Johannes Kip 1653-1722

Johannes Kip (1653 - 1722) was a Dutch draughtsman, engraver, and print dealer who was active in England, after producing works for the court of William of Orange in Amsterdam. Following the Glorious Revolution of 1688, Kip accompanied the Court to England and settled in Westminster, where he conducted a thriving print selling business from his house in St. John's Street.

He also worked for various London publishers producing engravings, largely for book illustrations. His most important works were the execution of the illustrations for Britannia Illustrata, 1708; The Ancient and Present State of Gloucestershire, 1712, and Le Nouveau Theatre de la Grande Bretagne, 1715.

Johnnes Kip (11)

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1720 Kip Large Folio Antique Print of Bath Cathedral, Somerset, England

1720 Kip Large Folio Antique Print of Bath Cathedral, Somerset, England

Description: 
This finely engraved original large folio antique Cathedral print by Johnnes Kip (1653-1722) and engraved by James Collins was published in the 1724 by Joseph Smith monumental work Nouveau Theatre de la Grande Bretagne. This print also appeared in Britannia Illustrata by D. Mortier (brother of Pierre).
This is a finely engraved print being testimony to the beautiful and detailed work produced by Kip whose eye for detail was one of the most acknowledged of his day.

Background:
Bath Abbey stands at the heart of the city of Bath; during the past twelve and a half centuries, three different churches have occupied this site:
An Anglo-Saxon Abbey Church dating from 757, pulled down by the Norman conquerors of England soon after 1066.
A massive Norman cathedral begun about 1090. It was larger than the monastery could afford to maintain and by the end of the 15th century was in ruins.
The present Abbey church founded in 1499, ruined after the dissolution of the monasteries in 1539 by order of Henry VIII.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - 
Colours used: - 
General colour appearance: - 
Paper size: - 
26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 18in (585mm x 460mm)
Margins: - min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: -  None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
More Info
1720 Kip Large Folio Antique Print of Durham Cathedral, England

1720 Kip Large Folio Antique Print of Durham Cathedral, England

Description: 
This finely engraved original large folio antique Cathedral print by Johnnes Kip (1653-1722) and engraved by James Collins was published in the 1724 by Joseph Smith monumental work Nouveau Theatre de la Grande Bretagne. This print also appeared in Britannia Illustrata by D. Mortier (brother of Pierre).
This is a finely engraved print being testimony to the beautiful and detailed work produced by Kip whose eye for detail was one of the most acknowledged of his day.

Background:
Durham Cathedral was first built as a shrine to house the uncorrupted body of St. Cuthbert, brought to rest here by his brother monks in the late eleventh century, after their wanderings around the north east. The famous seventh century saint of Lindisfarne had been celebrated by Bede in his writings and it is fitting that this wonderful writer is also buried and commemorated here at Durham, in the dramatic Galilee Chapel. 

On the main entrance door of the cathedral hangs a replica of the elaborately cast Sanctuary Knocker, where those seeking escape from the law would come to grasp the handle, gaining time to sort out their affairs. As you enter the dark nave, the shocking boldness of design almost a thousand years old arrests your attention. The nave pillars are deeply carved with geometric grooves, their circumference equal to their height, producing a feel of solidity and permanence. The emphasis at Durham is of mass and weight, a sharp contrast to the later gothic naves of cathedrals such as Winchester or Canterbury, where light and space are the key. Around 1093, the present cathedral was started by Bishop William of St. Carileph and the Benedictine monks. The shrine of St. Cuthbert attracted many pilgrims and a suitably grand structure was required.
In the early twelfth century, the Chapter house and the Galilee Chapel were built. The Galilee Chapel is one of my favourite architectural spaces, with its abundance of crisp zigzag carving arched over slim stone pillars. Bede is simply and suitably commemorated by a dark marble grave slab and the mixture of ancient and modern sculpture, stained glass and wall painting crosses and unites centuries of Christian belief and artistic devotion. 
Back in the nave, there is ample evidence also of the continuum of belief, interrupted and partly destroyed at times, but still very much alive today. Here is the earliest example in Europe of rib vaulting, there is a memorial to the local minors, reflecting poignantly the double-edged sword of industry and its losses. 
In the south transept is a huge clock, installed at the end of the fifteenth century, when the cathedral was still a priory, whose monks prayed through their daily round of services. At the Reformation, Durham was fortunate to become of the new cathedrals, saved from Henry VIII's destructive power. Between the two transepts, the tower over the crossing dates from around 1490, a replacement for the previous tower which had been destroyed by lightening and fire sixty years before. Despite the discrepancy in age between the main body of the cathedral and the tower, the design is harmonious. 
Beyond the high alter lies the raised site of the shrine of St. Cuthbert, still a place of quiet power and reverence for this unassuming, gentle man. Separating it from the high altar is the Neville Screen, built between 1372 and 1380 by the influential Neville family. Once adorned with 107 statues, supposedly removed before the iconoclasts of the Reformation could deface them, this structure stands out at Durham for its light, vertical, decorated gothic design. Around a hundred years before, the Chapel of the Nine Altars which encompasses the east end of the cathedral displays an earlier and more restrained gothic. Here the pillars are edged with local black 'Frosterley Marble', filled with fossils.    
During the seventeenth and nineteenth centuries, Durham underwent several 'beautification' schemes, best seen in the organ and choir screen areas. The geometric marble inlaid floor is particularly beautiful.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - 
Colours used: - 
General colour appearance: - 
Paper size: - 
26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 18in (585mm x 460mm)
Margins: - min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: -  None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
More Info
1724 Kip Large Antique Folio Print of Gloucester Cathedral, England

1724 Kip Large Antique Folio Print of Gloucester Cathedral, England

  • TitleThe South Prospect of The Cathedral of St Peters Glocester
  • Date : 1724
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  40415
  • Size: 26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)

Description: 
This finely engraved original large folio antique Cathedral print by Johnnes Kip (1653-1722) and engraved by James Collins was published in the 1724 by Joseph Smith monumental work Nouveau Theatre de la Grande Bretagne. This print also appeared in Britannia Illustrata by D. Mortier (brother of Pierre).
This is a finely engraved print being testimony to the beautiful and detailed work produced by Kip whose eye for detail was one of the most acknowledged of his day.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - 
Colours used: - 
General colour appearance: - 
Paper size: - 
26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 18in (585mm x 460mm)
Margins: - min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: -  None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
More Info
1724 Kip Large Antique Folio Print of Peterborough Cathedral, England

1724 Kip Large Antique Folio Print of Peterborough Cathedral, England

Description: 
This finely engraved original large folio antique Cathedral print by Johnnes Kip (1653-1722) and engraved by James Collins was published in the 1724 by Joseph Smith monumental work Nouveau Theatre de la Grande Bretagne. This print also appeared in Britannia Illustrata by D. Mortier (brother of Pierre).
This is a finely engraved print being testimony to the beautiful and detailed work produced by Kip whose eye for detail was one of the most acknowledged of his day.

Background:
An abbey was founded on the site around 655 by either Saxulf or Peada, the first Christian king of Mercia. The abbey was conconsecrated by the Archbishop of Canterbury in 655. at the end of the 9th century, the Danes invaded and raised the abbey to the ground. The abbey lay in ruins until the Bishop of Winchester, Aethelwold with help from King Edgar rebuilt the abbey and consecrated it in 972, in the presence of Archbishops Dunstan of Canterbury and Oswald of York. The second abbey was run under the rule of the Benedictines. The abbey dedicated to St. Peter had a wall built around it for defense and the name changed to Burgh St. Peter, where Burgh means fortified. In 1066, the abbot of Peterborough, Leofric, stood at Harold's side at Hastings but was wounded and died. His successor Brando mistakenly supported Edgar the Atheling instead of William and when William enforced his rule, Brando had to pay William a fine. A Norman abbot was installed at Peterborough when Brando died in 1069. In 1116 fire struck the abbey and the building was badly damaged. Building work begun in 1118. Building work took 120 years to complete. The building was consecrated in 1238 by the Bishop of Lincoln, Grosseteste. The abbey became a Cathedral in 1541 after the abbeys were dissolved in 1539. Notable people buried here are Catherine of Aragon, divorced from Henry VIII, and Mary, Queen of Scots was buried here first before being moved to Westminster Abbey.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - 
Colours used: - 
General colour appearance: - 
Paper size: - 
26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 18in (585mm x 460mm)
Margins: - min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: -  None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
More Info
1724 Kip Large Antique Folio Print of Rochester Cathedral, Kent, England

1724 Kip Large Antique Folio Print of Rochester Cathedral, Kent, England

  • TitleThe North Prospect of the Cathedral Church of Rochester
  • Date : 1724
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  40405
  • Size: 26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)

Description: 
This finely engraved original large folio antique Cathedral print by Johnnes Kip (1653-1722) and engraved by James Collins was published in the 1724 by Joseph Smith monumental work Nouveau Theatre de la Grande Bretagne. This print also appeared in Britannia Illustrata by D. Mortier (brother of Pierre).
This is a finely engraved print being testimony to the beautiful and detailed work produced by Kip whose eye for detail was one of the most acknowledged of his day.

Background:
Being the second oldest cathedral foundation in England, Rochester Cathedrals history goes back to AD604 when Augustine sent Bishop Justus to establish the house founded by King Ethelbert of Kent. Following several invasions by the Danes, the church was in a state of devastation by the time Bishop Gundulf was consecrated in 1077 but immediately he began a major building operation, and introduced a community of Benedictine monks in 1080.
The church suffered misfortune again in the mid 12th century with two serious fires, resulting in a further rebuilding programme. Since that time there has been continuous remodelling, refurbishments and restorations, mainly due to other historical events when the cathedral sustained damage. As a consequence of its very chequered history, Rochester Cathedral displays the varied building styles of each period, from the functional austerity of Gundulf's original structure, through the Romanesque, Gothic and Early English architectural periods, and continuing with renovation and restoration well into the 20th century following war damage.
The sturdy, squat Norman nave contrasts dramatically with the tall, narrow Gothic arches of the crossing. A superbly carved stone archway of the Decorated period (c1345), now enhanced with a solid oak door, leads to the chapter room and is a magnificent feat of craftsmanship. Quite unusually, the Lady Chapel is sited between the nave and the south transept as monastic outbuildings occupied the traditional location at the eastern end of the church when the chapel was added in the late 15th century. Beneath the quire transept is a beautifully preserved and vaulted crypt, with two bays surviving from the original Norman construction. There are also many fragments of medieval ceiling paintings to be found in this lower level sanctuary.
Though one of the smaller Norman cathedrals, Rochester was an important centre for pilgrimage during the 13th century, and even today attracts many visitors who are keen to learn more about its fascinating history. From a photographic perspective, a wonderful view of Rochester cathedral can be seen from the top of Rochester Castle, immediately opposite. We have visited both the Rochester Cathedral and Castle on many occasions, and still manage to uncover more information, or something interesting that we had previously overlooked. Earlier this year, we ventured for the first time into the cloister garth, discovering a substantial section of the ruined Chapter House. On the south side, the entrance arch to the monk's refectory survives and, looking behind it, the 13th century lavatorium and towel recess is still visible.

Johannes Kip was a draughtsman and engraver, who worked first in his native Amsterdam before moving to London at the end of the seventeenth century. He did portraits, views, and book illustrations. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - 
Colours used: - 
General colour appearance: - 
Paper size: - 
26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 18in (585mm x 460mm)
Margins: - min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: -  None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
More Info
1724 Kip Large Antique Folio Print of St Marys Church The Strand London England

1724 Kip Large Antique Folio Print of St Marys Church The Strand London England

  • TitleAdmodum Reverendis Amplissimis...Templi St Maria in Vico dicto The Strand
  • Date : 1724
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  40399
  • Size: 26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)

Description: 
This finely engraved original large folio antique Cathedral print by Johnnes Kip (1653-1722) and engraved by James Collins was published in the 1724 by Joseph Smith monumental work Nouveau Theatre de la Grande Bretagne. This print also appeared in Britannia Illustrata by D. Mortier (brother of Pierre).
This is a finely engraved print being testimony to the beautiful and detailed work produced by Kip whose eye for detail was one of the most acknowledged of his day.

Background:
The parish of St Mary le Strand may lay a good claim to being one of the oldest parishes in London. It stands dominating a roadway which since prehistory has been the main artery to the west from the City of London. In early Saxon times the Strand area was the very heart of London, for it seems that the City was effectively abandoned by the newly-arrived settlers. The Saxons predominantly inhabited "Lundenwic", an area stretching from Fleet Street to Whitehall and from the Thames to Covent Garden from the sixth to the ninth centuries. Christianity came to this settlement with St Mellitus and his followers in 604, and, despite their brief expulsion in the 620s, became firmly established. We do not know if any of the existing churches in the area date back that far but some, such as St Clement Danes, are known to have existed in later Saxon times. 

There is no record of when St Mary le Strand was founded, but the first church, which was dedicated to the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, stood just south of the present church on a site now covered by Somerset House. Throughout the Middle Ages, the Bishops of Worcester were the Patrons of the parish and had their London residence on an adjoining site. For throughout the period from the Norman Conquest to the Reformation, the Strand was mainly the home of bishops and princes. Within the parish were the "inns" - large town houses with chapels, stables and accommodation for a large retinue - of the Bishops of Worcester, Llandaff, Coventry and Lichfield. A large part of the parish was absorbed by the building of a great house, the Palace of the Savoy, by Count Peter of Savoy, the uncle of Henry III, in the 1240s. A century later this became the home of John of Gaunt, Earl of Lancaster, and the palace became a centre of culture; among its residents was Geoffrey Chaucer, who was married in the palace chapel. Gaunt's unpopularity, as the king's chief minister, caused the palace to be burned in the Peasant's Revolt. Despite its long absence, the fame of the palace has lasted in the area and was recreated in the nineteenth century by the Savoy Hotel and Theatre. 
The site where the present church stands was occupied in medieval times by Strand Cross. The origins of this are unclear. It was not a cross erected in memory of Queen Eleanor - as was Charing Cross - but seems to have dated back at least to Norman times. Perhaps it began as a market cross; by the early fourteenth century it had been rebuilt in a lavish manner, almost certainly following the design of the Eleanor Crosses. Strand Cross was a famous site and it is recorded that in the thirteenth century the local magistrates held their assizes in front of it.
Until the sixteenth century, the Strand was no more than a line of Bishops' palaces on the south side of the roadway stretching all the way to Whitehall. On the north side stood a wall which bounded the Convent - later Covent - Garden, while the churches further away, St Martin's and St Giles, stood "in-the-fields". All this was to change with the Reformation. The bishops' inns around the church were seized by Edward Lord Protector who set about building himself a renaissance palace in what was then the most fashionable part of town. Even with the extensive site that he had now obtained, further space was needed and towards the end of 1548 the Lord Protector's workmen fell upon St Mary's church and demolished it to provide stone for the new palace. Further stone was provided by the demolition of a cloister at St Paul's Cathedral known as Pardon Churchyard and the greater part of the Priory of St John at Clerkenwell. Even by the standards of the time, the demolition of so much sacred property was an outrage. Somerset was never to enjoy living in his new palace; just as it was nearing completion he was overthrown by his political enemies and executed at Tower Hill in 1551.
It is said that Somerset had intended to build a new parish church. If so, all thought of it passed away with his fall. Initially, the parishioners scattered but within a short time we find them gathered in the chapel of St John the Baptist in the Savoy. Here they would remain for the next 175 years. Now known at "St Mary le Savoy", the parishioners chose and paid for their own ministers. The most famous of these was Thomas Fuller, the church historian, who was appointed in 1642, fled during the Civil War and was restored to his living in 1660. 
Following the execution of Somerset, his palace had passed to the possession of the Crown. Elizabeth I occasionally lodged there and it was from Somerset House that she set off to give thanks after the defeat of the Armada. Under the Stuarts, extensive improvements were made to the palace, the most impressive being the lavish Roman Catholic chapel built by Charles I's queen, Henrietta Maria.
The roadway in front of Somerset House, where Strand Cross had stood and where the present church was later to stand, was occupied in the early seventeenth century by a windmill used to pump water. In 1634 the first Hackney Carriage stand in England was established here by one Captain Bailey. Here also a maypole was erected which became the most famous maypole in London. Demolished by the Puritans, a new maypole was erected in 1661. Parts of this maypole remained until 1717, when they were removed and presented to Sir Isaac Newton as the base for a telescope.
In 1711, an Act of Parliament was passed for building 50 New Churches in the fast expanding suburbs of London. These were the so-called "Queen Ann Churches"; among them are Hawksmoor's Chris
t Church Spitalfields, St Anne's Limehouse, and St George's-in-the-East, Archer's St Paul's Depftord and James' St George's, Hanover Square. St Mary le Strand was quick to apply for a church to replace their demolished one and, as the site on the Strand was so prominent, the Commissioners for building the New Churches decided to make the Strand church the most lavish of the churches. Initially, it was intended that there should not be a spire but that a column celebrating the building of the New Churches should stand directly in front of the church.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - 
Colours used: - 
General colour appearance: - 
Paper size: - 
26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 18in (585mm x 460mm)
Margins: - min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: -  None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
More Info
1724 Kip Large Antique Folio Print of St Marys Church, The Strand, London

1724 Kip Large Antique Folio Print of St Marys Church, The Strand, London

  • TitleThe South West Prospect of St Mary's Church in ye Strand
  • Date : 1724
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  40400
  • Size: 26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)

Description: 
This finely engraved original large folio antique Cathedral print by Johnnes Kip (1653-1722) and engraved by James Collins was published in the 1724 by Joseph Smith monumental work Nouveau Theatre de la Grande Bretagne. This print also appeared in Britannia Illustrata by D. Mortier (brother of Pierre).
This is a finely engraved print being testimony to the beautiful and detailed work produced by Kip whose eye for detail was one of the most acknowledged of his day.

Background:
The parish of St Mary le Strand may lay a good claim to being one of the oldest parishes in London. It stands dominating a roadway which since prehistory has been the main artery to the west from the City of London. In early Saxon times the Strand area was the very heart of London, for it seems that the City was effectively abandoned by the newly-arrived settlers. The Saxons predominantly inhabited "Lundenwic", an area stretching from Fleet Street to Whitehall and from the Thames to Covent Garden from the sixth to the ninth centuries. Christianity came to this settlement with St Mellitus and his followers in 604, and, despite their brief expulsion in the 620s, became firmly established. We do not know if any of the existing churches in the area date back that far but some, such as St Clement Danes, are known to have existed in later Saxon times. 

There is no record of when St Mary le Strand was founded, but the first church, which was dedicated to the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, stood just south of the present church on a site now covered by Somerset House. Throughout the Middle Ages, the Bishops of Worcester were the Patrons of the parish and had their London residence on an adjoining site. For throughout the period from the Norman Conquest to the Reformation, the Strand was mainly the home of bishops and princes. Within the parish were the "inns" - large town houses with chapels, stables and accommodation for a large retinue - of the Bishops of Worcester, Llandaff, Coventry and Lichfield. A large part of the parish was absorbed by the building of a great house, the Palace of the Savoy, by Count Peter of Savoy, the uncle of Henry III, in the 1240s. A century later this became the home of John of Gaunt, Earl of Lancaster, and the palace became a centre of culture; among its residents was Geoffrey Chaucer, who was married in the palace chapel. Gaunt's unpopularity, as the king's chief minister, caused the palace to be burned in the Peasant's Revolt. Despite its long absence, the fame of the palace has lasted in the area and was recreated in the nineteenth century by the Savoy Hotel and Theatre. 
The site where the present church stands was occupied in medieval times by Strand Cross. The origins of this are unclear. It was not a cross erected in memory of Queen Eleanor - as was Charing Cross - but seems to have dated back at least to Norman times. Perhaps it began as a market cross; by the early fourteenth century it had been rebuilt in a lavish manner, almost certainly following the design of the Eleanor Crosses. Strand Cross was a famous site and it is recorded that in the thirteenth century the local magistrates held their assizes in front of it.
Until the sixteenth century, the Strand was no more than a line of Bishops' palaces on the south side of the roadway stretching all the way to Whitehall. On the north side stood a wall which bounded the Convent - later Covent - Garden, while the churches further away, St Martin's and St Giles, stood "in-the-fields". All this was to change with the Reformation. The bishops' inns around the church were seized by Edward Lord Protector who set about building himself a renaissance palace in what was then the most fashionable part of town. Even with the extensive site that he had now obtained, further space was needed and towards the end of 1548 the Lord Protector's workmen fell upon St Mary's church and demolished it to provide stone for the new palace. Further stone was provided by the demolition of a cloister at St Paul's Cathedral known as Pardon Churchyard and the greater part of the Priory of St John at Clerkenwell. Even by the standards of the time, the demolition of so much sacred property was an outrage. Somerset was never to enjoy living in his new palace; just as it was nearing completion he was overthrown by his political enemies and executed at Tower Hill in 1551.
It is said that Somerset had intended to build a new parish church. If so, all thought of it passed away with his fall. Initially, the parishioners scattered but within a short time we find them gathered in the chapel of St John the Baptist in the Savoy. Here they would remain for the next 175 years. Now known at "St Mary le Savoy", the parishioners chose and paid for their own ministers. The most famous of these was Thomas Fuller, the church historian, who was appointed in 1642, fled during the Civil War and was restored to his living in 1660. 
Following the execution of Somerset, his palace had passed to the possession of the Crown. Elizabeth I occasionally lodged there and it was from Somerset House that she set off to give thanks after the defeat of the Armada. Under the Stuarts, extensive improvements were made to the palace, the most impressive being the lavish Roman Catholic chapel built by Charles I's queen, Henrietta Maria.
The roadway in front of Somerset House, where Strand Cross had stood and where the present church was later to stand, was occupied in the early seventeenth century by a windmill used to pump water. In 1634 the first Hackney Carriage stand in England was established here by one Captain Bailey. Here also a maypole was erected which became the most famous maypole in London. Demolished by the Puritans, a new maypole was erected in 1661. Parts of this maypole remained until 1717, when they were removed and presented to Sir Isaac Newton as the base for a telescope.
In 1711, an Act of Parliament was passed for building 50 New Churches in the fast expanding suburbs of London. These were the so-called "Queen Ann Churches"; among them are Hawksmoor's Chris
t Church Spitalfields, St Anne's Limehouse, and St George's-in-the-East, Archer's St Paul's Depftord and James' St George's, Hanover Square. St Mary le Strand was quick to apply for a church to replace their demolished one and, as the site on the Strand was so prominent, the Commissioners for building the New Churches decided to make the Strand church the most lavish of the churches. Initially, it was intended that there should not be a spire but that a column celebrating the building of the New Churches should stand directly in front of the church.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - 
Colours used: - 
General colour appearance: - 
Paper size: - 
26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 18in (585mm x 460mm)
Margins: - min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: -  None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
More Info
1724 Kip Large Antique Print of Chester Cathedral Church, Cheshire, England

1724 Kip Large Antique Print of Chester Cathedral Church, Cheshire, England

Description: 
This finely engraved original large folio antique Cathedral print by Johnnes Kip (1653-1722) and engraved by James Collins was published in the 1724 by Joseph Smith monumental work Nouveau Theatre de la Grande Bretagne. This print also appeared in Britannia Illustrata by D. Mortier (brother of Pierre).
This is a finely engraved print being testimony to the beautiful and detailed work produced by Kip whose eye for detail was one of the most acknowledged of his day.

Background:
Standing on the site of a 10th century Saxon church, the present cathedral at Chester dates from the mid 13th century. Dedicated to St Werburgh, this Christian church was transformed into a Benedictine Abbey in 1092, colonised by a small group of monks from Normandy. Building of the new abbey church began immediately and took the best part of 150 years to complete but little evidence of the first church remains. The traditional sturdy Norman architecture was eventually replaced over the next two centuries by a more elegant Gothic style. Henry VIII dissolved the monastery in 1540 just as the monks of St Werburgh's Abbey were beginning to enjoy their new surroundings. A year later the abbey was given back as a cathedral, the last abbot of St Werburgh's becoming the first Dean of Chester Cathedral. 

Over the next two hundred years the cathedral slipped into a bad state of disrepair but was eventually saved from total collapse by the efforts of Sir George Gilbert Scott. His 19th century restoration of Chester Cathedral, both externally and internally, not only put in place essential repairs but also enhanced the appearance of the great church immensely. Most of the stained glass comes from this period and highlights the abbey's dedication to St Werburgh, as well as the long history of the cathedral. On the northern aisle of the nave, at the side of one of the large windows, sits the 'Chester Imp'. A charming little figure in chains, carved by one of the medieval monks, to protect the church from evil spirits.
Most medieval cathedrals have beautifully carved stalls in the quire but the quality of oak carving at Chester Cathedral is quite exceptional. Each stall is topped with an elaborately carved canopy set above a row of small corbels, and below each seat a magnificently carved misericord. This area of the church is so richly carved with such a diverse array of religious artefacts, animals, birds and grotesque figures that it is quite overwhelming.
Apart from the main church many of the monastic buildings from the ancient Benedictine Abbey have been remarkably preserved. The original cloisters, although largely rebuilt during the first half of the 16th century and subsequently restored at the beginning of the 20th century, are a constant reminder of the important part they played in monastic life. All the bays of the undercroft, containing some wonderful vaulting, have been utilised to provide an exhibition centre, gift shop and workshop. The monks' dining room or refectory is still used regularly, as is the superb Chapter House. .

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - 
Colours used: - 
General colour appearance: - 
Paper size: - 
26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 18in (585mm x 460mm)
Margins: - min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: -  None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
More Info
1724 Kip Large Folio Antique Print a View of Carlisle Church in Cumbria, England

1724 Kip Large Folio Antique Print a View of Carlisle Church in Cumbria, England

Description: 
Carlisle Cathedral bears the scars of 900 years spent in this most tumultuous of regions. The scarred exterior and tower, has the effect of making the cathedral look more like a Border castle than a church! The cathedral suffered badly in the Civil War, when Parliamentary troops under General Leslie almost destroyed the nave, leaving only two bays standing.

The original nave was built by secular canons in 1092 as a collegiate church. That early church was built, but by 1123 the Augustinian order had taken over. The choir aisles are late 13th century, but the body of the choir was not completed until a century later.

The transepts and tower date from the 15th century. The glories of Carlisle are the east window, one of the best examples of decorated tracery anywhere, and the delicately carved capitals in the choir, depicting the seasons. The east window is believed to be the work of Ivo de Ragheton, who was also responsible for the west front of York Minster.

The barrel-vaulted choir ceiling is painted in vivid blue with gold trim. Medieval paintings in the north and south aisles and the choir represent the lives of the Apostles and saints Anthony and Cuthbert. The choir stalls and misericords are decorated with wonderful carvings dating from the early 15th century.

This is a finely engraved print being testimony to the beautiful and detailed work produced by Kip whose eye for detail was one of the most acknowledged of his day.

Condition Report
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - Early
Colours used: - Yellow, brown, green, red
General colour appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 
24 1/2in x 19 1/2in (610mm x 495mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 18in (585mm x 470mm)
Margins: - min 1/4in (6mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: -  None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1724 Kip Large Folio Antique Print of Worcester Cathedral, England

1724 Kip Large Folio Antique Print of Worcester Cathedral, England

Description: 
This finely engraved original large folio antique Cathedral print by Johnnes Kip (1653-1722) and engraved by James Collins was published in the 1724 by Joseph Smith monumental work Nouveau Theatre de la Grande Bretagne. This print also appeared in Britannia Illustrata by D. Mortier (brother of Pierre).
This is a finely engraved print being testimony to the beautiful and detailed work produced by Kip whose eye for detail was one of the most acknowledged of his day.

Background:
The history of Worcester goes back a long way. In 672, a council of the English Church was held, Worcester became the centre of five new dioceses formed. In the ninth century invasions from the Danes brought fighting to England, but Worcester being on the edge of the conflict escaped without much damage. In 983, Oswald founded a monastery at Worcester under the Benedictine rule, dedicated to St. Mary the Virgin. Wulfstan, in 1040 became a monk at Worcester and made such an impression, he became Bishop of Worcester in 1062. Wulfstan was the only Anglo-Saxon bishop to remain at his post after the Norman Conquest of 1066. In 1084, Wulfstan began rebuilding Worcester Cathedral, starting with the crypt, some of which still survives. He was canonised in 1203. Building work continued for some time, including rebuilding the two western bays of the nave in 1170 and around 1202 the central tower collapsed and there was a serious fire. In 1216, King John was buried at Worcester and he seems to have a devotion to St. Wulfstan. In 1224, Bishop William de Blois built the Lady Chapel, where he was buried when he died in 1236. In the fourteenth century the nave was completely rebuilt apart from the western bays. The central tower and the cloisters were completed built by 1374.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - 
Colours used: - 
General colour appearance: - 
Paper size: - 
26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 18in (585mm x 460mm)
Margins: - min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: -  None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1725 Kip Large Antique Print of the Holy Trinity Cathedral, Chichester, England

1725 Kip Large Antique Print of the Holy Trinity Cathedral, Chichester, England

  • TitleThe Cathedral Church of the Holy Trinity in Chichester
  • Date : 1724
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  40411
  • Size: 26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)

Description: 
This finely engraved original large folio antique Cathedral print by Johnnes Kip (1653-1722) and engraved by James Collins was published in the 1724 by Joseph Smith monumental work Nouveau Theatre de la Grande Bretagne. This print also appeared in Britannia Illustrata by D. Mortier (brother of Pierre).
This is a finely engraved print being testimony to the beautiful and detailed work produced by Kip whose eye for detail was one of the most acknowledged of his day.

Background:
The cathedral of the Holy Trinity at Chichester was founded in 1075, after the seat of the bishop was transferred to the town from nearby Selsey. It was consecrated in 1108, but a subsequent fire created a need for substantial rebuilding, which was not completed until 1184. The cathedral was reconsecrated in 1199. This was not the last stage in its development, by a long way. Richard de la Wyche, (Saint Richard of Chichester in the Anglican Communion), who was bishop from 1245 to 1253, was buried in the cathedral, where his shrine was a place of pilgrimage, until it was ordered destroyed in 1538, during the first stages of the English Reformation. Further damage to the cathedral had been done by fire after the second consecration, and much rebuilding was carried out in the Early English style. The original wooden ceiling had burnt out, and the sublimely simple present vaulting replaced it. The spire, which was originally built in the 14th century, was of poor-quality local stone, and collapsed suddenly in 1861, miraculously without loss of life. It was immediately rebuilt, by Sir Gilbert Scott, a noted scholarly architect.

The cathedral has many other unique features. Under the floor of the nave are the remains of a Roman mosaic pavement, which can be viewed through a glass window. Also in the interior are the grave of the composer Gustav Holst and the Gothic "Arundel tomb" referred to in a famous poem by Philip Larkin.
Despite its age, the cathedral contains several modern works of art, including tapestries by John Piper and Ursula Benker-Schirmer, a window by Marc Chagall, and a sculpture by Graham Sutherland.  

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - 
Colours used: - 
General colour appearance: - 
Paper size: - 
26 1/2in x 22in (670mm x 560mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 18in (585mm x 460mm)
Margins: - min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: -  None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
More Info