Johann Baptist Homann (1663 – 1724)

Profile :

Following the long period of Dutch domination in the field of Cartography, the Homann family became the most important map publishers in Germany in the eighteenth century. The business being founded by J.B. Homann in Nuremberg about the year 1702.

Soon after publishing his first atlas in 1707 he became a member of the Berlin academy of Sciences and in 1715 he was appointed Geographer to the Emperor. After the founder’s death in 1724, the firm was continued under the direction of his son until 1730 and was then bequeathed to his heirs on the condition that it trades under the name of Homann Heirs. The firm remained in being until the next century and had a wide influence on map publishing in Germany. Apart from the atlases the firm published a very large number of individual maps.

The Homman’s produced a Neuer Atlas in 1714, a Grosser Atlas in 1737, and an Atlas Maior with about 300 maps in 1780. They also issued a special Atlas of Germany with full sized plans of principal cities, school atlases and an Atlas of Silesia in 1750 with 20 maps.

Johann Baptist Homann (32)

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1200 - Template Prints

Description: 
This finely engraved, beautifully hand coloured original 1st edition antique map of America by Johann Baptiste Homann was published in 1710. This map is in beautiful condition, with a heavy, dark impression signifying an early pressing, beautiful original hand colouring on clean heavy and stable paper, a wonderful example of this hard to find map.

Background:
A wonderfully constructed map, an uncommon 1st edition, showing California as an Island based on Nicolas Sanson's second model, with additions of the towns, S Isidoro, Gigante and N S de la Guadalupe inserted in the south of the Island. The Straits of Anian are shown forming a Northwest Passage between California and the mythical Terra Esonis, which forms a nearly continuous land bridge from the Northwest to Asia. The Pays de Moozemleck is shown east of the Straits of Anian. This landmark remains virtually unchanged through all of Homann's maps of America, despite the later transition to a peninsular California, resulting in an odd change from a coastal to an apparently landlocked position for this landmark. The Great Lakes have a little more updated information and the Mississippi River shows the results of the early French Jesuit explorations. The rivers source extends to the far North of the limits of the maps produced 20 and 30 years earlier, although Le Moyne's mythical lake in the Southeastern US remains. The title cartouche is based upon De Fer's landmark map of 1699. The top dedication cartouche is based upon De L'Isle's 1703 map of Canada. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - Off white
Age of map color: - Original color:
Colors used: - Green, yellow, pink, orange.
General color appearance: - Authentic & beautiful
Paper size: - 23in x 20in (585mm x 510mm)
Plate size: - 22 1/2in x 19 1/4in (575mm x 490mm)
Margins: - Min 1/4in (7mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$2,250.00 USD
More Info

1200 - Template Reference

  • TitleKarstia, Carniola, Histria et Windorum Marchia
  • Ref #:  43152
  • Size: 21 1/2in x 18 1/2in (550mm x 470mm)
  • Date : 1639
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This finely engraved, beautifully hand coloured original 1st edition antique map of America by Johann Baptiste Homann was published in 1710. This map is in beautiful condition, with a heavy, dark impression signifying an early pressing, beautiful original hand colouring on clean heavy and stable paper, a wonderful example of this hard to find map.

Background:
A wonderfully constructed map, an uncommon 1st edition, showing California as an Island based on Nicolas Sanson's second model, with additions of the towns, S Isidoro, Gigante and N S de la Guadalupe inserted in the south of the Island. The Straits of Anian are shown forming a Northwest Passage between California and the mythical Terra Esonis, which forms a nearly continuous land bridge from the Northwest to Asia. The Pays de Moozemleck is shown east of the Straits of Anian. This landmark remains virtually unchanged through all of Homann's maps of America, despite the later transition to a peninsular California, resulting in an odd change from a coastal to an apparently landlocked position for this landmark. The Great Lakes have a little more updated information and the Mississippi River shows the results of the early French Jesuit explorations. The rivers source extends to the far North of the limits of the maps produced 20 and 30 years earlier, although Le Moyne's mythical lake in the Southeastern US remains. The title cartouche is based upon De Fer's landmark map of 1699. The top dedication cartouche is based upon De L'Isle's 1703 map of Canada. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - Off white
Age of map color: - Original color:
Colors used: - Green, yellow, pink, orange.
General color appearance: - Authentic & beautiful
Paper size: - 23in x 20in (585mm x 510mm)
Plate size: - 22 1/2in x 19 1/4in (575mm x 490mm)
Margins: - Min 1/4in (7mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$2,250.00 USD
More Info
1710 Homann Antique Map of America

1710 Homann Antique Map of America

Description: 
This finely engraved, beautifully hand coloured original 1st edition antique map of America by Johann Baptiste Homann was published in 1710. This map is in beautiful condition, with a heavy, dark impression signifying an early pressing, beautiful original hand colouring on clean heavy and stable paper, a wonderful example of this hard to find map.

Background:
A wonderfully constructed map, an uncommon 1st edition, showing California as an Island based on Nicolas Sanson's second model, with additions of the towns, S Isidoro, Gigante and N S de la Guadalupe inserted in the south of the Island. The Straits of Anian are shown forming a Northwest Passage between California and the mythical Terra Esonis, which forms a nearly continuous land bridge from the Northwest to Asia. The Pays de Moozemleck is shown east of the Straits of Anian. This landmark remains virtually unchanged through all of Homann's maps of America, despite the later transition to a peninsular California, resulting in an odd change from a coastal to an apparently landlocked position for this landmark. The Great Lakes have a little more updated information and the Mississippi River shows the results of the early French Jesuit explorations. The rivers source extends to the far North of the limits of the maps produced 20 and 30 years earlier, although Le Moyne's mythical lake in the Southeastern US remains. The title cartouche is based upon De Fer's landmark map of 1699. The top dedication cartouche is based upon De L'Isle's 1703 map of Canada. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - Off white
Age of map color: - Original color:
Colors used: - Green, yellow, pink, orange.
General color appearance: - Authentic & beautiful
Paper size: - 23in x 20in (585mm x 510mm)
Plate size: - 22 1/2in x 19 1/4in (575mm x 490mm)
Margins: - Min 1/4in (7mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Thumb print bottom left corner
Plate area: - None
Verso: - Bottom centerfold re-joined, no loss

$2,250.00 USD
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1712 Winter Antique Large Print Portrait of Johann Baptiste Homann

1712 Winter Antique Large Print Portrait of Johann Baptiste Homann

Description:
This finely engraved original antique print, a portrait of the early 18th century German Cartographer Johann Baptiste Homann after a painting by Joannes Krenckel was engraved by Wilhelm Winter and published in 1716 for Homann's Grosser Atlas.

Stunning full portrait of the Imperial Geographer of the Holy Roman Empire, Johann Baptist Homann (1664-1724) who was born in the Bavarian town of Kammlach.
Educated at a Jesuit school, he eventually became a member of the Prussian Academy of Sciences. As an Imperial Geographer he had special printing privileges, which were not only the best reference for customers but also gave him exclusive rights in his various endeavours as an engraver, publisher, cartographer, and a scientist. Homann died in Nuremberg, with the company, under his heirs, lasting until 1848.
After a painting by Joannes Krenckel (1688–1722), engraved by Wilhelm Winter (1696–1765). (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - Off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 21in x 11 3/4in (560mm x 295mm)
Plate size: - 15 1/4in x 11in (390mm x 280mm)
Margins: - Min 1/4in (7mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling bottom right corner
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$325.00 USD
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1715 Homann Antique Map of Virginia, Chesapeake & NE United States of America

1715 Homann Antique Map of Virginia, Chesapeake & NE United States of America

  • Title : Virginia Marylandia et Carolina in America Septentrionali Britannorum industria excultae"...Homann
  • Date : 1718
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  43166
  • Size: 24in x 20 1/2in (610mm x 530mm)  

Description: 
This large finely engraved beautifully hand coloured original antique map of Virginia, Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, the Carolina's, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, New York and parts west of the Apalchians, was published by J.B Homann in 1715.

An exceptionally beautiful example of J. B. Homann's 1715 map of Virginia, Carolina, Maryland, and New Jersey; considered one of the most important and decorative maps of is region to appear in the 18th century. This fine decorative map covers from New York City and Long Island south along the Atlantic Cost as far as modern day Georgia, and as far west as Lake Erie.

Background:
Homann drew this map in response to Virginia Lieutenant-Governor Alexander Spotswood's plan to settled the little known interior of Virginia with German immigrants. Shown here is the first mapping of Germantown Teutsche Statt on the Rappahanock River and Fort Christanna (Christ Anna Fort) on the Makharing River. Fort Christanna was built with the intention of defending the region against incursions from hostile American Indian groups such as the Tuscarora to the west. Christanna also acted as the headquarters of the Virginia Indian Company, a stock venture founded in 1714 with the intention of trading with indigenous groups in the interior.Though Homann's remarkable representation of Spottswood's plan is extraordinarily up-to-date considering that Fort Christana was founded in the same year that this map was initially published, the remainder of the map embraces a number of common misconceptions and cartographic inaccuracies common to the region. Probably the most notable of these is his inclusion of Apalache Lacus. This fictional lake, the source of the May River, appeared on maps of this region since the mid 16th century Le Moyne-De Bry map and was popularized by Mercator and Hondius in 1606.

It would remain on maps well into the mid 18th century before exploration and settlement finally disproved the theory. Further north Lake Erie and been expanded dramatically and shifted somewhat to the south where it takes on the appearance of a vast inland sea occupying the entire northwestern quadrant of the map. This region, west of the English colonies and north as far as Pennsylvana, Homann attaches to the Spanish claims in Florida.

Homann's also offers a wealth of detail along the Atlantic coast, where most of the European colonization efforts were focused. From Long Island, about two-thirds of which is shown, south to Craven County, Carolina, countless towns and cities are identified. New York City is mapped on the southern tip of Manhattan Island, but is not specifically labeled. New Jersey is divided into the colonial provinces of East New Jersey and West New Jersey. Curiously Homann maps a large inland lake "Zuyd Lac" straddling the New Jersey - Pennsylvania border. This is no doubt a early misinterpretation of the natural widening of the Delaware River at the Delaware Water Gap. Heading south along the Delaware River Philadelphia is identified and beautifully rendered as a grid embraced in four quadrants. Both the Delaware Bay and the Chesapeake Bay are rendered in full and even include a number of undersea notations and depth soundings. In Virginia and Carolina the river systems are surprisingly well mapped and a primitive county structure is beginning to emerge.

The early Virginia counties of Rappahannock, Henrico, City, Isle of Wright, Nansemond, Northumberland, Middlesex, Gloster and Corotvk are noted. Similarly in Carolina a number of counties are named, most of which refer to the Lords Proprietors, including Albemarle, Clarenden, and Craven. Cape Fear, Cape Lookout, and Cape Hattaras are noted and a number of anchorages, reefs, and depth sounding are noted along the entire coastline. The lower right quadrant of this map is occupied by a fabulous decorative title cartouche. Centered on an enormous scallop shell bearing the map's title and Homann's Privilege, the cartouche features a number of stylized American Indians trading with European merchants.

The wealth of the region is expressed by an abundance of fish, game, and other trade products. Curling behind the scallop shell is a gigantic stylized alligator looking like nothing so much as a mediaeval dragon. The inclusion of Homann's Provildge in the title cartouche helps us to date this map to about 1715, when Homann was granted the right to add this royal distinction to his maps. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original & later
Colors used: - Yellow, green, blue, pink
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 24in x 20 1/2in (610mm x 530mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 19 1/2in (580mm x 490mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$3,250.00 USD
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1715 Homann Large Antique Map North America, Great Lakes to New Mexico & Florida

1715 Homann Large Antique Map North America, Great Lakes to New Mexico & Florida

  • Title : Regni Mexicani seu Novae Hispaniae, Floridae, Novae Angliae, Carolinae, Virginiae et Pensylvaniae, nec non Insularum, Archipelagi Mexicani in America Septentrionali....Joh Baptista Homanno
  • Date : 1715
  • Condition: (A) Very Good Condition
  • Ref:  93118
  • Size: 23in x 19 1/4in (585mm x 485mm)

Description:
This large original beautifully hand coloured antique map of North America, centering on the claims of France, Spain & England in the New World, was published by J B Homann in 1715.
This is a magnificent map, with all the political nuisances of the time, illustrated throughout the map. The tension between the three European super powers is evident, from the waning Spanish, to the aspirational French and the upcoming British. The French borders in Louisiana and Canada push west and south far beyond reality, encroaching into New Mexico, Canada & the British colonial states. Large Spanish warships are seen to overpower both the British & French fleets in one cartouche and in the other the powerless native Americans are seen as their gold is plundered by all. 
With the death of Queen Anne in 1714 and the ascension of George I to the British throne, the era of British power in the New World will lead to the inevitable hard fought freedom of a new country, the United States. A great early 18th century map.

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: - Original & later
Colors used: - Yellow, green, blue, pink
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 23in x 19 1/4in (585mm x 485mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 19 1/4in (585mm x 485mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Soiling in margins, L,R & B margins cropped to plate mark.
Plate area: - Age toning
Verso: - Earlier backed onto contemporary paper

Background: 
Homanns 1715 map of North America from Mexico, Florida, New England, the West Indies, and the Mississippi Valley (Louisiana) was based on the earlier 1703 map of the same region by Claude Delisle, Carte du Mexique et de la Florida des Terres Angloises, who derived his information from the likes of La Salle, Bienville, d Iberville, Le Sueur and other French, British & Spanish explorers.
The map centres on Louisiana and the Mississippi River Valley, with detailed information of Mexico to the Pacific, north to New Mexico and the Great Lakes. East to the Colonial states, French Florida, The West Indies and northern South America.
Louisiana is divided as per the French borders in Delisles map, with large French aspirations extending well into Spanish North America from the Rio Grande to the Appalachian Mountains. France also lays claim to large sways of land in Canada and the whole of the Great Lakes and much of the northern colonial states of the time. One of the earliest maps to accurately portray the mouth of the Mississippi and the Great Lakes region.
An elaborately decorative map with illustrations of Spanish unloading gold while the native Americans look on. To the lower left is shown a large Spanish Galleon, with guns blazing on the smaller French or British fleet, highlighting the still evident power of the Spanish. A very political European view of the new world in the early 18th century.

$1,750.00 USD
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1715 Homann Original Antique Map of Africa - Origins of the Nile River, Heinrich Scherer

1715 Homann Original Antique Map of Africa - Origins of the Nile River, Heinrich Scherer

  • Title : Totius Africae Nova Repraesentatio qua praeter diversos in ea Status et Regiones, etiam Origo Nili ex veris RRPP Missionariorum Relationibus ostenditur" Johann Baptist Homann
  • Date : 1715
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Good Condition
  • Ref:  70820
  • Size: 24in x 20 1/2in (610mm x 520mm)

Description:
This beautiful, large original hand coloured antique map of Africa, 1st edition, by JB Homann was published in 1715.
Handsome, large map of the continent with the typical inaccuracies of eighteenth century cartography. The map conforms to the twin lake configuration for the source of the Nile and a lengthy paragraph on the map purports to provide evidence of the accuracy of this theory based on the work of Heinrich Scherer. The geographical features are identical to the map that Johann engraved for Jacob von Sandrart, circa 1697, prior to Homann establishing his own publishing firm. The political boundaries and the large title cartouche are different. The cartouche is filled with interesting imagery including the pyramids, ivory trading, the source of the Nile, a troop of monkeys (throwing rocks at their hunters), kings, chiefs and warriors, a fat-tailed sheep with its tail supported by a wagon, and cherubs bringing salvation to the continent. 

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: - Original & later
Colors used: - Yellow, green, blue, pink
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 24in x 20 1/2in (610mm x 520mm)
Plate size: - 22 1/2in x 19 1/4in (570mm x 490mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - Centerfold re-enforced on verso

Background: 
Being part of the Mediterranean world, the northern coasts of the African continent as far as the Straits of Gibraltar and even round to the area of the Fortunate Isles (the Canaries) were reasonably well known and quite accurately mapped from ancient times. In particular, Egypt and the Nile Valley were well defined and the Nile itself was, of course, one of the rivers separating the continents in medieval T-O maps. Through Arab traders the shape of the east coast, down the Red Sea as far as the equator, was also known but detail shown in the interior faded into deserts with occasional mountain ranges and mythical rivers. The southern part of the continent, in the Ptolemaic tradition, was assumed to curve to the east to form a land-locked Indian Ocean. The voyages of the Portuguese, organized by Henry the Navigator in the fifteenth century, completely changed the picture and by the end of the century Vasco da Gama had rounded the Cape enabling cartographers to draw a quite presentable coastal outline of the whole continent, even if the interior was to remain largely unknown for the next two or three centuries.
The first separately printed map of Africa (as with the other known continents) appeared in Munster\'s Geographia from 1540 onwards and the first atlas devoted to Africa only was published in 1588 in Venice by Livio Sanuto, but the finest individual map of the century was that engraved on 8 sheets by Gastaldi, published in Venice in 1564. Apart from maps in sixteenth-century atlases generally there were also magnificent marine maps of 1596 by Jan van Linschoten (engraved by van Langrens) of the southern half of the continent with highly imaginative and decorative detail in the interior. In the next century there were many attractive maps including those of Mercator/Hondius (1606), Speed (1627), Blaeu (1 630), Visscher (1636), de Wit (c. 1670), all embellished with vignettes of harbours and principal towns and bordered with elaborate and colourful figures of their inhabitants, but the interior remained uncharted with the exception of that part of the continent known as Ethiopia, the name which was applied to a wide area including present-day Abyssinia. Here the legends of Prester John lingered on and, as so often happened in other remote parts of the world, the only certain knowledge of the region was provided by Jesuit missionaries. Among these was Father Geronimo Lobo (1595-1678), whose work A Voyage to Abyssinia was used as the basis for a remarkably accurate map published by a German scholar, Hiob Ludolf in 1683. Despite the formidable problems which faced them, the French cartographers G. Delisle (c. 1700-22), J. B. B. d\'Anville (1727-49) and N. Bellin (1754) greatly improved the standards of mapping of the continent, improvements which were usually, although not always, maintained by Homann, Seutter, de Ia Rochette, Bowen, Faden and many others in the later years of the century. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

$949.00 USD
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1715 J B Homann Large 1st Edition Antique Map of Africa

1715 J B Homann Large 1st Edition Antique Map of Africa

  • Title : Totius Africae Nova Repraesentatio qua praeter diversos in ea Status et Regiones, etiam Origo Nili ex veris RRPP Missionariorum Relationibus ostenditur Johann Baptist Homann
  • Ref #:  93502
  • Size: 25in x 21 1/2in (635mm x 545mm)
  • Date : 1715
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This large original hand coloured copper plate engraved antique 1st edition map of Africa by Johann Baptist Homann was published in 1715.
Handsome, large map of the continent with the typical inaccuracies of eighteenth century cartography. The map conforms to the twin lake configuration for the source of the Nile and a lengthy paragraph on the map purports to provide evidence of the accuracy of this theory based on the work of Heinrich Scherer. The geographical features are identical to the map that Johann engraved for Jacob von Sandrart, circa 1697, prior to Homann establishing his own publishing firm. The political boundaries and the large title cartouche are different. The cartouche is filled with interesting imagery including the pyramids, the source of the Nile, a troop of monkeys (throwing rocks at their hunters), kings, chiefs and warriors, a fat-tailed sheep with its tail supported by a wagon, and cherubs bringing salvation to the continent.

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, green, blue, pink
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 25in x 21 1/2in (635mm x 545mm)
Plate size: - 22 1/2in x 19in (565mm x 490mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

Background:
Being part of the Mediterranean world, the northern coasts of the African continent as far as the Straits of Gibraltar and even round to the area of the Fortunate Isles (the Canaries) were reasonably well known and quite accurately mapped from ancient times. In particular, Egypt and the Nile Valley were well defined and the Nile itself was, of course, one of the rivers separating the continents in medieval T-O maps. Through Arab traders the shape of the east coast, down the Red Sea as far as the equator, was also known but detail shown in the interior faded into deserts with occasional mountain ranges and mythical rivers. The southern part of the continent, in the Ptolemaic tradition, was assumed to curve to the east to form a land-locked Indian Ocean. The voyages of the Portuguese, organized by Henry the Navigator in the fifteenth century, completely changed the picture and by the end of the century Vasco da Gama had rounded the Cape enabling cartographers to draw a quite presentable coastal outline of the whole continent, even if the interior was to remain largely unknown for the next two or three centuries.
The first separately printed map of Africa (as with the other known continents) appeared in Munster\\\'s Geographia from 1540 onwards and the first atlas devoted to Africa only was published in 1588 in Venice by Livio Sanuto, but the finest individual map of the century was that engraved on 8 sheets by Gastaldi, published in Venice in 1564. Apart from maps in sixteenth-century atlases generally there were also magnificent marine maps of 1596 by Jan van Linschoten (engraved by van Langrens) of the southern half of the continent with highly imaginative and decorative detail in the interior. In the next century there were many attractive maps including those of Mercator/Hondius (1606), Speed (1627), Blaeu (1 630), Visscher (1636), de Wit (c. 1670), all embellished with vignettes of harbours and principal towns and bordered with elaborate and colourful figures of their inhabitants, but the interior remained uncharted with the exception of that part of the continent known as Ethiopia, the name which was applied to a wide area including present-day Abyssinia. Here the legends of Prester John lingered on and, as so often happened in other remote parts of the world, the only certain knowledge of the region was provided by Jesuit missionaries. Among these was Father Geronimo Lobo (1595-1678), whose work A Voyage to Abyssinia was used as the basis for a remarkably accurate map published by a German scholar, Hiob Ludolf in 1683. Despite the formidable problems which faced them, the French cartographers G. Delisle (c. 1700-22), J. B. B. d\\\'Anville (1727-49) and N. Bellin (1754) greatly improved the standards of mapping of the continent, improvements which were usually, although not always, maintained by Homann, Seutter, de Ia Rochette, Bowen, Faden and many others in the later years of the century. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

$1,250.00 USD
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1715 J B Homann Large Antique Map of North America Virginia Chesapeake Bay NJ, NY

1715 J B Homann Large Antique Map of North America Virginia Chesapeake Bay NJ, NY

  • Title : Virginia Marylandia et Carolina in America Septentrionali Britannorum industria excultae"...Homann
  • Date : 1715
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  82002
  • Size: 24 1/2in x 21 1/4in (625mm x 540mm)

Description: 
This large finely engraved beautifully hand coloured original antique map of Virginia, Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, the Carolina's, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, New York and parts west of the Apalchians, was published by J.B Homann in 1715.

An exceptionally beautiful example of J. B. Homann's 1715 map of Virginia, Carolina, Maryland, and New Jersey; considered one of the most important and decorative maps of is region to appear in the 18th century. This fine decorative map covers from New York City and Long Island south along the Atlantic Cost as far as modern day Georgia, and as far west as Lake Erie.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original & later
Colors used: - Yellow, green, blue, pink
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 24 1/2in x 21 1/4in (625mm x 540mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 19 1/2in (580mm x 490mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

Background:
Homann drew this map in response to Virginia Lieutenant-Governor Alexander Spotswood's plan to settled the little known interior of Virginia with German immigrants. Shown here is the first mapping of Germantown Teutsche Statt on the Rappahanock River and Fort Christanna (Christ Anna Fort) on the Makharing River. Fort Christanna was built with the intention of defending the region against incursions from hostile American Indian groups such as the Tuscarora to the west. Christanna also acted as the headquarters of the Virginia Indian Company, a stock venture founded in 1714 with the intention of trading with indigenous groups in the interior.Though Homann's remarkable representation of Spottswood's plan is extraordinarily up-to-date considering that Fort Christana was founded in the same year that this map was initially published, the remainder of the map embraces a number of common misconceptions and cartographic inaccuracies common to the region. Probably the most notable of these is his inclusion of Apalache Lacus. This fictional lake, the source of the May River, appeared on maps of this region since the mid 16th century Le Moyne-De Bry map and was popularized by Mercator and Hondius in 1606.
It would remain on maps well into the mid 18th century before exploration and settlement finally disproved the theory. Further north Lake Erie and been expanded dramatically and shifted somewhat to the south where it takes on the appearance of a vast inland sea occupying the entire northwestern quadrant of the map. This region, west of the English colonies and north as far as Pennsylvana, Homann attaches to the Spanish claims in Florida.
Homann's also offers a wealth of detail along the Atlantic coast, where most of the European colonization efforts were focused. From Long Island, about two-thirds of which is shown, south to Craven County, Carolina, countless towns and cities are identified. New York City is mapped on the southern tip of Manhattan Island, but is not specifically labeled. New Jersey is divided into the colonial provinces of East New Jersey and West New Jersey. Curiously Homann maps a large inland lake "Zuyd Lac" straddling the New Jersey - Pennsylvania border. This is no doubt a early misinterpretation of the natural widening of the Delaware River at the Delaware Water Gap. Heading south along the Delaware River Philadelphia is identified and beautifully rendered as a grid embraced in four quadrants. Both the Delaware Bay and the Chesapeake Bay are rendered in full and even include a number of undersea notations and depth soundings. In Virginia and Carolina the river systems are surprisingly well mapped and a primitive county structure is beginning to emerge.
The early Virginia counties of Rappahannock, Henrico, City, Isle of Wright, Nansemond, Northumberland, Middlesex, Gloster and Corotvk are noted. Similarly in Carolina a number of counties are named, most of which refer to the Lords Proprietors, including Albemarle, Clarenden, and Craven. Cape Fear, Cape Lookout, and Cape Hattaras are noted and a number of anchorages, reefs, and depth sounding are noted along the entire coastline. The lower right quadrant of this map is occupied by a fabulous decorative title cartouche. Centered on an enormous scallop shell bearing the map's title and Homann's Privilege, the cartouche features a number of stylized American Indians trading with European merchants.
The wealth of the region is expressed by an abundance of fish, game, and other trade products. Curling behind the scallop shell is a gigantic stylized alligator looking like nothing so much as a mediaeval dragon. The inclusion of Homann's Provildge in the title cartouche helps us to date this map to about 1715, when Homann was granted the right to add this royal distinction to his maps. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

 

$2,750.00 USD
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1720 Homann Large Antique Map of Norway

1720 Homann Large Antique Map of Norway

  • TitleRegni Norvegiae Accurata Tabula in qua Praefecturae Quinque Generales Aggerhusiensis, Bergensis Nidrosiensis, Wardhusiensis et Bahusiensi Ioh. Bapt. Homanno.
  • Date : 1720
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  16343
  • Size: 23 3/4in x 20 1/4in (600mm x 515mm) 

Description: 
This large beautifully hand coloured original antique map of Norway & parts of Scandinavia - with an inset map of Lapland & Northern Norway - by Johann Baptist Homann was published 1720.

Background:
Before the fifteenth century the peoples of Southern Europe had little geographical knowledge of the Scandinavian world except from sketchy detail shown in the Catalan Atlas (1375) and on a number of 'portolani' embracing Denmark and the southern tip of Norway. It was not until 1427 that a manuscript map prepared about that time by Claudius Clavus (b. 1388), a Dane who had spent some time in Rome, made available to scholars a tolerable outline of the northern countries and Greenland. That was to remain the best map available for the rest of the century and it was used as the basis for maps of Scandinavia in early printed editions of Ptolemy. Others by Nicolaus Cusanus (1491) and Ehrhard Etzlaub (c. 1492) followed but, needless to say, these are extremely rare; even the later maps by Olaus Magnus and Marcus Jordan, where they have survived at all, are known only by very few examples. In fact, apart from the rare appearance of an early Ptolemy map, the oldest of Scandinavia which a collector is likely to find are those in Munster'sCosmography published in 1544 with many later editions. In the following centuries the comparatively few maps and charts compiled in Scandinavia were usually published in Amsterdam, Antwerp, Paris or Nuremberg, the more important maps often being incorporated in the major Dutch, French and German atlases. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, green, blue, pink
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 23 3/4in x 20 1/4in (600mm x 515mm) 
Plate size: - 23 1/4in x 19 1/2in (590mm x 495mm)
Margins: - Min 1/8in (2mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Left margin cropped close to border
Plate area: - Horizontal crease parallel to centrefold
Verso: - None

$650.00 USD
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1720 Homann Large Old, Antique Map of North America, Louisiana, Mississippi, Buffalo Map

1720 Homann Large Old, Antique Map of North America, Louisiana, Mississippi, Buffalo Map

  • Title : Amplissimae Regionis Mississipi seu Provinciae Ludovicianae a R.P. Ludovico Hennepin Francisc....
  • Date : 1720
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  43168
  • Size: 25in x 21 1/4in (635mm x 540mm)

Description: 
This large finely engraved beautifully hand coloured original antique map of North America from the United States, the Mississippi River, to Spanish North America was published by J.B Homann in 1720

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original & later
Colors used: - Yellow, green, blue, pink
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 25in x 21 1/4in (635mm x 540mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 19 1/2in (590mm x 500mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning in top margin
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

Background:
This iconic map of Louisiana, the Mississippi River Valley to the Colonial United States by Johann Baptiste Homann, is commonly called the 'Buffalo Map' for its distinctive decorative elements depicting a stylized buffalo. This map is derived from an earlier 1718 map of the same region by G. De L'Isle though it has been enlarged to include New England.

The map covers much of the modern day United States from Canada and the Great Lakes to the Florida Keys and from Mexico and Texas to the Pacific. According to the political conventions of the time this map is segmented into various zones including New Mexico (red) along the Rio de Norte (Rio Grande), Louisiana (blue) covering a vast area including Texas, all five of the Great Lakes, and both the upper and lower Mississippi River Valleys, Florida (green) consisting most of the American southeast, the english Colonies (yellow) along the Atlantic seaboard, and Canada (red) stretching across the top of the map north of the Great Lakes. Various explorers' routes (including de Soto) are noted, as are mission settlements, American Indian villages, fortifications, and portages. Florida is depicted as an archipelago inhabited by anthropophagi (cannibals). The cartouche work, in the upper left quadrant, details Niagara Falls as well as various allegorical illustrations. A secondary cartouche, showing American Indians and a stylized buffalo appears in the lower right.

This map enjoyed a long production run and was extremely popular throughout europe – most likely for its decorative inclusion of the American Buffalo and Niagara Falls, objects of fascination for many 18th century europeans. Though this map was issued in only one edition, it was published in Homann's Neuer Atlas, the Atlas Major, and many other composite atlases well into the late 1700s, making specific instances of the map all but possible to date with precision. Most examples thus reference the original publication date, c. 1720. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

$3,250.00 USD
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1720 J B Homann Large Original Antique Map of Norway - Regni Norvegiae

1720 J B Homann Large Original Antique Map of Norway - Regni Norvegiae

  • TitleRegni Norvegiae Accurata Tabula in qua Praefecturae Quinque Generales Aggerhusiensis, Bergensis Nidrosiensis, Wardhusiensis et Bahusiensi Ioh. Bapt. Homanno.
  • Date : 1720
  • Condition: (A) Very Good Condition
  • Ref:  16424
  • Size: 24in x 20 1/4in (610mm x 515mm)

Description: This large beautifully hand coloured original antique map of Norway & parts of Scandinavia - with an inset map of Lapland & Northern Norway - was published by Johann Baptist Homann in 1720.

Background: 
Before the fifteenth century the peoples of Southern Europe had little geographical knowledge of the Scandinavian world except from sketchy detail shown in the Catalan Atlas (1375) and on a number of 'portolani' embracing Denmark and the southern tip of Norway. It was not until 1427 that a manuscript map prepared about that time by Claudius Clavus (b. 1388), a Dane who had spent some time in Rome, made available to scholars a tolerable outline of the northern countries and Greenland. That was to remain the best map available for the rest of the century and it was used as the basis for maps of Scandinavia in early printed editions of Ptolemy. Others by Nicolaus Cusanus (1491) and Ehrhard Etzlaub (c. 1492) followed but, needless to say, these are extremely rare; even the later maps by Olaus Magnus and Marcus Jordan, where they have survived at all, are known only by very few examples. In fact, apart from the rare appearance of an early Ptolemy map, the oldest of Scandinavia which a collector is likely to find are those in Munster's Cosmography published in 1544 with many later editions. In the following centuries the comparatively few maps and charts compiled in Scandinavia were usually published in Amsterdam, Antwerp, Paris or Nuremberg, the more important maps often being incorporated in the major Dutch, French and German atlases. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

Condition Report:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - Off white
Age of map color: - Original & later
Colors used: - Yellow, pink, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 24in x 20 1/4in (610mm x 515mm)
Plate size: - 23 1/2in x 20in (595mm x 505mm)
Margins: - Min 1/8in (2mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Left margin cropped to plate-mark
Plate area: - Light creasing
Verso: - Centerfold re-joined, small re-enforced adjacent to centerfold

$625.00 USD
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1720 J B Homann Large Original Antique Map of Norway - Regni Norvegiae

1720 J B Homann Large Original Antique Map of Norway - Regni Norvegiae

  • Title : Regni Norvegiae Accurata Tabula in qua Praefecturae Quinque Generales Aggerhusiensis, Bergensis Nidrosiensis, Wardhusiensis et Bahusiensi Ioh. Bapt. Homanno.
  • Date : 1720
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  93359
  • Size: 24in x 20 1/4in (610mm x 540mm)

Description: This large beautifully hand coloured original antique map of Norway & parts of Scandinavia - with an inset map of Lapland & Northern Norway - was published by Johann Baptist Homann in 1720.

Condition Report:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - Off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, pink, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 24in x 20 1/4in (610mm x 540mm)
Plate size: - 23 1/2in x 20in (595mm x 505mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

Background: 
Before the fifteenth century the peoples of Southern Europe had little geographical knowledge of the Scandinavian world except from sketchy detail shown in the Catalan Atlas (1375) and on a number of 'portolani' embracing Denmark and the southern tip of Norway. It was not until 1427 that a manuscript map prepared about that time by Claudius Clavus (b. 1388), a Dane who had spent some time in Rome, made available to scholars a tolerable outline of the northern countries and Greenland. That was to remain the best map available for the rest of the century and it was used as the basis for maps of Scandinavia in early printed editions of Ptolemy. Others by Nicolaus Cusanus (1491) and Ehrhard Etzlaub (c. 1492) followed but, needless to say, these are extremely rare; even the later maps by Olaus Magnus and Marcus Jordan, where they have survived at all, are known only by very few examples. In fact, apart from the rare appearance of an early Ptolemy map, the oldest of Scandinavia which a collector is likely to find are those in Munster's Cosmography published in 1544 with many later editions. In the following centuries the comparatively few maps and charts compiled in Scandinavia were usually published in Amsterdam, Antwerp, Paris or Nuremberg, the more important maps often being incorporated in the major Dutch, French and German atlases. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

 

$675.00 USD
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1720 JB Homann Large Antique Map of Scotland

1720 JB Homann Large Antique Map of Scotland

  • Title : Magnae Britannia Pars Septentrionalis Regnum Scotiae....Johan. Bapt. Homanno
  • Ref #:  33663
  • Size: 24in x 20in (610mm x 515mm)
  • Date : 1720
  • Condition: (A) Very Good Condition

Description:
This large original hand coloured copper plate engraved antique map of Scotalnd by JB Homann firm was published in 1720.

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Blue, red, yellow
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 24in x 20in (610mm x 515mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 19in (585mm x 485mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling
Plate area: - Light soiling and dis-colouration in 4 small areas of image
Verso: - Backed onto contemporary paper

Background: 
The Treaty of Perpetual Peace was signed in 1502 by James IV of Scotland and Henry VII of England. James married Henrys daughter, Margaret Tudor. James invaded England in support of France under the terms of the Auld Alliance and became the last British monarch to die in battle, at Flodden in 1513. In 1560, the Treaty of Edinburgh brought an end to the Anglo-French conflict and recognized the Protestant Elizabeth I as Queen of England. The Parliament of Scotland met and immediately adopted the Scots Confession, which signaled the Scottish Reformations sharp break from papal authority and Catholic teaching. The Catholic Mary, Queen of Scots was forced to abdicate in 1567.
In 1603, James VI, King of Scots inherited the thrones of the Kingdom of England and the Kingdom of Ireland in the Union of the Crowns, and moved to London. The military was strengthened, allowing the imposition of royal authority on the western Highland clans. The 1609 Statutes of Iona compelled the cultural integration of Hebridean clan leaders. With the exception of a short period under the Protectorate, Scotland remained a separate state, but there was considerable conflict between the crown and the Covenanters over the form of church government. The Glorious Revolution of 1688–89 saw the overthrow of King James VII of Scotland and II of England by the English Parliament in favour of William III and Mary II In common with countries such as France, Norway, Sweden and Finland, Scotland experienced famines during the 1690s. Mortality, reduced childbirths and increased emigration reduced the population of parts of the country about 10-15%.
In 1698, the Company of Scotland attempted a project to secure a trading colony on the Isthmus of Panama. Although it received a huge investment, the Darien scheme failed, partially due to English hostility. Along with the threat of an English invasion, the resulting bankruptcies played a leading role in convincing the Scots elite to back a union with England. On 22 July 1706, the Treaty of Union was agreed between representatives of the Scots Parliament and the Parliament of England. The following year twin Acts of Union were passed by both parliaments to create the united Kingdom of Great Britain with effect from 1 May 1707 with popular opposition and anti-union riots in Edinburgh, Glasgow, and elsewhere.
With trade tariffs with England now abolished, trade blossomed, especially with Colonial America. The clippers belonging to the Glasgow Tobacco Lords were the fastest ships on the route to Virginia. Until the American War of Independence in 1776, Glasgow was the worlds premier tobacco port, dominating world trade. The deposed Jacobite Stuart claimants had remained popular in the Highlands and north-east, particularly amongst non-Presbyterians, including Roman Catholics and Episcopalian Protestants. However, two major Jacobite risings launched in 1715 and 1745 failed to remove the House of Hanover from the British throne. The threat of the Jacobite movement to the United Kingdom and its monarchs effectively ended at the Battle of Culloden, Great Britains last pitched battle.
The Scottish Enlightenment and the Industrial Revolution turned Scotland into an intellectual, commercial and industrial powerhouse so much so Voltaire said We look to Scotland for all our ideas of civilisation. With the demise of Jacobitism and the advent of the Union, thousands of Scots, mainly Lowlanders, took up numerous positions of power in politics, civil service, the army and navy, trade, economics, colonial enterprises and other areas across the nascent British Empire. Historian Neil Davidson notes after 1746 there was an entirely new level of participation by Scots in political life, particularly outside Scotland. Davidson also states far from being peripheral to the British economy, Scotland – or more precisely, the Lowlands – lay at its core. In the Highlands, clan chiefs gradually started to think of themselves more as commercial landlords than leaders of their people. These social and economic changes included the first phase of the Highland Clearances and, ultimately, the demise of the clan system. In the last third of the 18th century, Highlanders began to migrate seasonally to Lowland cities for work, and emigration to the New World from both the Highlands and Lowlands became commonplace, even as the population increased

$325.00 USD
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1730 G Delisle, Covens & Mortier, Large Antique Foundation Map of North America

1730 G Delisle, Covens & Mortier, Large Antique Foundation Map of North America

  • Title : L Amerique Septentrionale dressee sur les Observations de Mrs. De L Academie Royale des Sciences & quelques autres & sur les Memoires les plus recens Par G De L Isle A. Amsterdam Chez I Covens & C Mortier Avec Privilege.
  • Ref #:  93501
  • Size: 25 1/2in x 21 1/2in (650mm x 540mm)
  • Date : 1700 (1730)
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This is without doubt one of the most important foundation maps, of North America, published in the early to mid 18th century.
This large original hand coloured copper-plate engraved antique map by Johannes Covens & Pierre Mortier, after Guillaume Delisle, that was published in 1730 in Atlas nouveau de dicerses cartes choisies des Meilleurs Geographes comme Sanson, G De Lisle &c....A Amsterdam.....
The first edition of this map was mistakenly dedicated to Nicolas Sanson, in the title. This oversight was corrected to Delisle in this 1730 edition.
This map is original in every aspect from borders, to colour, & clarity of imprint.

Covens & Mortier (fl 1721-1866) was an eighteenth century cartographic publishing house. The company was founded by Johannes Covens (1697-1774) and Cornelis Mortier (1699-1783) and was located in Vijgendam in Amsterdam .
The collaboration between the two men began after the death of Pieter Mortier (1661-1711), son of a French political refugee. In 1690, Mortier obtained the privilege of distributing maps and atlases from French publishers, in the Netherlands . His widow continued business until his death in 1719 . His son Cornelis took over the business, under the name of his father.
In November 1721 Cornelis Mortier founded a company with Johannes Covens I. He was married in the same year to Corneliss sister. Thus the company of Covens & Mortier was born.

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, green, blue, pink
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 25 1/2in x 21 1/2in (650mm x 540mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 19in (585mm x 490mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

Background:
There are many reasons why this rare 1st edition foundation map is important. It contains detail of radical changes both to the interior of North America and helps debunk many fundamentally held ideas of the coastlines. Some of these ideas included The Great lakes, California as an island and previously invented ideas of the interior, NW & NE coastlines.
Specifically the shape of the Great Lakes are changed based on information from the great Italian cartographer Vincenzo Coronelli.
The Mississippi valley is well developed with recent French settlement of d\\\'Iberville at Bilochy and the forts at Bon Secours and St Louis. The map also corrects the error of the western swing of the lower part of the Mississippi River, moving its mouth to essentially its correct position on the Gulf of Mexico.
Delisle has also corrected longitude positions and was the first to revert to a peninsular form for California. He stops his western coast at Cape Mendocin and is the first map to show the Saragossa Sea.
The map also illustrates the routes of explorers such as Cortez, Drake, D\\\'Olivier, Gaeten and Mendana, and indicates the locates of a number of Indian tribes, including the Apaches.
As this is a French map we see many of the French strong points in the NE such as Tadousac, Quebec, Fort Sorel, Montreal & Fort Frontenac included. The English settlements are confined to the east of the Alleghenies, with Fort and River Kinibeki as the border between New England and Arcadia.
Such was the improvement of this map, and the sterling reputation of Delisle, that within a few years other publishers issued their own copies of the map, which continued to appear until the 1780s. The importance of this map cannot be overstated in the progression of American cartography. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

$2,250.00 USD
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1730 Homann Large Antique Map Straits of Gibraltar Cadiz, Morocco, Malaga, Spain

1730 Homann Large Antique Map Straits of Gibraltar Cadiz, Morocco, Malaga, Spain

Description:
This large beautifully hand coloured extremely attractive original antique map of the Strait of Gibraltar, Cadiz & southern Spain and Morocco, North Africa was published by Johann Baptiste Homann in 1730.

Background: This  map of the Strait of Gibraltar was a collaborative effort between Jean de Petit (royal engineer and architect), Johann Friedrich Weidler (mathematician and astronomer at Witenberg), R.A. Schneider (engraver) and Johann Baptist Homann (publisher).
The map covers the tips of southern Spain and northern Africa in great detail showing forts, cities, farms, mountains, local roads and rivers. The numerous fortifications guarding this strategic waterway are the focus of the map, which is richly adorned with a brilliant compass rose, three large sailing ships and a fine title cartouche. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, green, blue, pink
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 24 1/2in x 21in (620mm x 530mm)
Plate size: - 22 1/2in x 19 1/2in (570mm x 490mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning left margin
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$425.00 USD
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1735 Homann Large Antique Map of Oran, Algeria, North Africa

1735 Homann Large Antique Map of Oran, Algeria, North Africa

  • TitleTopographica Repræsentatio Barbarici Portus et Urbis Munitæ Oran... Nuremberg, 1732 
  • Ref #:  43187
  • Size: 24 1/2in x 21 1/4in (620mm x 540mm)
  • Date : 1735
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This large fine beautifully hand coloured original antique map and view of the City of Oran & Environs in the North African country of Algeria, as it was being captured by the Spanish in 1732, was published by Homann Heirs in ca 1735.

Background: Chart of the environs of Oran in Algeria, with a panorama of the city and environs, decorated with several sailing battle ships. In 1509 Spain captured Oran from the Moors, but in 1708, with Spain disadvantaged by the War of the Spanish Succession, they were driven out by the Turkish Bey, Mustapha Ben Youssef. In 1732 José Carrillo de Albornoz, 1st Duke of Montemar (1671-1747), recaptured Oran, causing this map to be published, after which the Spanish held the city until 1792. When the Spanish saw no point in keeping it, when it was handed over to the Bey of Algiers(Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, green, blue, pink
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 24 1/2in x 21 1/4in (620mm x 540mm) 
Plate size: - 22 1/2in x 19 1/2in (570mm x 500mm) 
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$325.00 USD
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1735 J B Homann Large Antique Map of Old Saxony, Germany - Berlin to Prague

1735 J B Homann Large Antique Map of Old Saxony, Germany - Berlin to Prague

  • Title  : Circuli Super Saxoniae pars Meridionalis sive Ducatus...Homannianos
  • Date  : 1735
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref # : 30832
  • Size  : 23in x 19in (600mm x 520mm)  

Description:
This large original hand coloured copper plate engraved antique map of the Saxony region of central Germany. The map stretches from Berlin in the north to Prague in the Czech Republic to the south, by J B Homann was published by the Homann Heirs firm in 1735. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Blue, pink, red, green, yellow
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 23in x 19in (600mm x 520mm)
Plate size: - 24in x 19 1/2in (565mm x 495mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

Background: 
Saxony is a landlocked federal state of Germany, bordering the federal states of Brandenburg, Saxony Anhalt, Thuringia, and Bavaria, as well as the countries of Poland and the Czech Republic. 
The history of the state of Saxony spans more than a millennium. It has been a medieval duchy, an electorate of the Holy Roman Empire, a kingdom, and twice a republic.
The area of the modern state of Saxony should not be confused with Old Saxony, the area inhabited by Saxons. Old Saxony corresponds roughly to the modern German states of Lower Saxony, Saxony-Anhalt, and the Westphalian part of North Rhine-Westphalia.
The territory of the Free State of Saxony became part of the Holy Roman Empire by the 10th century, when the dukes of Saxony were also kings (or emperors) of the Holy Roman Empire, comprising the Ottonian, or Saxon, Dynasty. Around this time, the Billungs, a Saxon noble family, received extensive fields in Saxony. The emperor eventually gave them the title of dukes of Saxony. After Duke Magnus died in 1106, causing the extinction of the male line of Billungs, oversight of the duchy was given to Lothar of Supplinburg, who also became emperor for a short time.
In 1137, control of Saxony passed to the Guelph dynasty, descendants of Wulfhild Billung, eldest daughter of the last Billung duke, and the daughter of Lothar of Supplinburg. In 1180 large portions west of the Weser were ceded to the Bishops of Cologne, while some central parts between the Weser and the Elbe remained with the Guelphs, becoming later the Duchy of Brunswick-Lüneburg. The remaining eastern lands, together with the title of Duke of Saxony, passed to an Ascanian dynasty (descended from Eilika Billung, Wulfhild\\\\\\\'s younger sister) and were divided in 1260 into the two small states of Saxe-Lauenburg and Saxe-Wittenberg. The former state was also named Lower Saxony, the latter Upper Saxony, thence the later names of the two Imperial Circles Saxe-Lauenburg and Saxe-Wittenberg. Both claimed the Saxon electoral privilege for themselves, but the Golden Bull of 1356 accepted only Wittenberg\\\\\\\'s claim, with Lauenburg nevertheless continuing to maintain its claim. In 1422, when the Saxon electoral line of the Ascanians became extinct, the Ascanian Eric V of Saxe-Lauenburg tried to reunite the Saxon duchies.
However, Sigismund, King of the Romans, had already granted Margrave Frederick IV the Warlike of Meissen (House of Wettin) an expectancy of the Saxon electorate in order to remunerate his military support. On 1 August 1425 Sigismund enfeoffed the Wettinian Frederick as Prince-Elector of Saxony, despite the protests of Eric V. Thus the Saxon territories remained permanently separated. The Electorate of Saxony was then merged with the much bigger Wettinian Margraviate of Meissen, however using the higher-ranking name Electorate of Saxony and even the Ascanian coat-of-arms for the entire monarchy. Thus Saxony came to include Dresden and Meissen. In the 18th and 19th centuries Saxe-Lauenburg was colloquially called the Duchy of Lauenburg, which in 1876 merged with Prussia as the Duchy of Lauenburg district.
Saxony-Wittenberg, in modern Saxony-Anhalt, became subject to the margravate of Meissen, ruled by the Wettin dynasty in 1423. This established a new and powerful state, occupying large portions of the present Free State of Saxony, Thuringia, Saxony-Anhalt and Bavaria (Coburg and its environs). Although the centre of this state was far to the southeast of the former Saxony, it came to be referred to as Upper Saxony and then simply Saxony, while the former Saxon territories were now known as Lower Saxony.
In 1485, Saxony was split. A collateral line of the Wettin princes received what later became Thuringia and founded several small states there (see Ernestine duchies). The remaining Saxon state became still more powerful and was known in the 18th century for its cultural achievements, although it was politically weaker than Prussia and Austria, states which oppressed Saxony from the north and south, respectively.
Between 1697 and 1763, the Electors of Saxony were also elected Kings of Poland in personal union.
In 1756, Saxony joined a coalition of Austria, France and Russia against Prussia. Frederick II of Prussia chose to attack preemptively and invaded Saxony in August 1756, precipitating the Third Silesian War (part of the Seven Years\\\\\\\' War). The Prussians quickly defeated Saxony and incorporated the Saxon army into the Prussian army. At the end of the Seven Years\\\\\\\' War, Saxony recovered its independence in the 1763 Treaty of Hubertusburg.

$175.00 USD
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1741 Large Homann Antique Map of London Surrey - Birds Eye View of London

1741 Large Homann Antique Map of London Surrey - Birds Eye View of London

  • TitleRegionis quae est circa Londinum....Homaniamus Heredibus 1741
  • Date : 1741
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  92275
  • Size: 25 ½in x 21 ½in (650mm x 550mm)

Description: 
This beautifully hand coloured original antique map* of the Environs of London - Middlesex, Essex, Surrey and Kent - with a beautiful and a very real view of the city of London in the mid 18th century and the Thames - was engraved in 1741 - dated at the top of the map - and was published by the Homann firm.
A superb map with a deep heavy impression, stunning colour and sound heavy paper, a fine map.

Background: This map is based upon an earlier map of the region by Thomas Bowles and covers the London area from Berkshire (including Windsor Castle) in the west to Shamel in the east, extending north north as far as Bedford. Specifically focuses on Hertfordshire, Middlesex, Surrey, Essex and Kent. Offers extraordinary detail throughout, showing roadways, villages, London Streets, estates, and in many cases, individual homes. The lower portion of the sheet is dominated by a dramatic bird's-eye view of London and Westminster from Southwark across the Thames. View reveals a densely populated showing numerous boats, barges, and sailing vessels.
The beautifully hand coloured view of the city of London & Westminster was published only 90 odd years after the great fire of 1666.The view of London after Thomas Bowles, was one of a number published by Bowles and the Homann firm in the mid 18th century illustrating the growth and change of the great city.
The view is stunning, stretching from old London bridge & the docklands in the east to the farmlands to the west. What is really fascinating is the level of detail. There are a myriad of different sailing vessels occupying both sides of London bridge. The number of shops and residences that occupied the bridge at that time are uniquely displayed as is the number churches and cathedrals that dominate the skyline. To the right you can see the farm land that will one day become the West End and other upmarket areas of London.(Ref: M&B; Tooley)

 General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original & later color
Colors used: - Yellow, green, pink
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 25 ½in x 21 ½in (650mm x 550mm)
Plate size: - 22 ½in x 20in (570mm x 510mm)
Margins: - Min ½in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling in margins
Plate area: - None
Verso: - Bottom left plate-mark a little worn

$950.00 USD
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1746 Homann Large Antique Map of America

1746 Homann Large Antique Map of America

Description:
Large original hand coloured antique map of America by the Homann Heirs, in 1746 (dated) published on the cusp of great change in North America in the mid to late 18th century.

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: - Original & later
Colors used: - Blue, pink, red, green, yellow
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 23in x 20in (595mm x 510mm)
Plate size: - 22in x 19in (500mm x 470mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Top left margin & border corner restored
Plate area: - Age toning, centerfold re-joined with light creasing
Verso: - Centerfold re-joined with light creasing

Background:
Homanns second map of America, which reflects the substantial new information obtained since the issuance of the first map of America by the patriarch of the Homann Family, Johann Baptiste Homann. The decorative cartouche includes some very lively visual imagery, including volcanos and a nice alegorical scene representing the people, flora and fauna of America.
The interior of North America benefits from the knowledge obtained by the Jesuits in the Interior parts of North America, especially along the Mississippi River and English and Dutch information along the coast. The French are still the dominant force in the North, the Spanish in the South, immediately prior to the French and Indian War. The Great Lakes are only just now being accurately charted by D\'Anville and later Mitchell. The west coast conforms to the French updates provided by De L\'Isle and progeny. South America is substantially corrected from earlier models.
The NW Coast of America and NW Passage are still unknown, but wishfully shown. Quivira is shown considerably east of its normal location. Quivira was the the legendary land of gold and silver. Francisco de Coronado began his search for Quivira in 1541, but found only Indian Villages. He did however report to the Spanish King that the land was suitable for growing all of the products of Spain. Quivira migrated progressively further North and East, until it disappeared in the late 18th Century. The map seems to be influenced primarily by the highly influential map of America by De L\'Isle first issued in 1700, although the Haas retains some of the great mythical cartographic features in the interior regions.

$475.00 USD
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