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1802 J B Lechevalier Antique Print Ancient Greek Coins - Minerva Mytilene Pallas

1802 J B Lechevalier Antique Print Ancient Greek Coins - Minerva Mytilene Pallas

Description:
This original copper-plate engraved antique prints of ancient Greek coins (details below) found in the ancient Greek province of Çanakkale in the NW of modern Turkey, was published in the 1802 edition of Jean-Baptiste Lechevaliers of Voyage de la Troade, fait dans les années 1785 et 1786

Each plate contains 3 coins;
Plate XXVI
7. Le Tete de Minerve (The head of Minerva)
8. Tete Casquee de Minerve, fondatrice d Athenes (Head Helmet of Minerva, founder of Athens)
9. Mytilene dans l ile de Lesbos, patrie de Pattacus (Mytilene in the island of Lesbos, homeland of Pattacus)
Plate XXVII
10. Tete a deux faces, l une barbue et couronnee de laurier (Head with two faces, l bearded and laurel wreath)
11. Tete de Palas ( Head of Pallas)
12. Tete de Pallas (Head of a Pallas)

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: -
Colors used: -
General color appearance: -
Paper size: - 14in x 10in (355mm x 255mm)
Plate size: - 7in x 5in (180mm x 130mm) each plate
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

Background: 
Jean-Baptiste Lechevalier was the secretary of the Ambassador of France in Constantinople. In the year 1788 he visited the plain of Troy, and was enthusiastically in favour of the theory that the site of Homers Troy was to be found at the village of Bunarbashi. His publication about Troy Voyage de la Troade.....was first published in 1799.
The Troad, also known as Troas, is the historical name of the Biga peninsula (Biga Yarımadası, Τρωάς) in the northwestern part of Anatolia, Turkey. This region now is part of the Çanakkale province of Turkey. Bounded by the Dardanelles to the northwest, by the Aegean Sea to the west and separated from the rest of Anatolia by the massif that forms Mount Ida, the Troad is drained by two main rivers, the Scamander (Karamenderes) and the Simois, which join at the area containing the ruins of Troy. Grenikos, Kebren, Simoeis, Rhesos, Rhodios, Heptaporos and Aisepos were seven rivers of the Troad and the names of the river gods that inhabited each river.

Troy (Ancient Greek: Τροία, Troia or Τροίας, Troias, Truva or Troya) was a city in the far northwest of the region known in late Classical antiquity as Asia Minor, now known as Anatolia in modern Turkey, just south of the southwest mouth of the Dardanelles strait and northwest of Mount Ida. The present-day location is known as Hisarlik. It was the setting of the Trojan War described in the Greek Epic Cycle, in particular in the Iliad, one of the two epic poems attributed to Homer. Metrical evidence from the Iliad and the Odyssey suggests that the name λιον (Ilion) formerly began with a digamma: Ϝίλιον (Wilion); this is also supported by the Hittite name for what is thought to be the same city, Wilusa.
A new capital called Ilium (from Greek: λιον, Ilion) was founded on the site in the reign of the Roman Emperor Augustus. It flourished until the establishment of Constantinople, became a bishopric and declined gradually in the Byzantine era, but is now a Latin Catholic titular see.
In 1865, English archaeologist Frank Calvert excavated trial trenches in a field he had bought from a local farmer at Hisarlik, and in 1868, Heinrich Schliemann, a wealthy German businessman and archaeologist, also began excavating in the area after a chance meeting with Calvert in Çanakkale. These excavations revealed several cities built in succession. Schliemann was at first skeptical about the identification of Hisarlik with Troy, but was persuaded by Calvert and took over Calverts excavations on the eastern half of the Hisarlik site, which was on Calvert\'s property. Troy VII has been identified with the city called Wilusa by the Hittites (the probable origin of the Greek λιον) and is generally (but not conclusively) identified with Homeric Troy.
Today, the hill at Hisarlik has given its name to a small village near the ruins, which supports the tourist trade visiting the Troia archaeological site. It lies within the province of Çanakkale, some 30 km south-west of the provincial capital, also called Çanakkale. The nearest village is Tevfikiye. The map here shows the adapted Scamander estuary with Ilium a little way inland across the Homeric plain. Due to Troys location near the Aegean Sea, the Sea of Marmara, and the Black Sea, it was a central hub for the military and trade(Ref: M&B; Tooley)

$90.00 USD
More Info
1802 J B Lechevalier Antique Print Ancient Greek Coins - Geta Gallien Apollo

1802 J B Lechevalier Antique Print Ancient Greek Coins - Geta Gallien Apollo

Description:
This original copper-plate engraved antique prints of ancient Greek coins (details below) found in the ancient Greek province of Çanakkale in the NW of modern Turkey, was published in the 1802 edition of Jean-Baptiste Lechevaliers of Voyage de la Troade, fait dans les années 1785 et 1786

Each plate contains 3 coins; 
Plate XXVIII
13. Septimus Geta Caes - Tete de Geta (The head of Geta)
14. Tete de Gallien (Head of Gallien)
15. Tete de Commode (Head of Commode)
Plate XXIX
16. Tete de Antonin le Pieux (Head of Antoninus Pius)
17. Tete de femme, tourrelee ( Head of a woman)
18. Tete d Apollon (Head of Apollo)

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 14in x 10in (355mm x 255mm)
Plate size: - 7in x 5in (180mm x 130mm) each plate
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

Background: 
Jean-Baptiste Lechevalier was the secretary of the Ambassador of France in Constantinople. In the year 1788 he visited the plain of Troy, and was enthusiastically in favour of the theory that the site of Homers Troy was to be found at the village of Bunarbashi. His publication about Troy Voyage de la Troade.....was first published in 1799.
The Troad, also known as Troas, is the historical name of the Biga peninsula (Biga Yarımadası, Τρωάς) in the northwestern part of Anatolia, Turkey. This region now is part of the Çanakkale province of Turkey. Bounded by the Dardanelles to the northwest, by the Aegean Sea to the west and separated from the rest of Anatolia by the massif that forms Mount Ida, the Troad is drained by two main rivers, the Scamander (Karamenderes) and the Simois, which join at the area containing the ruins of Troy. Grenikos, Kebren, Simoeis, Rhesos, Rhodios, Heptaporos and Aisepos were seven rivers of the Troad and the names of the river gods that inhabited each river.

Troy (Ancient Greek: Τροία, Troia or Τροίας, Troias, Truva or Troya) was a city in the far northwest of the region known in late Classical antiquity as Asia Minor, now known as Anatolia in modern Turkey, just south of the southwest mouth of the Dardanelles strait and northwest of Mount Ida. The present-day location is known as Hisarlik. It was the setting of the Trojan War described in the Greek Epic Cycle, in particular in the Iliad, one of the two epic poems attributed to Homer. Metrical evidence from the Iliad and the Odyssey suggests that the name λιον (Ilion) formerly began with a digamma: Ϝίλιον (Wilion); this is also supported by the Hittite name for what is thought to be the same city, Wilusa.
A new capital called Ilium (from Greek: λιον, Ilion) was founded on the site in the reign of the Roman Emperor Augustus. It flourished until the establishment of Constantinople, became a bishopric and declined gradually in the Byzantine era, but is now a Latin Catholic titular see.
In 1865, English archaeologist Frank Calvert excavated trial trenches in a field he had bought from a local farmer at Hisarlik, and in 1868, Heinrich Schliemann, a wealthy German businessman and archaeologist, also began excavating in the area after a chance meeting with Calvert in Çanakkale. These excavations revealed several cities built in succession. Schliemann was at first skeptical about the identification of Hisarlik with Troy, but was persuaded by Calvert and took over Calverts excavations on the eastern half of the Hisarlik site, which was on Calvert\'s property. Troy VII has been identified with the city called Wilusa by the Hittites (the probable origin of the Greek λιον) and is generally (but not conclusively) identified with Homeric Troy.
Today, the hill at Hisarlik has given its name to a small village near the ruins, which supports the tourist trade visiting the Troia archaeological site. It lies within the province of Çanakkale, some 30 km south-west of the provincial capital, also called Çanakkale. The nearest village is Tevfikiye. The map here shows the adapted Scamander estuary with Ilium a little way inland across the Homeric plain. Due to Troys location near the Aegean Sea, the Sea of Marmara, and the Black Sea, it was a central hub for the military and trade(Ref: M&B; Tooley)

$90.00 USD
More Info
1802 J B Lechevalier Antique Print Ancient Greek Coins - Hadrian, Maxime, Troy

1802 J B Lechevalier Antique Print Ancient Greek Coins - Hadrian, Maxime, Troy

Description:
This original copper-plate engraved antique prints of ancient Greek, Roman & Troy coins (details below) found in the ancient Greek province of Çanakkale, now in the NW of modern Turkey, was published in the 1802 edition of Jean-Baptiste Lechevaliers of Voyage de la Troade, fait dans les années 1785 et 1786

Each plate contains 3 coins;
Plate XXX
19. Tete d Hadrian (The head of Hadrian)
20. Tete de Maximin (Head of Maximin)
21. Tete de Maxime (Head of Maxime)
Plate XXXI
22. Tete de Marc Aurele (Head of Marcus Arelius)
23. Col. Avg Troad (Coin of Troy)
24. Tete d Antonin (Head of Antonin)

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: -
Colors used: -
General color appearance: -
Paper size: - 14in x 10in (355mm x 255mm)
Plate size: - 7in x 5in (180mm x 130mm) each plate
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

Background: 
Jean-Baptiste Lechevalier was the secretary of the Ambassador of France in Constantinople. In the year 1788 he visited the plain of Troy, and was enthusiastically in favour of the theory that the site of Homers Troy was to be found at the village of Bunarbashi. His publication about Troy Voyage de la Troade.....was first published in 1799.
The Troad, also known as Troas, is the historical name of the Biga peninsula (Biga Yarımadası, Τρωάς) in the northwestern part of Anatolia, Turkey. This region now is part of the Çanakkale province of Turkey. Bounded by the Dardanelles to the northwest, by the Aegean Sea to the west and separated from the rest of Anatolia by the massif that forms Mount Ida, the Troad is drained by two main rivers, the Scamander (Karamenderes) and the Simois, which join at the area containing the ruins of Troy. Grenikos, Kebren, Simoeis, Rhesos, Rhodios, Heptaporos and Aisepos were seven rivers of the Troad and the names of the river gods that inhabited each river.

Troy (Ancient Greek: Τροία, Troia or Τροίας, Troias, Truva or Troya) was a city in the far northwest of the region known in late Classical antiquity as Asia Minor, now known as Anatolia in modern Turkey, just south of the southwest mouth of the Dardanelles strait and northwest of Mount Ida. The present-day location is known as Hisarlik. It was the setting of the Trojan War described in the Greek Epic Cycle, in particular in the Iliad, one of the two epic poems attributed to Homer. Metrical evidence from the Iliad and the Odyssey suggests that the name λιον (Ilion) formerly began with a digamma: Ϝίλιον (Wilion); this is also supported by the Hittite name for what is thought to be the same city, Wilusa.
A new capital called Ilium (from Greek: λιον, Ilion) was founded on the site in the reign of the Roman Emperor Augustus. It flourished until the establishment of Constantinople, became a bishopric and declined gradually in the Byzantine era, but is now a Latin Catholic titular see.
In 1865, English archaeologist Frank Calvert excavated trial trenches in a field he had bought from a local farmer at Hisarlik, and in 1868, Heinrich Schliemann, a wealthy German businessman and archaeologist, also began excavating in the area after a chance meeting with Calvert in Çanakkale. These excavations revealed several cities built in succession. Schliemann was at first skeptical about the identification of Hisarlik with Troy, but was persuaded by Calvert and took over Calverts excavations on the eastern half of the Hisarlik site, which was on Calvert\'s property. Troy VII has been identified with the city called Wilusa by the Hittites (the probable origin of the Greek λιον) and is generally (but not conclusively) identified with Homeric Troy.
Today, the hill at Hisarlik has given its name to a small village near the ruins, which supports the tourist trade visiting the Troia archaeological site. It lies within the province of Çanakkale, some 30 km south-west of the provincial capital, also called Çanakkale. The nearest village is Tevfikiye. The map here shows the adapted Scamander estuary with Ilium a little way inland across the Homeric plain. Due to Troys location near the Aegean Sea, the Sea of Marmara, and the Black Sea, it was a central hub for the military and trade(Ref: M&B; Tooley)

$90.00 USD
More Info
1802 J B Lechevalier Antique Print Ancient Greek Coins, Alexander Severe Minerva

1802 J B Lechevalier Antique Print Ancient Greek Coins, Alexander Severe Minerva

Description:
This original copper-plate engraved antique prints of ancient Greek, Roman & Troy coins (details below) found in the ancient Greek province of Çanakkale, now in the NW of modern Turkey, was published in the 1802 edition of Jean-Baptiste Lechevaliers of Voyage de la Troade, fait dans les années 1785 et 1786

Each plate contains 3 coins; 
Plate XXXII
25. Tete d Alexandre Severe (The head of Alexander Severe)
26. Un cheval marin aile (A sailor wing horse)
27. Tete de Marc-Aurele (Head of Marcus Arelius)
Plate XXXIII
28. Minerve - Iliade tenant de la droite une lance sur l epaule (Minerva - Iliad holding on the right a spear on the shoulder)
29. Tete de Minerve (Head of Minerva)
30. Tete de Minerve casquee (Head of Minerva helmet)

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 14in x 10in (355mm x 255mm)
Plate size: - 7in x 5in (180mm x 130mm) each plate
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

Background: 
Jean-Baptiste Lechevalier was the secretary of the Ambassador of France in Constantinople. In the year 1788 he visited the plain of Troy, and was enthusiastically in favour of the theory that the site of Homers Troy was to be found at the village of Bunarbashi. His publication about Troy Voyage de la Troade.....was first published in 1799.
The Troad, also known as Troas, is the historical name of the Biga peninsula (Biga Yarımadası, Τρωάς) in the northwestern part of Anatolia, Turkey. This region now is part of the Çanakkale province of Turkey. Bounded by the Dardanelles to the northwest, by the Aegean Sea to the west and separated from the rest of Anatolia by the massif that forms Mount Ida, the Troad is drained by two main rivers, the Scamander (Karamenderes) and the Simois, which join at the area containing the ruins of Troy. Grenikos, Kebren, Simoeis, Rhesos, Rhodios, Heptaporos and Aisepos were seven rivers of the Troad and the names of the river gods that inhabited each river.

Troy (Ancient Greek: Τροία, Troia or Τροίας, Troias, Truva or Troya) was a city in the far northwest of the region known in late Classical antiquity as Asia Minor, now known as Anatolia in modern Turkey, just south of the southwest mouth of the Dardanelles strait and northwest of Mount Ida. The present-day location is known as Hisarlik. It was the setting of the Trojan War described in the Greek Epic Cycle, in particular in the Iliad, one of the two epic poems attributed to Homer. Metrical evidence from the Iliad and the Odyssey suggests that the name λιον (Ilion) formerly began with a digamma: Ϝίλιον (Wilion); this is also supported by the Hittite name for what is thought to be the same city, Wilusa.
A new capital called Ilium (from Greek: λιον, Ilion) was founded on the site in the reign of the Roman Emperor Augustus. It flourished until the establishment of Constantinople, became a bishopric and declined gradually in the Byzantine era, but is now a Latin Catholic titular see.
In 1865, English archaeologist Frank Calvert excavated trial trenches in a field he had bought from a local farmer at Hisarlik, and in 1868, Heinrich Schliemann, a wealthy German businessman and archaeologist, also began excavating in the area after a chance meeting with Calvert in Çanakkale. These excavations revealed several cities built in succession. Schliemann was at first skeptical about the identification of Hisarlik with Troy, but was persuaded by Calvert and took over Calverts excavations on the eastern half of the Hisarlik site, which was on Calvert\'s property. Troy VII has been identified with the city called Wilusa by the Hittites (the probable origin of the Greek λιον) and is generally (but not conclusively) identified with Homeric Troy.
Today, the hill at Hisarlik has given its name to a small village near the ruins, which supports the tourist trade visiting the Troia archaeological site. It lies within the province of Çanakkale, some 30 km south-west of the provincial capital, also called Çanakkale. The nearest village is Tevfikiye. The map here shows the adapted Scamander estuary with Ilium a little way inland across the Homeric plain. Due to Troys location near the Aegean Sea, the Sea of Marmara, and the Black Sea, it was a central hub for the military and trade(Ref: M&B; Tooley)

$90.00 USD
More Info
1802 J B Lechevalier Antique Print The Sarcophagus of the Greek Author, Homer

1802 J B Lechevalier Antique Print The Sarcophagus of the Greek Author, Homer

Description:
This original copper-plate engraved antique print of a Greek Sarcophagus, believe to be that of the ancient Greek Philosopher Homer, was published in the 1802 edition of Jean-Baptiste Lechevaliers of Voyage de la Troade, fait dans les années 1785 et 1786

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: -
Colors used: -
General color appearance: -
Paper size: - 20in x 14in (510mm x 360mm)
Plate size: - 17 1/2in x 10 3/4in (445mm x 275mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - Light soiling
Plate area: - Light toning along centerfold
Verso: - Light soiling

Background: 
Homer is the legendary author of the Iliad and the Odyssey, two epic poems that are the central works of ancient Greek literature. The Iliad is set during the Trojan War, the ten-year siege of the city of Troy by a coalition of Greek kingdoms. It focuses on a quarrel between King Agamemnon and the warrior Achilles lasting a few weeks during the last year of the war. The Odyssey focuses on the journey home of Odysseus, king of Ithaca, around 20 years after the fall of Troy. Many accounts of Homer\'s life circulated in classical antiquity, the most widespread being that he was a blind bard from Ionia, a region of central coastal Anatolia in present-day Turkey. Modern scholars consider them legends.
The Homeric Question—concerning by whom, when, where and under what circumstances the Iliad and Odyssey were composed—continues to be debated. Broadly speaking, modern scholarly opinion falls into two groups. One holds that most of the Iliad and (according to some) the Odyssey are the works of a single poet of genius. The other considers the Homeric poems to be the result of a process of working and reworking by many contributors, and that Homer is best seen as a label for an entire tradition. It is generally accepted that the poems were composed at some point around the late eighth or early seventh century BC.
The poems are in Homeric Greek, also known as Epic Greek, a literary language which shows a mixture of features of the Ionic and Aeolic dialects from different centuries; the predominant influence is Eastern Ionic. Most researchers believe that the poems were originally transmitted orally. From antiquity until the present day, the influence of the Homeric epics on Western civilization has been great, inspiring many of its most famous works of literature, music, art and film. The Homeric epics were the greatest influence on ancient Greek culture and education; to Plato, Homer was simply the one who has taught Greece – ten Hellada pepaideuken

Jean-Baptiste Lechevalier was the secretary of the Ambassador of France in Constantinople. In the year 1788 he visited the plain of Troy, and was enthusiastically in favour of the theory that the site of Homers Troy was to be found at the village of Bunarbashi. His publication about Troy Voyage de la Troade.....was first published in 1799.
The Troad, also known as Troas, is the historical name of the Biga peninsula (Biga Yarımadası, Τρωάς) in the northwestern part of Anatolia, Turkey. This region now is part of the Çanakkale province of Turkey. Bounded by the Dardanelles to the northwest, by the Aegean Sea to the west and separated from the rest of Anatolia by the massif that forms Mount Ida, the Troad is drained by two main rivers, the Scamander (Karamenderes) and the Simois, which join at the area containing the ruins of Troy. Grenikos, Kebren, Simoeis, Rhesos, Rhodios, Heptaporos and Aisepos were seven rivers of the Troad and the names of the river gods that inhabited each river.

Troy (Ancient Greek: Τροία, Troia or Τροίας, Troias, Truva or Troya) was a city in the far northwest of the region known in late Classical antiquity as Asia Minor, now known as Anatolia in modern Turkey, just south of the southwest mouth of the Dardanelles strait and northwest of Mount Ida. The present-day location is known as Hisarlik. It was the setting of the Trojan War described in the Greek Epic Cycle, in particular in the Iliad, one of the two epic poems attributed to Homer. Metrical evidence from the Iliad and the Odyssey suggests that the name λιον (Ilion) formerly began with a digamma: Ϝίλιον (Wilion); this is also supported by the Hittite name for what is thought to be the same city, Wilusa.
A new capital called Ilium (from Greek: λιον, Ilion) was founded on the site in the reign of the Roman Emperor Augustus. It flourished until the establishment of Constantinople, became a bishopric and declined gradually in the Byzantine era, but is now a Latin Catholic titular see.
In 1865, English archaeologist Frank Calvert excavated trial trenches in a field he had bought from a local farmer at Hisarlik, and in 1868, Heinrich Schliemann, a wealthy German businessman and archaeologist, also began excavating in the area after a chance meeting with Calvert in Çanakkale. These excavations revealed several cities built in succession. Schliemann was at first skeptical about the identification of Hisarlik with Troy, but was persuaded by Calvert and took over Calverts excavations on the eastern half of the Hisarlik site, which was on Calvert\'s property. Troy VII has been identified with the city called Wilusa by the Hittites (the probable origin of the Greek λιον) and is generally (but not conclusively) identified with Homeric Troy.
Today, the hill at Hisarlik has given its name to a small village near the ruins, which supports the tourist trade visiting the Troia archaeological site. It lies within the province of Çanakkale, some 30 km south-west of the provincial capital, also called Çanakkale. The nearest village is Tevfikiye. The map here shows the adapted Scamander estuary with Ilium a little way inland across the Homeric plain. Due to Troys location near the Aegean Sea, the Sea of Marmara, and the Black Sea, it was a central hub for the military and trade(Ref: M&B; Tooley)

$125.00 USD
More Info
1802 J B Lechevalier Antique Print Temple of Poseidon Cape Sounion Attica Greece

1802 J B Lechevalier Antique Print Temple of Poseidon Cape Sounion Attica Greece

Description:
This original copper-plate engraved antique print view of the ruins of the Temple of Poseidon, on the cliffs on Cape Sounion, Attica Peninsula, Greece, south of Athens was published in the 1802 edition of Jean-Baptiste Lechevaliers of Voyage de la Troade, fait dans les années 1785 et 1786

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 20in x 14in (510mm x 360mm)
Plate size: - 17 1/2in x 11in (445mm x 280mm) 
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

Background: 
Cape Sounion is the promontory at the southernmost tip of the Attic peninsula, 8 kilometres south of the town of Lavrio (ancient Thoricus), and 70 kilometres southeast of Athens. It is part of Lavreotiki municipality, East Attica, Greece.
Cape Sounion is noted for its Temple of Poseidon, one of the major monuments of the Golden Age of Athens. Its remains are perched on the headland, surrounded on three sides by the sea.
The original, Archaic-period temple of Poseidon on the site was built of tufa. The Sounion Kouros, discovered in 1906 in a pit east of the temple alongside fragments of other statues, was probably one of a number of votive statues dedicated to Poseidon which probably stood in front of the gods sanctuary. The archaic temple was probably destroyed in 480 BC by Persian troops during Xerxes I\'s invasion of Greece. After they defeated Xerxes in the naval Battle of Salamis, the Athenians placed an entire captured enemy trireme (warship with three banks of oars) at Sounion as a trophy dedicated to Poseidon.
The temple of Poseidon at Sounion was constructed in 444–440 BC. This was during the ascendancy of the Athenian statesman Pericles, who also rebuilt the Parthenon in Athens. It was built on the ruins of a temple dating from the Archaic period. It is perched above the sea at a height of almost 60 metres. The design of the temple is a typical hexastyle, i.e., it had a front portico with six columns. Only some columns of the Sounion temple stand today, but when intact it would have closely resembled the contemporary and well-preserved Temple of Hephaestus beneath the Acropolis, which may have been designed by the same architect.
As with all Greek temples, the Poseidon building was rectangular, with a colonnade on all four sides. The total number of original columns was 36: 15 columns still stand today. The columns are of the Doric Order. They were made of locally quarried white marble. They were 6.10 m high, with a diameter of 1 m (3.1 ft) at the base and 79 cm at the top. At the center of the temple, colonnade would have been the hall of worship (naos), a windowless rectangular room, similar to the partly intact hall at the Temple of Hephaestus. It would have contained, at one end facing the entrance, the cult image, a colossal, ceiling-height (6 metres (20 ft)) bronze statue of Poseidon.

Jean-Baptiste Lechevalier was the secretary of the Ambassador of France in Constantinople. In the year 1788 he visited the plain of Troy, and was enthusiastically in favour of the theory that the site of Homers Troy was to be found at the village of Bunarbashi. His publication about Troy Voyage de la Troade.....was first published in 1799.
The Troad, also known as Troas, is the historical name of the Biga peninsula (Biga Yarımadası, Τρωάς) in the northwestern part of Anatolia, Turkey. This region now is part of the Çanakkale province of Turkey. Bounded by the Dardanelles to the northwest, by the Aegean Sea to the west and separated from the rest of Anatolia by the massif that forms Mount Ida, the Troad is drained by two main rivers, the Scamander (Karamenderes) and the Simois, which join at the area containing the ruins of Troy. Grenikos, Kebren, Simoeis, Rhesos, Rhodios, Heptaporos and Aisepos were seven rivers of the Troad and the names of the river gods that inhabited each river.

Troy (Ancient Greek: Τροία, Troia or Τροίας, Troias, Truva or Troya) was a city in the far northwest of the region known in late Classical antiquity as Asia Minor, now known as Anatolia in modern Turkey, just south of the southwest mouth of the Dardanelles strait and northwest of Mount Ida. The present-day location is known as Hisarlik. It was the setting of the Trojan War described in the Greek Epic Cycle, in particular in the Iliad, one of the two epic poems attributed to Homer. Metrical evidence from the Iliad and the Odyssey suggests that the name λιον (Ilion) formerly began with a digamma: Ϝίλιον (Wilion); this is also supported by the Hittite name for what is thought to be the same city, Wilusa.
A new capital called Ilium (from Greek: λιον, Ilion) was founded on the site in the reign of the Roman Emperor Augustus. It flourished until the establishment of Constantinople, became a bishopric and declined gradually in the Byzantine era, but is now a Latin Catholic titular see.
In 1865, English archaeologist Frank Calvert excavated trial trenches in a field he had bought from a local farmer at Hisarlik, and in 1868, Heinrich Schliemann, a wealthy German businessman and archaeologist, also began excavating in the area after a chance meeting with Calvert in Çanakkale. These excavations revealed several cities built in succession. Schliemann was at first skeptical about the identification of Hisarlik with Troy, but was persuaded by Calvert and took over Calverts excavations on the eastern half of the Hisarlik site, which was on Calvert\'s property. Troy VII has been identified with the city called Wilusa by the Hittites (the probable origin of the Greek λιον) and is generally (but not conclusively) identified with Homeric Troy.
Today, the hill at Hisarlik has given its name to a small village near the ruins, which supports the tourist trade visiting the Troia archaeological site. It lies within the province of Çanakkale, some 30 km south-west of the provincial capital, also called Çanakkale. The nearest village is Tevfikiye. The map here shows the adapted Scamander estuary with Ilium a little way inland across the Homeric plain. Due to Troys location near the Aegean Sea, the Sea of Marmara, and the Black Sea, it was a central hub for the military and trade(Ref: M&B; Tooley)

$125.00 USD
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1802 Lechevalier Large Antique Print View of Xanthos or Kinik, Antalya Turkey

1802 Lechevalier Large Antique Print View of Xanthos or Kinik, Antalya Turkey

Description:
This original copper-plate engraved antique print view of the source of the Karamenderes (Scamander) River that flowed beneath the ancient Greek city of Troy located in the Troad region of Çanakkale in NW Turkey, was published in the 1802 edition of Jean-Baptiste Lechevaliers of Voyage de la Troade, fait dans les années 1785 et 1786

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: -
Colors used: -
General color appearance: -
Paper size: - 20in x 14in (510mm x 360mm)
Plate size: - 17 1/2in x 11in (445mm x 280mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

Background: 
Karamenderes is the modern name of the river Scamander, along the lower course of which, according to the Iliad, the battles of the Trojan War were fought. It flows entirely within the Turkish province of Çanakkale.

Scamander was the name of a river god in Greek mythology.
Scamander fought on the side of the Trojans during the Trojan War (Iliad XX, 73/74; XXI), after the Greek hero Achilles insulted him. Scamander was also said to have attempted to kill Achilles three times, and the hero was only saved due to the intervention of Hera, Athena and Hephaestus. In this context, he is the personification of the Scamander River that flowed from Mount Ida across the plain beneath the city of Troy, joining the Hellespont north of the city. The Achaeans, according to Homer, had set up their camp near its mouth, and their battles with the Trojans were fought on the plain of Scamander. In Iliad XXII (149ff), Homer states that the river had two springs: one produced warm water; the other yielded cold water, regardless of the season.
According to Homer, he was called Xanthos by gods and Scamander by men, which might indicate that the former name refers to the god and the latter one to the river itself

Jean-Baptiste Lechevalier was the secretary of the Ambassador of France in Constantinople. In the year 1788 he visited the plain of Troy, and was enthusiastically in favour of the theory that the site of Homers Troy was to be found at the village of Bunarbashi. His publication about Troy Voyage de la Troade..... was first published in 1799.
The Troad, also known as Troas, is the historical name of the Biga peninsula (Biga Yarımadası, Τρωάς) in the northwestern part of Anatolia, Turkey. This region now is part of the Çanakkale province of Turkey. Bounded by the Dardanelles to the northwest, by the Aegean Sea to the west and separated from the rest of Anatolia by the massif that forms Mount Ida, the Troad is drained by two main rivers, the Scamander (Karamenderes) and the Simois, which join at the area containing the ruins of Troy. Grenikos, Kebren, Simoeis, Rhesos, Rhodios, Heptaporos and Aisepos were seven rivers of the Troad and the names of the river gods that inhabited each river.

Troy (Ancient Greek: Τροία, Troia or Τροίας, Troias, Truva or Troya) was a city in the far northwest of the region known in late Classical antiquity as Asia Minor, now known as Anatolia in modern Turkey, just south of the southwest mouth of the Dardanelles strait and northwest of Mount Ida. The present-day location is known as Hisarlik. It was the setting of the Trojan War described in the Greek Epic Cycle, in particular in the Iliad, one of the two epic poems attributed to Homer. Metrical evidence from the Iliad and the Odyssey suggests that the name λιον (Ilion) formerly began with a digamma: Ϝίλιον (Wilion); this is also supported by the Hittite name for what is thought to be the same city, Wilusa.
A new capital called Ilium (from Greek: λιον, Ilion) was founded on the site in the reign of the Roman Emperor Augustus. It flourished until the establishment of Constantinople, became a bishopric and declined gradually in the Byzantine era, but is now a Latin Catholic titular see.
In 1865, English archaeologist Frank Calvert excavated trial trenches in a field he had bought from a local farmer at Hisarlik, and in 1868, Heinrich Schliemann, a wealthy German businessman and archaeologist, also began excavating in the area after a chance meeting with Calvert in Çanakkale. These excavations revealed several cities built in succession. Schliemann was at first skeptical about the identification of Hisarlik with Troy, but was persuaded by Calvert and took over Calverts excavations on the eastern half of the Hisarlik site, which was on Calvert\'s property. Troy VII has been identified with the city called Wilusa by the Hittites (the probable origin of the Greek λιον) and is generally (but not conclusively) identified with Homeric Troy.
Today, the hill at Hisarlik has given its name to a small village near the ruins, which supports the tourist trade visiting the Troia archaeological site. It lies within the province of Çanakkale, some 30 km south-west of the provincial capital, also called Çanakkale. The nearest village is Tevfikiye. The map here shows the adapted Scamander estuary with Ilium a little way inland across the Homeric plain. Due to Troys location near the Aegean Sea, the Sea of Marmara, and the Black Sea, it was a central hub for the military and trade(Ref: M&B; Tooley)

$125.00 USD
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1802 J B Lechevalier Antique Print View of Tomb of Ajax Troy in Troad, NW Turkey

1802 J B Lechevalier Antique Print View of Tomb of Ajax Troy in Troad, NW Turkey

Description:
This original copper-plate engraved antique print view of the Tomb of Ajax the Great near in the ancient Greek city of Troy in the Troad region of NW Turkey was published in the 1802 edition of Jean-Baptiste Lechevaliers of Voyage de la Troade, fait dans les années 1785 et 1786

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: -
Colors used: -
General color appearance: -
Paper size: - 20in x 14in (510mm x 360mm)
Plate size: - 17 1/2in x 11in (445mm x 280mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Light toning along centerfold
Verso: - None

Background: 
Ajax or Aiasis a Greek hero, the son of King Telamon and Periboea, and the half-brother of Teucer. He plays an important role, and is portrayed as a towering figure and a warrior of great courage in Homers Iliad and in the Epic Cycle, a series of epic poems about the Trojan War. He is also referred to as Telamonian Ajax (Αἴας ὁ Τελαμώνιος, in Etruscan recorded as Aivas Tlamunus), Greater Ajax, or Ajax the Great, which distinguishes him from Ajax, son of Oileus (Ajax the Lesser).

Jean-Baptiste Lechevalier was the secretary of the Ambassador of France in Constantinople. In the year 1788 he visited the plain of Troy, and was enthusiastically in favour of the theory that the site of Homers Troy was to be found at the village of Bunarbashi. His publication about Troy Voyage de la Troade.....was first published in 1799.
The Troad, also known as Troas, is the historical name of the Biga peninsula (Biga Yarımadası, Τρωάς) in the northwestern part of Anatolia, Turkey. This region now is part of the Çanakkale province of Turkey. Bounded by the Dardanelles to the northwest, by the Aegean Sea to the west and separated from the rest of Anatolia by the massif that forms Mount Ida, the Troad is drained by two main rivers, the Scamander (Karamenderes) and the Simois, which join at the area containing the ruins of Troy. Grenikos, Kebren, Simoeis, Rhesos, Rhodios, Heptaporos and Aisepos were seven rivers of the Troad and the names of the river gods that inhabited each river.

Troy (Ancient Greek: Τροία, Troia or Τροίας, Troias, Truva or Troya) was a city in the far northwest of the region known in late Classical antiquity as Asia Minor, now known as Anatolia in modern Turkey, just south of the southwest mouth of the Dardanelles strait and northwest of Mount Ida. The present-day location is known as Hisarlik. It was the setting of the Trojan War described in the Greek Epic Cycle, in particular in the Iliad, one of the two epic poems attributed to Homer. Metrical evidence from the Iliad and the Odyssey suggests that the name λιον (Ilion) formerly began with a digamma: Ϝίλιον (Wilion); this is also supported by the Hittite name for what is thought to be the same city, Wilusa.
A new capital called Ilium (from Greek: λιον, Ilion) was founded on the site in the reign of the Roman Emperor Augustus. It flourished until the establishment of Constantinople, became a bishopric and declined gradually in the Byzantine era, but is now a Latin Catholic titular see.
In 1865, English archaeologist Frank Calvert excavated trial trenches in a field he had bought from a local farmer at Hisarlik, and in 1868, Heinrich Schliemann, a wealthy German businessman and archaeologist, also began excavating in the area after a chance meeting with Calvert in Çanakkale. These excavations revealed several cities built in succession. Schliemann was at first skeptical about the identification of Hisarlik with Troy, but was persuaded by Calvert and took over Calverts excavations on the eastern half of the Hisarlik site, which was on Calvert\'s property. Troy VII has been identified with the city called Wilusa by the Hittites (the probable origin of the Greek λιον) and is generally (but not conclusively) identified with Homeric Troy.
Today, the hill at Hisarlik has given its name to a small village near the ruins, which supports the tourist trade visiting the Troia archaeological site. It lies within the province of Çanakkale, some 30 km south-west of the provincial capital, also called Çanakkale. The nearest village is Tevfikiye. The map here shows the adapted Scamander estuary with Ilium a little way inland across the Homeric plain. Due to Troys location near the Aegean Sea, the Sea of Marmara, and the Black Sea, it was a central hub for the military and trade(Ref: M&B; Tooley)

$125.00 USD
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1757 Abraham Swan Antique Architect Print of Ornate 18th century Bridges

1757 Abraham Swan Antique Architect Print of Ornate 18th century Bridges

  • Title : Ab. Swan Archt. Published aaccording to Act Nov 14th 1757. In. Addison Sculpt.
  • Date : 1757
  • Condition: (A) Very Good Condition
  • Ref:  70539
  • Size: 15 1/2in x 10in (395mm x 255mm)

Description: 
This fine original antique print of two interior architectural designs by the 18th century architect Abraham Swan was engraved by Thomas Miller in 1757 - the date is engraved at the foot of the print - and was published in Swans  A collection of designs in architecture : containing new plans and elevations of houses, for general use. 1757(Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: -  
Colors used: -  
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 15 1/2in x 10in (395mm x 255mm)
Plate size: - 14in x 8in (355mm x 205mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$75.00 USD
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1757 Abraham Swan Large Antique Print of 18th century Architect Design

1757 Abraham Swan Large Antique Print of 18th century Architect Design

  • Title : Ab. Swan Archt. Published aaccording to Act July 1757. Thomas Miller Sculpt.
  • Date : 1757
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  70538
  • Size: 15 1/2in x 10in (395mm x 255mm)

Description: 
This fine original antique print of two interior architectural designs by the 18th century architect Abraham Swan was engraved by Thomas Miller in 1757 - the date is engraved at the foot of the print - and was published in Swans  A collection of designs in architecture : containing new plans and elevations of houses, for general use. 1757(Ref: M&B; Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White
Age of map color: -  
Colors used: -  
General color appearance: -  
Paper size: - 15 1/2in x 10in (395mm x 255mm)
Plate size: - 14in x 8in (355mm x 205mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$75.00 USD
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1819 Gainsborough & Wells Antique Print of an English Country Farming Scene

1819 Gainsborough & Wells Antique Print of an English Country Farming Scene

  • Title : From the Original in the Collection of the Rt. Hon. ble Baroness Lucas...T Gainsborough del. W.F. Wells sculpt.
  • Date : 1801
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  91222
  • Size: 17 1/4in x 11 1/2in (440mm x 290mm) 

Description: 
This large beautiful executed original antique soft ground etched print with hand tint colour, of a English country scene after Thomas Gainsborough, was engraved by William Frederick Wells and published in A Collection of Prints Illustrative of English Scenery From the Drawings and Sketches of Thos. Gainsborough, R.A. in the various collections of The Baroness Lucas; Viscount Palmerston; George Herbert, Esq.; Dr. Monro by John and Josiah Boydell, London in 1819.

The English painter Thomas Gainsborough (1727-1788) ranks as one of the principal masters and innovators of the English school of landscape painting. Thomas Gainsborough was baptized in Sudbury, Suffolk, on May 14, 1727. His father, a substantial cloth merchant, recognized Thomas's precocious artistic gifts and sent him at an early age, possibly 12, to London. Gainsborough was connected with the artists Francis Hayman and Hubert François Gravelot, possibly as apprentice to the former and assistant to the latter. Gainsborough is reported to have copied and restored Dutch landscapes for dealers. At the age of 19 he married Margaret Burr, reputedly a natural daughter of the Duke of Beaufort, who is said to have brought him an income of £200 a year.

At the age of 21 Gainsborough was so much admired as a landscape painter that he was invited with the leading artists of the day to present a picture to the Foundling Hospital in London. His painting, The Charterhouse, shows a mature observation of reality and handling of light. From Hayman the scene painter and Gravelot the rococo decorator Gainsborough learned to approach pictorial composition on inventive principles, and the alternation between observation and invention henceforth became the basis of his artistic growth. The two approaches may be illustrated by comparing Mr. and Mrs. Robert Andrews (ca. 1749), with a deliciously observed Suffolk landscape dappled by sunlight and shadow of cloud, and Henéage Lloyd and His Sister (ca. 1750), shown against a limpid background of stage scenery.

Gainsborough's art after his early London studies falls into three main divisions: the Suffolk period, 1748-1759; the Bath period, 1759-1774; and the years of fame in London, 1774-1788. In Suffolk he combined the charms of the modern conversation piece with those of realistic landscape, thus making a strong appeal to the country gentry. Here too he painted the Suffolk countryside as faithfully and freshly as if he were a Dutch painter reborn in the 18th century.

William Frederick Wells (1762 - 10 Nov 1836) was an English watercolour landscape painter and etcher. Wells was born in London in 1762. Wells studied art in London under John James Barralet (1747–1815). On 20 November 1804, Wells initiated the founding of the Society of Painters in Watercolours (now the Royal Watercolour Society), at a meeting held at the Stratford Coffee House, Oxford St, London. He served as President of the fledgling association from 1806 to 1807.

He travelled and painted extensively in England and Europe, particularly in Norway and Sweden. Wells' art was annually exhibited at the Royal Academy from 1795 to 1813. He held the post of Professor of Drawing at Addiscombe Military Seminary for officers of the East India Company Army over twenty years from 1813 until his retirement, immediately before his death, in November 1836.[1] Wells was an intimate friend of Joseph Mallord William Turner. Among his works as an etcher are two fine sets in soft ground; Thomas Gainsborough's English Scenery (1819) and Select Views in Cumberland (1810).

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - Original
Colors used: - Blue, orange, green, brown
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 17 1/4in x 11 1/2in (440mm x 290mm)
Plate size: - 12 1/2in x 9 1/2in (315mm x 245mm)
Margins: - Min 2in (50mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$275.00 USD
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1720 Stow Large Antique Print St Thomas Hospital View Southwark, London, England

1720 Stow Large Antique Print St Thomas Hospital View Southwark, London, England

Description: 

This large fine original antique print a view of St Thomas Hospital & view of Southwark, London was published in the 1720 revised edition of John Stow's Survey of the Cities of London and Westminster.

The hospital was described as ancient in 1215 and was named after Thomas Becket — which suggests it may have been founded after 1173 when Becket was canonised. However, it is possible it was only renamed in 1173 and that it was founded when St Mary Overie Priory founded in 1106 in Southwark.

Originally it was run by a mixed order of Augustinian monks and nuns, dedicated to Thomas Becket. It provided shelter and treatment for the poor, sick, and homeless. In the fifteenth century, Richard Whittington endowed a laying-in ward for unmarried mothers. The monastery was dissolved in 1539 during the Reformation, but reopened in 1551 and rededicated to Thomas the Apostle. It was reopened through the efforts of the City of London who obtained the grant of the site and a charter from Edward VI and has remained open ever since. The hospital was also the site of the first printed English Bible in 1537.

At the end of the 17th century, the hospital and church were largely rebuilt by Sir Robert Clayton, president of the hospital and a former Lord Mayor of the City of London. He employed Thomas Cartwright as architect. Sir Thomas Guy, a governor of St Thomas', founded Guy's Hospital in 1721 as a place to treat 'incurables' discharged from St Thomas'

John Stow's work A Survey of the Cities of London and Westminster and the Borough of Southwark was originally published in 1598 and 1603. Many editions followed which included revisions, additions, and enlargements, both by the original author and others including John Strype. (Ref: Tooley; M&B)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color: - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 16in x 10in (410mm x 255mm)
Plate size: - 13in x 9in (330mm x 230mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - Small hole to top of image
Verso: - None

$149.00 USD
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1698 De Bruyn Antique Print of Cacao, Chinese lemon, Jaka Plants of Indonesia

1698 De Bruyn Antique Print of Cacao, Chinese lemon, Jaka Plants of Indonesia

  • Title : Kakauw vrugt, Chineesche Citroen, Jaka or Soorsacke, Blim-Bing boom and Nam-Nam boom
  • Date : 1698
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  23405
  • Size: 18 1/2in x 16in (470mm x 405mm)

Description: 
This beautifully hand coloured original antique print of Cacao fruit, Chinese lemon, Jaka or Soorsacke, Nam-Nam tree and a Blim-bing tree from Indonesia was published as part of Cornelis de Bruyn`s (1652 c.1726) monumental travel publication Reizen Door Klien Asia, 1698.

De Bruyn was a Dutch portrait painter and traveler. He painted for some years in Italy, where he was known, in Rome, as Adonis. Bruyn is remembered chiefly for the records of his extensive travels in Egypt, Persia, India, and other countries, illustrated with his own designs. (Ref: M&B, Tooley)

General Description:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy & stable
Paper color: - White Age of map color: - Early
Colors used: - Blue, yellow, green, red
General color appearance: - Authentic
Paper size: - 18 1/2in x 16in (470mm x 405mm)
Plate size: - 11 1/2in x 11 1/2in (290mm x 290mm)
Margins: - Min 2in (50mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

$175.00 USD
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1665 De Rossi Original Antique Architectural Plan, Print of Santo Spirito Palace Florence

1665 De Rossi Original Antique Architectural Plan, Print of Santo Spirito Palace Florence

Description: 
This finely engraved original antique architectural print of Palace Santo Spirito in the Oltrarno quarter of Florence, Italy by Giovanni Battistaa Falda was published by Giacomo de Rossi in the 1665 edition of Il nuovo teatro delle fabriche, et edificii, in prospettiva di Roma moderna, 1665-1699.
These original prints are published on beautiful heavy clean original 17th century laid Italian made paper.

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 18in x 14in (460mm x 360mm)
Plate size: - 11 1/2in x 9in (290mm x 230mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

Background: 
Il Nuovo Teatro: One of the most important architectural projects of the seventeenth century was the urban renovation of Rome. Under the brilliant leadership of Pope Alessandro VII (1655-1667), Rome dramatically emerged as one of the most modern and beautiful cities of the new Baroque age. Within several decades spacious roadways were constructed, monumental buildings arose, and many public squares appeared with elaborate fountains and monuments. To be sure, this massive undertaking was meant to underline the absolute power of the Papacy but it also brought forth a new flowering of Italian art and architecture.
The Nuovo Teatro was initiated in 1665 to depict the new Rome in a series of etchings. What it gave to future generations was a magnificent historical record of views etched by two of Italy's greatest architectural artists. The printing and publishing of these important etchings was entrusted to Giacomo de Rossi (1626-1691), the head of the most dominant Roman publishing house. Sons and nephews of de Rossi, in fact, continued the publishing house until 1738 when the business was sold to Pope Clement XII to form the basis of the Regia Calcografia.) Altogether, four sets of Nuovo Teatro were created during the seventeenth century. Volumes one (35 etchings) and two (17 etchings) were both published in the year of 1665 and dealt mainly in views of the new piazzas, gardens, terraces and their surrounding buildings. Volume 3 (38 etchings) was published in 1669 and concentrated upon the newly constructed churches of Rome. Every plate from the first three sets was both designed and etched by the influential architectural artist, Giovanni Battista Falda (1643-1678). For reasons unknown the fourth and final volume (52 etchings) did not appear until 1699. It was published by Giacomo's successor, Domenico de Rossi, and featured views of the palaces and stately homes of Rome. Each plate was designed and etched by the famous architect and etcher, Alessandro Specchi (1668-1729)

$125.00 USD
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1665 De Rossi Original Antique Architectural Plan, Print of Millini Palace, Rome, Italy

1665 De Rossi Original Antique Architectural Plan, Print of Millini Palace, Rome, Italy

Description:
This finely engraved original antique architectural engraving a plan of the Palace owned by the Mellini or Millini family in Rome, Italy by Giovanni Battistaa Falda was published by Giacomo de Rossi in the 1665 edition of Il nuovo teatro delle fabriche, et edificii, in prospettiva di Roma moderna, 1665-1699.
These original prints are published on beautiful heavy clean original 17th century laid Italian made paper.

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 18in x 14in (460mm x 360mm)
Plate size: - 11 1/2in x 9in (290mm x 230mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

Background: 
Il Nuovo Teatro: One of the most important architectural projects of the seventeenth century was the urban renovation of Rome. Under the brilliant leadership of Pope Alessandro VII (1655-1667), Rome dramatically emerged as one of the most modern and beautiful cities of the new Baroque age. Within several decades spacious roadways were constructed, monumental buildings arose, and many public squares appeared with elaborate fountains and monuments. To be sure, this massive undertaking was meant to underline the absolute power of the Papacy but it also brought forth a new flowering of Italian art and architecture.
The Nuovo Teatro was initiated in 1665 to depict the new Rome in a series of etchings. What it gave to future generations was a magnificent historical record of views etched by two of Italy's greatest architectural artists. The printing and publishing of these important etchings was entrusted to Giacomo de Rossi (1626-1691), the head of the most dominant Roman publishing house. Sons and nephews of de Rossi, in fact, continued the publishing house until 1738 when the business was sold to Pope Clement XII to form the basis of the Regia Calcografia.) Altogether, four sets of Nuovo Teatro were created during the seventeenth century. Volumes one (35 etchings) and two (17 etchings) were both published in the year of 1665 and dealt mainly in views of the new piazzas, gardens, terraces and their surrounding buildings. Volume 3 (38 etchings) was published in 1669 and concentrated upon the newly constructed churches of Rome. Every plate from the first three sets was both designed and etched by the influential architectural artist, Giovanni Battista Falda (1643-1678). For reasons unknown the fourth and final volume (52 etchings) did not appear until 1699. It was published by Giacomo's successor, Domenico de Rossi, and featured views of the palaces and stately homes of Rome. Each plate was designed and etched by the famous architect and etcher, Alessandro Specchi (1668-1729)

$125.00 USD
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1665 De Rossi Original Antique Architectural Plan, Print of Lancellotti Palace, Rome Italy

1665 De Rossi Original Antique Architectural Plan, Print of Lancellotti Palace, Rome Italy

Description:
This finely engraved original 1665 antique architectural plan of the Lancellotti Palace, also known as de Torres, in Rome, Italy by Giovanni Battistaa Falda, was published by Giacomo de Rossi in the 1665 edition of Il nuovo teatro delle fabriche, et edificii, in prospettiva di Roma moderna published in its between 1665-1699. 
These original prints are published on beautiful heavy clean original 17th century laid Italian made paper inlaid with a Fleur-de-Lis watermark.

Palazzo Torres Massimo Lancellotti(Lancellotti Palace, also known as de Torres) was built for the Spanish family Torres by P.Ligorio in 1560. The palace is irregular and has ten sides with the longest one on Via della Posta Vecchia. The main facades are one the Piazza Navona and Via della Cuccagna. The windows on the noble floor are of the 15th century type, while in the rest of the palace, of the 16th century.
The Palazzo Torres Lancellotti was designed by Francesco da Volterra, and completed by Carlo Maderno. The latter was most probably also responsible for the decorative scheme of the courtyard of which the collection of sculpture forms an integral part. Palazzo Mattei, also a work of Carlo Maderno, reflects similar decorative features in the courtyard and similar ideas.
Interior is characterized by beautiful halls with the carved ceilings. In the end of the 18th century the main hall was used as a theatre; and several decades before the palace housed Chamber printing-office.
The building, an example of late-Renaissance architecture, features an interesting main façade with three orders of eleven travertine windows, decorated by and topped by a cornice. The building is accessed through an imposing portal sided by columns and topped by a balcony, leading to a courtyard that has columns on one side and is decorated with plants, ancient reliefs and stuccoes.
The loggia features some statues that represent the remains of a great collection: it included the statue of Pudicitia, Diana Efesina and the bas-relief of Medea, now hosted in the Vatican Museums. Inside the palace, it is possible to admire the wonderful frescoes by Agostino Tassi and Guercino con landscapes, allegories and views.

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 18in x 14in (460mm x 360mm)
Plate size: - 11 1/2in x 9in (290mm x 230mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

Background: 
Il Nuovo Teatro: One of the most important architectural projects of the seventeenth century was the urban renovation of Rome. Under the brilliant leadership of Pope Alessandro VII (1655-1667), Rome dramatically emerged as one of the most modern and beautiful cities of the new Baroque age. Within several decades spacious roadways were constructed, monumental buildings arose, and many public squares appeared with elaborate fountains and monuments. To be sure, this massive undertaking was meant to underline the absolute power of the Papacy but it also brought forth a new flowering of Italian art and architecture.
The Nuovo Teatro was initiated in 1665 to depict the new Rome in a series of etchings. What it gave to future generations was a magnificent historical record of views etched by two of Italy's greatest architectural artists. The printing and publishing of these important etchings was entrusted to Giacomo de Rossi (1626-1691), the head of the most dominant Roman publishing house. Sons and nephews of de Rossi, in fact, continued the publishing house until 1738 when the business was sold to Pope Clement XII to form the basis of the Regia Calcografia.) Altogether, four sets of Nuovo Teatro were created during the seventeenth century. Volumes one (35 etchings) and two (17 etchings) were both published in the year of 1665 and dealt mainly in views of the new piazzas, gardens, terraces and their surrounding buildings. Volume 3 (38 etchings) was published in 1669 and concentrated upon the newly constructed churches of Rome. Every plate from the first three sets was both designed and etched by the influential architectural artist, Giovanni Battista Falda (1643-1678). For reasons unknown the fourth and final volume (52 etchings) did not appear until 1699. It was published by Giacomo's successor, Domenico de Rossi, and featured views of the palaces and stately homes of Rome. Each plate was designed and etched by the famous architect and etcher, Alessandro Specchi (1668-1729)

$125.00 USD
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1665 De Rossi Original Antique Architectural Plan, Print of the Giustiniani Palace in Venice, Italy

1665 De Rossi Original Antique Architectural Plan, Print of the Giustiniani Palace in Venice, Italy

  • Title : Pianta Del Palazzo Dell Ecc. Sig. Prencipe Giustiniani
  • Date : 1665
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  91188
  • Size: 18in x 14in (460mm x 360mm) 

Description:
This finely engraved original 1665 antique architectural print of the Giustiniani Palace in Venice, Italy by Giovanni Battistaa Falda was published by Giacomo de Rossi in the 1665 edition of Il nuovo teatro delle fabriche, et edificii, in prospettiva di Roma moderna, 1665-1699. 
These original prints are published on beautiful heavy clean original 17th century laid Italian made paper inlaid with a Fleur-de-Lis watermark.

Palazzo Giustinian is a palace in Venice, northern Italy, situated in the Dorsoduro district and overlooking the Grand Canal next to Ca' Foscari. It is among the best examples of the late Venetian Gothic and was the final residence of Princess Louise Marie Thérèse of France.
The edifice was built in the late 15th century, perhaps with the participation of Bartolomeo Bon. The palace consisted originally of two separated sectors, one for each branch of the family, which were later harmonized through a central section in the façade; these are known as Ca' Giustinian dei Vescovi(now housing part of the Ca' Foscari University) and Ca' Giustinian dalle Zogie (now privately owned). Behind the façade, they are separated by an alley which, through a sottoportego, or portico-tunnel, connects to the central portal.
The two sub-palaces share numerous decorative features with the annexed Ca' Foscari. They have an L-shaped plan with four floors, the upper ones having mullioned windows. At the piano nobile they form a six-arches arcade with an interwoven motif of multi-lobes circles. The single windows are ogival, or decorated with a three-lobe motif. Ca' Giustinian dei Vescovi has in the rear a court with a Gothic staircase, while Ca' Giustinian delle Zogie has a large garden.
The family sold the palazzo in the 19th century. Since then, personalities such as painter Natale Schiavoni, German composer Richard Wagner (who wrote the second act of Tristan und Isolde here between 1858 and 1859), the last Duchess of Parma, Louise d'Artois, and Hungarian violinist Franz von Vecsey have lived here

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 18in x 14in (460mm x 360mm)
Plate size: - 11 1/2in x 9in (290mm x 230mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

Background: 
Il Nuovo Teatro: One of the most important architectural projects of the seventeenth century was the urban renovation of Rome. Under the brilliant leadership of Pope Alessandro VII (1655-1667), Rome dramatically emerged as one of the most modern and beautiful cities of the new Baroque age. Within several decades spacious roadways were constructed, monumental buildings arose, and many public squares appeared with elaborate fountains and monuments. To be sure, this massive undertaking was meant to underline the absolute power of the Papacy but it also brought forth a new flowering of Italian art and architecture.
The Nuovo Teatro was initiated in 1665 to depict the new Rome in a series of etchings. What it gave to future generations was a magnificent historical record of views etched by two of Italy's greatest architectural artists. The printing and publishing of these important etchings was entrusted to Giacomo de Rossi (1626-1691), the head of the most dominant Roman publishing house. Sons and nephews of de Rossi, in fact, continued the publishing house until 1738 when the business was sold to Pope Clement XII to form the basis of the Regia Calcografia.) Altogether, four sets of Nuovo Teatro were created during the seventeenth century. Volumes one (35 etchings) and two (17 etchings) were both published in the year of 1665 and dealt mainly in views of the new piazzas, gardens, terraces and their surrounding buildings. Volume 3 (38 etchings) was published in 1669 and concentrated upon the newly constructed churches of Rome. Every plate from the first three sets was both designed and etched by the influential architectural artist, Giovanni Battista Falda (1643-1678). For reasons unknown the fourth and final volume (52 etchings) did not appear until 1699. It was published by Giacomo's successor, Domenico de Rossi, and featured views of the palaces and stately homes of Rome. Each plate was designed and etched by the famous architect and etcher, Alessandro Specchi (1668-1729)

$125.00 USD
More Info
1665 De Rossi Original Antique Architectural Plan, Print of Palazzo Valentini Rome, Italy

1665 De Rossi Original Antique Architectural Plan, Print of Palazzo Valentini Rome, Italy

  • Title : Pianta Del Palazzo Del Cardinale Alesandrino a SS Apostoli
  • Date : 1665
  • Condition: (A+) Fine Condition
  • Ref:  91183
  • Size: 18in x 14in (460mm x 360mm) 

Description:
This finely engraved original antique architectural engraving a plan of Palazzo Valentini in central Rome, Italy by Giovanni Battistaa Falda was published by Giacomo de Rossi in the 1665 edition of Il nuovo teatro delle fabriche, et edificii, in prospettiva di Roma moderna, 1665-1699.
These original prints are published on beautiful heavy clean original 17th century laid Italian made paper inlaid with a Fleur-de-Lis watermark.

Palazzo Valentini is a palazzo in central Rome, Italy, not far from Piazza Venezia that was the residence of Carlo Michele Bonelli, Cardinal Alessandrino and his hiers in the 17th century.
The palazzo was first built by cardinal Michele Bonelli, nephew of pope Pius V, who, in 1585, acquired a pre-existing palazzo from Giacomo Boncompagni at the extremity of what was then piazza dei Santi Apostoli. Today the palazzo is separated from that piazza by via Quattro Novembre, opened later to connect the new via Nazionale with piazza Venezia. The cardinal was also the owner of a large part of the area which extended, behind the palazzo, above the ruins of the imperial foraof Trajan and Augustus, known by the name "Pantano" due to being subject to impaludamenti or flooding. Over the same years the district on the ruins of the imperial fora was subjected to a general development of the land and to a systematic urbanisation, with the creation of the "quartiere Alessandrino" in the cardinal's honour (he was nicknamed "cardinale alessandrino" after his origins in a village in the province of Alessandria). The quarter was destroyed in the 1920s and 1930s to open via dei Fori Imperiali.
The trapezoidal plan of the palazzo was designed by Domenico Paganelli. Thanks to substantial funds ploughed into the project by the cardinal, the palazzo was quickly completed within 3 years after building started. In the 17th century the building was then subject to a series of major renovations and expansions, carried out on behalf of cardinals Carlo Bonelli and Michele Ferdinando Bonelli. The palazzo was partially demolished and rebuilt by Francesco Peparelli for its new owner, cardinal Renato Imperiali, who organised the important family library (the "Imperiali") of around 24,000 volumes.
At the start of the 18th century, the palazzo was leased to several prominent personalities, including marchese Francesco Maria Ruspoli from 1705 to 1713, who made it the site for a private theatre and hosted illustrious musicians of the time such as Handel, Alessandro Scarlatti and Arcangelo Corelli. The entire building was then acquired in 1752 by cardinal Giuseppe Spinelli, who realised a new decorative scheme for the first floor and systematised the library (meant by him for public use, and frequented by Johann Joachim Winckelmann) on the ground floor.
In 1827 the Prussian banker and consul general Vincenzo Valentini acquired the palazzo, in which he settled and to which he gave his name. The palazzo was later expanded and rebuilt at great expense, and its new owner used it to house his own collection of paintings as well as increasing the palazzo's own substantial library and archaeological collection. Completion of the works at the back of the palazzo, overlooking the column of Trajan, was entrusted to the architects Filippo Navone and Giovanni Battista Benedetti. Between 1861 and 1865 Vincenzo's son Gioacchino Valentini commissioned two further expansions on the left side, along via di Sant'Eufemia, designed by the architect Luigi Gabet. The provincial deputation of Rome acquired the palazzo as their base in 1873, commissioning the architect Gabet to complete the right side on via de’ Fornari, at the top of vicolo di San Bernardo.

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 18in x 14in (460mm x 360mm)
Plate size: - 11 1/2in x 9in (290mm x 230mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

Background: 
Il Nuovo Teatro: One of the most important architectural projects of the seventeenth century was the urban renovation of Rome. Under the brilliant leadership of Pope Alessandro VII (1655-1667), Rome dramatically emerged as one of the most modern and beautiful cities of the new Baroque age. Within several decades spacious roadways were constructed, monumental buildings arose, and many public squares appeared with elaborate fountains and monuments. To be sure, this massive undertaking was meant to underline the absolute power of the Papacy but it also brought forth a new flowering of Italian art and architecture.
The Nuovo Teatro was initiated in 1665 to depict the new Rome in a series of etchings. What it gave to future generations was a magnificent historical record of views etched by two of Italy's greatest architectural artists. The printing and publishing of these important etchings was entrusted to Giacomo de Rossi (1626-1691), the head of the most dominant Roman publishing house. Sons and nephews of de Rossi, in fact, continued the publishing house until 1738 when the business was sold to Pope Clement XII to form the basis of the Regia Calcografia.) Altogether, four sets of Nuovo Teatro were created during the seventeenth century. Volumes one (35 etchings) and two (17 etchings) were both published in the year of 1665 and dealt mainly in views of the new piazzas, gardens, terraces and their surrounding buildings. Volume 3 (38 etchings) was published in 1669 and concentrated upon the newly constructed churches of Rome. Every plate from the first three sets was both designed and etched by the influential architectural artist, Giovanni Battista Falda (1643-1678). For reasons unknown the fourth and final volume (52 etchings) did not appear until 1699. It was published by Giacomo's successor, Domenico de Rossi, and featured views of the palaces and stately homes of Rome. Each plate was designed and etched by the famous architect and etcher, Alessandro Specchi (1668-1729)

$125.00 USD
More Info
1665 De Rossi Original Antique Architectural Plan, Print of Barberini Palace, Rome Italy

1665 De Rossi Original Antique Architectural Plan, Print of Barberini Palace, Rome Italy

Description:
This finely engraved original antique architectural engraving a plan of Barberini Palace Rome, Italy by Giovanni Battistaa Falda was published by Giacomo de Rossi in the 1665 edition of Il nuovo teatro delle fabriche, et edificii, in prospettiva di Roma moderna, 1665-1699.
These original prints are published on beautiful heavy clean original 17th century laid Italian made paper inlaid with a Fleur-de-Lis watermark.

The Palazzo Barberini is a 17th-century palace in Rome, facing the Piazza Barberini in Rione Trevi. It houses the Galleria Nazionale d'Arte Antica.
The sloping site had formerly been occupied by a garden-vineyard of the Sforza family, in which a palazzetto had been built in 1549. The sloping site passed from one cardinal to another during the sixteenth century, with no project fully getting off the ground.
When Cardinal Alessandro Sforza met financial hardships, the still semi-urban site was purchased in 1625 by Maffeo Barberini, of the Barberini family, who became Pope Urban VIII.
Three great architects worked to create the Palazzo, each contributing his own style and character to the building. Carlo Maderno, then at work extending the nave of St Peter's, was commissioned to enclose the Villa Sforza within a vast Renaissance block along the lines of Palazzo Farnese; however, the design quickly evolved into a precedent-setting combination of an urban seat of princely power combined with a garden front that had the nature of a suburban villa with a semi-enclosed garden.
Maderno began in 1627, assisted by his nephew Francesco Borromini. When Maderno died in 1629, Borromini was passed over and the commission was awarded to Bernini, a young prodigy then better known as a sculptor. Borromini stayed on regardless and the two architects worked together, albeit briefly, on this project and at the Palazzo Spada. Works were completed by Bernini in 1633.
After the Wars of Castro and the death of Urban VIII, the palace was confiscated by Pamphili Pope Innocent X and was only returned to the Barberini in 1653.

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 18in x 14in (460mm x 360mm)
Plate size: - 11 1/2in x 9in (290mm x 230mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

Background: 
Il Nuovo Teatro: One of the most important architectural projects of the seventeenth century was the urban renovation of Rome. Under the brilliant leadership of Pope Alessandro VII (1655-1667), Rome dramatically emerged as one of the most modern and beautiful cities of the new Baroque age. Within several decades spacious roadways were constructed, monumental buildings arose, and many public squares appeared with elaborate fountains and monuments. To be sure, this massive undertaking was meant to underline the absolute power of the Papacy but it also brought forth a new flowering of Italian art and architecture.
The Nuovo Teatro was initiated in 1665 to depict the new Rome in a series of etchings. What it gave to future generations was a magnificent historical record of views etched by two of Italy's greatest architectural artists. The printing and publishing of these important etchings was entrusted to Giacomo de Rossi (1626-1691), the head of the most dominant Roman publishing house. Sons and nephews of de Rossi, in fact, continued the publishing house until 1738 when the business was sold to Pope Clement XII to form the basis of the Regia Calcografia.) Altogether, four sets of Nuovo Teatro were created during the seventeenth century. Volumes one (35 etchings) and two (17 etchings) were both published in the year of 1665 and dealt mainly in views of the new piazzas, gardens, terraces and their surrounding buildings. Volume 3 (38 etchings) was published in 1669 and concentrated upon the newly constructed churches of Rome. Every plate from the first three sets was both designed and etched by the influential architectural artist, Giovanni Battista Falda (1643-1678). For reasons unknown the fourth and final volume (52 etchings) did not appear until 1699. It was published by Giacomo's successor, Domenico de Rossi, and featured views of the palaces and stately homes of Rome. Each plate was designed and etched by the famous architect and etcher, Alessandro Specchi (1668-1729)

$125.00 USD
More Info
1665 De Rossi Original Antique Architectural Plan, Print of Falconieri Palace, Rome, Italy

1665 De Rossi Original Antique Architectural Plan, Print of Falconieri Palace, Rome, Italy

Description: 
This finely engraved original antique architectural engraving a plan of the Falconieri Palace Rome, Italy by Giovanni Battistaa Falda was published by Giacomo de Rossi in the 1665 edition of Il nuovo teatro delle fabriche, et edificii, in prospettiva di Roma moderna, 1665-1699.
These original prints are published on beautiful heavy clean original 17th century laid Italian made paper.

Palazzo Falconieri is a palace in Rome, Italy formed in the seventeenth century as a result of remodelling by the Baroque architect Francesco Borromini. It is the home of the Hungarian Academy Rome(which is the Rome office of the Balassi Institute), since its foundation in 1927. It is located between Via Giulia and Lugotevere, with entrances to both; it is near Plazzo Farnese and a few houses down and across Via Giulia from the church of Santa Caterina a Magnanapoli in the Rione of Regola. From 1814, it was occupied by cardinal Joseph Fesch, Napoleon's uncle.
In 1638, Orazio Falconieri purchased a palace on the Via Giulia which had a small courtyard facing the River Tiber. He bought an adjacent property in 1645 and in 1646 and appointed the architect Francesco Borromini to remodel and refurbish the two. Some of Borromini’s work was lost in the nineteenth century development of Lungotevere, the embankment and road between the Tiber and the buildings which overlook it, but parts remain.
The surviving parts of Borromini’s work include the façade to the Via Giulia, the Belvedere overlooking the Tiber and the decorative work in several rooms. On the façade, the number of bays was increased from seven to eleven and at either end, tall inverted fluted pilasters were placed terminating in falcons heads, a reference to the family name, that each look back at the façade. Overlooking the Tiber, Borromini added a Belvedere, a three bay loggia with Serliana openings, that stands above the surrounding buildings. On the interior, some of the rooms are ornamented with stucco work designed by Borromini, with the frequent use of heraldic devices and symbolic motifs

General Definitions:
Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable
Paper color : - off white
Age of map color: - 
Colors used: - 
General color appearance: - 
Paper size: - 18in x 14in (460mm x 360mm)
Plate size: - 11 1/2in x 9in (290mm x 230mm)
Margins: - Min 1/2in (12mm)

Imperfections:
Margins: - None
Plate area: - None
Verso: - None

Background: 
Il Nuovo Teatro: One of the most important architectural projects of the seventeenth century was the urban renovation of Rome. Under the brilliant leadership of Pope Alessandro VII (1655-1667), Rome dramatically emerged as one of the most modern and beautiful cities of the new Baroque age. Within several decades spacious roadways were constructed, monumental buildings arose, and many public squares appeared with elaborate fountains and monuments. To be sure, this massive undertaking was meant to underline the absolute power of the Papacy but it also brought forth a new flowering of Italian art and architecture.
The Nuovo Teatro was initiated in 1665 to depict the new Rome in a series of etchings. What it gave to future generations was a magnificent historical record of views etched by two of Italy's greatest architectural artists. The printing and publishing of these important etchings was entrusted to Giacomo de Rossi (1626-1691), the head of the most dominant Roman publishing house. Sons and nephews of de Rossi, in fact, continued the publishing house until 1738 when the business was sold to Pope Clement XII to form the basis of the Regia Calcografia.) Altogether, four sets of Nuovo Teatro were created during the seventeenth century. Volumes one (35 etchings) and two (17 etchings) were both published in the year of 1665 and dealt mainly in views of the new piazzas, gardens, terraces and their surrounding buildings. Volume 3 (38 etchings) was published in 1669 and concentrated upon the newly constructed churches of Rome. Every plate from the first three sets was both designed and etched by the influential architectural artist, Giovanni Battista Falda (1643-1678). For reasons unknown the fourth and final volume (52 etchings) did not appear until 1699. It was published by Giacomo's successor, Domenico de Rossi, and featured views of the palaces and stately homes of Rome. Each plate was designed and etched by the famous architect and etcher, Alessandro Specchi (1668-1729)

$125.00 USD
More Info