expedition on the Endeavour initially sailed to Tahiti to observe the transit of the planet Venus in order to calculate the earth's distance from the sun. Cook landed on the South Pacific island in April of 1769 and in June of that year the astronomical observations were successfully completed. In addition to these labors, very good relations with the Tahitians were maintained and the naturalists Joseph Banks and Daniel C. Solander conducted extensive ethnological and botanical research. 

Another purpose of the voyage was to explore the South Seas to determine if an inhabitable continent existed in the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Upon leaving Tahiti, Cook named and charted the Society Islands and then continued southwest to New Zealand. His circumnavigation and exploration of that country also resulted in a detailed survey. Cook proceeded to Australia, where he charted the eastern coast for 2,000 miles, naming the area New South Wales. As a result of these surveys, both Australia and New Zealand were annexed by Great Britain. In addition to these explorations, the Endeavour returned to England without a single death from scurvy among its men, an historic feat at the time. The combination of these accomplishments brought Cook prominence, promotion, and the opportunity to lead further expeditions.

Cook's Second Voyage (1772-1775)
Based on the success of his first voyage, Cook was appointed by the Admiralty to lead a second expedition. Two ships were employed with Cook commanding the Resolution and Captain Tobias Furneaux in charge of the Adventure. The purpose was to circumnavigate the globe as far south as possible to confirm the location of a southern continent. Cook proved that there was no "Terra Australis," which supposedly was located between New Zealand and South America. Cook was convinced, however, that there was land beyond the southern ice fields. In his pursuit of this idea, this expedition was the first European voyage to cross the Antarctic Circle. In addition, in two great sweeps through the Southern latitudes, Cook made an incredible number of landfalls including New Zealand, Easter Island, the Marquesas, Tahiti and the Society Islands, the Tonga Islands, the New Hebrides, New Caledonia, and a number of smaller islands. 

In addition to these navigational accomplishments and the accompanying expansion of geographical knowledge, the expedition also recorded a vast amount of information regarding the Pacific islands and peoples, proved the value of the chronometer as an instrument for calculating longitude, and improved techniques for preventing scurvy.

Cook's Third Voyage (1776-1779)
In the course of his first two voyages, Cook circumnavigated the globe twice, sailed extensively into the Antarctic, and charted coastlines from Newfoundland to New Zealand. Following these achievements, Cook's third voyage was organized to seek an efficient route from England to southern and eastern Asia that would not entail rounding the Cape of Good Hope. The search for such a Northwest (or Northeast) Passage had been on the agenda of northern European mariners and merchants since the beginning of European expansion in the late fifteenth century. England's growing economic and colonial interests in India in the later eighteenth century provided the stimulus for the latest exploration for this route.

Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 15 1/2in x 10in (395mm x 255mm)
Plate size: - 14in x 9in (355mm x 230mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
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1780 Cook Benard Antique Print French Polynesia Marquesas Isles Ceremonial Dress

1780 Cook Benard Antique Print French Polynesia Marquesas Isles Ceremonial Dress

Description:
This finely engraved original antique print of ornamental dress worn by warriors from the Marquesas Islands in French Polynesia was engraved by John Benard - after John Webber drawn during Capt. Cooks third and final voyage - was published in the first French edition of Cooks Voyages in 1780.

In general, this idyllic scene represents an image of serenity and prosperity consistent with Cook's observations about the native lifestyle that he found in his travels about the Hawaiian islands. It also is indicative of Webber's keen eye for detail. Cook's Journal - January 21, 1778

Cook's Third Voyage (1776-1779)
In the course of his first two voyages, Cook circumnavigated the globe twice, sailed extensively into the Antarctic, and charted coastlines from Newfoundland to New Zealand. Following these achievements, Cook's third voyage was organized to seek an efficient route from England to southern and eastern Asia that would not entail rounding the Cape of Good Hope. The search for such a Northwest (or Northeast) Passage had been on the agenda of northern European mariners and merchants since the beginning of European expansion in the late fifteenth century. England's growing economic and colonial interests in India in the later eighteenth century provided the stimulus for the latest exploration for this route.

Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: -  
Colors used: -  
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 10in x 8in (255mm x 205mm)
Plate size: - 9 1/2in x 7 1/2in (240mm x 180mm)
Margins: - Min 1/4in (5mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$99.00 USD
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1785 Cook & Benard Old, Antique Map Bays & Harbours of Tahiti & French Polynesia

1785 Cook & Benard Old, Antique Map Bays & Harbours of Tahiti & French Polynesia

  • Title : Baye De Matavai; Havre D Ohamaneno; Havre DÓwharre; Havre D Ooopoa
  • Ref #:  32195
  • Size: 15in x 9 1/2in (380mm x 245mm)
  • Date : 1785
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This beautifully hand coloured, original antique map* of four South Pacific Island Bays & Harbours specifically Tahiti, Raiatea, Tahaa and Huahine - last three part of the Society Islands of French Polynesia - was engraved by Robert Benard (fl 1750-85) and was published in the 1785 French edition of Cooks Voyages of Discovery to the South Pacific.

Cook's First Voyage (1768-1771)
The first voyage under Captain James Cook's command was primarily of a scientific nature. The expedition on the Endeavour initially sailed to Tahiti to observe the transit of the planet Venus in order to calculate the earth's distance from the sun. Cook landed on the South Pacific island in April of 1769 and in June of that year the astronomical observations were successfully completed. In addition to these labors, very good relations with the Tahitians were maintained and the naturalists Joseph Banks and Daniel C. Solander conducted extensive ethnological and botanical research.
Another purpose of the voyage was to explore the South Seas to determine if an inhabitable continent existed in the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Upon leaving Tahiti, Cook named and charted the Society Islands and then continued southwest to New Zealand. His circumnavigation and exploration of that country also resulted in a detailed survey. Cook proceeded to Australia, where he charted the eastern coast for 2,000 miles, naming the area New South Wales. As a result of these surveys, both Australia and New Zealand were annexed by Great Britain. In addition to these explorations, the Endeavour returned to England without a single death from scurvy among its men, an historic feat at the time. The combination of these accomplishments brought Cook prominence, promotion, and the opportunity to lead further expeditions.

Cook's Second Voyage (1772-1775)
Based on the success of his first voyage, Cook was appointed by the Admiralty to lead a second expedition. Two ships were employed with Cook commanding the Resolution and Captain Tobias Furneaux in charge of theAdventure. The purpose was to circumnavigate the globe as far south as possible to confirm the location of a southern continent. Cook proved that there was no "Terra Australis," which supposedly was located between New Zealand and South America. Cook was convinced, however, that there was land beyond the southern ice fields. In his pursuit of this idea, this expedition was the first European voyage to cross the Antarctic Circle. In addition, in two great sweeps through the Southern latitudes, Cook made an incredible number of landfalls including New Zealand, Easter Island, the Marquesas, Tahiti and the Society Islands, the Tonga Islands, the New Hebrides, New Caledonia, and a number of smaller islands.
In addition to these navigational accomplishments and the accompanying expansion of geographical knowledge, the expedition also recorded a vast amount of information regarding the Pacific islands and peoples, proved the value of the chronometer as an instrument for calculating longitude, and improved techniques for preventing scurvy.

Cook's Third Voyage (1776-1779)
In the course of his first two voyages, Cook circumnavigated the globe twice, sailed extensively into the Antarctic, and charted coastlines from Newfoundland to New Zealand. Following these achievements, Cook's third voyage was organized to seek an efficient route from England to southern and eastern Asia that would not entail rounding the Cape of Good Hope. The search for such a Northwest (or Northeast) Passage had been on the agenda of northern European mariners and merchants since the beginning of European expansion in the late fifteenth century. England's growing economic and colonial interests in India in the later eighteenth century provided the stimulus for the latest exploration for this route. 
Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early 
Colors used: -  Green, yellow, red
General color appearance: -  Authentic
Paper size: - 15in x 9 1/2in (380mm x 245mm)
Plate size: - 14 1/2in x 9in (370mm x 230mm)
Margins: - 1/4in (5mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Folds as issued
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
More Info
1790 Cook Hogg Antique Map of Tahiti, Raiatea, Ulietea

1790 Cook Hogg Antique Map of Tahiti, Raiatea, Ulietea

  • Title : Matavia Bay in Otaheite; Ohamaneno Harbour in Ulietea; Owharre Harbourin Huaheine; Oopoa Harbour in Ulietea
  • Date : 1790
  • Condition: (A+) Fne Condition
  • Ref:  32197
  • Size: 15 1/2in x 10in (395mm x 255mm)

Description: 
This fine original antique map of the Friendly Islands - Tonga Islands - with the routes of Cooks ships Resolution in 1774 & Adventure 1773 - was engraved by Robert Benard after Webber for the French edition of Cooks voyages published in 1780.

This print is from the 1st edition of the French publication of Cooks voyages and are beautifully engraved on heavy stable paper and should not be confused with the later re-engravings of the next 30 years which were of a more inferior quality.

The first printed account of the first voyage under Cook's command was surreptitiously edited and printed by Thomas Becket only two months after the expedition returned to England, it was published almost two years before the official account by John Hawkesworth appeared. As described on the title page, the book related "various occurrences of the voyage, with descriptions of several new discovered countries in the southern hemisphere." The work also provided much information about the native inhabitants encountered on the voyage, including "a concise vocabulary of the language of Otahitee" [Tahiti]. The text was quickly disseminated with a second English edition published in Dublin as well as translations into German and French the following year. French editions were printed in 1773, 1777, 1782, and 1793.

Cook's First Voyage (1768-1771)
The first voyage under Captain James Cook's command was primarily of a scientific nature. The expedition on the Endeavour initially sailed to Tahiti to observe the transit of the planet Venus in order to calculate the earth's distance from the sun. Cook landed on the South Pacific island in April of 1769 and in June of that year the astronomical observations were successfully completed. In addition to these labors, very good relations with the Tahitians were maintained and the naturalists Joseph Banks and Daniel C. Solander conducted extensive ethnological and botanical research. 

Another purpose of the voyage was to explore the South Seas to determine if an inhabitable continent existed in the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Upon leaving Tahiti, Cook named and charted the Society Islands and then continued southwest to New Zealand. His circumnavigation and exploration of that country also resulted in a detailed survey. Cook proceeded to Australia, where he charted the eastern coast for 2,000 miles, naming the area New South Wales. As a result of these surveys, both Australia and New Zealand were annexed by Great Britain. In addition to these explorations, the Endeavour returned to England without a single death from scurvy among its men, an historic feat at the time. The combination of these accomplishments brought Cook prominence, promotion, and the opportunity to lead further expeditions.

Cook's Second Voyage (1772-1775)
Based on the success of his first voyage, Cook was appointed by the Admiralty to lead a second expedition. Two ships were employed with Cook commanding the Resolution and Captain Tobias Furneaux in charge of the Adventure. The purpose was to circumnavigate the globe as far south as possible to confirm the location of a southern continent. Cook proved that there was no "Terra Australis," which supposedly was located between New Zealand and South America. Cook was convinced, however, that there was land beyond the southern ice fields. In his pursuit of this idea, this expedition was the first European voyage to cross the Antarctic Circle. In addition, in two great sweeps through the Southern latitudes, Cook made an incredible number of landfalls including New Zealand, Easter Island, the Marquesas, Tahiti and the Society Islands, the Tonga Islands, the New Hebrides, New Caledonia, and a number of smaller islands. 

In addition to these navigational accomplishments and the accompanying expansion of geographical knowledge, the expedition also recorded a vast amount of information regarding the Pacific islands and peoples, proved the value of the chronometer as an instrument for calculating longitude, and improved techniques for preventing scurvy.

Cook's Third Voyage (1776-1779)
In the course of his first two voyages, Cook circumnavigated the globe twice, sailed extensively into the Antarctic, and charted coastlines from Newfoundland to New Zealand. Following these achievements, Cook's third voyage was organized to seek an efficient route from England to southern and eastern Asia that would not entail rounding the Cape of Good Hope. The search for such a Northwest (or Northeast) Passage had been on the agenda of northern European mariners and merchants since the beginning of European expansion in the late fifteenth century. England's growing economic and colonial interests in India in the later eighteenth century provided the stimulus for the latest exploration for this route.

Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 15 1/2in x 10in (395mm x 255mm)
Plate size: - 14in x 9in (355mm x 230mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
More Info
1797 Wilson Large Antique Map of the Duff Isles, Solomon Islands, South Pacific

1797 Wilson Large Antique Map of the Duff Isles, Solomon Islands, South Pacific

  • Title : Sketch of the Duffs Groupe Discovered September 25 1797 by Capt: James Wilson
  • Date : 1799
  • Condition: (A) Very Good Condition
  • Ref:  90620
  • Size: 12in x 9 1/2in (305mm x 240mm)  

Description: 
This finely engraved original map of the Duff Island group - sometimes called the Wilson Islands - of the Solomon Islands - including Obelisk Island, Treasurers Island and Disappointment Island - was published in 1799  for the publication A missionary voyage to the Southern Pacific Ocean, performed in the years 1796, 1797, 1798, in the ship Duff, commanded by Captain James Wilson.Compiled from journals of the officers and the missionaries. With a preliminary discourse on the geography and history of the South Sea Islands; and an appendix, including details never before published of the natural and civil state of Otaheite.

Background:
The Duff set out for Tahiti in 1796, but visited many island groups, including particularly Tonga and the Marquesas, and on the outward voyage the expedition visited Rio de Janeiro. A new group of islands, the Duff Group, was discovered among the Santa Cruz islands. The knowledge of Pacific geography was considerably extended. The mission met with continual difficulties because of the civil wars and were finally forced to flee to Australia, though returning some time later in 1815. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: -  
Colors used: -
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 15 1/2in x 10in (395mm x 255mm)
Plate size: - 15 1/2in x 10in (395mm x 255mm)
Margins: - Min 0in (0mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Bottom margin cropped to border. light foxing
Plate area: - Folds as issued, light foxing
Verso: - light foxing

$125.00 USD
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1799 Wilson Antique Map of Gambier Island in French Polynesia

1799 Wilson Antique Map of Gambier Island in French Polynesia

Description: 
This finely engraved original antique map of Crescent Island Temoe islands in French Polynesia - also showing the Gambier Islands to the NW - was engraved by Thomas Foot and published by T. Gillet in 1799 for the publication A missionary voyage to the Southern Pacific Ocean, performed in the years 1796, 1797, 1798, in the ship Duff, commanded by Captain James Wilson.
Compiled from journals of the officers and the missionaries. With a preliminary discourse on the geography and history of the South Sea Islands; and an appendix, including details never before published of the natural and civil state of Otaheite.

Background:
The Duff set out for Tahiti in 1796, but visited many island groups, including particularly Tonga and the Marquesas, and on the outward voyage the expedition visited Rio de Janeiro. A new group of islands, the Duff Group, was discovered among the Santa Cruz islands. The knowledge of Pacific geography was considerably extended. The mission met with continual difficulties because of the civil wars and were finally forced to flee to Australia, though returning some time later in 1815. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: -  
Colors used: -
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 12in x 9 1/2in (305mm x 240mm)
Plate size: - 12in x 9 1/2in (305mm x 240mm)
Margins: - Min 1/4in (5mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light foxing
Plate area: - Folds as issued, light foxing 
Verso: - Folds as issued, light foxing

$125.00 USD
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1799 Wilson Antique Map of the Marquesas Islands of French Polynesia

1799 Wilson Antique Map of the Marquesas Islands of French Polynesia

Description: 
This finely engraved original map of the Marquesas Islands of French Polynesia was engraved by Thomas Foot and published by Thomas Chapman in 1799 - the date is engraved at the foot of the map - for the publication A missionary voyage to the Southern Pacific Ocean, performed in the years 1796, 1797, 1798, in the ship Duff, commanded by Captain James Wilson.
Compiled from journals of the officers and the missionaries. With a preliminary discourse on the geography and history of the South Sea Islands; and an appendix, including details never before published of the natural and civil state of Otaheite.

Background: The Duff set out for Tahiti in 1796, but visited many island groups, including particularly Tonga and the Marquesas, and on the outward voyage the expedition visited Rio de Janeiro. A new group of islands, the Duff Group, was discovered among the Santa Cruz islands. The knowledge of Pacific geography was considerably extended. The mission met with continual difficulties because of the civil wars and were finally forced to flee to Australia, though returning some time later in 1815. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: -  
Colors used: -
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 11 1/2in x 9in (285mm x 230mm)
Plate size: - 11 1/2in x 9in (285mm x 230mm)
Margins: - Min 1/4in (3mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Left margin cropped to plate-mark
Plate area: - Folds as issued
Verso: - Folds as issued

$125.00 USD
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1803 Freycinet Large Antique Map of West Timor, Rote Island, Kupany Indonesia

1803 Freycinet Large Antique Map of West Timor, Rote Island, Kupany Indonesia

  • TitleCarte Particuliere des Detroits De Rottie et de Simao...L Freycienet...le Casuarina 1803..Lambert Sculp..
  • Ref #:  42014
  • Size: 22 1/2in x 16 1/2in (570mm x 420mm)
  • Date : 1803
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This large beautifully engraved original antique map of the western peninsular of West Timor and the island of Rote and West Timor's biggest city Cupang (Kupang) was engraved by Charles Lambert in 1803 - the date is engraved in the title cartouche - and was published in the 1807 1st edition ofVoyage de descouvertes aux Terres Australes by Louis Freycinet.

Louis Claude Desaulces de Freycinet (1779-1842) was a French marine officer and explorer, who participated in several significant early 19th-century expeditions to relatively unknown areas in the southern hemisphere. In 1800, he joined one of the most important early explorations of Australia, which was commissioned by the French government and commanded by Nicholas Baudin (1754-1803). On this voyage, which included stops in Mauritius and Tasmania, Freycinet served as a surveyor and was responsible for conducting a thorough cartographic survey of the Australian coast. Upon returning to France years later, he completed a detailed account of the journey begun by the naturalist Françis Péron that was published as Voyage de decouvertes aux Terres Australes between 1807 and 1816.

In 1817, Freycinet embarked on the Uranie on a major scientific expedition around the world to record information regarding the geography, meteorology, terrestrial magnetism, ethnology, and indigenous flora and fauna of various locations in the southern hemisphere. Accompanied by the talented artist Jacques Arago, he explored the Sandwich Islands, the Hawaii Islands as well as Rio de Janeiro, the Cape of Good Hope, Tonga, Gibraltar, Tenerife, Mauritius, Timor, Tierra del Fuego, Montevideo, Mauritius, New South Wales, and the Caroline Islands. After being shipwrecked near the Falklands, Freycinet eventually returned to Paris on the Physicienne in 1820, where he published a comprehensive illustrated account of the expedition in a colossal thirteen-volume work entitled Voyage Autor de Monde. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 22 1/2in x 16 1/2in (570mm x 420mm)
Plate size: - 22 1/2in x 16 1/2in (570mm x 420mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$375.00 USD
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1833 d' Urville Antique Folio Print The People of Solomon Islands

1833 d' Urville Antique Folio Print The People of Solomon Islands

Description:
This large beautifully coloured original antique  lithograph folio print of people, habits and  costumes of the inhabitants of the Vanikoro and Tikopia Islands - part of the Solomon Islands group - was engraved by Antoine Maurin (1793-1860) and was published in the 1833 edition ofDumont d'Urville Voyage de la corvette l'Astrolabe

Jules Sébastien César Dumont d'Urville (1790–1842) - was born on 23 May 1790 at Condé-sur-Noireau, a village in Normandy, France. His father was Gabriel François Dumont, sieur of Urville and an hereditary Judge; his mother, née Jeanne de Croisilles, was of a noble French family. 
The d'Urvilles, because of their aristocratic connections, took refuge after the French Revolution in a secluded part of Normandy. Here, after the death of his father, Jules was educated by his mother's brother, a churchman of wide learning. Later he attended the Lycée Malherbe at Caen. In 1807 he entered the Navy. A student by talent and inclination, he devoted himself to learning, both in the humanities and natural sciences. In 1815 he married. In 1820, while on a visit in a French naval vessel to the eastern Mediterranean, he was instrumental in procuring for France a Greek statue which had been found on Melos – the Venus de Milo.

In 1822–25, while serving on the Coquille, he surveyed the Falklands, Tahiti and other Pacific islands, and New Holland (W Australia). In 1826–29 he commanded the Astrolabe in a voyage around the world; searching for the ill-fated La Pérouse expedition, he explored Fiji and many other islands of Oceania, the New Zealand coast, and the Moluccas. With the Astrolabe and the Zelée he made a second circumnavigation in 1837–40, and in 1840 he penetrated the ice pack south of New Zealand and discovered the Adélie Coast region in Antarctica. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy 
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original  
Colors used: - Yellow, green, blue, red  
General color appearance: - Authentic 
Paper size: - 19 1/2in x 13 1/2in (485mm x 345mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - Light age toning
Verso: - Light age toning

$375.00 USD
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