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1719 Chatelain Large Old, Antique Map of Saudi Arabia, Egypt, The Horn of Africa

1719 Chatelain Large Old, Antique Map of Saudi Arabia, Egypt, The Horn of Africa

  • Title : Carte Particuliere De L Egypt De La Nubie et De Abyssinie 
  • Ref #:  50627
  • Size: 22in x 17 1/2in (560m x 445m)
  • Date : 1719
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This large beautifully hand coloured original antique map of Saudi Arabia, Egypt and The Horn of Africa was published by Henri Abraham Chatelain in 1719, in his famousAtlas Historique.

Henri Abraham Chatelain (1684 - 1743)
was a Huguenot pastor of Parisian origins. He lived consecutively in Paris, St. Martins, London (c. 1710), the Hague (c. 1721) and Amsterdam (c. 1728).
Chatelain was a skilled artist and knew combining a wealth of historical and geographical information with delicate engraving and an uncomplicated composition. Groundbreaking for its time, this work included studies of geography, history, ethnology, heraldry, and cosmography. His maps with his elegant engraving are a superb example from the golden age of French mapmaking.The publishing firm of Chatelain, Chatelain Frères and Chatelain & Fils is recorded in Amsterdam, from around 1700-1770, with Zacharias living "op den Dam" in 1730.
Henri Abraham Chatelain, his father Zacharie Chatelain (d.1723) and Zacharie Junior (1690-1754), worked as a partnership publishing the Atlas Historique, Ou Nouvelle Introduction à L'Histoire under several different Chatelain imprints, depending on the Chatelain family partnerships at the time of publication. The atlas was published in seven volumes between 1705 and 1720, with a second edition appearing in 1732. The volumes I-IV with a Third edition and volume I with a final edition in 1739.
Henri Abraham Chatelain, whose "Atlas Historique" was one of the most expansive Dutch encyclopedias of the age. First published in 1705, Chatelain's Atlas Historique was part of an immense seven-volume encyclopedia. Although the main focus of the text was geography, the work also included a wealth of historical, political, and genealogical information. The text was compiled by Nicholas Gueudeville and Garillon with a supplement by H.P. de Limiers and the maps were engraved by Chatelain, primarily after charts by De L'Isle. The atlas was published in Amsterdam between 1705 and 1721 and was later reissued by Zacharie Chatelain between 1732 and 1739.

Atlas Historique: First published in Amsterdam from 1705 to 1720, the various volumes were updated at various times up to 1739 when the fourth edition of vol.I appeared, stated as the "dernière edition, corrigée & augmentée."
The first four volumes seem to have undergone four printings with the later printings being the most desirable as they contain the maximum number of corrections and additions. The remaining three final volumes were first issued between 1719-1720 and revised in 1732.
An ambitious and beautifully-presented work, the Atlas Historique was intended for the general public, fascinated in the early eighteenth century by the recently conquered colonies and the new discoveries. Distant countries, such as the Americas, Africa, the Middle East, Mongolia, China, Japan, Indonesia, etc., take an important place in this work.
In addition to the maps, many of which are based on Guillaume De L'Isle, the plates are after the best travel accounts of the period, such as those of Dapper, Chardin, de Bruyn, Le Hay and other.
Other sections deal with the history of the european countries, and covers a wide range of subjects including genealogy, history, cosmography, topography, heraldry and chronology, costume of the world, all illustrated with numerous engraved maps, plates of local inhabitants and heraldic charts of the lineages of the ruling families of the time. The maps, prints and tables required to make up a complete set are listed in detail in each volume.
The accompanying text is in French and often is printed in two columns on the page with maps and other illustrations interspersed. Each map and table is numbered consecutively within its volume and all maps bear the privileges of the States of Holland and West-Friesland.
The encyclopaedic nature of the work as a whole is reflected in this six frontispiece. The pages are the work of the celerated mr. Romeijn de Hooghe. and are engraved by J.Goeree, T.Schynyoet and P.Sluyter.
New scholarship has suggested the compiler of the atlas, who is identified on the title as "Mr. C***" not to be Henri Abraham Châtelain, but Zacharie Châtelain. (See Van Waning's article in the Journal of the International Map Collectors' Society for persuasive evidence of the latter's authorship.) (Ref: M&B; Tooley)   

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Later
Colors used: - Pink, green, yellow, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic 
Paper size: - 22in x 17 1/2in (560m x 445m)
Plate size: - 21 1/2in x 16in (545m x 405mm)
Margins: - min. 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$325.00 USD
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1639 Hondius Old, Antique Map of Henneberg, Thuringia Region Germany - Meiningen

1639 Hondius Old, Antique Map of Henneberg, Thuringia Region Germany - Meiningen

Description:
This beautifully hand coloured original antique  map of the Henneberg county in the Thuringia region of Southern Germany - centering on the cities of Henneberg andMeiningen was published in the 1639 French edition of  Mercators Atlas published by Henricus Hondius and Jan Jansson. (Ref: Koeman; Tooley; M&B)

Condition Report:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Early 
Colors used: - Yellow, pink, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 23in x 19in (585mm x 485mm)
Plate size: - 19 1/2in x 15in (495mm x 380mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$175.00 USD
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1630 Jodocus Hondius Antique Map of America

1630 Jodocus Hondius Antique Map of America

Description:
This magnificent and extremely important, hand coloured original antique map of America was drawn and engraved by Jodocus Hondius for inclusion in his editions of Gerard Mercator's Atlas sive Cosmographicae between 1606 and 1630. This actual map is from the last 1630 Latin edition, identified by the text line Mmmmmmmm on the verso of the map.

This map like many of the time was published on a stereographic projection and is an amalgam of various sources. It incorporates a more correct west coast of South America and narrows still further the longitudinal width of New Spain at the Tropic of Cancer, making it just 10°, much closer in reality. However, like all cartography before, it still retains an enlarged North American continent.
A Plancius type depiction of Newfoundland occurs alongside a typical representation of the east coast, with a more protruding Virginia than usual. Various scenes taken from earlier volumes of de Bry's Grand Voyages adorn the whole. Particularly notable is the native Brazilian scene illustrating the method used to make the local beverage, derived from Hans Stadens voyage as recorded by de Bry. 
There are various galleons, kayaks and Indian canoes along with a pair of birds perched on the inset.

Background: This map was engraved by Jodocus Hondius for his first edition of Gerard Mercator's atlas. Intended to be a grand comprehensive work, with the first part originally appearing in 1585, by Mercator's death in 1594 only two parts had been published. Continued by his family, it was still incomplete for the 1602 edition, lacking most importantly a section on the Iberian peninsula. During this time it was also competing with the remarkably successful atlas of Abraham Ortelius which averaged almost one edition per year. By 1604 Jodocus Hondius was flourishing, and in that year acquired all of the plates from Mercator's descendant. He immediately set about engraving many new maps to augment and complete the work, amongst which was a set of the four continents. He also had the original text expanded by Petrus Montanus. In the following year he brought out Mercator's Ptolemy, and in 1606 his first edition of the general atlas which proved instantly popular, selling out within a year. 
Right up until 1630 this attractive map was issued alongside the AMERICA sive INDIA NOVA by Michael Mercator, 1595. Since the text describing America was always used by the Mercator, this one is always lacking one. Produced on a stereographic projection like more and more maps of the time, it is an amalgam of various sources. (Ref: Burden; Koeman; M&B; Tooley)

Condition Report
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original & later
Colors used: - Red, yellow, green
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 22 1/4in x 18 1/4in (565mm x 465mm)
Plate size: - 19 3/4in x 14 3/4in (500mm x 375mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Professional repair to bottom center-fold and bottom left margin 1 1/2in into image, no loss
Plate area: - None
Verso: - Light age toning

$8,500.00 USD
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1719 Chatelain View of Cape Town, Table Top Mountain South Africa

1719 Chatelain View of Cape Town, Table Top Mountain South Africa

  • Title : Vue et Description Du Cap De Bonne Esperance
  • Ref  :  50640
  • Size: 17 1/2in x 10 1/2in (440mm x 265mm)
  • Date : 1719
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
An exceptional hand coloured original antique page of Abraham Chatelain's 1719 striking view of the Cape of Good Hope, with Dutch ships in the harbour and Table Mountain in the background.  
Separating the two views is an engraved descriptive text which refers mainly to the Company’s gardens, ‘the most beautiful and curious to be seen in a country that is sterile and frightful.’
The lower engraving shows the Dutch fort at the Cape and an observatory established by the Frenchman Tachard and the Jesuit Fathers to observe the southern skies.

Background:
The first Europeans to discover the Cape were the Portuguese, with Bartholomeu Dias arriving in 1488 after journeying south along the west coast of Africa. The next recorded European sighting of the Cape was by Vasco da Gama in 1497 while he was searching for a route that would lead directly from Europe to Asia. Table Mountain was given its name in 1503 by António de Saldanha, a Portuguese admiral and explorer. He called it Taboa da caba ("table of the cape"). The name given to the mountain by the Khoi inhabitants was Hoeri 'kwaggo ("sea mountain")
The area fell out of regular contact with Europeans until 1652, when Jan van Riebeeck and other employees of the Dutch East India Company (Dutch: Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie, or simply VOC) were sent to the Cape to establish a halfway station to provide fresh water, vegetables, and meat for passing ships travelling to and from Asia. Van Riebeeck's party of three vessels landed at the cape on 6 April 1652. The group quickly erected shelters and laid out vegetable gardens and orchards, and are preserved in the Company Gardens. Water from the Fresh River, which descended from Table Mountain, was channelled into canals to provide irrigation. The settlers bartered with the native Khoisan for their sheep and cattle. Forests in Hout Bay and the southern and eastern flanks of Table Mountain provided timber for ships and houses. At this point, the VOC had a monopoly on trade and prohibited any private trade. The Dutch gave their own names to the native inhabitants that they encountered, calling the pastoralists "Hottentots," those that lived on the coast and subsisted on shellfishing," and those who were hunter-gatherers were named "Bushmen."
The first wave of Asian immigration to South Africa started in 1654. These first immigrants were banished to the Cape by the Dutch Batavian High Court. These Asians helped to form the foundation of the Cape Coloured and Cape Malay populations, as well as bringing Islam to the Cape. The first large territorial expansion occurred in 1657, when farms were granted by the VOC to a few servants in an attempt to increase food production. These farms were situated along the Liesbeeck River and the VOC still retained financial control of them. The first slaves were brought to the Cape from Java and Madagascar in the following year to work on the farms. The first of a long series of border conflicts between the inhabitants in the European-controlled area and native inhabitants began in 1658 when settlers clashed with the Khoi, who realised that they were losing territory.
Work on the Castle of Good Hope, the first permanent European fortification in the area, began in 1666. The new castle replaced the previous wooden fort that Van Riebeeck and his men built. Finally completed in 1679, the castle is the oldest building in South Africa.
Simon van der Stel, after whom the town of Stellenbosch is named, arrived in 1679 to replace Van Riebeeck as governor. Van der Stel founded the Cape wine industry by bringing grape vines with him on his ship, an industry which would quickly grow to be important for the region. He also promoted territorial expansion in the Colony.
The first non-Dutch immigrants to the Cape, the Huguenots, arrived in 1688. The Huguenots had fled from anti-Protestant persecution in Catholic France to the Netherlands, where the VOC offered them free passage to the Cape as well as farmland. The Huguenots brought important experience in wine production to the Cape, greatly bolstering the industry, as well as providing strong cultural roots.
By 1754, the population of the settlement on the Cape had reached 5,510 Europeans and 6,729 slaves. But by 1780, France and Great Britain went to war against each other. The Netherlands entered the war on the French side, and thus a small garrison of French troops were sent to the Cape to protect it against the British. These troops, however, left by 1784. By 1795, however, the Netherlands was invaded by France and the VOC was in complete financial ruin. The Prince of Orange fled to England for protection, which allowed for the establishment of the Dutch Batavian Republic. Due to the long time it took to send and receive news from Europe, the Cape Commissioner of the time knew only that the French had been taking territory in the Netherlands and that the Dutch could change sides in the war at any moment. British forces arrived at the Cape bearing a letter from the Prince of Orange asking the Commissioner to allow the British troops to protect the Cape from France until the war. The British informed the Commissioner that the Prince had fled to England. The reaction in the Cape Council was mixed, and eventually the British successfully invaded the Cape in the Battle of Muizenberg. The British immediately announced the beginning of free trade.
As elsewhere in Africa and other parts of the world, trading in slaves was a significant activity. A notable event was the mutiny, in 1766, of the slaves on the slaver ship Meermin. 

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Later
Colors used: - Pink, green, yellow, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic 
Paper size: - 17 1/2in x 10 1/2in (440mm x 265mm)
Margins: - min. 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$175.00 USD
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1628 Seb. Munster Antique Map of Swabia, Bavaria, Germany - Danube, Nordlingen

1628 Seb. Munster Antique Map of Swabia, Bavaria, Germany - Danube, Nordlingen

Description:
This finely engraved hand coloured original antique map of part of German Swaben in Southern Bavaria - centering on the city of Nordlingen stretching to the Danube River - was published in the 1628 last release of Sebastian Munsters Cosmographia published by Sebastian Petri, Basle.

Background:
Swabia - Schwabenland -  is a cultural, historic and linguistic region in south-western Germany. The name is ultimately derived from the medieval Duchy of Swabia, one of the German stem duchies, representing the territory of Alemannia, whose inhabitants interchangeably were called Alemanni or Suebi.
This territory would include all of the Alemannic German area, but the modern concept of Swabia is more restricted, due to the collapse of the duchy of Swabia in the thirteenth century. Swabia as understood in modern ethnography roughly coincides with the Swabian Circle of the Holy Roman Empire as it stood during the Early Modern period, now divided between the states of Bavaria and Baden-Württemberg.
Nördlingen is a town in the Donau-Ries district, in Swabia, Bavaria, Germany, It was first mentioned in recorded history in 898, and in 1998 the town celebrated its 1100th anniversary. The town was the location of two battles during the Thirty Years' War, which took place between 1618–1648.
The remains of a Roman castellum, built in the 85AD and probably called Septemiacum, have been found under the city.  In 1998, Nördlingen celebrated its 1100-year-old history.
Nördlingen was one of Germany's major trading towns, until its importance declined with the battles of the Thirty Years' War. In 1215 Emperor Frederick II declared Nördlingen aFree Imp erial City, and it remained so until 1802 when it changed to become part of present-day Bavaria. The Nördlingen trade fair (Pfingstmesse) was first mentioned in 1219.
A well-documented legal case of 1471 involved the prostitute Els von Eystett who worked in Nördlingen's Frauenhaus, an officially sanctioned municipal brothel.
Nördlingen was one of the first Protestant cities and took part in the Protestation at Speyer in 1529.

Sebastian Petri re-release of Cosomgraphia in 1588 produced some fine woodcut maps in the "copperplate style". The maps in this release were more sophisticated than with earlier publications of Cosomgraphia and were based on the 1570 release of Abraham Ortelius monumental work Theatrum Orbis Terrarum.
For a variety of reasons town plans were comparatively latecomers in the long history of cartography. Few cities in Europe in the middle ages had more than 20,00 inhabitants and even London in the late Elizabethan period had only 100-150,000 people which in itself was probably 10 times that of any other English city. The Nuremberg Chronicle in 1493 included one of the first town views of Jerusalem, thereafter, for most of the sixteenth century, German cartographers led the way in producing town plans in a modern sense. In 1544 Sebastian Munster issued in Basle his Cosmographia containing roughly sixty-six plans and views, some in the plan form, but many in the old panorama or birds eye view. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Blue, green, orange
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 17in x 15in (435mm x 380mm)
Margins: - Min ½in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
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1714 Visscher & Stoopendaal Large Antique Twin Hemisphere World Map

1714 Visscher & Stoopendaal Large Antique Twin Hemisphere World Map

Description: 
This beautifully engraved hand coloured original twin Hemisphere Antique World map by Nicolas Visscher was engraved by Daniel Stoopendaal and published by Pieter Keur, Rotterdam in 1716.

Background:
Nicolas Visschers Twin Hemisphere World Map is regarded as the forerunner of a number of highly decorative Dutch world maps produced throughout the latter part of the 17th & early 18th centuries. 
Essentially based on Blaeu's large world map of 1648, Visscher introduced no substantial new geographical features, however there were minor variations in the still unknown coastline of North America.
The northern part of California (as an Island) has now been flattened and is now called New Albion; still further north a small piece of land or an island "Anian" appears adjacent to a strait leading within striking distance of the west shores of Hudson Bay, a possible early guess at a NW passage. 
The distinctive attractiveness of many 17th century Dutch world maps is to be found in their border decorations and this one is no exception. The original artist assisting Visscher, Nicolas Berchem, introduced dramatic classical scenes. Daniel Stoopendaal carried on this tradition by representing each of the 4 know continents in allographical form in the 4 corners Europe, Asia, Africa & The America's. Another small change was the inclusion of astronomical diagrams replacing the north & south polar projections located at the top and bottom of the map. 
The Keur family produced a number of fine maps from their presses at Dordrecht and later from Rotterdam in the 17th & 18th centuries. This finely executed  twin hemisphere world map is a classic example being first released by Nicolas Visscher and Nicolas Berchem in 1658. (Ref: Shirley; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper colour: - off white
Age of map colour: - Early colour
Colours used: - Yellow, pink, green, orange
General colour appearance: - Beautifully applied
Plate size: - 19 ½in x 17in (495mm x 430mm)
Plate size: - 18 ½in x 14 ½in (470mm x370mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections: 
Margins: - Light age toning in margins
Plate area: - Several small worm holes professionally repaired
Verso: - Light age toning

$1,250.00 USD
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1558 Munster, Hiob Magdeburg Antique Print of Meissen & Dresden Saxonia Germany

1558 Munster, Hiob Magdeburg Antique Print of Meissen & Dresden Saxonia Germany

Description:
This fine wood-blocked engraved hand coloured original antique print a view of the German city of Meissen in Saxonia, Germany(with a view of the city of Dresden on the verso) was engraved in 1558 - date is engraved at the bottom of the image - byHiob Magdeburg and was published in the 1588 edition of Sebastian MunstersCosmographia published by Sebastian Petri, Basle.

Sebastian Petri re-release of Cosomgraphiain 1588 produced some fine woodcut maps in the "copperplate style". The maps in this release were more  sophisticated than with earlier publications of Cosomgraphia and were based on the 1570 release of Abraham Ortelius monumental work Theatrum Orbis Terrarum.

Hiob Magdeburg (1518 - 1595) was a German theologian, educator, cartographer and humanist of the Reformation period. Magdeburg important legacy is not of a theological or educational nature, but cartographic specifically of the region of Saxony, including Meissen.

Background: For a variety of reasons town plans were comparatively latecomers in the long history of cartography. Few cities in Europe in the middle ages had more than 20,00 inhabitants and even London in the late Elizabethan period had only 100-150,000 people which in itself was probably 10 times that of any other English city. The Nuremberg Chronicle in 1493 included one of the first town views of Jerusalem, thereafter, for most of the sixteenth century, German cartographers led the way in producing town plans in a modern sense. In 1544 Sebastian Munster issued in Basle his Cosmographia containing roughly sixty-six plans and views, some in the plan form, but many in the old panorama or birds eye view. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Later
Colors used: - Blue, green, red, brown
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 17in x 15in (435mm x 380mm)
Margins: - Min ½in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - 9cm repair to left and right margins of image, no loss
Plate area: - 9cm repair to left and right of image, no loss
Verso: - 9cm repair to left and right of verso, no loss

$149.00 USD
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1596 Hondius Large Antique Map of Greece - Ist Edition

1596 Hondius Large Antique Map of Greece - Ist Edition

  • Title : Exxas; Graecia Sophiani. Ex Contibus Geographicis Abraham Ortelli Antierpiensis Ao. 1596
  • Ref #:  35084
  • Size: 20in x 15 1/2in (510mm x 390mm)
  • Date : 1596
  • Condition: (B) Good Condition

Description:

This fine beautifully hand coloured original  antique scarce map of Greece, Greek Islands & Western Turkey was engraved by Joducus Hondius in 1596 - dated in the title - and was published in P Bertius Atlas Historical Atlas in 1618. Blank verso.
This is a rare 1st edition of this map. It has undergone some professional restoration and is priced accordingly.

There were only 2 editions of this map engraved by Hondius in 1596, one with and one without dots in the sea. This one has the dots. In later editions the Hondius signature was removed as was the date   from the title. (Ref: Koeman; M&B)

Condition Report
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Red, yellow, green, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 20in x 15 1/2in (510mm x 390mm)
Plate size: - 20in x 14 1/4in (510mm x 365mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (7mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling, bottom left corner professionally restored
Plate area: - Profession repairs to centerfold, light soiling
Verso: - Soiling on verso

$475.00 USD
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1811 Delamarche Antique Map of North America, Russian Alaska

1811 Delamarche Antique Map of North America, Russian Alaska

  • Title : Amerique Septentrionale Par F Delmarche fils 1811
  • Ref #:  35093
  • Size: 18in x 12 1/2in (460mm x 310mm)
  • Date : 1811
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This beautifully hand coloured original antique Map of North America by Robert De Vaugondy was published by Charles Francois Delamarche, De Vaugondy's successor, in 1811 - dated in the title. 

Great early 19th century map of North America showing French Spanish and English possessions of North America. Alaska is shown as Russian Territory. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Pink, green, blue, yellow
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper Size: - 18in x 12 1/2in (460mm x 310mm)
Plate size: - 13in x 11 3/4in (330mm x 280mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1719 Chatelain Large Antique Maps and Views of Mexico & Mexico City

1719 Chatelain Large Antique Maps and Views of Mexico & Mexico City

  • Title : Description, Situation & Vue De La Ville De Mexique, Des Deux Lacs
  • Ref #:  50634
  • Size: 20 3/4in x 17 1/2in (530m x 445m)
  • Date : 1719
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
An exceptionally beautiful example of Abraham Chatelain's 1719 maps and views on Mexico.

This sheet combines two maps and four engraved views with extensive text describing the lands and customs of Mexico. The maps, appearing in the upper right and left quadrants detail central Mexico and Mexico City.
The first map located in the upper left, is centered on Mexico City and details from the Gulf of Mexico to the Pacific and from the Rio de Palmas to Acapulco. The second map, in the upper right, focuses more specifically on Mexico City, revealing the ancient Lake Texcoco, and the cultivated islands that once housed the great Aztec capital.
Between the two maps a large view depicts a typical Aztec temple complex. The lower views detail, from left, traditional Aztec dances with a Spanish galleon in the background, human sacrifice, and a general view of Mexico City combining European and Aztec architectural elements. The extensive surrounding text, in French, attempt to describe the customs, peoples, resources, and geography of Mexico

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Later
Colors used: - Pink, green, yellow, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic 
Paper size: - 20 3/4in x 17 1/2in (530m x 445m)
Plate size: - 17in x 15in (435m x 380mm)
Margins: - min. 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1784 Homann Large Antique Map of The Newly Formed United States of America

1784 Homann Large Antique Map of The Newly Formed United States of America

  • TitleCharte uber die XIII vereinigte Staaten von Nord-Amerika...F L Guffefeld...A 1784 
  • Ref #:  61031
  • Size: 23 1/4in x 19 1/4in (590mm x 490mm)
  • Date : 1784
  • Condition: (A) Very Good Condition

Description: 
This large important & scarce fine beautifully hand coloured original antique map of the United States just after the War of Independence was engraved by F.J. Guttefeld in 1784 - dated - and published by the famous German firm of Homann Heirs.
 Also known as the Stetson map, after the Stetson engraved in the title cartouche, this is one of the earliest maps to recognised the newly independent United States after the revolutionary war of Independence.

Background: An early and large map of the newly formed United States  delineating all 13 states. The map extends west past the Mississippi River and north to the southern tip of Hudson Bay. The southern states are shown with their western boundaries on the Mississippi River, although the coloring shows only regions east of the Appalachians as being organized. As with many German maps of the period, there are some incorrect state boundaries; Vermont is shown as part of New Hampshire, and Maryland includes much of northern Virginia. A list of the principal German communities in New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania are listed. The interior regions are shown with considerable topographical detail, locating numerous Indian tribes, topography, and watershed. The uncolored garland-style title cartouche is topped with a hat and crossed swords. 

Each state is colored in a contrasting pastel and the states in the northern part are named by way of a lettered key given just below the attractive title cartouche. The treatment of the lands to the west of the Appalachian Mountains and up to the Mississippi River is quite interesting. This area is indicated as lands that came to the United States by the Treaty of 1783.French title outside top neat-line: Les XIII Etats Unis de l' Amerique Septentrionale. Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, green, blue, pink
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 23 1/4in x 19 1/4in (590mm x 490mm)
Plate size: - 23in x 18 1/4in (685mm x 465mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling in top margin,
Plate area: - Light creasing along centerfold, light soiling
Verso: - Re-enforced along centerfold

$2,250.00 USD
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1858 Dufour Very Large Antique Map of Texas, California, SW US, Mexico

1858 Dufour Very Large Antique Map of Texas, California, SW US, Mexico

  • Title : Mexique Antilles et Californie Dressee par A H Dufour Gravee CH Dyonnet..1858
  • Ref #:  61025
  • Size: 33in x 24in (840mm x 610mm)
  • Date : 1858
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This scarce very large elephant folio, finely executed hand coloured map of North Central America centering on Texas and the SW region was engraved by Charles Dyonnet in 1858 - dated in the title - for Adolphe Hippolyte Dufour's monumental elephant folio Atlas Physique, Historique et Politique Geographie Moderne published by Pauline Et La Chevalier, Paris.  

Background: This large, handsome map covers the United States, Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean. The interior of the continent is well delineated noting mountains, rivers and many Native American tribes. In the West there are several large territories including Nebraska, Kanzas, Utah, New Mexico, Washington and Oregon. Utah Territory and New Mexico territories are shown in very unusual configurations with the eastern border of California defined by the Sierra Nevada range rather than by straight boundary lines. A color key identifies European colonial possessions including German and French colonies in Texas. Castroville appears as the major town in the Col. Française, which extends west to the Frio River. The Col. Allemande shows the Adelsverein's area between the Colorado and Llano Rivers with Fredericksburg as its primary town. An expansive West Texas presents a very wide Panhandle and Trans-Pecos region. The two inserts are of the French Caribbean island possessions (Guadeloupe and Martinique), the remnants of France's once extensive New World empire.

Adolphe Hippolyte Dufour (1795 - 1865) also known as Auguste-Henri Dufour, was a Paris based map and atlas publisher active in the middle to late 19th century. Dufour claimed to be a student of another French cartographer, Emile Lapie. He is known to have worked with numerous other cartographers, publishers and engravers of the period including Charles Dyonnet and Duvotenay. His corpus includes numerous maps and atlases, the most striking of which is probably his monumental elephant folioAtlas Universel physique, historique et politique geographie ancienne et moderne. Dufour's student and successor was Alexandre Vuillemin. 

Charles Dyonnet (fl. c. 1822 - c. 1880) was an extremely active Paris based engraver working in the mid to late 19th century. From his offices at 220 Rue St. Jacques, Paris, Dyonnet engraved numerous maps for many of the most prominent 19th French cartographic publishers including Vuillemin, Dufour, Fremin and Duvotenay. From 1850-1861, he held the coveted position of "Graveur du Dépot de la Marine," and in this position engraved numerous French naval and military maps. Dyonnet had a detail oriented and aesthetically minded hand and is responsible from some of the most beautiful French maps to emerge during the 19th century. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original 
Colors used: - Yellow, red, green, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic 
Paper size: - 33in x 24in (840mm x 610mm)
Paper size: - 33in x 24in (840mm x 610mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (24mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$750.00 USD
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1858 Dufour Very Large Antique Map of Africa

1858 Dufour Very Large Antique Map of Africa

  • Title : Afrique Dressee par A H Dufour Gravee CH Dyonnet..1858
  • Ref #:  61022
  • Size: 33in x 24in (840mm x 610mm)
  • Date : 1858
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This scarce very large elephant folio, finely executed hand coloured map was engraved by Charles Dyonnet in 1856 - dated in the title - for Adolphe Hippolyte Dufour's monumental elephant folioAtlas Physique, Historique et Politique Geographie Moderne published by Pauline Et La Chevalier, Paris.  

Adolphe Hippolyte Dufour (1795 - 1865) also known as Auguste-Henri Dufour, was a Paris based map and atlas publisher active in the middle to late 19th century. Dufour claimed to be a student of another French cartographer, Emile Lapie. He is known to have worked with numerous other cartographers, publishers and engravers of the period including Charles Dyonnet and Duvotenay. His corpus includes numerous maps and atlases, the most striking of which is probably his monumental elephant folioAtlas Universel physique, historique et politique geographie ancienne et moderne. Dufour's student and successor was Alexandre Vuillemin. 

Charles Dyonnet (fl. c. 1822 - c. 1880) was an extremely active Paris based engraver working in the mid to late 19th century. From his offices at 220 Rue St. Jacques, Paris, Dyonnet engraved numerous maps for many of the most prominent 19th French cartographic publishers including Vuillemin, Dufour, Fremin and Duvotenay. From 1850-1861, he held the coveted position of "Graveur du Dépot de la Marine," and in this position engraved numerous French naval and military maps. Dyonnet had a detail oriented and aesthetically minded hand and is responsible from some of the most beautiful French maps to emerge during the 19th century. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Original 
Colors used: - Yellow, red, green, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic 
Paper size: - 33in x 24in (840mm x 610mm)
Paper size: - 33in x 24in (840mm x 610mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (24mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$225.00 USD
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1574 Munster Large Antique Print View of Speyer Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany

1574 Munster Large Antique Print View of Speyer Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany

Description: 
This large finely engraved original antique print a view of the Rhineland-PalatinateCity of Speyer - dominated by the Speyer Cathedral - on the River Rhine was published by Sebastian Munster in the 1574 edition of Cosmographia.

Speyer is a town in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany, located beside the River Rhine, Speyer is 25 km south of Ludwigshafen and Mannheim. Founded by the Romans, it is one of Germany's oldest cities. The first known names were Noviomagus and Civitas Nemetum, after the Teutonic tribe, Nemetes, settled in the area.
Around the year 500 the name Spira first appeared in written documents. Spire, Spira, and Espira are still names used for Speyer in the French, Italian, and Spanish languages.
Speyer is dominated by the Speyer Cathedral begun in 1030AD, a number of churches and the Altpörtel (old gate). In the cathedral, beneath the high altar, are the tombs of eight Holy Roman emperors and German kings.

Background: For a variety of reasons town plans were comparatively latecomers in the long history of cartography. Few cities in Europe in the middle ages had more than 20,00 inhabitants and even London in the late Elizabethan period had only 100-150,000 people which in itself was probably 10 times that of any other English city. The Nuremberg Chronicle in 1493 included one of the first town views of Jerusalem, thereafter, for most of the sixteenth century, German cartographers led the way in producing town plans in a modern sense. In 1544 Sebastian Munster issued in Basle hisCosmographia containing roughly sixty-six plans and views, some in the plan form, but many in the old panorama or birds eye view.

Sebastian Münster (1488-1552) was a German cartographer, cosmographer, and Hebrew scholar whose work Cosmographia (1544; "Cosmography") was the earliest German description of the world and a major work in the revival of geographic thought in 16th-century Europe. It had numerous editions in different languages including Latin, French, Italian, English, and even Czech. Altogether, about 40 editions of the Cosmographiaappeared between 1544 and 1628 and was one of the most successful and popular books of the 16th century. Münster was a major influence in popular thinking in Europe for the next 200 years.
This success was due not only to the level of descriptive detail but also to the fascinating full page maps & views as well as smaller woodcuts that were included in the text. Many of the woodcuts were executed by famous engravers of the time including Hans Holbein the Younger, Urs Graf, Hans Rudolph Manuel Deutsch, and David Kandel. 
Aside from the well-known maps present in the Cosmographia, the text is thickly sprinkled with vigorous views: portraits of kings and princes, costumes and occupations, habits and customs, flora and fauna, monsters, wonders, and horrors about the known -- and unknown -- world, and was undoubtedly one of the most widely read books of its time.
Münster acquired the material for his book in three ways. Firstly he researched all available literary sources across Germany, Switzerland and other parts of Europe. Secondly he obtained original manuscript material from locals all over Europe for description of the countryside, cities, villages, towns, rivers and local history. Finally, he obtained further material first hand on his travels (primarily in south-west Germany, Switzerland, and Alsace). 

In 1588 Sebastian Petri re-released Cosomgraphia and re-issued many of Munsters maps and views in the "copperplate style". The maps in this release were more sophisticated than with earlier publications ofCosomgraphia and were based on the 1570 release of Abraham Ortelius monumental work Theatrum Orbis Terrarum.(Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 16in x 13in (410mm x 330mm)
Plate size: - 16in x 13in (410mm x 330mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: -None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
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1780 Cook Benard Large Antique Print Men Dancing on Hapaee Ha’apai Islands Tonga

1780 Cook Benard Large Antique Print Men Dancing on Hapaee Ha’apai Islands Tonga

  • TitleDanse de Nuit Executee Par Les Hommes De Hapaee
  • Ref #:  21439
  • Size: 15 1/2in x 11in (395mm x 280mm)
  • Date : 1780
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This fine large original antique print of dancing and ceremony at night by the men of Hapaee , one of the islands of the Ha’apai group of Tonga - as seen by Captain Cook and his men during their visit to the Islands - was engraved by the Frenchman Robert Benard and was published in the first French edition of Hawkesworth's Voyages in 1780.

This print is from the 1st edition of the French publication of Cooks voyages and are beautifully engraved on heavy stable paper and should not be confused with the later re-engravings of the next 30 years which were of a more inferior quality.

Cook's First Voyage (1768-1771)
The first voyage under Captain James Cook's command was primarily of a scientific nature. The expedition on the Endeavour initially sailed to Tahiti to observe the transit of the planet Venus in order to calculate the earth's distance from the sun. Cook landed on the South Pacific island in April of 1769 and in June of that year the astronomical observations were successfully completed. In addition to these labors, very good relations with the Tahitians were maintained and the naturalists Joseph Banks and Daniel C. Solander conducted extensive ethnological and botanical research.

Another purpose of the voyage was to explore the South Seas to determine if an inhabitable continent existed in the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Upon leaving Tahiti, Cook named and charted the Society Islands and then continued southwest to New Zealand. His circumnavigation and exploration of that country also resulted in a detailed survey. Cook proceeded to Australia, where he charted the eastern coast for 2,000 miles, naming the area New South Wales. As a result of these surveys, both Australia and New Zealand were annexed by Great Britain. In addition to these explorations, the Endeavour returned to England without a single death from scurvy among its men, an historic feat at the time. The combination of these accomplishments brought Cook prominence, promotion, and the opportunity to lead further expeditions.

Cook's Second Voyage (1772-1775)
Based on the success of his first voyage, Cook was appointed by the Admiralty to lead a second expedition. Two ships were employed with Cook commanding the Resolution and Captain Tobias Furneaux in charge of theAdventure. The purpose was to circumnavigate the globe as far south as possible to confirm the location of a southern continent. Cook proved that there was no "Terra Australis," which supposedly was located between New Zealand and South America. Cook was convinced, however, that there was land beyond the southern ice fields. In his pursuit of this idea, this expedition was the first European voyage to cross the Antarctic Circle. In addition, in two great sweeps through the Southern latitudes, Cook made an incredible number of landfalls including New Zealand, Easter Island, the Marquesas, Tahiti and the Society Islands, the Tonga Islands, the New Hebrides, New Caledonia, and a number of smaller islands.

In addition to these navigational accomplishments and the accompanying expansion of geographical knowledge, the expedition also recorded a vast amount of information regarding the Pacific islands and peoples, proved the value of the chronometer as an instrument for calculating longitude, and improved techniques for preventing scurvy.

Cook's Third Voyage (1776-1779)
In the course of his first two voyages, Cook circumnavigated the globe twice, sailed extensively into the Antarctic, and charted coastlines from Newfoundland to New Zealand. Following these achievements, Cook's third voyage was organized to seek an efficient route from England to southern and eastern Asia that would not entail rounding the Cape of Good Hope. The search for such a Northwest (or Northeast) Passage had been on the agenda of northern European mariners and merchants since the beginning of European expansion in the late fifteenth century. England's growing economic and colonial interests in India in the later eighteenth century provided the stimulus for the latest exploration for this route.

Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 15 1/2in x 11in (395mm x 280mm)
Plate size: - 15in x 9 1/2in (380mm x 245mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - light soiling in margins
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
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1780 Cook Benard Large Antique Print of King of Tonga During Kava Ceremony

1780 Cook Benard Large Antique Print of King of Tonga During Kava Ceremony

  • TitlePoulaho Roi Des Isles Des Amis, Buvant La Kava
  • Ref #:  21480
  • Size: 15 1/2in x 10in (395mm x 265mm)
  • Date : 1780
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This fine large original antique print of of Poulaho the King of the Tongan or Friendly Islands during a Kava Drinking ceremony - witnessed by Cook and his men during their time on the islands - was engraved by the Frenchman Robert Benard after John Webber and was published in the first French edition of Hawkesworth's Voyages in 1780.

This print is from the 1st edition of the French publication of Cooks voyages and are beautifully engraved on heavy stable paper and should not be confused with the later re-engravings of the next 30 years which were of a more inferior quality.

Cook's First Voyage (1768-1771)
The first voyage under Captain James Cook's command was primarily of a scientific nature. The expedition on the Endeavour initially sailed to Tahiti to observe the transit of the planet Venus in order to calculate the earth's distance from the sun. Cook landed on the South Pacific island in April of 1769 and in June of that year the astronomical observations were successfully completed. In addition to these labors, very good relations with the Tahitians were maintained and the naturalists Joseph Banks and Daniel C. Solander conducted extensive ethnological and botanical research.

Another purpose of the voyage was to explore the South Seas to determine if an inhabitable continent existed in the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Upon leaving Tahiti, Cook named and charted the Society Islands and then continued southwest to New Zealand. His circumnavigation and exploration of that country also resulted in a detailed survey. Cook proceeded to Australia, where he charted the eastern coast for 2,000 miles, naming the area New South Wales. As a result of these surveys, both Australia and New Zealand were annexed by Great Britain. In addition to these explorations, the Endeavour returned to England without a single death from scurvy among its men, an historic feat at the time. The combination of these accomplishments brought Cook prominence, promotion, and the opportunity to lead further expeditions.

Cook's Second Voyage (1772-1775)
Based on the success of his first voyage, Cook was appointed by the Admiralty to lead a second expedition. Two ships were employed with Cook commanding the Resolution and Captain Tobias Furneaux in charge of theAdventure. The purpose was to circumnavigate the globe as far south as possible to confirm the location of a southern continent. Cook proved that there was no "Terra Australis," which supposedly was located between New Zealand and South America. Cook was convinced, however, that there was land beyond the southern ice fields. In his pursuit of this idea, this expedition was the first European voyage to cross the Antarctic Circle. In addition, in two great sweeps through the Southern latitudes, Cook made an incredible number of landfalls including New Zealand, Easter Island, the Marquesas, Tahiti and the Society Islands, the Tonga Islands, the New Hebrides, New Caledonia, and a number of smaller islands.

In addition to these navigational accomplishments and the accompanying expansion of geographical knowledge, the expedition also recorded a vast amount of information regarding the Pacific islands and peoples, proved the value of the chronometer as an instrument for calculating longitude, and improved techniques for preventing scurvy.

Cook's Third Voyage (1776-1779)
In the course of his first two voyages, Cook circumnavigated the globe twice, sailed extensively into the Antarctic, and charted coastlines from Newfoundland to New Zealand. Following these achievements, Cook's third voyage was organized to seek an efficient route from England to southern and eastern Asia that would not entail rounding the Cape of Good Hope. The search for such a Northwest (or Northeast) Passage had been on the agenda of northern European mariners and merchants since the beginning of European expansion in the late fifteenth century. England's growing economic and colonial interests in India in the later eighteenth century provided the stimulus for the latest exploration for this route.

Cook, again in command of the Resolution, was to approach the Northwest Passage from the Pacific accompanied by a second ship, the Discovery, captained by Charles Clerke. The ships left England separately, regrouped at Cape Town, and continued on to Tasmania, New Zealand, and Tahiti. The expedition then sailed north and made landfall at Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands. Cook continued northward and charted the west coast of North America from Northern California as far as the Bering Strait. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in a skirmish with natives on February 14, 1779. Upon Cook's death, Clerke took command of the expedition but died six months later. The ships returned to England in 1780 under John Gore, who had commanded the Discovery after Cook's death. From start to finish, the voyage had lasted more than four years. (Ref Tooley; M&B; Clancy)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 15 1/2in x 10in (395mm x 265mm)
Plate size: - 15in x 9 1/2in (380mm x 245mm)
Margins: - 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$149.00 USD
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1719 Chatelain Large Antique Print of The Pyramids and Sphinx of Egypt

1719 Chatelain Large Antique Print of The Pyramids and Sphinx of Egypt

  • Title Description des Piramides D Egypte Tant au Dedans qu'au Dehors...
  • Ref  :  50648
  • Size: 20in x 17 1/2in (510m x 440m)
  • Date : 1719
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This large original antique print including detailed French Text on the subject was published by Henri Abraham Chatelain in 1719, in his famous Atlas Historique.

Atlas Historique: First published in Amsterdam from 1705 to 1720, the various volumes were updated at various times up to 1739 when the fourth edition of vol.I appeared, stated as the "dernière edition, corrigée & augmentée."
The first four volumes seem to have undergone four printings with the later printings being the most desirable as they contain the maximum number of corrections and additions. The remaining three final volumes were first issued between 1719-1720 and revised in 1732.
An ambitious and beautifully-presented work, the Atlas Historique was intended for the general public, fascinated in the early eighteenth century by the recently conquered colonies and the new discoveries. Distant countries, such as the Americas, Africa, the Middle East, Mongolia, China, Japan, Indonesia, etc., take an important place in this work.
In addition to the maps, many of which are based on Guillaume De L'Isle, the plates are after the best travel accounts of the period, such as those of Dapper, Chardin, de Bruyn, Le Hay and other.
Other sections deal with the history of the european countries, and covers a wide range of subjects including genealogy, history, cosmography, topography, heraldry and chronology, costume of the world, all illustrated with numerous engraved maps, plates of local inhabitants and heraldic charts of the lineages of the ruling families of the time. The maps, prints and tables required to make up a complete set are listed in detail in each volume.
The accompanying text is in French and often is printed in two columns on the page with maps and other illustrations interspersed. Each map and table is numbered consecutively within its volume and all maps bear the privileges of the States of Holland and West-Friesland.
The encyclopaedic nature of the work as a whole is reflected in this six frontispiece. The pages are the work of the celerated mr. Romeijn de Hooghe. and are engraved by J.Goeree, T.Schynyoet and P.Sluyter.
New scholarship has suggested the compiler of the atlas, who is identified on the title as "Mr. C***" not to be Henri Abraham Châtelain, but Zacharie Châtelain. (See Van Waning's article in the Journal of the International Map Collectors' Society for persuasive evidence of the latter's authorship.

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: -  
Colors used: -  
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 20in x 17 1/2in (510m x 440m)
Plate size: - 17 1/2in x 15in (440m x 380mm)
Margins: - min. 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
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1786 La Perouse Large Antique Map of British Columbia & Vancouver Isle, Canada

1786 La Perouse Large Antique Map of British Columbia & Vancouver Isle, Canada

  • TitleCarte Particuliere de la Cote du Nord-Ouest de l Amerique reconnue par les Fregates Francaises la Boussole et l Astrolabe en 1786. 2e. Feuille.
  • Ref #:  31912
  • Size: 20 1/2in x 16 1/2in (520mm x 420mm)
  • Date : 1786
  • Condition: (B) Good Condition

Description:
This large very handsome original antique ofWashington, British Columbia & Vancouver Island coastline from Cape Rond or Tillamook Head, Oregon in the south to Baie de Clonard or The Queen Charlotte Islands or Haida Gwaii in the north by Jean-François de Galaup, Comte de la Pérouse in 1786 - dated in the title - was published in the 1st edition of the Atlas du voyage de La Perouse, Paris 1797.

La Perouse set sail from France in 1785 to continue the discoveries of Captain Cook. He was shipwrecked in 1788 but his narrative, maps, and views survived and were published in 1797. 

This is La Perouse's important 1787 map of the west coast of Vancouver Island and the coastlines of Washington and British Columbia. When drawn in 1787 La Perouse's map was the only available map of this region not based on the survey work of Captain Cook.
The map covers the coastline from Cape Rond (Tillamook Head, Oregon) northwards past Vancouver Island as far the north-western top of the Baie de Clonard (The Queen Charlotte Islands or Haida Gwaii). The cartography here may be a little hard to understand for most casual observers due Perouse's use of archaic French language place names and well as a number of major errors. Perouse, like Cook, entirely missed the entrance to the Strait of Juan de Fuca, consequently Vancouver Island is erroneously attached to the mainland. Nonetheless, many of the sites visited by early explorers, including the Nootka Sound, the Bay of St. Louis (Quatsino Sound), Pointe Boisee (Cape Cook), Mont Fleurieu (Silverthrone Mountain), Cape Fleurieu (Goose Island), Cap Hector (Cape St. James), and many others are noted.
Cartographically Perouse's mapping of this region, though still quite incomplete, is a major advancement over the work of Cook who after leaving Nootka Sound was forced offshore by stormed and skipped much of the coast until he reached Alaska near Sitka. This is thus the first chart to map the British Columbia coastline between 49°34' and 57°. In its day the importance of this chart went largely unknown for, though the survey work and original engraving date to 1786, the atlas of La Perouse's discoveries was not officially published until 1798, by which time other more advances mappings of the region had reached the mainstream. Nonetheless, this map is a vital addition to any serious collection focusing on the cartographic development of America's northwest coast.

For much of the time (between 1768 and 1783) while Captain Cook was exploring the North Pacific, Britain and France were at war. Even in times of peace, the Anglo-French rivalry was strong. With the news of Cook’s death in 1779 and the cessation of hostilities in 1783, the French government resolved to mount a competing expedition to the “Great Ocean” (the Pacific Ocean) to “complete various discoveries” and engage in “astronomical observations” and research into physics and natural history. The man entrusted with this mission was Jean-François de Galaup, comte de La Pérouse, an experienced captain in the French navy. He was placed in command of two fine frigates, La Boussole and L’Astrolabe.

La Pérouse sailed west from Brest in August 1785 and on 24 June 1786 made landfall off the coast of present-day southeast Alaska, just below 60˚ N latitude and within view of Mount Saint Elias. For the next three months he sailed south along the coast, eventually reaching Monterey. This map, printed in Paris in 1797 as part of a general atlas of the La Pérouse expedition, show the meticulously charted coastline surveyed by the crews of La Boussole and L’Astrolabe. In contrast to the imaginative speculations of many earlier explorers and cartographers, the areas not explored are left blank by La Pérouse, but he did substitute his own names for many—but not all—of those endowed by Captain Cook. Mount Elias, Cross Sound, and Nootka are shown on the La Pérouse maps but, for example, Cape St. James at the southern tip of Moresby Island in the Queen Charlotte Islands just south of 50˚ N latitude is renamed Cape Hector and Mount Edgecombe (named by Captain Cook) near Sitka at 57˚ N latitude is relabeled Mont Saint-Hyacinthe.

After leaving Monterey, La Pérouse crossed the Pacific to Macao (near Hong Kong) and, in the summer of 1787, worked his way up the Asiatic coast of the Pacific. Encountering difficult and contrary winds as he approached the Bering Strait, he retreated to the Russian port of Petropavlovsk at the southern tip of the Kamchatka Peninsula. There he decided to send a report overland via Russia to Paris. He dispatched Jean, baron de Lesseps, on the eight thousand-mile trans-Siberian journey to France. De Lesseps carried with him the reports, ships’ logs, maps, and sketches made by the expedition to date.

This map were derived from the dispatches carried by de Lesseps. As it turned out, he was the only member of the expedition to complete the circumnavigation; indeed the only member to survive. La Pérouse and his companions left Petropavlovsk just before the ice set and sailed south. Calling at Samoa, the captain of L’Astrolabe and ten of his men were murdered. La Pérouse sailed on, stopping at Tonga, Norfolk Island, and Port Jackson, the newly established British penal colony in New South Wales, Australia. They left Port Jackson in February 1788 and were never seen again. Thirty-eight years later the scattered remains of La Boussole and L’Astrolabewere discovered wrecked on a vicious reef on an atoll in the New Hebrides. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: -  
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 20 1/2in x 16 1/2in (520mm x 420mm)
Plate size: - 20 1/2in x 16 1/2in (520mm x 420mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (10mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Small repairs to margins, no loss
Plate area: - Age toning, light soiling
Verso: - Top and bottom centerfold re-joined

$275.00 USD
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1719 Chatelain Large Antique Map of Caribbean Antilles Guadeloupe to Grenada

1719 Chatelain Large Antique Map of Caribbean Antilles Guadeloupe to Grenada

  • TitleCarte des Antilles Francois Et Des Isles Voisines Dressee Sur Des Memoires Manuscrits
  • Ref #:  50618
  • Size: 21 1/2in x 19 1/4in (550m x 490m)
  • Date : 1719
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This large beautifully hand coloured original antique map of the Caribbean Antilles Islands from Guadeloupe south to the island of Grenada was published by Henri AbrahamChatelain in 1719, in his famous Atlas Historique.

Henri Abraham Chatelain (1684 - 1743)
was a Huguenot pastor of Parisian origins. He lived consecutively in Paris, St. Martins, London (c. 1710), the Hague (c. 1721) and Amsterdam (c. 1728).
Chatelain was a skilled artist and knew combining a wealth of historical and geographical information with delicate engraving and an uncomplicated composition. Groundbreaking for its time, this work included studies of geography, history, ethnology, heraldry, and cosmography. His maps with his elegant engraving are a superb example from the golden age of French mapmaking.The publishing firm of Chatelain, Chatelain Frères and Chatelain & Fils is recorded in Amsterdam, from around 1700-1770, with Zacharias living "op den Dam" in 1730.
Henri Abraham Chatelain, his father Zacharie Chatelain (d.1723) and Zacharie Junior (1690-1754), worked as a partnership publishing the Atlas Historique, Ou Nouvelle Introduction à L'Histoire under several different Chatelain imprints, depending on the Chatelain family partnerships at the time of publication. The atlas was published in seven volumes between 1705 and 1720, with a second edition appearing in 1732. The volumes I-IV with a Third edition and volume I with a final edition in 1739.
Henri Abraham Chatelain, whose "Atlas Historique" was one of the most expansive Dutch encyclopedias of the age. First published in 1705, Chatelain's Atlas Historique was part of an immense seven-volume encyclopedia. Although the main focus of the text was geography, the work also included a wealth of historical, political, and genealogical information. The text was compiled by Nicholas Gueudeville and Garillon with a supplement by H.P. de Limiers and the maps were engraved by Chatelain, primarily after charts by De L'Isle. The atlas was published in Amsterdam between 1705 and 1721 and was later reissued by Zacharie Chatelain between 1732 and 1739.

Atlas Historique: First published in Amsterdam from 1705 to 1720, the various volumes were updated at various times up to 1739 when the fourth edition of vol.I appeared, stated as the "dernière edition, corrigée & augmentée."
The first four volumes seem to have undergone four printings with the later printings being the most desirable as they contain the maximum number of corrections and additions. The remaining three final volumes were first issued between 1719-1720 and revised in 1732.
An ambitious and beautifully-presented work, the Atlas Historique was intended for the general public, fascinated in the early eighteenth century by the recently conquered colonies and the new discoveries. Distant countries, such as the Americas, Africa, the Middle East, Mongolia, China, Japan, Indonesia, etc., take an important place in this work.
In addition to the maps, many of which are based on Guillaume De L'Isle, the plates are after the best travel accounts of the period, such as those of Dapper, Chardin, de Bruyn, Le Hay and other.
Other sections deal with the history of the european countries, and covers a wide range of subjects including genealogy, history, cosmography, topography, heraldry and chronology, costume of the world, all illustrated with numerous engraved maps, plates of local inhabitants and heraldic charts of the lineages of the ruling families of the time. The maps, prints and tables required to make up a complete set are listed in detail in each volume.
The accompanying text is in French and often is printed in two columns on the page with maps and other illustrations interspersed. Each map and table is numbered consecutively within its volume and all maps bear the privileges of the States of Holland and West-Friesland.
The encyclopaedic nature of the work as a whole is reflected in this six frontispiece. The pages are the work of the celerated mr. Romeijn de Hooghe. and are engraved by J.Goeree, T.Schynyoet and P.Sluyter.
New scholarship has suggested the compiler of the atlas, who is identified on the title as "Mr. C***" not to be Henri Abraham Châtelain, but Zacharie Châtelain. (See Van Waning's article in the Journal of the International Map Collectors' Society for persuasive evidence of the latter's authorship.) (Ref: M&B; Tooley)   

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Later
Colors used: - Pink, green, yellow, blue
General color appearance: - Authentic 
Paper size: - 21 1/2in x 19 1/4in (550m x 490m)
Plate size: - 19 1/4in x 13 1/2in (490m x 345mm)
Margins: - min. 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Folds as issued
Verso: - None

$875.00 USD
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Correct Chart of the Baltick or East Sea from ye Sound to Petersburg

1745 Seale Large Antique Map of Baltic Sea Latvia Estonia, Sweden, St Petersburg

  • TitleCorrect Chart of the Baltick or East Sea from ye Sound to Petersburg
  • Ref #:  16429
  • Size: 21in x 15 1/2in (535mm x 395mm)
  • Date : 1745
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This fine hand coloured original antique map a detailed chart of the Baltic Sea and the coastlines of Sweden, Finaland, Russia, Estonia, Latvia & Poland was engraved by Richard Seale and published in the 1745 edition of Mr Rapins History. The map significantly contains an early inset map of the Harbour of Petersburg showing the narrow, protected approach to the city. Includes a decorative compass rose with radiating rhumb lines, plus a very decorative title cartouche.  

St Petersburg was founded by Peter the Great in 1703 as Russia’s “window on Europe.” The first building was the Peter and Paul Fortress on Zayachy (Hare) Island. The earliest residential property was the wooden Cabin of Peter of Great.
Peter invited architects and engineers from all over Europe to build a new Western capital. The first boulevards and stone palaces were decorated by foreign painters and sculptors. Peterhof was created on the Gulf of Finland to rival Versailles.
In the middle of the eighteenth century, Peter’s daughter Elizabeth commissioned such Baroque masterpieces as the Winter Palace on the River Neva and the Catherine Palace at Tsarskoe Selo. She was followed by Catherine the Great, who preferred Neoclassical architecture and founded the Hermitage in 1764.
Confusion following the sudden death of Tsar Alexander I led to the first Russian revolution in 1825 – the Decembrist Revolt. This period was followed by a flourishing of the arts known as the Golden Age of Russian culture. St Petersburg inspired such famous writers as Alexander Pushkin, Nikolai Gogol and Fyodor Dostoyevsky.

Russia underwent rapid industrialisation in the second half of the nineteenth century. After Tsar Alexander II abolished serfdom in 1861, many peasants flooded to St Petersburg in search of work.
The growth of industry and urban sprawl contributed to the spread of Socialist and other revolutionary ideas. Discontent with the Russo-Japanese War culminated in a year of revolution in 1905.
Between 1905 and 1914, St Petersburg was the centre of a second wave of cultural achievements, known as the Silver Age. Russian artists, choreographers and composers revolutionised world painting, ballet and music.
In 1914, Russia entered the First World War on the side of the Western Allies. The German-sounding name of St Petersburg was changed to the more Slavonic Petrograd.
In 1917, discontent with the war led to the February Revolution and the abdication of Tsar Nicholas II. The war continued until the Provisional Government was overthrown by Vladimir Lenin and the Bolsheviks in the October Revolution.
As the civil war spread, the Communist government was forced to move the capital back to Moscow in 1918. In 1924, Petrograd was renamed Leningrad.

Paul Rapin de Thoiras was a Frenchman responsible for publishing ten elaborate volumes on the History of England Histoire D’ Angleterre published between 1724-27. In 1745 his work was translated and updated by Nicholas Tindal and called “Tindal’s Continuation of Mr. Rapin’s History of England”. Included with the English edition of Rapins work was an atlas containing 45 maps, battle plans and town plans of the Spanish War of Succession (1701-13) engraved by Richard William Seale and John Basire.
Richard William Seale was an engraver and publisher from London responsible for publishing a number of fine and detailed maps of the continents between 1744-47. (Ref Tooley M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: -  Early
Colors used: -  Pink, yellow, green
General color appearance: -  Authentic
Paper size: - 21in x 15 1/2in (535mm x 395mm)
Plate size: - 19in x 15in (482mm x 380mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Folds as issued
Verso: - None

$475.00 USD
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1756 Homann Large Antique Map of The Colonial United States - French Indian War

1756 Homann Large Antique Map of The Colonial United States - French Indian War

  • Title : America Septentrionalis a Domino d'Anville in Galliis edita nunc in Anglia Coloniis in Interiorem Virginiam….1756 
  • Ref #: 61007
  • Size:  24in x 21in (610mm x 535mm)
  • Date : 1756
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description:
This large finely engraved beautifully hand coloured original antique 1st edition map of the Colonial United States United States was engraved in 1756 - dated - and was published by the Homann firm.

This is a wonderful and important map with beautiful hand colour, a dark impression on heavy sturdy paper. This map is the 1st edition and was reprinted with political changes in 5 different editions until the 1790's

Background: This is an important, informative and interesting map of colonial North America at the outset of the French & Indian War. The map is incredibly detailed with historical text on British and French claims in North America as well as cartographical details on cities, towns, rivers, Indian settlements and many other features.
Cartographically the map shows both the British and French possessions but from the British perspective. The map is based on the cartography of both J B D' Anville & Thomas Jefferys', using the latters map of 1755 for the political boundaries.
Some of the interesting features include, a truncated Pennsylvania and oversized Virginia, as well as the massive stretch of land in North Carolina designated Earl Granville's property, which extends to the Mississippi. Also shown is a very early Georgia, chartered in 1754.The boundary of New York crosses Lakes Ontario, Huron and Erie to include the lower peninsula of Michigan.
The map is beautifully adorned with a large rococo cartouche and the extensive text in German, describes the British claims and French encroachments, that led to the inevitable conflict.

The French and Indian War is the common American name for the war between Great Britain and France in North America from 1754 to 1763. In 1756, the war erupted into the world-wide conflict known as the Seven Years' War and thus came to be regarded as the North American theater of that war. In Canada, it is usually just referred to as the Seven Years' War, although French Canadians often call it La guerre de la Conquête ("The War of Conquest"). In Europe, there is no specific name for the North American part of the war. The name refers to the two main enemies of the British colonists: the royal French forces and the various Native American forces allied with them, although Great Britain also had Native allies.
The war was fought primarily along the frontiers separating New France from the British colonies from Virginia to Nova Scotia, and began with a dispute over the confluence of the Allegheny and Monongahela rivers, the site of present-day Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The dispute erupted into violence in the Battle of Jumonville Glen in May 1754, during which Virginia militiamen under the command of George Washington ambushed a French patrol. British operations in 1755, 1756 and 1757 in the frontier areas of Pennsylvania and New York all failed, due to a combination of poor management, internal divisions, and effective French and Indian offense. The 1755 capture of Fort Beauséjour on the border separating Nova Scotia from Acadia was followed by a British policy of deportation of its French inhabitants, to which there was some resistance.
After the disastrous 1757 British campaigns (resulting in a failed expedition against Louisbourg and the Siege of Fort William Henry, which was followed by significant atrocities on British victims by Indians), the British government fell, and William Pitt came to power. Pitt significantly increased British military resources in the colonies, while France was unwilling to risk large convoys to aid the limited forces it had in New France, preferring instead to concentrate its forces against Prussia and its allies in the European theatre of the war. Between 1758 and 1760, the British military successfully penetrated the heartland of New France, with Montreal finally falling in September 1760.
The outcome was one of the most significant developments in a century of Anglo-French conflict. France ceded French Louisiana west of the Mississippi River to its ally Spain in compensation for Spain's loss to Britain of Florida (which Spain had given to Britain in exchange for the return of Havana, Cuba). France's colonial presence north of the Caribbean was reduced to the islands of Saint Pierre and Miquelon, confirming Britain's position as the dominant colonial power in the eastern half of North America. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original & later
Colors used: - Yellow, green, blue, pink
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 24in x 21in (610mm x 535mm)
Plate size: - 20 1/2in x 18 3/4in (520mm x 475mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Bottom margin centerfold re-joined
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$2,250.00 USD
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1855 US Survey Large Map of the Aucilla or Ocilla River Estuary, Florida USA

1855 US Survey Large Map of the Aucilla or Ocilla River Estuary, Florida USA

Description: 
This finely engraved hand coloured lithograph map of the Ocilla - Aucilla - River in NW Florida in the United States was commissioned by A D Bache and surveyed by Lieutenant OH Berryman in 1855.(Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Light & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: - Early  
Colors used: - Green, yellow  
General color appearance: - Authentic  
Paper size: - 15 1/2in x 11in (390mm x 280mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$125.00 USD
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1710 Valk Large Antique Map of The Netherlands, Belgium Federation, Holland

1710 Valk Large Antique Map of The Netherlands, Belgium Federation, Holland

  • TitleBelgica Foederata complectens septem Provincias, Ducatus Geldriae, Comitatus Hollandiae et Zelandiae, Dioec. Traject : Transisul : Groningam et Frisiam et circumjacentes Provincias.
  • Ref #:  16496
  • Size: 24in x 20 1/2in (610mm x 520mm)
  • Date : 1710
  • Condition: (A) Very Good Condition

Description: 
This large somewhat scarce beautifully hand coloured original antique map of The Netherlands was published by Gerard Valck in his rare atlas Nova Totius Geographica Telluris Projecto in 1710. 

Background: 
It would be hard to imagine a more inauspicious period for a nation's cultural development than the years between 1520 and 1600 in the Low Countries. Under the harsh domination of the Spanish Emperors, facing fanatical religious persecution and the threat of the Inquisition, the constant presence of foreign troops and even the destruction of some of their cities, the Dutch, nevertheless, in 1581 contrived to break their subservience to Spain and form their own federation. Belgium, being mainly Catholic, remained within the orbit of the Empire though henceforward was recognized as a separate state. In such circumstances there would seem to have been little chance for growth of a national entity in the small Northern Provinces but, on the contrary, under the leadership of Amsterdam, their banking and commercial enterprise soon dominated Europe. The attempt by Philip II to eliminate their control of European coastal trade by the use of Portuguese craft inspired the Dutch, first, to seek a North East passage to India and Asia and then, failing that, to challenge Spanish and Portuguese power directly, not only in European waters but also in the East, and eventually to eclipse it. English attempts to gain a foothold in the Indies were bitterly opposed and the English turned their attention to India where only a handful of Dutch settlements existed.

In spite of the turmoil arising out of these events, first Antwerp and then Amsterdam became centres of the arts and their cartographers, engravers and printers produced magnificent maps and charts of every kind which many claim have never been surpassed. Later in this chapter an account is given of Gerard Mercator, who studied at Louvain under Gemma Frisius, the Dutch astronomer and mathematician, and later moved to Duisburg in the Rhineland where most of his major work was carried Out. There he produced globes, maps of Europe, the British Isles and the famous World Map using his newly invented method of projection, all of which were widely copied by most of the cartographers of the day. The first part of his Atlas - the word chosen by Mercator to describe a collection of maps - was published in 1585, the second in 1589, and the third in 1595, a year after his death.

Other great names of the time were Abraham Ortelius, native of Antwerp, famous for his world atlas, Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, issued in 1570; Waghenaer, noted for his sea atlases of 1584 and 1592, Gerard de Jode and Jodocus and Henricus Hondius, followed in the next century by W. J. Blaeu and his sons and Jan Jansson. The Blaeu and Jansson establishments were noted mainly for land atlases but their sea atlases and pilot books were also published in numerous editions which went some way to meeting the rising demand for aids to navigation in European and Mediterranean waters. Their productions were challenged by other, smaller publishers specializing in such works, Jacob Colom, Anthonie Jacobsz, Pieter Goos, Hendrick Doncker, to mention a few, and, later, the charts issued by the van Keulen family and their descendants covered practically all the seas of the known world. As we reach the second half of the seventeenth century the details of publication of these sea atlases and pilot books become more and more interwoven and complicated. Not infrequently the same charts were issued under the imprint of different publishers; at death the engraved plates were sold or passed to their successors and were re-issued, with minor alterations and often without acknowledgement to the originator, all of which adds to problems of identification. Although, in this period, charts of every kind must have been issued in great quantity, good copies are now hard to find.

By about the year 1700 Dutch sea power and influence was waning and although their pilot books and charts remained much in demand for many years to come, leadership in the production of land atlases passed into the hands of the more scientific French cartographers who, in their turn, dominated the map trade for most of the following century. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Yellow, green, pink, blue.
General color appearance: - Authentic
Papaer size: - 24in x 20 1/2in (610mm x 520mm)
Plate size: - 23 1/2in x 19 1/2in (595mm x 495mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (10mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Light soiling, several small worm holes
Verso: - Light soiling

$375.00 USD
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1771 Bouganville Large Antique World Map - Global Route of Exploration

1771 Bouganville Large Antique World Map - Global Route of Exploration

  • TitleDévelopement de la route des vaissaux du roy La Boudeuse et L’Étoile autour du monde
  • Ref :  42015
  • Size:  24in x 11 1/2in (610mm x 295mm)
  • Date : 1771
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition

Description: 
This large finely engraved original antique World map showing the global voyage of Louis Antoine de Bougainville’s route in the ships the Boudeuse and the Etoile was published inBougainville’s 1771 edition of Voyage autour du monde, par la fregate du roi La Boudeuse, et la flute L'Etoile en 1766, 1767, 1768 & 1769 Paris.

Bougainville’s voyage - the first French circumnavigation - was of immense importance in terms of the impetus it provided to a renewal of France’s colonial empire following territorial losses suffered to Britain in the Seven Years’ War: it opened up the Pacific for French expansion. Yet what cannot be overstated is the impact that Bougainville’s own vivid and romanticised descriptions of the Pacific - specifically Tahiti - had on the French public imagination, her writers, artists and thinkers. The utopian ideal of the noble savage living in an Earthly Paradise owes much to Bougainville’s response to his encounter with the Tahitian culture and landscape. Even though he was not the first European to reach Tahiti - the Englishman Samuel Wallis had done so one year earlier - Bougainville’s account is fundamental to the formation of the European romantic vision of the South Seas.

Bougainville had the imprimatur of the French government to undertake a voyage of exploration which would seek to gather scientific, geographical and cultural information. For example, his narrative includes the first vocabulary of the Tahitian language, which is also the first written glossary of any Polynesian language. The advancement of knowledge had not been the principle objective of French voyages of the preceding period, which were motivated by commercial interests.

After entering the Pacific through the Straits of Magellan early in 1768, Bougainville went in fruitless search of the fabled ‘Davis Land’, which was rumoured to exist to the west of Chile. He then took possession of the Tuamotu Archipelago and Tahiti for France, providing in his narrative an extensive, detailed and enthusiastic account of Tahiti. Crossing the Pacific he made landfall first in Samoa and then the New Hebrides. From the island of Espiritu Santo, with the thought of possibly discovering the east coast of New Holland, he struck out due west, a course which would have allowed him to reach the coast of Queensland. Fatefully, he was unable to navigate through the Great Barrier Reef, and sailing north instead, he passed through the Solomons (naming Bougainville for himself) and on to Batavia. Bougainville was to learn in Batavia of the exploits of the navigators Wallis and Carteret, both of whom had sailed across the Pacific a short time earlier. However, it was Bougainville’s narrative which was to cause a sensation in France upon its publication, in some part because of its contribution to scientific and geographical knowledge but primarily for the account of Tahiti, which was to have such an enduring effect on the European imagination. (Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: -  
Colors used: -  
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 24in x 11 1/2in (610mm x 295mm)
Paper size: - 22 1/4in x 9 1/2in (570mm x 240mm)
Margins: - Min 1in (25mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light age toning in margins, small tears to left fold margins
Plate area: - Folds as issued
Verso: - Folds as issued

$425.00 USD
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