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1817 James Cook Antique Atlas, 2nd Voyage Pacific & Antartica - 1 Map 21 Prints

1817 James Cook Antique Atlas, 2nd Voyage Pacific & Antartica - 1 Map 21 Prints

Description: 
This fine original antique French Atlas of Captain James Cooks 2nd Voyage of discovery to the Pacific, The Great South land - Antarctica, translated from the English by M Henry & M Breton, was published by V Lepetit. Paris in 1817 - dated.
This atlas contains 22 (of 27) copper-plate engraved prints & map, listed below, sold as a collection of prints.
The atlas covers have been removed. Pages are generally clean with light aging to borders, overall VG, 8vo, each page size is 7in x 5in (180mm x 125mm)

  1. Carte des Decouvertes saites dans la Mer Pacifique...Capitaine Cook...1774
    2. Isles de Glacee
    3. Crombes de mer
    4. 
    5. 
    6. Coupapow
    7. 
    8. Cimetierre de L Isle d Amesterdam
    9. Homme de Lisle de Paques
    10. Femme de Lisle de Paques
    11. Monumens de Isle de Paques
    12. Baie de la Resolution
    13. Flotte d'Oparee
    14. Cynaimai
    15. Ohedidee
    16. Ile de Rotterdam
    17. Pirogues des Isles des Aimes
    18. Debarquement a Erramanga
    19. Ile de Tanna
    20.  Hommes de la Nouvelle Caledonie
    21. Femme de la nouvelle Caledone
    22. Ornemens et armes de la nouvelle Caledonie
    23. Isle des pines Norfolk
    24.
    25.
    26. Canal de Noel
    27. Baie de la Possession

Cook's Second Voyage (1772-1775)
Two ships were employed with Cook commanding the Resolution and Captain Tobias Furneaux in charge of the Adventure. The purpose was to circumnavigate the globe as far south as possible to confirm the location of a southern continent. Cook proved that there was no "Terra Australis," which supposedly was located between New Zealand and South America. Cook was convinced, however, that there was land beyond the southern ice fields. In his pursuit of this idea, this expedition was the first European voyage to cross the Antarctic Circle.

Captain James Cook navigator, was born on 27 October 1728 at Marton-in-Cleveland, Yorkshire, England, the son of a Scottish labourer and his Yorkshire wife. He grew up on a farm at Great Ayton, attending the village school, and at 17 was apprenticed to a shopkeeper at Staithes. After eighteen months, with the consent of all concerned, he gave this up for a more enticing apprenticeship of three years under John Walker, a Quaker coal-shipper of Whitby. Here he made some headway with mathematics and navigation and served two years before the mast in the Baltic trade. In 1755 Walker offered him a command, but instead Cook joined H.M.S. Eagle and within a month was master's mate. After two years on the Channel service, he was promoted master of the Pembroke, and in 1758 crossed the Atlantic in her and took part in the siege of Louisburg and the survey of the St Lawrence River that led to the capture of Quebec. Transferred to the Northumberland, he began surveying the coasts of Nova Scotia and Newfoundland, in the winter months at Halifax reading solidly in his chosen subjects.
Back in England late in 1762 he married Elizabeth Batts (1742-1832?) of Shadwell, but soon returned to the Newfoundland survey, in 1764 winning his first command in the Grenville. The acquaintance he made here with the future Admiral Sir Hugh Palliser, then governor of Newfoundland and Labrador, the publication of his Newfoundland charts and his observation of a solar eclipse brought him to the attention of the Royal Society and the Admiralty. Although the society recommended Alexander Dalrymple as leader of the expedition to the South Seas to observe the transit of Venus, the Admiralty chose Cook, promoted him from master to lieutenant and gave him command of the Endeavour Bark, 368 tons. He sailed from Plymouth on 26 August 1768 with a complement of ninety-four, including Joseph Banks and his retinue. By way of Cape Horn, they reached Tahiti on 13 April 1769 and duly made their observations on 3 June, meanwhile charting the islands and collecting natural history specimens.
Cook also had secret instructions to determine the existence of a southern continent propounded by geographical philosophers. Accordingly he sailed for New Zealand in August, circumnavigated the islands, charted its coast and took formal possession. This work finished, Cook decided 'to steer to the Westward until we fall in with the E coast of New Holland'. At 6 p.m. on 19 April 1770 Lieutenant Hicks saw land, and a point at the south-east of the Australian mainland was named after him. Cook sailed north, charting the coast and seeking a harbour where the Endeavour's fouled bottom could be scraped. On 29 April he landed at Stingray Bay, where Banks and his naturalists collected such varied specimens that the anchorage was renamed Botany Bay. After a week they sailed again, making their second landing at Bustard Bay and a third near Cape Townshend. Further north Cook found himself within the Barrier Reef amidst dangerous shoals. Sounding their way and often preceded by the long-boat, they crept north, making two more landings in search of water, but at 10 p.m. on 11 June the Endeavour struck fast on a coral reef at high tide. Ballast, guns and decayed stores were jettisoned; then, two tides later she was hauled off with windlass and anchors, and after three days beached in the Endeavour River. Repairs and gales delayed them for seven weeks but, after rounding and naming Cape York, on 22 August at Possession Island, Cook once more 'hoisted English Coulers' and took possession of the whole eastern coast, later adding the name, New South Wales, in his journal. Satisfied that New Guinea and New Holland were separate islands, he sailed for Batavia, arriving on 11 October. Repairs and refitting delayed his departure until 26 December, and he did not reach England until 13 July 1771.
Not even the modesty of Cook's report could obscure the extent or importance of his achievements. His discoveries, apart from New South Wales, were not new, yet without a chronometer he had charted 5000 miles (8047 km) of coast with unusual accuracy. But he lamented his failure to find the southern continent and pleaded for another opportunity to seek it. He was promoted commander and given charge of an expedition, himself in the Resolution and Tobias Furneaux captain of the Adventure. On this second voyage in 1772-75, Cook circumnavigated the world in high southern latitudes. Its chief importance for Australian discovery was in February and March 1773 when the Adventure, parted from the Resolution by fog and gales, made for the south coast of Van Diemen's Land. Here Furneaux renamed Adventure Bay on Bruny Island, sailed round Tasman Peninsula and up the east coast to Flinders Island, but through bad weather failed to reach Point Hicks before proceeding to rendezvous with the Resolution in New Zealand. On his third voyage Cook, now post-captain and fellow of the Royal Society, visited Adventure Bay himself on 26 January 1777, on his way to New Zealand and Tahiti. He went on to explore the Pacific coasts of North America and Siberia. In November 1778 he was at the Sandwich Islands (Hawaii), where at Kealakekua (Karakakooa) Bay he was killed on 14 February 1779.
Cook's strength was his self-confidence. He drove himself as hard as his men yet they followed him loyally, though they sometimes grumbled at his rules of hygiene and at the diet necessary to prevent scurvy, which were singularly successful in preserving the health of his crews. He was also severe on uncompliant natives whom he met on his voyages, and his readiness to use force contributed to his untimely death. His greatest achievements were negative, for they proved where land was not, but his coastal charting set high standards and many of his discoveries helped to create a second British empire.

General Description:
 Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy, stable
 Paper color: - off white
 Age of map color: - 
 Colors used: - 
 General color appearance: - 
 Atlas size: - 8vo
 
 Imperfections:
 Margins: - Age toning
 Plate area: - Age toning
 Verso: - Age toning

$499.00 USD
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1817 Capt. Norden & Lepetit Antique Atlas of Egypt & Nubia - 1 Map & 22 Prints

1817 Capt. Norden & Lepetit Antique Atlas of Egypt & Nubia - 1 Map & 22 Prints

Description:
This fine original antique French Atlas, Voyage d'Egypte et de Nubie, travels to Egypt and Nubia by the Dane, Captain Frederick Louis Norden was translated from the English by M Henry & M Breton and published by V Lepetit. Paris in 1817 - dated.
This atlas contains 1 map of Egypt, Nubia & the Course of the Nile plus 22 copper-plate engraved prints of city views, pyramids and ruins of Egypt, as listed below.
The atlas covers have been removed with front title page partially detached & damaged. Pages are generally clean, with some age toning, overall VG. Size 8vo, each page size is 7in x 5in (180mm x 125mm)

1. Cours du Nil Depuis le Sennaar
2. Vue de Ville d Alexandrie....
3. Vue de la Ville et du Port Neuf d Alexandrie....
4. Vue de la Vieille Alexandrie
5. A: Chateau d Aboukir B: Vue de cote de l Orient meridional C: Plan du Chateau vec son port
6. Fig1: Vue de la villede Rosette Fig 2: Chateau de Rosette Fig 3: Vue du village de Deruth
7. Perspective du Vieux Caire
8. Vue du vieux Caire et d'une Pyramide dans le lointain
9. Vue de la ville de Gize ci-devant Memphis....
10. Coupe du Mokian
11. Plan de l ile de Rodda
12. Village de Dair Etun
13. Vue des Pyramides proche du Caire
14. Vue des Pyramides de Memphis
15. Maisons ordinaires des Arabec
16. Ruines di Palais de Memmon
17. Portail antique plien de Hieroglyphes en couleur et ...
18. Ancien Temple au milieu de la ville d Esnay
19. Deux coupes sur la longueur des superbes..Ruines du temple d Tsia
20. Fig 1: Les Deux Colosses en particular Fig 2: Portail principal des antiquities de Luxor
21. Statues colossales et Ruines du Palais de Memnon
22. Vue des Tombeaux pres d Essouan
23. Maniere de Battre les ris et de porter lEau en Egypte

Frederick Norden sailed to Egypt in 1737-38 to survey the architecture, agriculture, and other curiosities of the country. He was the first European to penetrate as far as Derr in Nubia, and produced the first coherent maps of the country. Seventeen years later, long after Norden’s death, his maps and drawings were published by the Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters, under order of Frederick V of Denmark, as Voyage d’Egypte et de Nubie (1755). Two years later, the physician and naturalist Peter Templeman completed an English translation, which was published in two folio volumes.

Frederic Louis Norden (1708 –1742) was a Danish naval captain and explorer.
Also known as FrederickFrederikFriderickLudwigLudvig and Lewis, the name used on the first publication of his famous Voyage d'Egypte et de Nubie (Copenhagen, 1755) is Frederic Louis Norden. His name is often shortened F. L. Norden.
Norden made a voyage through Egypt all the way down to Sudan in 1737–1738, on the request of King Christian VI of Denmark. Norden made abundant notes, observations and drawings of everything around him, including people, pharaonic monuments, architecture, installations, maps etc., all of which was published in the posthumous Voyage d'Egypte et de Nubie.
On 8 January 1741 he became a Fellow of the Royal Society of London, where his name was registered as Frederic Lewis Norden.

General Description:
 Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy, stable
 Paper color: - off white
 Age of map color: - 
 Colors used: - 
 General color appearance: - 
 Atlas size: - 8vo
 
 Imperfections:
 Margins: - Age toning
 Plate area: - Age toning
 Verso: - Age toning

$499.00 USD
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1817 Tavernier & Lepetit Antique Atlas of Turkey Persia Vietnam, Asia - 22 Prints

1817 Tavernier & Lepetit Antique Atlas of Turkey Persia Vietnam, Asia - 22 Prints

Description:
This fine original antique French Atlas of the travels from Turkey, Persia, Central Asia, Vietnam of Jean Baptist Tavernier's was translated from the English by M Henry & M Breton and published by V Lepetit. Paris in 1817 - dated.
This atlas contains 22 copper-plate engraved prints, as listed below.
The atlas covers have been removed with front title page partially detached. Pages are generally clean with light aging to borders, Print V detached, light toning to pages, overall VG, 8vo, each page size is 7in x 5in (180mm x 125mm)

  1. J B Tavernier
    2. Vue de Constantinople
    3. Point de Serail a Constantionople
    4. Le Trois Eglises
    5. Ervan
    6. Caravanserail de Cachen
    7. Village Camouk ou Circassien
    8. Mosquee Persane
    9. Pont d' Ispahan
    10. Costumes Persan
    11. Femmes Persans
    12. Bas-reliefs de Persepolis
    13. Diamonds
    13 (repeat). Animal qui produit le Musc
    14. Serpent
    15. Diverses Monaies Asie
    16. Poignard Indien
    17. Marche du Roi de Tonquin lorsqu il va a laguerre
    18. Costumes Tonquinois
    19. Spectacle Tonquinois
    20.
    21. Pompe funebre du Roi de Tonquin
    22. Convoi de provisions a l enterrement du Roi de Tonquin

Jean-Baptiste Tavernier (1605 – 1689) was a 17th-century French gem merchant and traveller. Tavernier, a private individual and merchant travelling at his own expense, covered, by his own account, 60,000 leagues in making six voyages to Persia and India between the years 1630 and 1668. In 1675, Tavernier, at the behest of his patron Louis XIV, published Les Six Voyages de Jean-Baptiste Tavernier (Six Voyages, 1676).
Tavernier was born in Paris of a French or Flemish Huguenot family that had emigrated to Antwerp, to escape persecution, and which subsequently returned to Paris after the publication of the Edict of Nantes, which promised protection for French Protestants. Both his father Gabriel and his uncle Melchior were cartographers. Though it is clear from the accuracy of his drawings that Tavernier received some instruction in the art of cartography/engraving, he was possessed of a wanderlust. While still a teenager, he traveled extensively through Europe and achieved a working knowledge of its major languages.
Tavernier is best known for his 1666 discovery/purchase of the 116-carat Tavernier Blue diamond that he subsequently sold to Louis XIV of France in 1668 for 120,000 livres, the equivalent of 172,000 ounces of pure gold, and a letter of ennoblement. (Five years later, Louis had his court jeweler Jean Pitau recut the stone into the 68 carat French Blue and had it set as a hatpin. The gem was reset by his great-grandson Louis XV in The Medal of The Order of the Golden Fleece, stolen in 1792, and was recut and re-emerged in London 30 years later as the Hope Diamond).
In 1669, Tavernier purchased for 60,000 livres the Seigneury of Aubonne, located in the Duchy of Savoy near the city of Geneva, and became Baron of Aubonne.
Tavernier's writings show that he was a keen observer, as well as a remarkable cultural anthropologist. His Six Voyages became a best seller and was translated into German, Dutch, Italian, and English during his lifetime. The work is frequently quoted by modern scholars writing about the period. (Ref Tooley M&B)

General Description:
 Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy, stable canvas backed
 Paper color: - off white
 Age of map color: - 
 Colors used: - 
 General color appearance: - 
 Atlas size: - 8vo
 
 Imperfections:
 Margins: - Age toning
 Plate area: - Plate V detached, age toning
 Verso: - Age toning

$499.00 USD
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1880 FV Greene Lot of 5 Large Antique Lithograph Maps of Washington DC, America

1880 FV Greene Lot of 5 Large Antique Lithograph Maps of Washington DC, America

  • Title : City of Washington Statistical Map No. 4, No. 5, No. 6, No.7, No. 8
  • Ref #:  16266, 16282, 16263, 16265, 16264
  • Size: 30in x 23in (767mm x 585mm) each
  • Date : 1880
  • Condition: (A) Very Good Condition

Description: 
This lot of 5 (of 12 published) first edition, original antique very large lithograph statistical maps of Washington DC by Lieutenant Francis Vinton Greene were published to show the large-scale improvements to the infrastructure of on the June 30th 1880, all maps dated bottom left.

These maps were compiled by Greene to accompany the annual report of the commissioners of the District of Columbia, for the year ending June 30th 1880. Each map carries the title "Statistical Map No.__," is drawn on an identical scale and shows the street pattern of Washington.
Each has a specialized focus, e.g.
No. 4 - Shade trees
No. 5 - Gas Lamps
No. 6 - Water Mains
No. 7 - Sewers
No. 8 - Public Schools
Very interesting details emerge from the maps, e.g., there were 1266 telegraph poles with 30.5 miles of line and 436 miles of wire; New Jersey Ave. was paved with wood and swept once each month. This important set of five of the original 12 provide a remarkable look into the capital's infrastructure in the early 1880's.   (Ref Tooley M&B)

General Description:
 Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy, stable canvas backed
 Paper color: - off white
 Age of map color: - Original
 Colors used: - Pink, blue, yellow, green
 General color appearance: - Authentic
 Paper size: - 30in x 23in (767mm x 585mm)
 Margins: - Min 2in (50mm)
 
 Imperfections:
 Margins: - Light spotting L&R bottom corners
 Plate area: - None
 Verso: - Bottom L&R bottom corner canvas loose on all maps.

$650.00 USD
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1812 Pinkerton Large Old, Antique Stereographic Map of The Northern Hemisphere

1812 Pinkerton Large Old, Antique Stereographic Map of The Northern Hemisphere

Description: 
This very large and beautifully hand coloured original antique Stereographic Northern Hemisphere map was engraved by John Neele in 1812 - the date is engraved at the foot of the maps - and was published by the famous Scottish publisher John Pinkerton in his large folio Modern Atlas, which was published between 1809-14. 

Background: 
In geometry, the stereographic projection is a particular mapping (function) that projects a sphere onto a plane. The projection is defined on the entire sphere, except at one point: the projection point. Where it is defined, the mapping is smooth and bijective. It is conformal, meaning that it preserves angles. It is neither isometric nor area-preserving: that is, it preserves neither distances nor the areas of figures.
Intuitively, then, the stereographic projection is a way of picturing the sphere as the plane, with some inevitable compromises. Because the sphere and the plane appear in many areas of mathematics and its applications, so does the stereographic projection; it finds use in diverse fields including complex analysis, cartography, geology, and photography. In practice, the projection is carried out by computer or by hand using a special kind of graph paper called a stereographic net, shortened to stereonet, or Wulff net.

The stereographic projection was known to Hipparchus, Ptolemy and probably earlier to the Egyptians. It was originally known as the planisphere projection. Planisphaerium by Ptolemy is the oldest surviving document that describes it. One of its most important uses was the representation of celestial charts. The term planisphere is still used to refer to such charts.
In the 16th and 17th century, the equatorial aspect of the stereographic projection was commonly used for maps of the Eastern and Western Hemispheres. It is believed that already the map created in 1507 by Gualterius Lud was in stereographic projection, as were later the maps of Jean Roze (1542), Rumold Mercator (1595), and many others. In star charts, even this equatorial aspect had been utilised already by the ancient astronomers like Ptolemy.
François d'Aguilon gave the stereographic projection its current name in his 1613 work Opticorum libri sex philosophis juxta ac mathematicis utiles (Six Books of Optics, useful for philosophers and mathematicians alike)
In 1695, Edmond Halley, motivated by his interest in star charts, published the first mathematical proof that this map is conformal. He used the recently established tools of calculus, invented by his friend Isaac Newton. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - Original & later
Colours used: - Green, pink, yellow
General colour appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 31in x 22in (790mm x 560mm)  
Plate size: - 31in x 22in (790mm x 560mm)  
Margins: - min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$750.00 USD
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1812 Pinkerton Large Old, Antique Stereographic Map of The Southern Hemisphere

1812 Pinkerton Large Old, Antique Stereographic Map of The Southern Hemisphere

Description: 
This very large and beautifully hand coloured original antique Stereographic Southern Hemisphere map was engraved by John Neele in 1812 - the date is engraved at the foot of the maps - and was published by the famous Scottish publisher John Pinkerton in his large folio Modern Atlas, which was published between 1809-14. 

Background: 
In geometry, the stereographic projection is a particular mapping (function) that projects a sphere onto a plane. The projection is defined on the entire sphere, except at one point: the projection point. Where it is defined, the mapping is smooth and bijective. It is conformal, meaning that it preserves angles. It is neither isometric nor area-preserving: that is, it preserves neither distances nor the areas of figures.
Intuitively, then, the stereographic projection is a way of picturing the sphere as the plane, with some inevitable compromises. Because the sphere and the plane appear in many areas of mathematics and its applications, so does the stereographic projection; it finds use in diverse fields including complex analysis, cartography, geology, and photography. In practice, the projection is carried out by computer or by hand using a special kind of graph paper called a stereographic net, shortened to stereonet, or Wulff net.

The stereographic projection was known to Hipparchus, Ptolemy and probably earlier to the Egyptians. It was originally known as the planisphere projection. Planisphaerium by Ptolemy is the oldest surviving document that describes it. One of its most important uses was the representation of celestial charts. The term planisphere is still used to refer to such charts.
In the 16th and 17th century, the equatorial aspect of the stereographic projection was commonly used for maps of the Eastern and Western Hemispheres. It is believed that already the map created in 1507 by Gualterius Lud was in stereographic projection, as were later the maps of Jean Roze (1542), Rumold Mercator (1595), and many others. In star charts, even this equatorial aspect had been utilised already by the ancient astronomers like Ptolemy.
François d'Aguilon gave the stereographic projection its current name in his 1613 work Opticorum libri sex philosophis juxta ac mathematicis utiles (Six Books of Optics, useful for philosophers and mathematicians alike)
In 1695, Edmond Halley, motivated by his interest in star charts, published the first mathematical proof that this map is conformal. He used the recently established tools of calculus, invented by his friend Isaac Newton. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - Original & later
Colours used: - Green, pink, yellow
General colour appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 31in x 22in (790mm x 560mm)  
Plate size: - 31in x 22in (790mm x 560mm)  
Margins: - min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$850.00 USD
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1797 Faden & D Anville Large Antique Map of America - Western Hemisphere, NZ

1797 Faden & D Anville Large Antique Map of America - Western Hemisphere, NZ

  • Title : A Map of America or the New World, wherein are introduced all the known parts of the Western Hemisphere From the Map of d'Anville with the necessary alterations and the addition of the Discoveries made since the Year 1761. London: W. Faden 1797.
  • Ref #:  61144
  • Size: 33in x 23in (840mm x 585mm)
  • Date : 1797
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This very large, beautifully hand coloured original 1st edition scarce antique map of America & The Western Hemisphere with New Zealand was engraved by William Palmer in 1797 - date engraved in the title cartouche - and was published by William Faden in his General Atlas, London.

Background: This is the first state of Faden's large beautiful map of America within the Western Hemisphere after D Anville, with the words O Rare Columbus included within the title cartouche, paying homage to Christopher Columbus.
The map illustrates the discoveries of Captains Cook & La Perouse along the NW Coast of America and throughout the Pacific, including the Sandwich Islands during the mid to late 8th century. 
Pope Alexander's 1493 Line of Demarcation is shown in the Atlantic, separating the Portuguese and Spanish possessions. The Antarctic Icy Sea is noted, along with a note reading Cook's Nec Plus Ultra 71 Degrees 10 Minutes Latitude South January 30th 1774.
While the Bay of the West is not shown, there is an annotation in the Northwest which reads A'ASS TOPULSE or GREAT SEA of the Indians SEA of THE WEST of the Geographers. The Arctic Icy Sea or Hyperborean Sea is named. 
Excellent detail along the Northwest Passage, with several additional annotations, along with several discoveries and exploration annotation's appearing in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. Attractive engraved cartouche. (Ref Tooley M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Pink, blue, yellow, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 33in x 23in (840mm x 585mm)
Plate size: - 24in x 21 1/2in (610mm x 545mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$975.00 USD
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1794 Faden & Cook Large Antique Map NW America. Alaska, Canada, Bering Straits

1794 Faden & Cook Large Antique Map NW America. Alaska, Canada, Bering Straits

  • Title : Chart of the NW Coast of America and the NE Coast of Asia Explored in the Years 1778 and 1779. Prepared by Lieut. Heny Roberts under the immediate Inspection of Capt Cook
  • Ref #:  61145
  • Size: 33in x 23in (840mm x 585mm)
  • Date : 1794
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This very large, beautifully hand coloured original 2nd edition antique map of NW America, NE Russia, North Pacific & the Bering Straits by Henry Roberts & Capt James Cook, with later information from other explorers, was engraved by William Palmer in 1794 - date engraved at the foot of the map - and was published by William Faden in London.

This highly detailed chart of the North Pacific, is based upon Captain James Cook's map from his last voyage of 1784, with updates in 1794 to include discoveries and tracks from the voyages of Captain George Vancouver, Sir Alexander MacKenzie, 18th Century Russian sources about the northern arctic regions and others. One interesting feature is the supposed course of the voyage of Columbia Rediviva, commonly known as the Columbia, a privately owned ship under the command of John Kendrick and Captain Robert Gray, with tracks extending due north into British Columbia. The map also includes a nearly daily course of Cook's voyage along Northern Canada and the NW Coast of America, including the region explored by Vancouver. Details on the NW Passage from Hans Sloan's Japanese map of the world are also included, along with information on certain arctic coastlines from Russian sources and many other annotations. 

Background: The map is the second edition of Lieutenant Henry Robert’s chart depicting Captain Cook’s explorations in the North Pacific during his third and final voyage.  The original Roberts map was suppressed and not included in the official atlas of the journey.  It contained details of the Alaskan coastline and Canadian Arctic not presented on the officially sanctioned map and provided the first relatively accurate mapping of the Northwest Coast of North America, dispelling many of the fantastic theories that had plagued the region for years.
Cook’s death left the production of his final expedition’s findings to two camps of editors: Henry Roberts and Captain King, (the authors of the charts and journals, respectively) and Alexander Dalrymple, Cook’s long-time rival, and his political supporters. Dalrymple won out, and Roberts’ chart was replaced with the less-detailed map engraved by T. Harmar.
It was not understood that Roberts’ chart and the Faden were the same until 1985, when the British Library acquired a proof state of the map.  Roberts had sold his copperplate to Faden, who published this map a month after the publication of the official atlas.  The Roberts / Faden map contains fourteen Alaskan place names not on the authorized map, including Bald Head, Cape Denbigh and Cape Darby in Norton Sound. It also shows, for the first time on any printed map, the results of Hearn’s expedition in the Canadian Arctic.
In 1794,  William Faden commissioned the engraver Louis Stanislas D’Arcy de la Rochette to update Roberts’ chart with new data gathered over the last decade. A note on the map states:

The Interesting Discoveries made by the British and American Ships, since the first Publication of this Chart in 1784, Together with the Hydrographical Materials, lately procured from St. Petersburg and other places, have enabled Mr. De la Rochette to lay down the Numerous Improvements which appear in the Present Edition. 

The 1794 edition of the map also incorporates the supposed course of the American sloop Lady Washington into the Gulph of Georgia in 1794, based upon reports by John Meares, an English fur trader active along the coast of British Columbia. The Lady Washington, commanded by Captain Robert Gray, was the first of many ships sailed by the so-called Boston Men, American fur traders competing for the lucrative China trade. Meares had reported to Captain George Vancouver that Captain Gray had sailed completely around the east side of Vancouver Island, confirming its insularity.  

In describing the first edition, Cohen & Taliaferro (Catalogue 62) note:

 This legendary lost chart was drawn by Henry Roberts for the authorized atlas of Cook's third voyage, but because of disputes among the editors, it was never included.  It is now known that the plate for Roberts' chart, " version more elaborate than that [included] in the authorized atlas" (Campbell), was purchased by Faden and published separately.  Th[e] exceptionally rare first state of  the Roberts-Faden chart is the first published map to show the discoveries of Samuel Hearne in the Canadian Arctic. . . .

Although a few examples of the chart were known, including one belonging to the great Americana collector, Thomas Streeter, its true importance was not recognized until 1985, when a proof copy was acquired by the British Library . . .

...the [map] includes a number of Alaskan place-names not found on the authorized version [in the account of Cook's third voyage]. . . 

This Roberts chart also contains information on interior geography not included on the [official map].  The source for this information came from Samuel Hearne's c.1772 manuscript map of the Coppermine River, in the possession of the Hudson's Bay Company, and which had never before appeared in print.  The Company suppressed Hearne's map to protect its interests in the north.  This was important information because Hearne's map showed the impossibility of a Northwest Passage through Hudson's Bay, and it is curious that the Company had not released it to settle arguments over a point that continued to occupy public attention. . .  (Ref Tooley M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Pink, blue, yellow, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 33in x 23in (840mm x 585mm)
Plate size: - 28in x 17in (710mm x 430mm)
Margins: - Min 2in (50mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Slight loss from to top left margin edge
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$1,250.00 USD
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1550 Sebastian Munster Original Antique Oval World Map - Columbus America

1550 Sebastian Munster Original Antique Oval World Map - Columbus America

Description:
This fine wood-block engraved original antique World Map was engraved by David Kandel, initials engraved bottom left "DK" and was published in the 1550 edition of Cosmographia by Sebastian Munster.
One of the most recognizable maps of the 16th century considered the first map to identify the Pacific Ocean, as here, 'Mare Pacificum.' This is the world of the educated 16th century European, divided into Asia, Europe, India, Africa and America. The southern latitudes are inhabited by a variety of sea monsters and sailing ships.
American continent is nearly unrecognizable, only a scant 58 years after European discovery by Christopher Columbus. North America is defined as Terra Florida showing an enormous inlet extending towards the eastern seaboard in the vicinity of modern day North Carolina named Verrazano's Sea. Apparently Verrazano, coasting the Outer Banks, observed the Pamlico Sound and assumed that beyond the narrow coastal banks, an open sea gave direct access to the pacific - wishful thinking at best. Verrazano's Sea appears so dramatically on few maps, but persisted in lesser forms for nearly a century. 
South America with tentacle like protrusions in all directions, is largely amorphous, but the Rio de la Plata and the Strait of Magellan are clear. Tierra del Fuego is enormous, with no mention of greater Terra Australias, an interesting omission by Munster. 
Europe is vaguely recognizable and connected, via an arctic peninsula, to Greenland and North America. 
Asia/Pacific extends eastward far enough to reappear just north of America. Ceylon is not present, but a landmass bearing roughly the shape and position of Sumatra is identified as Tapobrana (a term more commonly associated with Ceylon). Japan appears as Zipangri. 
Unlike many other world maps of the time, Munster has left out the concept of a 'Terra Australis Incognita' altogether choosing to show ocean instead.
Africa follows the Ptolemaic model with the Nile finding its source in a mountain range and two associated lakes. 
The whole is surrounded by twelve named and prominent wind heads - one for each direction.

Background: This wood-cut engraved World map was prepared for the 1550 edition of Sebastian Münster's Cosmographia to replace the earlier World map by Sebasian Munster which had appeared in the editions of the Geographia and Cosmographia from 1540 onwards. The publisher, from 1552, was Heinrich Petri, Münster's son-in-law. 
This "new world" map is on an oval projection, similar in many respects to the previous Munster world map, but with the woodcutter's initials "DK" added, identified as those of the engraver David Kandel, in the lower left-hand corner.
The titles of the wind-heads are now in banners and the east and west winds, unlike the 1540 version, do not protrude inside the oval circumference. North America still retains its unusual shape almost bisected by water but the earlier note indicating a route to the Moluccas has been omitted...."
The map was first issued in the 1550 edition of Cosmographia, and appeared in all subsequent editions through to 1578, with the title varying according to the language of the edition. On the verso the wood block is the title and text, in Latin.

Sebastian Münster (1488-1552) was a German cartographer, cosmographer, and Hebrew scholar whose work Cosmographia (1544; "Cosmography") was the earliest German description of the world and a major work in the revival of geographic thought in 16th-century Europe. It had numerous editions in different languages including Latin, French, Italian, English, and even Czech. Altogether, about 40 editions of the Cosmographia appeared between 1544 and 1628 and was one of the most successful and popular books of the 16th century. Münster was a major influence in popular thinking in Europe for the next 200 years.
This success was due not only to the level of descriptive detail but also to the fascinating full page maps & views as well as smaller woodcuts that were included in the text. Many of the woodcuts were executed by famous engravers of the time including Hans Holbein the Younger, Urs Graf, Hans Rudolph Manuel Deutsch, and David Kandel. 
Aside from the well-known maps present in the Cosmographia, the text is thickly sprinkled with vigorous views: portraits of kings and princes, costumes and occupations, habits and customs, flora and fauna, monsters, wonders, and horrors about the known -- and unknown -- world, and was undoubtedly one of the most widely read books of its time.
Münster acquired the material for his book in three ways. Firstly he researched all available literary sources across Germany, Switzerland and other parts of Europe. Secondly he obtained original manuscript material from locals all over Europe for description of the countryside, cities, villages, towns, rivers and local history. Finally, he obtained further material first hand on his travels (primarily in south-west Germany, Switzerland, and Alsace). 

In 1588 Sebastian Petri re-released Cosomgraphia and re-issued many of Munsters maps and views in the "copperplate style". The maps in this release were more sophisticated than with earlier publications of Cosomgraphia and were based on the 1570 release of Abraham Ortelius monumental work Theatrum Orbis Terrarum. (Ref: Shirley; Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: -  
Colors used: -  
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 15 3/4in x 12 1/2in (400mm x 310mm)
Plate size: - 15 3/4in x 12 1/2in (400mm x 310mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (10mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - L&R margins extended, not affecting borders or image
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$3,250.00 USD
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1719 Chatelain Antique Map of North America, GOM, Caribbean, United States

1719 Chatelain Antique Map of North America, GOM, Caribbean, United States

  • Title : Carte Contenant Le Royaume Du Mexique Et La Floride
  • Date : 1719
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  50621
  • Size: 23 1/4in x 17 1/2in (590m x 445m) 

Description: 
This large beautifully hand coloured original antique foundation map of North America and the Caribbean - after Delisle landmark map of 1703 - was published by Henri Abraham Chatelain in 1719, in his famous Atlas Historique.

Background:
A very attractive example of Chatelain's issue of Guillaume De L'Isle's foundation map of present-day United States, Central America and the West Indies, originally published in 1703. Guillaume De L'Isle brought a new scientific approach to mapmaking at the end of the seventeenth century and his rigorously prepared maps of all areas became the standards for much of the following century.

Amongst his most important works were those relating to the New World, especially North America, where the recent reports of French travellers into the interior were utilised. Sources for this map - the first to show the lower reaches of the Mississippi accurately - included d'Iberville, Tonty and Le Sueur, Father Gravier, and Bienville (later to become Governor of the French colony of Louisiana). Evidence of the contemporary superiority of De L'Isle's maps lies in the numerous copies, published in Paris, Amsterdam, London and Germany, and the republishing of the original plate over many years. Geographically his maps were as correct, however, this map is also remarkable for De L'Isle's political boundaries which squeeze the English Colonies, on the east coast into a narrow strip, thus allocating the greater part of North America to France. Chatelain's map has a large panel of text describing Mexico and Florida at lower left.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Pink, green, yellow, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic 
Paper size: - 23 1/4in x 17 1/2in (590m x 445m)
Plate size: - 20 3/4in x 16 1/4in (530m x 415mm)
Margins: - min. 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections: Margins: - None
Plate area: - Folds as issued
Verso: - None

$1,499.00 USD
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1757 De Vaugondy Large Antique Map of Westphalia, Germany Friesland & Oldenberg

1757 De Vaugondy Large Antique Map of Westphalia, Germany Friesland & Oldenberg

Description:
This large beautifully hand coloured original antique map of the Westphalia region of Germany with an inset map of the Friesland & Oldenberg regions - was published by Robert De Vaugondy in Atlas Universal, Paris 1757. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Pink, yellow, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 26in x 20in (660mm x 510mm)
Plate size: - 25in x 19in (635mm x 485mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
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1778 De Vaugondy Large Antique Map Lower Saxony Germany

1778 De Vaugondy Large Antique Map Lower Saxony Germany

Description:
This large beautifully engraved & original map of the northern German region of Lower Saxony was engraved in 1778 - the date is engraved in the title cartouche - after Robert De Vaugondy and was published by P Santini (fl. 1776-84) in his 2 volume edition of Atlas Universal 1776-84.

The map centers on the Elbe River and the city of Hamburg stretching east to Berlin south to the state of Brunswick and west to Bremen. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Pink, yellow, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 29in x 20in (735mm x 510mm)
Plate size: - 21 1/2in x 19 1/2in (545mm x 495mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Small worm hole repair to mid centerfold
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
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1745 Tindal Antique Map Plan of Dendermonde, Belgium

1745 Tindal Antique Map Plan of Dendermonde, Belgium

  • Title : Plan of the City of Dendermonde, and the manner in which it was blocked by the troops of the Allies
  • Date : 1745
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  22157-1
  • Size: 19 1/2in x 15 3/4in (497mm x 400mm)

Description:
This beautifully hand coloured original antique battle plan & seige placements of the city of Dendermonde, Belgium features a Bird's Eye view of the town, and a charming inset view, was published in 1745 by Nicholas Tindal in the continuation of Paul Rapin de ThoirasHistory of England.

A broad plan of the city and vicinity showing Allied siege works; a cartouche containing an explanatory key and a small "prospect" of the city. Dendermonde was besieged by the English in August 1706 and surrendered to Marlborough 5 Sep 1706.

Paul Rapin de Thoiras was a Frenchman responsible for publishing ten elaborate volumes on the History of England Histoire D’ Angleterre published between 1724-27. In 1745 his work was translated and updated by Nicholas Tindal and called “Tindal’s Continuation of Mr. Rapin’s History of England”. Included with the English edition of Rapins work was an atlas containing 45 maps, battle plans and town plans of the Spanish War of Succession (1701-13) engraved by Richard William Seale and John Basire.
Richard William Seale was an engraver and publisher from London responsible for publishing a number of fine and detailed maps of the continents between 1744-47. (Ref Tooley M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 19 1/2in x 15 3/4in (497mm x 400mm)
Plate size: - 19 1/2in x 15 3/4in (497mm x 400mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Folds as issued
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
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1760 Bowen, D Anville Map Entrance of River Sanaga, St Louis Senegal West Africa

1760 Bowen, D Anville Map Entrance of River Sanaga, St Louis Senegal West Africa

  • Title : A General Map of The River Sanaga or Senegal; Map of ye Entrance of the Sanga or Senegal; Island of Sanaga Senegal or St Louis.
  • Date : 1760
  • Condition: (A) Very Good Condition
  • Ref:  31879
  • Size: 16in x 10in (405mm x 255mm)

Description: 
This large beautifully hand coloured original antique map of three view of the River, River Mouth & Island of St Louis of the Sangha River in Senegal West Africa by Thomas Bowen - after D anville - was published in 1760. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Yellow, green, pink, blue  
General color appearance: - Authentic  
Paper size: - 16in x 10in (405mm x 255mm)
Plate size: - 16in x 10in (405mm x 255mm)
Margins: - min. 1/4in (6mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Folds as issued
Plate area: - Folds as issued, light creasing along folds
Verso: - Folds as issued, light creasing along folds

$125.00 USD
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1790 Cook Hogg Antique Map of Tahiti, Raiatea, Ulietea

1790 Cook Hogg Antique Map of Tahiti, Raiatea, Ulietea

  • Title : Matavia Bay in Otaheite; Ohamaneno Harbour in Ulietea; Owharre Harbourin Huaheine; Oopoa Harbour in Ulietea
  • Date : 1790
  • Condition: (A+) Fne Condition
  • Ref:  32197
  • Size: 15 1/2in x 10in (395mm x 255mm)

Description: 
This fine original antique map of the Friendly Islands - Tonga Islands - with the routes of Cooks ships Resolution in 1774 & Adventure 1773 - was engraved by Robert Benard after Webber for the French edition of Cooks voyages published in 1780.

This print is from the 1st edition of the French publication of Cooks voyages and are beautifully engraved on heavy stable paper and should not be confused with the later re-engravings of the next 30 years which were of a more inferior quality.

The first printed account of the first voyage under Cook's command was surreptitiously edited and printed by Thomas Becket only two months after the expedition returned to England, it was published almost two years before the official account by John Hawkesworth appeared. As described on the title page, the book related "various occurrences of the voyage, with descriptions of several new discovered countries in the southern hemisphere." The work also provided much information about the native inhabitants encountered on the voyage, including "a concise vocabulary of the language of Otahitee" [Tahiti]. The text was quickly disseminated with a second English edition published in Dublin as well as translations into German and French the following year. French editions were printed in 1773, 1777, 1782, and 1793.

Cook's First Voyage (1768-1771)
The first voyage under Captain James Cook's command was primarily of a scientific nature. The expedition on the Endeavour initially sailed to Tahiti to observe the transit of the planet Venus in order to calculate the earth's distance from the sun. Cook landed on the South Pacific island in April of 1769 and in June of that year the astronomical observations were successfully completed. In addition to these labors, very good relations with the Tahitians were maintained and the naturalists Joseph Banks and Daniel C. Solander conducted extensive ethnological and botanical research. 

Another purpose of the voyage was to explore the South Seas to determine if an inhabitable continent existed in the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Upon leaving Tahiti, Cook named and charted the Society Islands and then continued southwest to New Zealand. His circumnavigation and exploration of that country also resulted in a detailed survey. Cook proceeded to Australia, where he charted the eastern coast for 2,000 miles, naming the area New South Wales. As a result of these surveys, both Australia and New Zealand were annexed by Great Britain. In addition to these explorations, the Endeavour returned to England without a single death from scurvy among its men, an historic feat at the time. The combination of these accomplishments brought Cook prominence, promotion, and the opportunity to lead further expeditions.

Cook's Second Voyage (1772-1775)
Based on the success of his first voyage, Cook was appointed by the Admiralty to lead a second expedition. Two ships were employed with Cook commanding the Resolution and Captain Tobias Furneaux in charge of the Adventure. The purpose was to circumnavigate the globe as far south as possible to confirm the location of a southern continent. Cook proved that there was no "Terra Australis," which supposedly was located between New Zealand and South America. Cook was convinced, however, that there was land beyond the southern ice fields. In his pursuit of this idea, this expedition was the first European voyage to cross the Antarctic Circle. In addition, in two great sweeps through the Southern latitudes, Cook made an incredible number of landfalls including New Zealand, Easter Island, the Marquesas, Tahiti and the Society Islands, the Tonga Islands, the New Hebrides, New Caledonia, and a number of smaller islands. 

In addition to these navigational accomplishments and the accompanying expansion of geographical knowledge, the expedition also recorded a vast amount of information regarding the Pacific islands and peoples, proved the value of the chronometer as an instrument for calculating longitude, and improved techniques for preventing scurvy.

Cook's Third Voyage (1776-1779)
In the course of his first two voyages, Cook circumnavigated the globe twice, sailed extensively into the Antarctic, and charted coastlines from Newfoundland to New Zealand. Following these achievements, Cook's third voyage was organized to seek an efficient route from England to southern and eastern Asia that would not entail rounding the Cape of Good Hope. The search for such a Northwest (or Northeast) Passage had been on the agenda of northern European mariners and merchants since the beginning of European expansion in the late fifteenth century. England's growing economic and colonial interests in India in the later eighteenth century provided the stimulus for the latest exploration for this route.

Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 15 1/2in x 10in (395mm x 255mm)
Plate size: - 14in x 9in (355mm x 230mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
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1765 Isaac Tirion Antique Print of an Alms House in Amsterdam, Holland

1765 Isaac Tirion Antique Print of an Alms House in Amsterdam, Holland

  • Title : Het Oude-Zyds-Huiszitten-Aalmoesseniers-Huis, van agteren.
  • Date : 1765
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  Het1
  • Size: 9in x 6in (230mm x 150mm)

Description: 
This beautifully hand coloured original antique print of an Alms House in Amsterdam was published by Isaac Tirion in the 1765 edition ofTopografie van Nederland. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Green, pink, yellow
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 9in x 6in (230mm x 150mm)
Plate size: - 8 1/2in x 5 1/2in (215mm x 140mm)
Margins: - Min 1/4in (5mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$75.00 USD
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1751 Diderot Antique Print Canadian Otter, East Indies Seal & Morse

1751 Diderot Antique Print Canadian Otter, East Indies Seal & Morse

  • Title : Histoire Naturelle, Fig. 1. Le Loutre Du Canada. Fig 2. Le Phoque Des Indies Fig 3. Le Morse
  • Date : 1751
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  90532
  • Size: 15in x 10in (380mm x 255mm)

Description:
This fine beautifully hand coloured original antique print of a Canadian Otter, Seal of the East Indies & a Morse was drawn by Francois Nicolas Martinet and engraved by Robert Benard (fl 1750-85) to accompany Denis Diderot's (1713-84) monumental work Encyclopedia published between 1751 & 1772.

Encyclopedia was a landmark work of the Enlightenment that depicted the arts and sciences, and the tools and methods of artisans and trade people in a methodical and thorough way. The entire encyclopedia comprised of 17 volumes of text and 11 volumes of plates. 
The marvelous detailed plates show how everything in the period was made. It had a huge impact on its own time, and is highly valued by present-day historians as a record of the techniques and vocations of the pre-Industrial world. It is also a great resource for collectors, art and craftspeople. (Ref Tooley M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Brown, yellow, green, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 15in x 10in (380mm x 255mm)
Plate size: - 14in x 9in (355mm x 230mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$75.00 USD
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1789 Lamarck & Redoute Antique Conchology Print, Molluscs, Pl 256

1789 Lamarck & Redoute Antique Conchology Print, Molluscs, Pl 256

Description:
This fine beautifully hand coloured original antique copper-plate Conchology print was published by Jean Baptiste Lamarck in Encyclopedia Methodique, Paris 1789-1832. 
These prints by various artists including H J Redoute - younger brother of the famous Rose illustrator P J Redoute - Fossier, J Deseve and others were engraved by Robert Benard who was responsible for most of the engravings of the French edition of Cooks voyages.

Jean Baptiste Lamarck (1744-1829) - was one of the most famous French naturalists of the 18th century. He took part in the war of The Seven Years with the Duke of Broglie. After abandoning the military career and returning to France, he settled in Paris, where he devoted himself to Medicine, Meteorology and Botanic, for which he had as a master Bernard de Jussieu. 
He became well-known after the publication of the catalogue La Flore Française, written using the dichotomic keys, a new method invented by the same Lamarck. As the botanist of the king, he started a long trip through Europe, taking with him Buffon's son. When he returned, he worked at the Encyclopedie methodique, continuing D'Alembert and Diderot's work. After starting teaching at the Museum National d' Histoire Naturelle, he spent all his time devoting himself to Zoology, with a particular interest to fossils and living mollusks. 
The scientific world owes him the reorganization of the classification and distinction between Vertebrates and Invertebrates and the introduction of new species divisions, like Crustaceans, Arachnids and Annelids. The [Encyclopedia Methodique] Botanique 1789-1832, was his most famous work. It was originally published in 4 volumes, containing over 1000 plates, of which 28 by Redouté.(Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Blue, yellow, green, red
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 11 1/2in x 8 1/2in (280mm x 215mm)
Plate size: - 10in x 7 1/2in (255mm x 190mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light uniform age toning
Plate area: - Light uniform age toning
Verso: - Light uniform age toning

$75.00 USD
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1789 Lamarck & Redoute Antique Conchology Print of Duck Clam Shells Pl 255

1789 Lamarck & Redoute Antique Conchology Print of Duck Clam Shells Pl 255

Description:
This fine beautifully hand coloured original antique copper-plate Conchology print was published by Jean Baptiste Lamarck in Encyclopedia Methodique, Paris 1789-1832. 
These prints by various artists including H J Redoute - younger brother of the famous Rose illustrator P J Redoute - Fossier, J Deseve and others were engraved by Robert Benard who was responsible for most of the engravings of the French edition of Cooks voyages.

Jean Baptiste Lamarck (1744-1829) - was one of the most famous French naturalists of the 18th century. He took part in the war of The Seven Years with the Duke of Broglie. After abandoning the military career and returning to France, he settled in Paris, where he devoted himself to Medicine, Meteorology and Botanic, for which he had as a master Bernard de Jussieu. 
He became well-known after the publication of the catalogue La Flore Française, written using the dichotomic keys, a new method invented by the same Lamarck. As the botanist of the king, he started a long trip through Europe, taking with him Buffon's son. When he returned, he worked at the Encyclopedie methodique, continuing D'Alembert and Diderot's work. After starting teaching at the Museum National d' Histoire Naturelle, he spent all his time devoting himself to Zoology, with a particular interest to fossils and living mollusks. 
The scientific world owes him the reorganization of the classification and distinction between Vertebrates and Invertebrates and the introduction of new species divisions, like Crustaceans, Arachnids and Annelids. The [Encyclopedia Methodique] Botanique 1789-1832, was his most famous work. It was originally published in 4 volumes, containing over 1000 plates, of which 28 by Redouté.(Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Blue, yellow, green, red
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 11 1/2in x 8 1/2in (280mm x 215mm)
Plate size: - 10in x 7 1/2in (255mm x 190mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light uniform age toning
Plate area: - Light uniform age toning
Verso: - Light uniform age toning

$75.00 USD
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1789 Lamarck & Redoute Antique Conchology Print of Duck Clams Shells

1789 Lamarck & Redoute Antique Conchology Print of Duck Clams Shells

Description:
This fine beautifully hand coloured original antique copper-plate Conchology print was published by Jean Baptiste Lamarck in Encyclopedia Methodique, Paris 1789-1832. 
These prints by various artists including H J Redoute - younger brother of the famous Rose illustrator P J Redoute - Fossier, J Deseve and others were engraved by Robert Benard who was responsible for most of the engravings of the French edition of Cooks voyages.

Jean Baptiste Lamarck (1744-1829) - was one of the most famous French naturalists of the 18th century. He took part in the war of The Seven Years with the Duke of Broglie. After abandoning the military career and returning to France, he settled in Paris, where he devoted himself to Medicine, Meteorology and Botanic, for which he had as a master Bernard de Jussieu. 
He became well-known after the publication of the catalogue La Flore Française, written using the dichotomic keys, a new method invented by the same Lamarck. As the botanist of the king, he started a long trip through Europe, taking with him Buffon's son. When he returned, he worked at the Encyclopedie methodique, continuing D'Alembert and Diderot's work. After starting teaching at the Museum National d' Histoire Naturelle, he spent all his time devoting himself to Zoology, with a particular interest to fossils and living mollusks. 
The scientific world owes him the reorganization of the classification and distinction between Vertebrates and Invertebrates and the introduction of new species divisions, like Crustaceans, Arachnids and Annelids. The [Encyclopedia Methodique] Botanique 1789-1832, was his most famous work. It was originally published in 4 volumes, containing over 1000 plates, of which 28 by Redouté.(Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Blue, yellow, green, red
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 11 1/2in x 8 1/2in (280mm x 215mm)
Plate size: - 10in x 7 1/2in (255mm x 190mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light uniform age toning
Plate area: - Light uniform age toning
Verso: - Light uniform age toning

$75.00 USD
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1695 Morden Antique Map The English County of Rutland

1695 Morden Antique Map The English County of Rutland

Description:
This beautifully hand coloured original antique map of the English County of Rutland was engraved by Robert Morden for the 1695 edition of Camden's Britannia

William Camden was an historian who first published his Britannia, a description and history of Britain, in 1586. Written in Latin, the book contained only a general map of the country but had a wide circulation and eventually in 1607 an edition (the sixth) was published with a series of maps with Latin text on the reverse. 
Further editions in English were published in 1610 and 1637 but without text.  (Many more editions were published up until 1806 with map contributions from Blaeu in 1617, John Bill 1626, Robert Morden 1695-1772 and John Cary 1789-1806)
In the 1610 & 1617 editions the maps were mostly engraved by William Kip and William Hole and were based on those of Christopher Saxton, but six were copied from John Norden. 
The map of Pembroke is by George Owen and the general maps of England/Wales, Scotland and Ireland were probably taken from Mercator. Kip reduced the size of each map for Britannia from the originals published byChristopher Saxton in 1579. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Red, yellow, blue, green, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 16in x 14in (405mm x 355mm)
Plate size: - 14 1/2in x 11 1/2in (370mm x 290mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25m)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$99.00 USD
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1695 Rob. Morden Antique Map English County of Hereford

1695 Rob. Morden Antique Map English County of Hereford

Description:

This attractive original antique map of the English county of Hereford, by Robert Morden, was published in the 1695 edition of Camden's Britannia

William Camden was an historian who first published his Britannia, a description and history of Britain, in 1586. Written in Latin, the book contained only a general map of the country but had a wide circulation and eventually in 1607 an edition (the sixth) was published with a series of maps with Latin text on the reverse. 
Further editions in English were published in 1610 and 1637 but without text.  (Many more editions were published up until 1806 with map contributions from Blaeu in 1617, John Bill 1626, Robert Morden 1695-1772 and John Cary 1789-1806)
In the 1610 & 1617 editions the maps were mostly engraved by William Kip and William Hole and were based on those of Christopher Saxton, but six were copied from John Norden. 
The map of Pembroke is by George Owen and the general maps of England/Wales, Scotland and Ireland were probably taken from Mercator. Kip reduced the size of each map for Britannia from the originals published byChristopher Saxton in 1579. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Red, yellow, blue, green
General color appearance: - Authentic, heavy
Paper size: - 17in x 15in (430mm x 380mm)
Plate size: - 17in x 15in (430mm x 380mm)
Margins: - Min 1/4in (4mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Top margin cropped close to border
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
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1695 Morden Antique Map The Welsh County of Monmouth

1695 Morden Antique Map The Welsh County of Monmouth

Description:
This fine beautifully hand coloured original antique map of the Welsh county of Monmouth was engraved by Robert Morden & published by Abel Swale & John Churchil for the 1695 edition of Willam Camden's Britannia

William Camden was an historian who first published his Britannia, a description and history of Britain, in 1586. Written in Latin, the book contained only a general map of the country but had a wide circulation and eventually in 1607 an edition (the sixth) was published with a series of maps with Latin text on the reverse. 
Further editions in English were published in 1610 and 1637 but without text.  (Many more editions were published up until 1806 with map contributions from Blaeu in 1617, John Bill 1626, Robert Morden 1695-1772 and John Cary 1789-1806)
In the 1610 & 1617 editions the maps were mostly engraved by William Kip and William Hole and were based on those of Christopher Saxton, but six were copied from John Norden. 
The map of Pembroke is by George Owen and the general maps of England/Wales, Scotland and Ireland were probably taken from Mercator. Kip reduced the size of each map for Britannia from the originals published by Christopher Saxton in 1579. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Red, yellow, blue, green, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 17 1/2in x 15in (445mm x 380mm)
Plate size: - 16 1/2in x 14in (420mm x 355mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - 4 small repairs to bottom margin
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
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1695 Morden Antique Map The Welsh County of Monmouth

1695 Morden Antique Map The Welsh County of Monmouth

Description:

This fine beautifully hand coloured original antique map of the Welsh county of Monmouth was engraved by Robert Morden & published by Abel Swale & John Churchil for the 1695 edition of Willam Camden's Britannia

William Camden was an historian who first published his Britannia, a description and history of Britain, in 1586. Written in Latin, the book contained only a general map of the country but had a wide circulation and eventually in 1607 an edition (the sixth) was published with a series of maps with Latin text on the reverse. 
Further editions in English were published in 1610 and 1637 but without text.  (Many more editions were published up until 1806 with map contributions from Blaeu in 1617, John Bill 1626, Robert Morden 1695-1772 and John Cary 1789-1806)
In the 1610 & 1617 editions the maps were mostly engraved by William Kip and William Hole and were based on those of Christopher Saxton, but six were copied from John Norden. 
The map of Pembroke is by George Owen and the general maps of England/Wales, Scotland and Ireland were probably taken from Mercator. Kip reduced the size of each map for Britannia from the originals published by Christopher Saxton in 1579. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Red, yellow, blue, green, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 17 1/2in x 15in (445mm x 380mm)
Plate size: - 16 1/2in x 14in (420mm x 355mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - 4 small repairs to bottom margin
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
More Info